• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of elementary sounds
 Exercises in articulation
 Combination of vocals and...
 Combination of vocals and...
 Directors to teachers
 Contents
 Back Cover






Group Title: American first reader
Title: Osgood's American first reader
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055892/00001
 Material Information
Title: Osgood's American first reader for schools and families
Series Title: Progressive series
Uniform Title: American first reader
Physical Description: 80 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Osgood, Lucius
A.H. English & Co ( Publisher )
New York Bureau of Illustration ( Illustrator )
Publisher: A.H. English & Co.
Place of Publication: Pittsburgh
Publication Date: c1870
 Subjects
Subject: Primers (Instructional books) -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Primers (Instructional books)   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Lucius Osgood.
General Note: Illustrated by New York Bureau of Illustration.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055892
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002235204
notis - ALH5647
oclc - 16181793

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Preface
        Page 2
    Table of elementary sounds
        Page 3
    Exercises in articulation
        Page 4
    Combination of vocals and subvocals
        Page 4
    Combination of vocals and subvocals
        Page 5
    Directors to teachers
        Page 6
    Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text


















THE PROPERTY OF

TEACHER & SUBSCRIPTION
BOOK AG-ENTT,
1941 EAST STATE STREET,
$|~amt~bttr^, ^a.






PROGRESSIVE SERIES.



OSGOOD'S


AMERICAN



FIRST READER.


FOR

SCHOOLS AND FAMILIES.


BY
LUCIUS OSGOOD.






PITTSBURGH:
A. H. ENGLISH & CO
98 FOURTH AVENUE.









PREFACE.

THIs book is a continuation of the American Primer;
and is so closely connected with it, that it cannot be used
with complete success until the pupil has become perfectly
familiar with the lessons of that book.
It is prepared and arranged witl the most careful atten-
tion to easy and regular progression.
The lessons are short, simple, and well adapted, in every
way, to the capacities of the little learners, for whom they
are designed. They are composed entirely of monosylla-
bles which are in such general use, that children will find
very little difficulty in comprehending or pronouncing them.
No word is used in any reading lesson which has not
been presented in some preceding spelling lesson; and all
of the new words in every spelling lesson are introduced
into the reading lesson which immediately follows them.
The words at the head of the lessons from the twelfth
to the twenty-first page are not new, but are, with a very few
exceptions, the words used in the Primer of this series,
and in the preceding lessons of this First Reader; and
are introduced on those pages for the purpose of carefully
reviewing them before proceeding to the subsequent lessons
of this reader, in which they frequently occur.
The engravings in this book, and also in the American
Primer, are original ; having been designed expressly for
these books by the best artists in the country. These illus-
trations will do much to awaken the interest of the pupil,
and aid him in understanding the lessons.

Entered, -ccording to Act of Congress, in the year 1870, by
A. H. ENGLISH & CO.
rn the Clerk's Office of the Distriat Court of tle United States for the Western
District of Pennsylvania.








TABLE OF ELEMENTARY SOUNDS.

The elements in.the following table must be uttered by the
teacher first, and then by the class individually, or in con-
cert. In order to give each element correctly, pronounce the
word containing it distinctly and forcibly, and then utter the
1 2
element alone; as ape, a; arm, a; bat, b, &c. Let the prac-
tice upon this table be continued until every elementary
sound can be uttered correctly and promptly.
VOCALS.
Element. Element.
1 .2
1. a, as in ape, is m.Lrked a I. 11. in it, is marked I
2. a, arm, a 12. o, ': old, o
3. a, all, a 13. o, do, o
4. a, at, a 14. o, on, "
5
5. a, care, a 15. u, mute, uR
6. a, ask, a 16. u, up, n
1
7. e, me, e 17. u, fll, "
2
8. e, met, e 18. u, urge, u
9. e, term, e 19. oi," oil, o

10. i, ice, i 20. on," out, on
SUBVOCALS.
Element. Element.
21. as in bib, b 29. V, asin Van, V
22. d, did, d 30. W, we, w
23. g, gay, g 31. y, yes, y
24. j, joy, j 32. z, zone, z
25. 1, lad, 1 33. z, azure, z
26. m, man, m 34. th, thy, th
27. n, no, M 35. ng, song, ng
28. r, run, r







4 ELEMENTARY SO FUNDS.


ASPIRATES.
Element. Element.
36. p, as in pin, p 41. f, as in fan, f

37. S, sin, S 42. ch, chin, ch
38. t, tin, t 43. th, thin, th
39. k kid, k 44. sh, shy, sh
40. h, his, h 45. wh, why, wh



EXERCISES IN ARTICULATION.
VOCALS.
Let the practice upon these elements be continued from day
to day, until the pupil can correctly and promptly give that
sound to each vowel which is indicated by the figure placed
over it.
1 2 2 2 3
1. a, a 4. e, e 7. 0, 0
2. a, a 5. e, 1 8. u, II
5 6 2 1 3 4
3 a, a 6. 1, 0 9. u, U

