• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Jack Forest
 The little girl over the way
 The watch king
 Mamma's little fritz
 Did dollie vote?
 A window-gardening flower show
 The cat's dinner-time
 Little One-ear
 A German schoolboy and his...
 A bad habit
 The dolls may-day party
 Little Winona
 Patter-foot
 How the fort was taken
 Jacks work in maple sugar time
 The dog's plaint
 The little Colorado shepherd
 Back Cover






Title: Jack Frost and other stories for little folks
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055874/00001
 Material Information
Title: Jack Frost and other stories for little folks
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Humphrey, Frances A ( Editor )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1888
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1888   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1888   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1888
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: edited by Mrs. F.A. Humphrey.
General Note: Contains verse and prose.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055874
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223945
notis - ALG4201
oclc - 70260325

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Jack Forest
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The little girl over the way
        Page 5
    The watch king
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Mamma's little fritz
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Did dollie vote?
        Page 12
    A window-gardening flower show
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The cat's dinner-time
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Little One-ear
        Page 17
        Page 18
    A German schoolboy and his master
        Page 19
        Page 20
    A bad habit
        Page 21
        Page 22
    The dolls may-day party
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Little Winona
        Page 26
    Patter-foot
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    How the fort was taken
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Jacks work in maple sugar time
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The dog's plaint
        Page 36
        Page 37
    The little Colorado shepherd
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text




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JACK FROST AND OTHER STORIES




FOR LITTLE FOLKS



EDITED BY
MRS A HUMPHREY










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WASHINGTON STREET OPPOSITE BROMFIELD



























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JACK FROST.



JACK FROST.

SACK FROST is a rough old fellow,
But perhaps a good friend too;
He'll nip your nose, and bite your lh,1ekl.
S And pinch your fingers blue.
But I often say to Willie,
S And I'll say the same to you,
There is one good thing, there are two
S-'.good things,
V There are three good things he'll do:
S'. First he'll crack open the chestnut burrs
, ^-,'' ,And set the brown nuts free;
And next he'll make you a skating rink,
The finest you'd wish to see;
And then he'll prepare a coasting hill
Will make you shout for joy:
"Welcome, Jack Frost, the rough old friend
Of every girl and boy!"




A round little man with eyes of blue,
White hair from which the icicles grew,
And a red, red nose like a cherry!
"'Who are you?" I wonderingly said,
And the icicles clinked as he nodded his' Itad
"I am Master Feb Ru Ary."


































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DOLLY'S REVENGE.
DOLY REVENGE.








THE LITTLE GIRL OVER THE WAY.



THE LITTLE GIRL OVER THE WAY.

.I Whenever I'm tired of
'., reading,
1Or lonely in my
"'I play,
SI come to the window
V: 'I here and watch
j,', : The little girl over
M "- 1 f .... .. .the way.
.b. has cheeks as pink
as roses,
S; / And the loveliest
ejj. curly hair,
i .And I think that she
likes to look at me,
.- -" For she', almost always
there.



And trimmed with
ribbons and lace,
I'm sure she must be proud of it,
For she turns around in her place,
Around and around, till Im dizzy,
And wish she would stop a while
And I tap on the window-pane to her,
And beckon and nod and smile.








THE WA 'TH KING.

But she will not look nor listen
Nor stand for a moment still,
And though I watch her the li-. .l_'n; day,
I'm afraid she never will.
For some. day some one will buy her,
And carry her quite away -
She is only a doll in a great glass case,
The little girl over the way.





THE WATCH KING.

"Tick-tack, tick-tack! Hear the wheels of the Watch King!
Who is the Watch King? Mary, don't you know? Why, Fanny,
have you never seen the Watch World said aunt Rachel.
.Here it is. Let us lift the covering and take a peep. We
cannot see the kil-.. because he is in his palace. But here is
the palace. It is a round, golden house with a funny little
square silvery tower. People call it the Mainspring House, but
that is a mistake. It is really the palace of the Watch King.
The king is not like you or me, but he isvery log and very
slender. Once in his palace he must curl his legs round and
round; for he cannot stretch out at full length in his beautiful
room.
The king is very restless. Every day le stretches himself, lit-
tle by little, just as far as he can. And every time the king
1- lves hie touches a slave who stands by him and the slave says
to the one nexi. i order, The king moves.' And every time'








THE WA TI'CH KIVNi .

the slave says, The king moves,' the people of the Watch World
know that they dare not stand still, but each one turns a wheel
and tries to give the king room and ease.
"Every day there came to the
.-.'P "palace of the Watch King a beauti-
1 iful girl. She was slender and grace-
ful. She wore a golden dress. Her
S eyes were so bright and sparkling that
S people called her Diamond Eyes.' But
.. though her eyes were bright, and though
she was beautiful, yet her temper was
not lovable. She was not always so
sunshiny as she seemed.
SShe came daily to the king's pal-
t ace to wait upon him. She sang to
S him; she curled him up and made
S. him comfortable. The king loved her
AUNT RACHEL. very much. Said he, If I could only
have Diamond Eyes with me always how happy I should be!
My palace would no longer be dark. N,- would make it light
with her sparkling eyes. Next time she comes I will ask her to
stay with me always, for I. love her.'
"The morning came and with it Diamond Eyes. She iripp.-d
along gayly singing: She ran up to the tower and began to put
the palace in order. The king called her.
"DDiamond Eyes,' he said, 'I love you. I cannot live without
you. Will you stay with me always and be my queen? The
whole of this -..1.1.-i world shall be yours if you will.'
"But Diamond Eyes tossed her head and said scornfully, 'No.
I. will not be your queen. Do you think I should be content to









