Group Title: Indian River Field Laboratory mimeo report
Title: Sorghum and millet production on South Florida mineral soils
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055941/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sorghum and millet production on South Florida mineral soils
Series Title: Indian River Field Laboratory mimeo report
Physical Description: 13 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Kretschmer, Albert E ( Albert Emil ), 1925-
Indian River Field Laboratory
Publisher: Inidan River Field Laboratory
Place of Publication: Ft. Pierce Fla
Publication Date: 1966]
 Subjects
Subject: Sorghum -- Field experiments -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Millets -- Field experiments -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Albert E. Kretschmer, Jr.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "June 9, 1966."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055941
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 67622279
clc - 000460317

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HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida





Indian R a d Laboratory Mimeo Report IRL 66-5 June 9, 1966

,' SORGHUM 1LLET PRODUCTION ON SOUTH FLORIDA MINERAL SOILS

) ie Albert E. Kretschmer, Jr.1/


The development of sorghum x sudangrass hybrids has resulted in many acres
being planted in south Florida and elsewhere. Many questions have been raised
concerning productionn practices. The results of research reported in the
following Tables answer some of the questions.

The work was done at the Indian River Field Laboratory on Immokalee fine
sand. None of the experiments were designed to determine the fertility require-
ments of the plants, and in some instances, not enough fertilizer was applied to
maintain a high protein content of the plants. However, it is doubtful that
yields of forage were reduced by the lack of fertilizer in most cases. In
most of the experiments seeds were broadcast and disked in with a light (grove-
type) disk along with the initial fertilizer. Plots were harvested with a
small, hand manipulated sickle-bar mower with a cutting width of 2.5 feet, or
with a 5 foot sickle-bar attached to a tractor. Row plantings were harvested
by cutting plants with a knife. Dry weights indicate samples which were dried
at 70-75C in the oven. In some of the experiments it was very difficult to
obtain uniform growth. Much of this difference was believed a result of too
much or not enough soil moisture, although definite proof is lacking. Cutting
heights were such as to leave from 5 to 7 inches of stubble.

An explanation of the types of summer-growing annual sorghums that have
been used in south Florida follows.

Sorghum x Sudangrass Hybrid (SS)--Plants grow rapidly and are generally cut
as green-chop (sometimes for silage) or grazed. They should be cut prior to
seed-head emergence, usually when there attain a height of 36 to 60 inches.
They can be cut 4 or 5 times during the season under favorable conditions.
Examples are Sudax, Lindsey 77F, etc.

Silage or Forage Sorghums (FS)--Plahts normally are cut for stored feed (some-
times green-chop). These plants are normally cut when the seeds are in the dough
stage (but cut before seed-head emergence for green-chop). At this time the plants
have reached the height of about'6 to 9 feet. This type of sorghum produces 50
or more bushels of grain per acre which comprises about 20 to 25 percent of the
total dry weight of the plants Normally, two cuttings can be obtained, with
the first harvest yielding more than thd second. Beef Builder, Lindsey 101F
and Silo King are examples of the varieties available.

Grain Sorghums (GS)--Plants produce 50 or more bushels of grain per acre, but
are considerably shorter than the silage type sorghums. Heights at maturity
are generally 2.5 to 3.5 feet to the top of leaves. The percent grain on a
dry matter basis of the total yield is in range of 45 to 55 percent. This type
is almost always used as a stored feed and as a substitute for corn. Generally,
only one good harvest can be obtained.



I/ Associate Agronomist, Indian River Field Laboratory, Florida Agricultural
Experiment Stations, Ft. Pierce, Florida.





-2-


QUESTIONS WITH ANSWERS.BASED ON RESEARCH RESULTS
AT THE INDIAN RIVER FIELD LABORATORY

1. SHOULD SORGHUMS AND MILLETS BE PLANTED IN THE LATE SUMMER AND FALL, AND WHAT
YIELDS CAN BE EXPECTED?

In Table 1 are yield results of seeding summer annuals on September 27
and on October 30. By January 1 about 2 tons of dry matter (11 tons fresh
weight) per acre were produced from the September seeding and slightly less
than a ton (about 5 tons fresh weight) from the October seeding. This compares
favorably with yields obtained from Suregrain oats up to the first of the year,
but the oats continued to:grow after this time. There doesn't seem to be a
logical reason to plant sorghums or millets after June. There is a danger of
feeding sorghums during periods immediately after frosts or extreme cold spells
because of the possibility of prussic acid poisoning.