10. oi, on



COMBINATION OF VOCALS AND SUBVOCALS.
First, utter each combination, giving as much stress as
possible to the subvocal; then, omitting the vocal, give to
the subvocal precisely the same sound that it has in com-
bination, thus: bA, b; dA, d, &c. Vary the exercise occa-
sionally by spelling phonetically, which is done by uttering







4 ELEMENTARY SO FUNDS.


ASPIRATES.
Element. Element.
36. p, as in pin, p 41. f, as in fan, f

37. S, sin, S 42. ch, chin, ch
38. t, tin, t 43. th, thin, th
39. k kid, k 44. sh, shy, sh
40. h, his, h 45. wh, why, wh



EXERCISES IN ARTICULATION.
VOCALS.
Let the practice upon these elements be continued from day
to day, until the pupil can correctly and promptly give that
sound to each vowel which is indicated by the figure placed
over it.
1 2 2 2 3
1. a, a 4. e, e 7. 0, 0
2. a, a 5. e, 1 8. u, II
5 6 2 1 3 4
3 a, a 6. 1, 0 9. u, U

10. oi, on



COMBINATION OF VOCALS AND SUBVOCALS.
First, utter each combination, giving as much stress as
possible to the subvocal; then, omitting the vocal, give to
the subvocal precisely the same sound that it has in com-
bination, thus: bA, b; dA, d, &c. Vary the exercise occa-
sionally by spelling phonetically, which is done by uttering







ELEMENTARY SOUNDS. 5

the exact sound that each letter has in the combination,
and not its name, and then pronouncing as usual, thus:
b-A, bA; d-A, dA. Pursue the same course in the next ex-
ercise upon aspirates.

1. ba, da 11. yu, ze 21. am, in
2. b, d 12. y z 22. m, n
oi
3. go, joi 13. zu, the 23. or, ev
4. g, j 14. z, th 24. r, V
23 1 1
5. lo, me 15. ong, eb 25. we, ye
6. 1, n 16. ng, b 26. W, y
1 1 4 2 1
7. no, ra 17. ad, eg 27. oz, uz
8. n, r 18. d, g 28. z, z
S 1 ]2 4
9. vi, wo 19. aj, el 29. ith, ang
10. V, W 20. j, 1 30. th, ng


COMBINATION OF VOCALS AND SUBVOCALS.

1. pi, sa 8. ch,, th 15. ha, of
2. p, S 9. sho, whi 16. h, f
3. t), kou 10. sh, wh 17. ach, ath
4. t, I 11. ap, is 18. eh, th
5. hi, fu 12. p, S .19. ash, who
6. h, f 13. at, ek 20. sh, wh
7. chun, tha 14. t, k











DIRECTIONS TO TEACHERS.


To use this book successfully, you must thoroughly teach the words
at the head of each lesson before you permit the pupil to read the
sentences which follow them. This is necessary because these words
are the only new words, and consequently the principal difficulties
of the reading lesson. To afford the greatest facilities for teaching
these words, and for accomplishing other desirable results in primary
reading, large cards are prepared to accompany this series of Readers
and Primer. With the aid of these cards, you will be able to teach
the new words of any lesson to twelve pupils in the same time that
would be required to teach them to one.
In teaching these words, you will follow that course which you find
the most successful. The following plan, however, may be pursued
if no better one suggests itself to you. First teach your pupils to
spell the words by naming the letters, and then by giving the ele-
mentary sounds which they contain. This done, let them be required
to pronounce the words correctly and promptly at sight. This kind
of drill will not only prepare your pupils for reading the lesson in
an easy and natural manner, but it will give you an excellent oppor-
tunity to teach correct articulation.
To teach phonetic spelling, it will be necessary to make frequent
use of the black-board. Take, for example, the words of the first
lesson, and write their elements on the board, thus; of = o v = 6v;
are = a r = ar, &c. The words being thus analyzed, require the
pupil to give the elements according to the Table of Elementary
Sounds, at first slowly, then more and more rapidly until the com-
bined sounds form the correct pronunciation of the words. This black-
board exercise should be continued until the pupil is so familiar with
the Table of Elementary Sounds, and so expert in giving them, that
it will be no longer necessary.
Do not attempt to accomplish too much at one lesson. Keep con-
stantly in view that you are dealing with the minds of little children;
and do not weary them. A short lesson, with the undivided attention
of your class, is better than a long lesson with careless attention. If
necessary, teach the words at one lesson, and the reading at another.
Teach, what you attempt to teach, thoroughly, even if it be but one
word.








OSGOOD'S
AMERICAN

FIRST READER.