THE WA TCIH KING.

live in this little palace? No, your whole world is not large
enough for me. I lead a happy life. I swing on a golden
chain, I dance all day in the light. 0, I would not miss all
this just to be 'queen of the watch,' and she danced away.
"These cruel words no sooner dropped from her lips than a
hush fell on the country of the king. Not a wheel turned; not
a slave moved. The king's heart was broken. He was dead!
"And now there was to be a new king in the palace. Such
a cleaning as there was! All the slaves were freshened up; their
clothes shone, and their eyes sparkled, and the palace was as
bright as polished gold can be. The new king came. He went
into his palace. A loud cheer arose Vive le roi! (Long live
the king!) Then the king stretched himself, gave an order
to the slave, and the
wheels moved as briskly .
as before."
"There, Fanny! there, .:
Mary Be careful. It
is not safe to swing my \i, ." .
watch so," said aunt
Rachel to the two lit- ,
tle girls. "Be careful! :
said the warning voice -
again. But it was too
late. The watch struck ..:.
the table and flew into a FANNY AND MARY.
thousand pieces. The slaves rolled here, the wheels rolled there.
The palace was on the floor. The king sprang upon the table
and lay stretched out at full length. The day of the Watch
World was done.






























































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AL 1MAJIA'S LITTLE FRITZ.




SMAMMIA'S LITTLE FRITZ.

Do all little `boys like to stay in bed in the morning and
.frolic among the sheets and pillows ? Fritz does.
He makes a tent with the upper sheet and then peeps out and
bombards mamma, who is brushing her hair by the dressing table.
Sometimes he hits her so hard her brush flies right out of her
hand! Ti.-u F,'itz rolls over and laughs and down tumbles the
tent.
But when mamma says, "Come, now, Fritz, my .1.nlin ', -now
for bath and breakfast," Fiitz does not like that at all. Strange
"r.;-. as it may seem, he does not like
his bath, and as for having his hair
combed deardear ea how it does


'" *. It pulls aw-aw-ful !" says Fritz,
S. every morning of his little life. But
.- .' all the same, hard-hearted mamma
I.: I!I SCOW IN A vA.: FAINcE s: keeps right on dressing him. And he
is so cross by breakfast time that he can only sit and scowl
at the pretty faience set aunt .Phyllis gave himi on his birth-
day. Twice his cross fit Ihas lasted so long he has gone off to
school wti.hout any brieaZlf.st at all!
The first time maun, a ga ve him a lunch to take. But the
second tme well. the second time, mamma thought, perhaps, it
would be just as well to teach her little Fritz a lesson. So he
had iintl I'r!;. to eat till dinner time, and wasn't he hungry!
I wonder if he will ever be so cross again.























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DID DOLLIE VOTE?



DID DOLLIE VOTE?

S-- ANETTE is my own little girl. In
i' \ the spring of 1883, I was in the
Gallery of the* House of Represen-
fi '. \ tatives, at Washington, and this is
I. what I saw.
k..7 i' In one of the revolving chairs,
right in among the honorable mem-
~~'b 'ers, sat Nanette. She was then
; six years old, and was a rosy-
S~ cheeked, brown-eyed little woman.
She wore a red Mother Hubbard
gown, and a large white poke, with
/ / cunning little humming-birds perched
Among the ribbons. In her arms she
hugged her doll.
/ She was with an old gentleman,
her grandpapa, one of the mem-
bers. Several members who were
around his desk spoke to her. Presently a pleasant-faced gentle-
man, with curly brown hair, took dollie, and asked the little
mamma some questions about her.
Just then Mr. Speaker shouted, "Those in favor of the bill
stand until counted." Up got our pleasant-faced gentleman, with
dollie in his hand, and was counted. And what I have always
wondered is, did they count dollie as in favor of the bill?







A WINlDOW-GARDENING FiLOWER SHOW.




A WINDOW-GARDENING FLOWER SHOW.