2. HOW DO SEED YIELDS AND FORAGE YIELDS OF SORGHUM X SUDANGRASS (SS), SILAGE
SORGHUMS (FS), AND GRAIN SORGHUMS (GS) COMPARE?

See Table 2. Varieties were seeded in rows 3.5 feet apart. Seeds were
permitted to form on one SS, four FS and four GS varieties for grain yield
comparisons. With two exceptions, grain yields varied from about 2300 to 3400
pounds per acre. The SS type produced as much as the grain sorghums type.
Percent grain was between about 20 and 29 percent for the better SS and FS
types and between 46 and 53 percent for the GS types. Several of the FS
types harvested earlier produced larger total yields than those produced by
the SS type. The better yielding FS types produced a:total of about 8 to 10
tons of dry matter and 45 to 50 tons of fresh matter per acre for three cuttings.
Gahi #1 millet produced considerably more dry matter than Starr but somewhat
less than the better FS types. The grain sorghums only produced about half the
dry matter and only one-third the fresh matter compared to FS.

3. HOW LONG FROM SEEDING SORGHUMS UNTIL FIRST HARVEST?

In Table 3 it is shown that GS seeded on May 16 headed-out 47 days later
but were not ready to cut until 77 days from seeding, There is a difference
between seed-head emergence time and the FS type used. This varied from 47
to 68 days; and 83 days or more from seeding to harvest. When seeded after
April the SS types are usually ready for cutting in 4 or 5 weeks.

4. SHOULD SORGHUMS BE SPRAYED FOR BUDWORMS?

In Table 4 results indicated that there was very little budworm damage
on millet or SS types and moderate damage to the FS types. In this and in the
other tests there would have been no need to spray for budworms on any of the
sorghums-grown.

5. WHAT IS THE BEST SS HYBRID TO USE?

In Tables 5 and 6 are comparisons of several SS types, one millet and two
FS types. There are many more than 100 varieties' of the SS types available
commercially, and it is difficult to evaluate all of them since new ones are
being hybridized yearly. It is suggested that although real differences may
exist between them no marked differences showed up in these tests. As much




-3-

or greater differences appeared between replicates of the same variety than
between varieties. The effect of planting date also influences yields; the
early planting dates resulted in increased yields because of the extended
growing season. Average dry matter and fresh matter production from three
cuttings (Table 5) seeded June 4 were about 4.4 and 30 tons per acre,
respectively, while from a March 17 seeding and a total of 4 cuttings (Table 6)
yields were about 9.0 and 45 tons per acre, respectively.

6. HOW DO TOTAL YIELDS OF FS AND SS COMPARE?

In question 2 a comparison was made in an earlier experiment. In Tables
5, 6, 7, and 8 comparisons of yields indicate a decided total dry matter yield
advantage of one of the FS types (Lincsey 101F) over the SS types, when they
are cut at the proper time. The SS type should be cut before seed-head
emergence (when plants are leafy and small-stalked) and the FS type cut when
seeds are in the dough stage(plants are more mature, have larger stalks and
are not as leafy). The percent moisture in the SS is greater than for FS at
harvest. The yield advantage of FS over SS is eliminated when fresh weight
yields are compared.

7. HOW DOES GAHI MILLET COMPARE WITH SS SORGHUMS?

In several experiments (Tables 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8) the SS types yielded
as well or in most instances better than millet on a dry and fresh weight
basis. This was true whether the first two harvests were used as a basis of
comparison or the total yields for all harvests.

8. WHAT BROADCAST SEEDING RATE SHOULD BE USED?

In Table 7, seeding rates of 10, 20, 30, and 40 lbs./A of millet, a SS,
and a FS sorghum were compared. There is an indication that the higher rates
resulted in greater dry and fresh matter production in the first harvest but
this trend appeared to be reversed for the second harvest. Very little differ-
ence existed among total yields. Fifteen to twenty pounds per acre of millet
seed broadcast and disked, and 20 to 25 pounds of SS, FS, or GS seed normally
would provide good stands.

9. HOW MUCH MOISTURE DO THE SORGHUMS NbRMALLY CONTAIN AT HARVEST TIME?

This depends primarily on the stage of growth when harvested, and somewhat
on the harvest number under adequate soil moisture and fertility. During
periods of droughts or when nitrogen is deficient moisture contents in sorghums
would be less than those listed in the Tables.

For the first harvest, moisture contents of SS and millet ranged from
about 82 to 89 percent, but can go as low as 70 percent if harvesting is delayed.
The values usually are lower for the second and third harvests ranging from
about 75 to 85 percent.