'I






LESSON I.
of two paws
are pups side
Here is Tom with his pets.
Two pups are in the box, and two
are by the side of the old dog.
See the one with his paws on the
side of the box!
7





8 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

LESSOr II.
+_ tin blow
"- hers horn
made horns
The boy has a
horn.
The cow has two horns.
The boy's horn is made of tin.
The boy can blow his horn.
Can the cow blow hers?

LESSON III.
Ann they
nice them
kind hands
Here is Ann with
her cat and kits.
They are nice pets.
See them try to run! They are
too fat to run well.
Ann has one kit in her hands.
She is kind to her cat and kits.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 9

LESSONS IV.
tell home
fish what
take some
Can you tell what
the man has ? He has some fish.
What will he do with them?
He will take them to his home.
Some of the fish are by the tub,
and some are in the tub.
LESSON V.
went barn
nest took
eggs from
Ann went to the u.
barn. F.
She saw a nest in the hav.
The nest had some eggs in it.
Ann took two of the eggs from the
nest.





10 PROGRESSIVE SEBTES.

She has them in her hands.
Two of the eggs are in the nest.
Can you see the eggs in the nest?


LESSON VI.
Tray good




dogs.
Do you see the dog by the side of
the man?
The name of this dog is Tray.
Tray is a good dog, and can run
fast. He can run as fast as a fox
can.
It may be that the man will go out
to look for a fox.
If he goes, he will take his dogs
with him.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 11

LESSON VII.
too like
move ride
cars most
l How fast the cars
move!
No boy can run as fast as the cars
can go.
How nice it is to ride in the cars!
Do you like to ride in the cars?
Most boys like to ride in them.

LESSON VIII.
Rand hoe -
play draw -
cart cornY
This boy has a :
new hoe. fy.
His name is Rand. -
.He can use his new hoe.
He can hoe corn with it.






12 PROGRESSE1VE SERIES.

He can hoe as well as a man can.
Rand can play too. He has a dog
and a cart to play with.
Tray is the name of his dog.
He is a good dog, and can draw
the cart for Rand.


qo'.


,r -,-_ . .
~L-T









Here is Rand with his old dog Tray
and his cart.
Rand runs by the side of his dog,
and lets Ann ride in his cart.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN PiRST READER. 13

LESSON IX.
ate sun L
day one
hay some
may son
Do not lie, my 1
son.
A good boy will not lie.
It is a sin to lie; and a good boy
will not sin.

LESSONS X.

S bed far
i 'de'' yes hard
S, elk are
pen car
hen barn
Will you let me go out to play?
Yes; if you will not play too hard.
I will not play too hard.
Here is my dog. He will go with
Sme.





14 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

LESSOR XI
our pup that well
cow hut hand went
how cut here cart
use bud eat harm

S Do not run from
him, Tom.
He will not harm
you.
He will not run
from us.
See! he will eat out of my hand.
And he will let me put my hand on
him too.

LESSON XII.

sin fig them home
tin bit nest hold
him will egg keep
big with when fall





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 15














Now let us see how fast we can
go.
Do not go too fast.
I do not like to ride when you go
so fast.
I will not go too fast.
You are kind to do what I tell you.
I like to be kind to you.
Keep fast hold of me, and you will
not fall.





16 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.


- -- ------ ---













LESSON X III.
had put take corn
saw lot made horn
she hot name bow
bee log play help
I can not see God, but he can see
me.
He can see me in my bed, and he
can see me at my play.






OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FYRST READER. 17

He can see me bow to him now.
God is good, and can not sin.
Oh, may he help me to be good!
And may he help me to do
good!
May he be with me when I lie in
my bed, and when I get up.
May he keep me from all harm and
from all sin.

LESSON XIV.
fly look
lie book
like have
ride read
side these
These boys have a book.
It is a new book and a nice one.
it is a good book too.
Can these boys read this good
book?
B





18 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

Two of the boys can read it.
They can read well, and can tell
what they read too.

LESSON X .
all move.
-gun they
S : bat goes
odd rake
two men
eat then

You saw Rand with his new hoe.
And you saw him at play with his
cart and his dog Tray.
Now here he is with a new rake.
He can use his rake as well as he
can use his hoe.
He can rake hay as well as he can
hoe corn.
Rand will help the men to rake
the hay.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIST hEADER. 19

Then the men will put it on the
cart, and take it to the barn.
I like to see boys hoe corn and
rake hay. It is good for them.
Play is good for boys too; and I
like to see them play.


LESSON XL .
fast from
paws this
blow girl,
nice girls
kind broom
took sweep

See these two girls!
They have a broom.
Can they sweep with the broom?
One of the girls can sweep with it.
The girl that has the broom in her
hands is the one that can sweep.





20 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.





d--;









LESSOr X VII.
tell hoe why hens
fish most off pigs
what draw horn horns
Tom has some pigs and some hens.
He has a pen in the lot for his
pigs, and a barn for his hens.
He had the pigs in the pen, and
the hens in the barn.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 21

But the pigs are out of the pen
now, and the hens are out of the
barn.
The pigs saw Tom, and ran to him
to be fed.
The hens saw the pigs run to Tom,
and they ran to him too.
Now Tom has fed his pigs and his
hens.
LESSON X VIII.
bird your
tree more
small four
Do you see me, -_
bird?
I see you. You .
have a nest. I saw it one day.
It is in a small tree that is by the
side of our old hut.
It had two eggs in it when I saw
it.





22 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

It may have more in it now.
I will go and see if it has more.
Will you let me look at your nest,
bird?
I will do it no harm. I will look at
the eggs; but
-- I will not take
them from your
nest.
Here is the nest.
SThe bird is sly
"V to put her nest
here.
It has four eggs in it now.
They are nice eggs; but I will nnt
take them from the nest.



LESSON XIX.
Jip arms bark
poor down there





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 23

SHow do you do,
S Jip ?
II; I saw you go to
o'iI the barn.
What did you do
._ there?
S Did you see my
old cat in the barn?
What did you do to her?
Run at her, did you?
That was not nice, Jip.
Good dogs are kind. They do not
try to harm the poor cats.
You are not good, Jip; and I will
not let you go to the barn now.
I, will take you
to bed
It is of no use for
you to try to
get out of my
arms; for I can
hold you fast.





24 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

Do not bark so: I will not let you
get down.
I will put you to bed.
--- -- Here is your bed.
o Now lie down,
Jip.
Do not bark so,
I tell you.
Do not put out
your paws.
I will not let you get up.
Now be a good dog, and lie down.
If you are good, I will let you get
up by and by.

LESSOr XX.
cold come wood
snow sled horse
It is a cold day.
Snow has come.
Now the men will go out to cut
some wood.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 25

Here they are.--
How cold they .
look!
One man cuts the
wood; and two
men put it on
the sled.
When the men have put the wood on
the sled, the boy will come with the
horse, and take the wood home.
The horse can draw the sled with
the boy and the wood on it.
Here is the boy '
with the horse
and sled.
See him sit on the
wood and ride!
It is not hard for ,
the horse to
draw the sled on the snow.
The horse will not run off with the
boy.






26 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.





















Here you are, my fine old dog.
You have a whip, I see.
Where did you get it?
You can not tell me.
LESSONf XXI.
fine meat whip
talk give where
Here you are, my fine old dow.

You have a whip, I see.
Where did you get it?
You can not tell me.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 27

You can run, bark, and play; but
you can not talk.
Well, you are a good old dog; and
I like you.
Now come with me, and I will give
you a bit of meat.
LESSON XXII.
.. swim crumb
I-i swims crumbs
"' feed bread
Vt^, Here is a fish.
.-- Let us feed it.
SWill it eat bread?
Yes; and meat too.
You may give it some bits of meat,
and I will give it some crumbs
of bread.
See! it swims to get the bits of
meat and crumbs of bread.
Now it takes a crumb of bread;
and now it takes a bit of meat.





28 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

LESSON XXIII.
Frank Kate
told bid
beat drum
Frank has a drum,
and can beat
it.
Kate got the drum
for Frank.
She told him not to go out and play
in the snow.
Frank did as he. was bid; and Kate
got the drum for him.
See the boys and dog at play with
Frank!
The boys have caps on.
The dog has a cap on too.

LESSON XXIV.
ill went stay
till must took





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 29

Whyisthisboy in '
bed? le is ill. i
He went out to I
play in the ,
snow, and took "
cold.
He was told not '
to go out and play in the snow.
He did not do as he was bid.
Now he is ill, and must stay in bed
till he gets well.
LESSONS XX .
sick red
rose bush
friend sweet
knn has a rose. i
It is a red rose. -
It is so sweet.
Where did she get it?
She took it from the bush at her
side.





30 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

Ann is a kind girl, and will take
this sweet rose to her sick friend.


LESSON XXVI.
came school strike
house their hurt
Frank and Tom came home from
school, and took their books to
the house.
Then they went out to play.











Here they are at play in the lot.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 31

Frank has a whip in his hand.
Will he strike Tom with it?
Oh, no! he will not strike him.
Frank is a good boy, and will not
hurt Tom.
How fast they can run!
See their dog run with them!
He can run as fast as Frank and
Tom can.


LESSON XX II.
twigs touch
blue aunt
hair would
Oh! come and
see this nest,
aunt Kate.
It is so nice.
It is made of hay, small twigs, and
fine hair.
It has two, nice, blue eggs in it.





32 PROGREsTVE ~ERIEs.

May I hold them in my hand ?
No; do not take them from the
nest.
We will look at them; but we will
not touch them.
The birds would not like to have
us take their eggs from their
nest.
LESSON XX VIII.
James soon
-- Grace does
gave hope
See mynew sled!
'1 Where did you
get it ?
James gave it to
me.
It is a fine sled. The top is red,
but the side is blue.
I hope the snow will come soon.
When it does come, I will try my
new sled.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 33

James was kind to give me this
sled; and I will let him try
it too.
I will give Grace and Ann a ride
on my new sled.