For FS, when harvested in the dough stage, moisture contents ranged from
about 68 to 72 percent for the first harvest to about 50 for the second harvest.

Grain sorghums contained about 60 to 65 percent moisture at the first harvest
and about 50 percent at the second harvest.







10. WHAT CRUDE PROTEIN'CONTENTS CAN BE-EXPECTED IN SORGHUMS AND MILLET?

Crude protein contents at harvest depend primarily on the quantity'of
nitrogen applied and the maturity of the plants at harvest. Protein contents
will be increased as nitrogen rates are increased and as harvesting dates are
shortened. Because FS and GS are normally cut in the dough stage (much later
than SS or millet), they contain less protein at harvest time.

In Table 5, SS and millet crude protein contents fot the first harvest can
be seen to vary from about 10 to 12-percent on a dry matter basis. This was 27
days after seeding with 72 pounds of nitrogen applied. Protein levels for the
second and third harvests were lower, ranging from about 5 to 8 percent even
though nitrogen at rates of about 128 pounds per acre were applied.. Crude
protein contents of FS types were about 4.7.

In Table 9, when 128 pounds of nitrogen were applied at seeding, 92 days
before harvest, crude protein contents of GS and FS were between 2.2 and 4.4
percent. The FS was slightly lower in protein than the GS. Although these
levels are very low compared to SS, the grain production of GS and FS provides
a higher energy feed than that obtained with SS.

11. HOW MUCH AND WHAT KIND OF FERTILIZER SHOULD BE USED FOR SORGHUM PRODUCTION?

The rate and kind will depend on the type of soil and previous culture.

As a guideline the following fertilization schedule could be used success-
fully on flatwoods type soils where soil moisture can be adequately controlled.

A. Following spring vegetables--SS and Millet: about 70 pounds of nitrogen
at seeding; 70-35-35 of N-P205-K20 per acre after the first cutting; and 70
pounds of nitrogen after the second cutting.

FS and GS: 150 pounds nitrogen per acre (1/2 at seeding and 1/2 when
plants reach 18"-24" height. A 2-1-1 ratio of N-P20O-K2O should be applied
after the first harvest with the rate depending on the amount of regrowth
and plant htand 7 to 10 days after harvest.

B. Limed virgin soil or old pasture: SS and Millet: 70-70-70 pounds per
acre of N-P205-K20 at seeding, and 70 pounds of nitrogen after first harvest.
Repeat alternately for succeeding harvests. FS and GS 150-75-75 pounds of
N-P205-K20 before plants reach 20" height (750 pounds of 10-10-10 at seeding
and side-dress to supply 75 pounds of nitrogen per acre). Use a 2-1-1 ratio
after first harvest.'

The boron, copper, manganese, and zinc requirements are'not completely
known. However, on virgin soil enough should be added to provide an equivalent
of 5 pounds per acre each of borax, and the sulfates of the others. None need
be added following a vegetable crop or on old fields that have received minor
elements within the past two years.







Table 1. Dry and Fresh Weight Yields of Summer-Growing Annuals Broadcast
Seeded on September 27 and October 30, 1961 at the Indian River Field Laboratory


Weight Yield
11/15 11/29


Seeded September 27, 1961
Is-tons/A Fresh Weight Yields-tons/A


12/27 Total


11/11 11/15 11/29 12/27 Total


Sorghum Almum 0.6
SSorghum FS1
Texas Ribbon Cane -
SGahi #1 Millet 0.9
Starr Millet 0.8
Suregrain oats


1.14. 8.9


1.4
1.2


0.6


0.5


0.6
0.6
-


0.3
0.5
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.8


1.4
1.9
2.0
2.1
1.8
1.4


4.1


6.8
5.6
-


8.9
7.9


4.1


1.3
2.2
3.5
2.5
1.9
5.3


8.4
11.1
11.4
12.9
10.5
9.4)


Seeded October 30, 1961


12/11 12/27 Total 12/11 12/27 Total

1. Sorghum Almum 0.5 0.2 0.7 2.8 1.0 3.8
2. Sorghum FS1 0.3 0.2 0.5 2.2 1.0 3.2
3. Texas Ribbon Cane 0.5 0.3 0.8 3.8 1.6 5.4
4. Gahi #1 Millet 0.6 0.3 0.9 5.2 1.3 6.5
5. Starr Millet 0.6 0.3 0.9 5.6 1.4 7.0
(Suregrain oats 0.4 0.4 0.8 3.1 2.0 5.1)


1/ Four replications; fertilization schedule:
acre of N-P205-K20; topdress--50 pounds of
seeding; after first harvest--50 pounds of


at seeding--50-100-100 pounds per
nitrogen per acre 2 weeks after
nitrogen per acre.