LESSON XXIX.
seem call tame
fear sing wild

Is this a wild ;... --,
bird ?
It is not so wild -.
as some birds,
but it is not
what we call ,
a tame bird. '
It does not seem to fear us at all.
Let us be kind to it, and it may be
that we can tame it.
We will feed it, and it may sing
for us.





34 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

LESSON XXX.
heart think hit
mark shoot could

See this boy! I i,
What has he in
his hands ? A
What can he do
with it ?
He can shoot -
with it.
See him shoot at the mark!
Can you see the mark?
Do you think that he can hit it?
Could he hit your bird?
I would not like to have him try to
hit it.
I would not like to have him shoot
at it.
If he has a kind heart, he will not
shoot my poor bird.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST ;EADER. 35









c ,,' .....--^ol

LESSON XXXI.
oats say spin
grass make rock
Frank has a fine horse; but it is
made of wood.
It can not eat oats and grass; and
it can not run.
Frank may say, "Run, horse, run;"
but the horse will not run, for it
is made of wood.
He can not make his horse run, but
he can make it rook.





36 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

See the boy with his top!
How he can make it spin!
He can spin his top; and Frank
can sit on his horse and rock.

LESSOJV XXXII.
e- Pomp stand
piece bold
crust done
Oh! Kate, look
here!
SeemydogPomp!
He can stand up
like a boy.
Hold out your paws, Pomp, and I
will give you a piece of meat
and a crust of bread.
See! Kate, see him hold out his
paws! How bold he looks!
That is well done. Now eat your
crust of bread and your piece of
meat.






OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 37

LESSON XXXIII.
find dry pick
found nuts quite
James, Frank.and
Kate went out
to find some t
nuts.
Here they are.
They have. found
some.
They are on the tree; but James
can pick them off.
They will not eat them now.
They will take them home, and
keep them till they are dry.
When the nuts are quite dry, they
will eat some, and give some to
Ann and Tom.
LESSON XXXIP.V
John club game
ball throw sport





38 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

k. EE See these boys
-.. l play a game
of ball!
-i Johnhas theball,
and Tom has
the club.
SJohn will throw
the ball, and
Tom will try to hit it with his club.
It is fine sport to play ball.
Play on, boys, play on. It will do
you good.

LESSOr XXX V.
bite wish
stop thing
-- such would
If Stop,Frank! that
is not kind.
'i Why do youwhip
your poor dog
-- so? s





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 39

Did he bite you?
No; but I told him to bark, and he
would not do it.
Do not beat him for such a thing
as that.
If you wish to have your do; do
what you tell him to do, you
must be kind to him.
LESSOJV XXX VI.
Jane deep much
small near large
Look at this boy
at the well!
He is not large,
but he is kind.
He is kind to Jane.
See him try to
help her!
He is too small
to help her much, but he will
do what he can for her.






40 PROGRESSlVE SERIES.

He must not play too near the
well; for it is deep, and he may
fall in.




= -- -- k







LESSON XXX II.
sad bare feet
food looks sleep
Poor boy! How sad he looks!
His feet are bare.
IIe is cold and poor, and has no
food.
Let us take him home with us.






OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST LEADER. 41

We will give him food to eat, and
a bed to sleep in.
We will feed his poor old dog.
The boy can eat with us, and his
dog can eat with ours.

LESSON XXX VIII.
bag sure need yet
own rude neat clean
See my blue bag!
Is it not a fine ~
one?
Yes; it is a fine
bag; and you
must be sure
to keep it neat
and clean.
I will let you take
my bag when you go out to ride.
You are kind to let me use your
bag, but I do not need it; for
my own is good yet.





42 PROGRESSIVE SERIES:

I will take it to your box now; and
you may go out to play.
Do not be rude in your play.
It is not nice to be rude.

LESSON XXXIX.
calf dish drink who
glad milk which young

S Look at this boy
and his calf!
He likes his calf,
and is kind to
it.
He gives it milk
to drink.
Do you see the dish which the boy
holds in his hands?
There is milk in this dish for the
young calf.
See him hold out the dish for the
young calf to drink!






OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST BEADE7. 43

I am glad that the boy is so kind
to the calf.
When I see a boy who is kind to
his pets,.I am sure that he has
a kind heart.
LESSOJV XL.
were head hear lamb
fell lost goat stand





II' ,- -K-
S-- ,






Look at my new book!
It is a fine book. Who gave it to
you?
Jane gave it to me.





44 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

She gave me a book too.
We must be kind to Jane, who is
so kind to us.
We will be kind to her. We will
do as she bids us.
We will keep our books neat and
clean.
Hear how well I can read.
I can read of the lamb and goat,
or of the boy and girl who were
lost in the woods.
Let me hear you read of the boy
that fell from his horse, and hurt
his head.
Do not try to read too fast; if you
do, you will not read well.
That is well done. You read quite
well.

LESSON XLI.
fur soft care pull
purr tail mice catch





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIST LEADER. 45










Look here, John! See what I have
for you!
It is my old cat. She will not bite
you. She is a good cat.
What soft fur-she has! Do you
hear her purr?
I will give her to you, if you will
take good care of her.
You must be kind to her.
Feed her well. Give her milk to
drink and bread to eat.
Do not beat her, and do not pull
her tail.






46 PR1OGBESSIVIE SERIES.

Take her home, and she will soon
catch all the rats and mice in
your house and barn.
LESSON XLII.
duck sky does ones
ducks pond rest young


,: -_








Here are some ducks.
Some are old, and some are young.
Some fly in the sky, and some
swim in the pond.
The young ones swim near the old
ones.
": -- .,. . 'h -'





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 47

One old duck stands by the side of
-the pond.
He does not swim with the rest.
It may be that he can not swim.
Do you think he can?
Some ducks are wild, and some are
tame.
Do these look like wild ducks?
Who canl tell?

LESSON XLIII.
flew best seek light
eyes gone night bright
I saw an owl fly
to the barn.
It flew out of the
woods.
Let us go and >,
see if it is
in the barn
now.





48 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

It may catch our hens, if we let it
stay there.
I do not think it will harm our hens.
I think it has gone to the barn to
look for rats
and mice.
But we will
go and see.
Here is the
owl.
How large its
eyes are!
Owls can not
see well by
day.
They see best at night.
The bright light of the sun seems
to hurt their eyes.
They do not fly much by day.
They sit in some old tree or barn
all day, and fly out at night to
seek for food.






OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 49

They feed on rats, mice, fish, and
small birds.

LESSON XLIT.
set wheat stick holes
steel trap round cheese
These boys have
a trap. I
Some traps are -
made of steel.
This one is made
of wood.
The boys set their
trap for rats.
The rats ate the
corn and wheat; and these boys
set the trap to catch them.
They put some cheese on a stick
in the trap.
But the rats were too sly for the
boys. They came to the trap,
D and went round and round it.





50 PROGRESSIVE SErIES.

They could see the cheese, but it
was in the trap.
They did not like
the looks of
the trap. .on i-
So off they ran
to their holes,
and did not I
try to get the
cheese.
LESSON XL Y.
white soft wool skip
black snow grass green
Jane has a pet
lamb.
How white it
is!
Some lambs are
black.
But this one is
as white as
snow. -






OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FItRST .KEADE. 51

Its wool is soft and clean.
Jane is kind to her pet lamb.
She gives it milk to drink.
It is too young to eat hay or grass.
Jane likes to see her lamb skip
and play on the green grass.

LESSOJV XL VI.
cage perch picks seeds
hops keeps gives song
This girl has a ''
cage. '
She keeps her
tame bird in
it.
Do you see the I i,- 3|
bird on its
perch in the
cage?
This girl takes good care of her
bird.





52 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

She gives it seeds and crumbs of
bread to eat, and keeps its cage
neat and clean.
And the bird seems to like the girl.
When she goes up to the cage, it
hops down from its perch
It picks seeds out of hei hand,
and does not seem to fear her at
all.
It sits on its perch, and sings a
song when she is near.
If you had a bird, would you keep
it in a cage?


LESSON XL VII.
left drive while start
hoop right strike roll
Tom has a hoop, and a stick to
drive it with.
There he goes! Look at him!





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 53

j See how fast he
makes the hoopi I11 j
go round and
round!
Can you drive a '-
hoop ?
I will tell you
how to do it.
Take the hoop in your left hand,
and the stick to drive it with in
your right hand.
Hold the hoop up with your left
hand, while you strike it with
the stick in your right hand.
This will start the hoop.
Then run by its side, and strike it
now and then with your stick;
but do not strike it too hard.
If you do this right, the hoop will
not fall, but will roll on.
If you wish to make it go fast, you
must run fast and strike fast.





54 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.















LESSOJ XLVIII.

ship sail mast Fred
wind sails masts spread
Fred has a new ship.
See him try to make it sail on the
pond!
It is a small ship; but it has masts
and sails like a large one.
Fred has set the sails of his ship.





OSGOOOD' AMERICAN FIRST READER. 55

) To set the sails of a ship is to
spread them, as you see Fred
has done.
The sails of a ship are, spread, so
that the wind may strike them.
and move the ship.

LESSON XLIX.
rob full limb brings
dear close bill worm

Who can tell
what this is ?
Itseemstome,
that I hear
some boy or
girlsay,that
it is a bird's
nest.
Yes; that is right. It is a bird's
nest.
A bird's nest full of young birds.