Dry
11/11


Variety./







Table 2. Dry, Fresh and Grain Yields and Dry Matter Percentages
of Various Sorghums and Millets Seeded in 42 Inch Rows on
May 16, 1962 at the Indian River Field Laboratory

Oven Dry Weight Yields


1st Harvest


Variety
92F (Lindsey)
77F (Lindsey)
Silo King (Asgrow)
Coastal (Asgrow)
Red Raider (Asgrow)
Rocket (Asgrow)
Ranger (Asgrow)
FS-1 (De Kalb)
Plantation Pride
MK 320 (Northrup King)
101F (Lindsey)
115F (Lindsey)
Texas Ribbon Cane
Beef Builder (Asgrow)
Sorghum Almum
Starr Millet
Gahi #1 Millet
L.S.D. .01


1st
Harvest
Date.

8/7
8/7
8/1
8/1
8/1
8/1
8/7
8/7
7/23
7/23
7/23
7/23
7/23
7/23
7/23
7/23


Grain
lbs/A
2910
3250
2320
3140
2910
3370
3020
930
1390








81?


Forage
tons/A
4.5
3.9
4.5
1.5
1.6
1.5
1.8
5.1
3.6
5.3
5.7
6.1
5.1
6.7
5.1
3.6
6.0
1.1


Total:
Forage+
Grain
tons/A
5.9
5.7
5.7
3.1
3.0
3.2
3.3
5.6
4.3
5.3
5.7
6.1
5.1
6.7
5.1
3.6
6.0
-


9/25
or
10/26
Forage +
tons/A ti
2.d8
1.6

0.5
0.4
0.6
0.7
1.7
1.8
(2.5)*
(2.7)*
(2.3)*
(1.5)*
(2.5)*
(3.5)*
(0.4)*
(1.6)*
0.4 (0.7)*


Ll/8
Train
ons/A
2I

2.1
2/
"!
TI


0.7
1.1
1.1
0.6
1.2
1.2
0.1
0.4
0.4


Grand
Total
tons/A
-8.7
7.3
7.8
3.6
3.4
3.8
4.0
S7.3
S6.1
8.5
9.5
9.5
7.2
10.4
9.8
4.1
8.0


% Grain
8/1 or 8/7
Harvest
-24.4
28.7
.20.5
.51.3
148.2
52.8
46.0:
8.3
:16.2


Fertilization Schedule-lbs/A
Date N P05 K20
May 16 80 40 40
After 1st cut 90 45 45
Sept. 4 67 0 0
Sept. 26 90 45 45
Total 327 130 130


!/ SS = sorghum x sudangrass hybrids; FS = silage type (tall plants with grain); GS = grain type (short plants
with grain). Four replications.
2/ Plots abandoned after second harvest. -Yields oh these plots if treated as the rest would probably have
produced in the range of 3 to 5 tons of fresh material per acre on Nov. 8.


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.


Typel/
FS
SS
FS
GS
GS
GS
GS
FS
FS
FS
FS
FS

FS
-


--






--Table 2 continued--


Variety
92F (Lindsey)
77F (Lindsey)
Silo King (Asgrow)
Coastal (Asgrow)
Red Raider (Asgrow)
Rocket (Asgrow)
Ranger (Asgrow)
FS-1 (De Kalb)
Plantation Pride
NK 320 (Northrup King)
101F (Lindsey)
115F (Lindsey)
Texas Ribbon Cane
Beef Builder (Asgrow)
Sorghum Almum7
Starr Millet
Gahi %1-Millet


Type 1/
FS
SS
FS
GS
GS
GS
GS
FS
FS
FS
FS
FS

FS


1st
Harvest
Date
8/7
8/7
8/7
8/1
8/1
8/1
8/1
8/7
8/7
7/23
7/23
7/23
7/23
7123
7/23
7/23
7/23


l Dry Matter
9/25
1st or
Harvest 10/26
26.6 22.4
28.4 23.7
17.7
21.1 23.3
23.5 23.8
20.9 24.2
22.8 23.8
29.6 22.8
28.7 23.2
18.9 17.3
22.1 19.4
19.3 17.3
13.5 14.2
19.5 16.8
30.2 31.1
14.8 14.7
23.6 22.0


Fresh Weight Yields
tons/A


11/8


28.2






16.4
22.7
20.5
16.7
22.7
21.9
18.1
21.8


1st
Harvest
18.5
10.3
26.4
8.6
8.1
9.0
9.2
18.0
13.2
28.2
25.6
31.8
37.7
34.5
16.7
24.4
25.6