56 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

Do you see their heads?
There are four small birds.
See the old birds!
One sits on a limb close by, and
sings.
One brings food, and feeds the
young birds.
It has a worm in its bill to give to
the young ones.
How much the old birds seem to
like the young ones!
What care they take of them!
I hope no boy who reads this will
rob a bird's nest.
No good boy will take young birds
from the old ones.
Dear birds! we like them; and we
will not do them harm.

LESSON L.
fun folks thick smooth
ice time skate break





OSGOOD'8 AMERICAN FIRST READER. 57



-.!--- -










Here is sport for the young folks.
See the boys and girls!
See them skate! How fast they
move!
Round and round they go.
Now here, and now there.
The ice is hard and smooth.
It is new and thick, and will not
break.
Go on, boys and girls; for now is
the time for fun.





58 PROGRESSIVE ERBIES.


-,-- ..









LESSON LI.
rope jump air cheek
kite pure health cheeks
Here are Kate, Tom, and Frank.
Kate has a rope, Tom has a hoop,
and Frank has a kite.
Kate can jump the rope.
Tom can drive the hoop.
Frank can fly the kite.
It is fine sport for boys and girls
to drive the hoop, and jump the
rope.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 59

S Boys and girls, it will do you good
to play at these games.
Such sports as these in the pure
air will give you health, and
make your cheeks as red as a
rose.

LESSON LII.
toys three know child
love than knows years
Here is our child.
His name is
Frank.
He is three years
old.
He knows his
name, and can
tell how old he is.
He is a dear, good child.
How much we all love him
We call him "our pet."





60 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

He has a large box full of toys.
He has a bat, a ball, a top, a whip,
a gun, a sled, and more things
than I can think of now.

LESSON LIII.
doll curls wax wears
socks brown silk shoes
S, i i -




J-






Look at my new doll!
It is a wax doll.
My aunt gave it to me.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 61

It has red cheeks and blue eyes.
It wears a hat made of green silk.
Do you wish to know the name of
my doll?
Well, I will tell you. Her name is
Kate Rose.
I gave her this name.
It is the right name for her; for
she looks like a rose.
She wears red shoes, and blue and
white socks.
Her hair is so fine and so soft.
I have made some brown curls for
her.
How glad I am that my aunt gave
me this doll.


LESSON LIP.
nose cross ear
face kiss speak
means word shall





62 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

Some one has left old Pomp to
take care of
this child.
See him put his
nose up to the
boy's face Do
you think he
means to bite
him ?
He does not look like a cross dog.
I do not think that he will hurt
the child.
It may be that he puts his nose up
to the boy's face to kiss it.
Or it may be that he would like to
speak a kind word in his ear.
He looks as if he would like to
say to the child,
"I will take good care of you. No
one shall harm you, if I can help
it."





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 63












A
LESSON LV.
said six slide
mine hill truth
lame count thank
Snow has come; and the boys are
glad.
What fine sport they have now!
They run up the hill, and ride down.

the hill they slide.





64 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

I can count one, two, three sleds,
and six boys
There are two boys on one sled.
Two boys have no sleds.
But the boys that have sleds are
kind, and will let these two boys
ride on their sleds.
Do you see the sled with the word
"Truth" on the side?
Truth is the name of the sled.
It is a good name; and the boy
who owns it is a good boy.
His name is James. He is kind
as well as good.
I will tell you what he did.
A lame boy went out to see the
boy's slide.
He was a poor boy, and had no
sled.
James said to him, "Have you no
sled?" "I have not," said the
boy.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 65

"Well," said James, "you may ride
on mine.".
"Thank you," said the boy. "You
are kind to me. I shall be glad
to try your sled."
It was right for James to let the
lame boy take his sled.
I hope all boys will use their sleds
as well as James did his.

L LESSOJY L VI.
Schick five warm place
chicks finds safe leads

Let us stop and _
look at our
old hen and
her chicks.
She has one, two,
three, four,
five, six small
chicks.
E





66 PROGCESSIVE SERIES.

Shall I feed them?
You may feed them if you wish to.
Shall I give them some corn?
No; they are too small to eat corn.
You may give them some crumbs
and small seeds.
I will give some corn to the old
hen.
How good the old hen is to her
chicks.
When she finds a crumb, she does
not eat it.
She calls her chicks, and gives it
to them.
She takes good care of them all
day.
She leads them to some safe place,
and keeps them warm all night.

LESSONS L TI.
Ruth ought else long
Ralph please stars string





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 67

















I think it is nice. Where did you
get it?
My aunt Ruth made it for me.
Your aunt Ruth is kind; and she
knows how to make a kite.
Yes; she does. She is the right
Kind of an aunt.
]kind of an aunt.





68 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

She can make a kite, and fly it
too.
She can skate, and slide, and drive
a hoop.
She plays with me, when I have no
one else to play with.
She is good at all kinds of sport,
and can make as much fun as a
boy can.
She is good to me; and I love
her.
That is right. You ought to love
her, when she does so much to
please you.
What a large kite she has made
for you.
It has two bright stars on its face;
and it has a long string to hold
it with.
Let us go out and see if we can
find a place, where we can
fly it.






OSGOOD'S AMERICA.N FIRST READER. 69









} -


II
LESSOJV LT III.
found field strong still
both cool pitch high
Here are James and Ralph with
the kite.
It is a fine day; and they have
found a good place for their
sport.
The field is large and smooth; and
the sun is bright.





70 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

The wind is cool, but not too strong
for the boys to fly their kite.
As soon as they came to this field,
James said to Ralph,
"You may pitch the kite. Stand
still, and throw it up when I say
4now.' "
Ralph took the kite; and James,
the string.
"Now," said James. Up went the
kite; and off went James as fast
as he could run.
"Give it more string," said Ralph;
"and let us see how high it will
go."
" The string may break," said James.
" It is too strong for that," said Ralph.
Now they both stand still and look.
Up, up goes the kite high in the
air.
Soon it will be so high, that it will
look as small as a boy's hand.





OS/OOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 71












LESSON LIX.
back treat joins short
show those quick least
See the old dog and the pups!
One, two, three, four pups.
The name of the old dog is Pomp.
What large ears and long hair he
has!
There is one pup on his back.
Do you think Pomp will hurt the
pup that is on his back?





72 PROGBES81VYE SERIES.

Does he look like a cross dog?
See what a kind face he has!
Old Pomp is not cross. I know
him well.
He is an old friend of mine.
He will not do the least harm to
those who treat him well.




I-Q
'._.-









He likes to play with boys and girls.
He joins in their sports; and his
quick, short barks show how
much they please him.






OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 73













LESSON LX.
moon half heat round
last shine late ground
Do you see the moon far off in the
sky?
How large and bright it looks!
It did not seem so large when we
saw it last.
Some nights, it looks quite large
and round; and some nights, it
seems but half a moon.





74 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

Some nights, it looks quite small;
and some nights, we do not see
it shine at all.
God made the moon to give us
light by night.
He made the sun to give us light
by day.
The light of the moon is not so
bright as the light of the sun.
We do not get heat from the moon;
but we get heat, as well as light,
from the sun.
Boys like to play at night, when
the air is cool, and the moon is
high and bright.
They like to run and jump on the
green grass; or, if there is snow
on the ground, they like to slide
down hills on sleds.
But it is not well for boys to play
too late at night; for night is the
time for rest and sleep.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 75
LESSON LXI.
steep climb ,
tea sheep
gloves hoof ,,
bound slip
skin beard
An old goat and
her kids. ,,
A kid is a young goat.
Do you see what a long beard the
old goat has ?
She has long horns too.
The kids have no
horns and no
beard.
Goats can climb .- ,
steep hills and
rocks.
They can climb
where cows
and sheep can
not go.





76 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

The hoof of the goat does not
slip on the rocks.
The milk of goats is good.
Some folks think it is quite as good
as cow's milk, and drink it in
their tea.
Cheese is made from goat's milk.
Fine gloves are made from the
skins of kids.
Books are bound with the skins of
goats.
LESSON LXI1.
teach teeth
pink mouse
learn sharp
These are white
mice.
They are as large
as brown mice.
They are pure white, and have
large, pink eyes.





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 77

They have sharp teeth; but they
do not bite those who are kind
to them.
They soon learn to know those who
take care of them.
Some boys and girls like them for
pets.
Theycanbemade ,
quite tame.
A boy can soon : il
teach a white
mouse to eat
out of his hand,
run -up on his
arm, and sit on -
his head.

LESSON LXIII.
earth each fail
fruit seen pray
rise clear 'tis
prize streams Lord





78 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.



= f



K __. __ _,,.








So cool, so clear,
How much we prize!
Look on the earth!
Where grass so green,
And corn, and fruit,
And trees are seen.
How nice the wheat!
Our bread how sweet!





OSGOOD'S AMERICAN FIRST READER. 79











Each day we eat
'Tis still a treat;
Nor does it fail,
As day by day
For it we pray.
So from our hearts
Ought we to say,
"I thank thee, Lord of all."
LESSONS LXIT.
brick sand haul
stone fill creek
load walks lime





80 PROGRESSIVE SERIES.

This man has a
horse and cart.
He sits on the 3 i
cart, anddrives
his horse.
The horse is
strong, andcan I
draw the cart
and the man.
There is no load on the cart now.
The man will go to the creek to
get a load of sand.
He will fill his cart with sand; and
his horse will haul it home.
When there is a large load on the
cart, the man does not ride.
He walks by the side of his horse,
and now and then lets him stop
to rest.
The man can haul stone, lime, brick,
and wood with his horse.
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