9/2I
or
10/26
12.5
6.9

2.3
1.8
2.4
3.1
7.3
7.6
14.4
13.8
13.0
10.5
15.1
11.3
2.7
7.4


11/8
2/

7.6
2/
iVt
t f



4.5
4.8
5.7
3.5
5.5
5.3
0.4
1.7


1/ SS = sorghum x sudangrass


hybrids; FS = silage type (tall plants with grain); GS =.grain type (short plants


with grain).
2/ Plots abandoned after second harvest. Yields on these plots if treated as the rest would probably have
produced in the range of 3 to 5 tons of fresh material per acre on Nov. 8.


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.


Total
31.0
17.2
34.0
10.9
9.9
11.4
12.3
25.3
20.8
47.1
44.2
50.5
51.7.
55.1
33.3
27.5
14.7


III


-- -







Table 3.
Days to
Head or



Variety


Number of Days to Seed-Head Emergence, Number of
First Harvest and Height of Plants (To Base of Seed
to Growing Tip) When Harvested from Seedings Made on
May 16, 1962


Typel/


Days to
Head


Days to
1st Harvest


Height
Ft.


92F
77F
Silo King
Coastal
Red Raider
Rocket
Ranger
FS1
Plantation Pride
NK.320
101F
115F
Ribbon Cane
Beef Builder
Sorghum Almum
Starr Millet
Gahi #1 Millet


FS
SS
FS
GS
GS
.GS
GS
FS
FS
FS
FS
'FS

FS.


47
47
54
47.
47
47
,47
62
50
68
68
50
none
68
47
62
54


8.6
8.8
8.5
4.1
3.9
4.1
4.8
8.0
7.5
9.3
8.5
9.8
8.0
9.6
10.4
6.9
9.6


Table 4. Height and Budworm Damage of Sorghums and Millet
Seeded on June 4, 1964


Height-6/29 Budworm
(1st out 7/1) Damage
Variety Type./ Ft. 6/29
1. Sordan SS 3.6 light
2. Sweet Sioux SS 3.7 light
3. Gahi #1 Millet 2.5 very light
4. Grazemaster SS 3.6 light
5. Lindsey 77F SS 3.8
6. Advance 1038G SS 3.5
7. SX-ll (sudax) SS 3.6
8. Plantation Pride. FS 2.6 moderate
9. Lindsey 101F FS 2.8 "


I/ SS = sorghum x sudangrass hybrid; SFS
with grain); GS = grain sorghum (low


= forage.l.or
growth with


silage type
grain).


(tall growth


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.


_ __ __





Table 5. Dry and I
Matter Percentages
June 4, 1964


-9
'resh Weight
of Sorghums


Yields, and Crude Protein and Dry
and Millet Broadcast Seeded on


at the Indian River Field


Laboratory


Dry Weight Yields Fresh Weight Yields
tons/A tons/A
Variety Tp 7/1 8/5 9/17 Total 7/1 8/5 9/17 Total
1. Sordan SS 1.2 1.2 1.7 4.1 13.8 6.7 9.0 29.5
2. Sweet Sioux SS 1.3 1.5 2.0 4.8 15.0 7.1 9.6 31.7
3. Gahi #2 Millet 0.9 2.3 1.4 4.6 11.4 12.6 7.4 31.4
4. Grazemaster SS 1.2 1.2 .1.7 4.1 13.5 7.1 8.9 29.5
5. Lindsey 77F SS 1.1 1.4 1.7 '4.2 12.2 7.4 9.3 28.9
6. Advance 1038C SS 1.0 1.4 1.8 4.2 12.9 6.8 8.1 27.8
7. SX-11 (sudax) SS 1.1 1.4 1.9 4.4 13.3 7.4 10.5 31.2
8. Plantation Pride FS 54.2/ 5.4 17.8 17.8
9. Lindsey 101F FS .8.4/ 8.4 25.9 25.9
L.S.D. .01 N.S. 0.5 0.3 1.2 -



Dry Matter-% Crude Protein-%
7/1 8/5 9/17 Ave. 7/1 8/5 9/17 Ave.
1. Sordan SS 11.4 18.7718.7 16.3 11.6 7.4 7.3 8.8
2. Sweet Sioux SS 12.0 20.3 20.5 17.6 10.1 7.0 8.1 8.4
3. Gahi #2 Millet 12.7 18.1 18.6 16.5 11.3 5.2 8.1 8.2
4. Grazemaster SS 11.6 17.8 19.4 16.3 10.8 6.5 8.6 8.6
5. Lindsey 77F SS 11.6 18.6 18.7 16.3 11.9 7.6 7.5 9.0
6. Advance 10380 SS 12.7 20.6 22.0 18.4 11.7 7.2 6.7 8.5
7. SX-11 (sudax) SS 11.7 19.0 18.5 16.4 12.2 6.7 7.8 8.9
8. Plantation Pride FS 30.2 30.2 4.8 4.8
9. Lindsey 101F FS 32.4 32.4 4.6 4.6

Fertilization Schedule-lbs/A
Date N P205 K20
At planting 72 72 72
July 2 64 32 32
July 22 64 32 32
Aug. 10 64 32 32
Aug. 31 60 0 60
Total 324 168 228


_/ SS = sorghum
with grain).
2/ Not included


x sudangrass hybrid; FS = forage
Five replications.
in statistical analyses.


or silage sorghum (tall growth






Table 6. Dry


and Fresh Weight Yields, Height and Dry Matter Contents of Sorghums and Millet
Seeded on March 17, 1965 at the Indian River Field Laboratory


Dry Weight Yields-tons/A Dry Matter-%
Variety:/ Type 5/4 6/3 6/11 7/21 9/22 Total (Total)=/ 5/4 6/3 6/11 7/21 9/22 Ave.
1. Sordan SS 1.5 1.4j/ 2.8 2.9 8.6 5.7 12.6 15.7 20.9 33.9 20.7
2. Sweet Sioux SS 1.8 1.9 3.2 2.2 9.1 6.9 15.5 20.5 23.9 30.0 22.5
3. Gahi #1 Millet 1.2 1.13/ 1.6 2.0 5.9 3.9 12.3 18.6 18.2 28.8 19.5
4. Grazemaster SS 1.6 1.9 3.4 4.7 11.6 6.9 12.9 18.6 20.9 32.4 21.2
5. Lindsey 77F SS 1.5 1.03/ 2.9 2.3 7.7 5.4 13.0 19.3 22.6.25.7 20.2
6. Advance 1038G SS 1.6 173 2.5 2.1 7.9 5.8 15.1 19.2 23.939.2 24.4
7. SX11 (sudax) SS 1.3 2.0 2.7 4.1 10.1 6.0 12.9 19.8 20.6 29.2 20.6
8. Plantation Pride FS 4.4 2.8 7.2 7.2 29.9 44.1 37.1
9. Lindsey 101F FS 6.1 5.9 12.0 12.0 29.9 52.5 41.2
10. SX 12 SS 1.4 1.53/ 3.5 4.2 10.6 6.4 16.1 17.5 22.7 39.3 23.9
11. Haygrazer SS 1.6 2.1 2.8 4.4 10.9 6.5 13.9 17.4. .20.8:41.1 23.3
12. Grazer A SS 1.8 1.6/ 3.6 3.4 10.4 7.0 13.0 18.5 19.9 29.3 20.2
L.S.D. .05 N.S. N.S. N.S. 0.6 0.8 2.2 N.S. 1.3
Fresh Weight Yields-tons/A Height to Top Leaf-Inches
.4/30 56/32/6/11 7/197/ 9/205/
1. Sordan SS 11.9 8.9 13.6 8.7 43.1 34.4 40 33 61 62
2. Sweet Sioux SS 11.5 9.0 13.2 7.4 41.1. 33.7 44 45 65: 69
3. Gahi #1 Millet SS 10.1 5.9 8.5 6.9 31.4 24.5 29 25 34 20
4. Grazemaster SS 12.2 10.3 16.2 14.5 53.2 38.7 43 47 64 67
5. Lindsey 77F SS 11.3 5.1 12.9 9.0 38.3 29.3 40 29 59 62
6. Advance 1038G SS 10.8 8.9 10.3 5.3 35.3 30.0 39 43 59. 57
7. SX 11 (sudax) SS 10.2 9.9 13.2 13.9 47.2. 33.3 38 45 57. 66
8. Plantation Pride FS 14.7 6.4 21.1 21.1 29 55 51
9. Lindsey 101F FS 20.3 11.1 31.4 31.4 34 58 51
10. SX12 SS 8.8 8.3 15.4 10.7 43.2 32.5 36 39 62 62
11. Haygrazer SS 11.4 12.2 13.3 10.8 47.7 36.9 41 48 55 68
12. Grazer A SS 13.6 8.8 18.0 11.7 52.1 40.4 41 36 57 58
1/ Five replications fertilized all plots with 400 Ibs./A 16-8-8 at seeding at 400 lbs./A of 16-8-8 after each
harvestf


SS = sorghum x sudangrass hybrid; FS = forage or silage sorghum (tall growth with grain).
A cow had grazed at least one replicate of the variety..
September 22 harvest not included--plants at this time were over-mature except for Plantation Pride'& Lindsey 101F.
No seed heads showing on April 30. Except for Grazemaster on June 3 at least one replicate of all other
varieties had seed heads visible. All had seed heads on July 19 and September 20.


I..
H.
0.






Table 7. Effects of Broadcast Seeding Rates of Sorghums and Millet on Dry and Fresh Weight
Yields and Dry Matter Contents When Seeded on March 17, 1965
at the Indian River Field Laboratory

Seeding
Rate Dry Weight Yields-tons/A Dry Matter-%
Varietyl/ lbs/A 5/4 6/31/6/11 7/21 9/22 Total Total/ 5/4 6/3 6/11 7/21 9/22 Ave.
1. Gahi #1 Millet 10 1.6 2.0 3.2 1. 8.6 6.8 17.2 16.6 21. 30.6 21.6
2. 20 1.8 1.9 3.1 2.7 9.5 7.8 16.7 14.8 22.3 58.0 28.0
3. 30 1.8 1.2 2.1 1.6 6.7 5.1 16.1 15.2 21.5 28.5 20.3
4. 40 2.0 1.5 2.6 3.3 9.4 6.1 17.1 15.4 22.9 52.5 27.0
5. Lindsey 77F 10 1.3 2.9 2.4 2.2 8.8 6.6 18.3 16.0 21.5 39.2 23.8
6. 20 1.6 3.1 2.2 3.2 10.1 6.9 14.3 15.6 20.1 46.5 24.1
7. 30 1.9 3.1 2.4 2.4 9.8 7.4 17.9 14.0 19-3 33.8 21.3
8. 40 2.1 2.3 2.7 2.2 9.3 7.1 17.1 14.2 19.8 42.5 23.4
9. Lindsey 101F 10 5.9 4.5 10.4 10.4 28.1 51.2 39.7
10. 20 6.7 4.3 11.0 11.0 31.8 55.6 43.7
11. 30 8.0 3.5 11.5 11.5 32.2 48.9 40.6
12. 40 7.8 3.6 11.4 11.4 31.3 56.7 44.0
. : L.S.D. .05 0.5 1.3 N.S. 1.5 -


Fresh weightS~tons/A


Dry Seed Yields
lbs./A
6/11


% Seed by
Weight Total Forage
6/11


1. Gahi #1 Millet 10 9.3 11.8 14.9 6.0 42.0 360 -
2. "20 10.1 9.3 13.7 4.6 37.7 33 -
3. 30 11.0 7.9 9.7 5.8 -34.4 28.6 -
4. "40 11.4 9.6 11.2 6.3 38.5 32.2
5. Lindsey 77F 10 7.0 22.9 10.9 5.6 46.4 40.8
6. 20 11.0 20.0 10.6 7.0 48.6 41.6
7. 30 10.9 22.3 12.4 7.0 52.6 45.6 -
8. 40 12.5 15.9 13.6 5.2 47.2 42.0 -
9. Lindsey 101F 10 21.1 8.7 29.8 29.8 4640 30.4
10. 20 21.0 7.8 28.8 28.8 3480 25.4
11. 30 24.7 7.1 31.8 31.8 3630 22.8
12. 40 24.9 6.3 31.2 31.2 3770 24.3


Four replications; fertilization included 400
A cow had grazed most of the millet plots and
September harvest not included--plants except


lbs./A of 16-8-8 at seeding and after each harvest.
a few of the 77F plots prior to harvest.
Lindsey 101F were over-mature.







Table 8. Effects of Maturity of Sorghums and Millet on Dry and Fresh Weight Yields and
Heights, and on Dry Matter Percentages from Seedings on March 17, 1965
at the Indian River Field Laboratory


Stage of
Growth Dry Weight Yields-tons/A Harvest Number
Varietyv/ When Cut 4/20 4/29 5/12 5/19 6/3.6/11 6/30 7/21 9/22 Total 1 2 3 4 5
1. Gahi #1 Millet E2/ 0.9 1.7 0.3 3.4 1.1 7.4 12.1 15.3 16.6 18.5 35.7
2. M 1.6 1.4 5.1 8.1 15.6 16.3 75.9 -
3. "L 3.2 0.3 4.7 8.2 22.1 17.8 73.3 -
4. Lindsey 77F E 1.0 1.3 0.3 4.1 3.1 9.8 12.7 14.7 21.7 22.2 45.9
5. M 1.9 '- 3.2 3.4 8.5 16.8 16.5 41.4 -
6. "L 7.2 4.6 11.8 30.9 53.5 -
7. Lindsey 101F E 0.9 1.3 0.7 3.1 3.2 9.3 15.1 15.9 20.5 17.2 47.6
8. 8.8/ 4.9 13.7 33.6 48.5 -
9. L 7.8 3.7 11.5 35.9 40.2 -


Fresh Weight Yields-tons/A Height to top leaf-inches
1. Gahi #1 Millet E 7.5 10.8 l.8 18.3 3.1 41.5 27 41 19 46 32
2. M 10.0 8.9 6.7 25.6 41 33 33 -
3- L -14.6 1.5 6.5 22.6 63 10 48 -
4. -Lindsey 77F. E ..8,0 8.8 1.6 18.2 6.7 43.3 31 42 12 66 48
5. M 11.2 19.5 8.2 38.9 49 60 61 -
6. "L 23.2 8.6 31.8 69 66 -
7. Lindsey 101F E 5.9 8.2 3.6 18.1 6.8 42.6 31 35 14 54 -
8. M 26.6 10.2 36.4 65 42 -
9. L -21.7 12.6 34.3 66 43 -


2:1
2/
:.- /


Four replications--fertilization consisted of 400 lbs./A 16-8-8 at seeding and after each harvest.
E = early, M = medium or optimum (soft dough stage for 101F) and L = late (over-mature) except for the
9/22 harvest, and No. 3 treatment for 6/3 harvest.
Grain yield was 4070 pounds per acre or 24% of total yield for June 11.






Table 9. Dry and Fresh Weight Yields, Heights, and Crude Protein and Dry Matter Percentages
of Grain Sorghums Seeded March 30, 1965 at the Indian River Field Laboratory


Broadcast
Seeding
Rate


0 t-1
o0 M
o
' 'D
Or


Tvne2/


Grain
6/30


Forage
6/30


Forage +
9/23 Forage


Fresh Weight-tons/A
% Grain + Forage
Grain 6/30 9/23 Total


lbs/A tons/A tons/A tons/A

1. Lindsey 551 20 GS 5780 5.3 2.9 8.2 54.1 13.2 6.0 19.2
2. Lindsey 755 20 GS 5470 5.1 2.7 7.8 53.5 12.6 5.2 17.8
3. Lindsey 788 20 GS 5890 6.9 3.9 10.8 42.7 19.1 6.4 25.5
4. Lindsey 101F 20 FS 6930 8.6 .10.2 18.8 40.5 24.7 20.4 45.1
5. Lindsey 551 30 GS 5430 5.1 2.8 7.9 53.4 12.6 6.9 19.5
6. Lindsey 755 30 GS 6400 6.0 3.0 9.0 52.9 15.2 5.4 20.6
7. Lindsey 788 30 GS 5600 6.5 4.3 10.8 43.0 19.0 5.8 24.8
8. Lindsey 101F 30 FS 4820 6.3 7.9 13.9 38.4 17.5 16.5 34.0
L.S.D. .01 N.S. 2.4 4.0 -


% Dry Matter Height-Ft.-Top Leaf $ Crude Protein
6/30 9/23 Ave.. 6/30 9/23 6/30
1. Lindsey 551 20 GS 40.6 47.7 44.2 2.6 3.3 3.7
2. Lindsey 755 20 GS 40.6 52.7 46.7 2.7 2.0 3.5
3. Lindsey 788 20 GS 36.0 60.4 48.2 3.0 2.8 3.1
4. Lindsey 101F 20 FS 34.6 49.9 42.3 4.9 3.1 2.5
5. Lindsey 551 30 GS 40.2 41.3 40.8 2.3 2.0 4.4
6. Lindsey 755 30 GS 39.8 55.6 47.7 2.8 3.4 3.3
7. Lindsey 788 30 GS 34.3 73.4 53.9 3.0 2.8 3.6
8. Lindsey 101F 30 FS 35.9 48.2 42.0 4.0 3.6 2.2
L.S.D. .01 N.S. N.S. -


1/ Four replications fertilization consisted of 800
2/ GS = grain sorghum (short plants with grain); FS =


lbs./A of 16-8-8 at seeding and on June 30.
silage sorghum (tall plants with grain).


Dry Weight Yields
Grain Grain Total
+ + Grain


TT~r; p+rrl-/





















































































































































































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