"'. .) to Dean's Yard, Westminster, on a certain
1., -,_- day in mid-July, and you will see a pretty
sight. You will see a crowd, largely boys
Al~ ,@and girls, each carrying a flower-pot with
its plant. They are taking them to the
S' -. yearly exhibit of The societyy obr Proi,,,il,,i,
Window-Gir,d ,',,;I, amony the Poor of West-
S,;iter. That is a long name, but it tells exactly
what the society is for. It is to encourage poor
people who have to live in small tenements, and who have few
pretty things, to grow plants in their windows. For what makes
a room look prettier than a blossoming plant in the window ?
Now you will want to know where Dean's Yard is. It is
close'to the beautiful old Vestminster Abbey in London.
The plants are exhibited in tents. These tents are put up in
Dean's Yard. Prizes' are given' to those who have the finest
plants. There are usually about twelve hundred plants, and the
prizes are from two to ten shillings. An English shilling is
twenty-five cents of our money.
The public pays to go into the Show, but the exhibitors go in
free. Cut roses and other flowers are sent in to decorate the
tents. After the Show is over, these are sent to cheer the sick
people in Westminster Hospital.
Lady Augusta Stanley, the wife of Dean Stanley, took a great
interest in this Annual Flower Show. M iiii..i of the royal
family often visit it.






































































WINDOW-GARDENING FLOWER SHOW, DEAN'S YARD, WESTMINSTER.- TAKING IN THE FLOWERS,
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THE CAT'S DINNER-TIME.



THE CAT'S DINNER-TIME.

OTH at once to leave her play
Under the pear-tree, Bessie stands:
f,-, Mamma, why do you always say
'Come to dinner, and wash your hands?'
o ,, There's my kitty--you said to-day
You only wished I were half as neat-
:1 She don't bother herself to stay
A .nd wash her hands when she wants
to eat.

..'- '"- After dinner I've seen her sit
And wash herself for an hour or more,
- And smooth her kitten, and tidy it-
S li-,' ii'vr does it at all before."
Mamma laughed. "There was once a time,
Ages and ages long ago,
When mice could reason, and birds make rhyme,
And cats could talk -or they tell us so.

"Then all cathood (or so 'tis writ,
I read it once in a book of mine),
Grown-up tabby and little kit,
Washed their hands when they went to dine.
Once, a cat of an ancient house,
Mindful always of social laws,
Caught a frightened and trembling mouse,
And as she held him with teeth and claws,






THE CAT' S DINNER- TIME

"' 0,' said he, you're forgetting quite
What even a poor mouse understands -
It isn't tidy, nor yet polite
To eat before you have washed your hands!'
So a moment the cat put by
Her longed-for dinner, to wash herself,
And whisk he found, without one good-by,
The mouse-hole under the pantry shelf!















Hereafter, whether in field or town,




I never will wash my hands and face,
Until my dinner is safely down!'
And ever since, it is said, my sweet,
All the kittens beneath the sun,
Rush unwashed when they're called to eat,
And make their toilet when dinner's done!"










LITTLE ONE-EAR.



LITTLE ONE-EAR.

One early ii ;'ii morning, when
I was a little girl, papa found
two lambs lying with their
mother beside a snowdrift in
the pasture. He took the lambs
in his arms, and brought them
to the barn, the mother-sheep
/x following. There he laid them
j .' on some hay on the barn floor
.I ,to get warm. The horse reached
over from his stall to eat some
of the hay, and by accident bit
THE BOY W) HO ORGOT.
off an ear of one of the lambs !
The lamb looked so very queer with only one ear, that his
mother did not know him. She could not believe he was her baby.
She petted and kissed the other one, and gave him his dinner,
but she would not let little One-Ear come near her.
So papa brought him into the house, and we fed hin" and took
care of him. When the warm days came, little One-Ear and I
used to play together like kittens. We would both run to the
top of a small hill and jump off, and the funny little lamb al-
ways tried to jump farther than I did.
Papa gave him a grassy yard all to himself, because the other
sheep treated him badly. They did not like him because he had
only one ear but I lo\ed him all the better for his misfortune.
When the hot summer days came, we went away and staid three


























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A GERMAN SCHOOLBOY AND HIS MASTER.

days. We left a boy to take care of the animals, and I l.r.ged
him to give little One-Ear milk, night and morning, and water at
noon.
When we came back, I ran directly to his yard, but he did not
come to meet me as he had always done before. I called my lit-
tle pet by name, and papa and mamma came to look. At last we
saw something white in the grass in the corner of the yard, and
there lay my little lamb, fast asleep, I thought.
But papa said the boy had forgotten to give him milk or water,
and he never would wake up again, nor be thirsty any more. I
will not tell you how many tears I shed over my lost playfellow,
but it was a sad lesson that I have never forgotten.
Since that time I have never trusted my pets to a careless boy
or girl.



A GERMAN SCHOOLBOY AND HIS MASTER.

Schoolboys are very much alike all over the world. They like
fun, they like mischief, they like to tease, they are always getting
into scrapes.
So this German schoolboy, this Fritz, or whatever his name may
be, is in trouble. He has been teasing another boy, a boy smaller
than himself, too, and that is mean. He has been teasing Alex,
and made him tumble down and break his pitcher. Alex very
likely was fetching water fo-- his mother. Christine saw it all and
she is telling the master. What will the master do with Fritz ?
I do not know.
If Fritz confesses that he has done w l,,. and promises to do
better, he may not be punished. Do you think he will?












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A BAD HAB[T.



A BAD HABIT.

OLLY sniffs!
And she snuffs!
Dainty kerchief at her belt
SSoftest linen ever felt-
Still she sniffs!

"- Why is Polly acting so,
Bred above each action low?
Little lady, hath a cold
Caught thee in its cruel hold?

More she sniffs!
More she snuffs -
Ah, the case is solved at last:
'Tis a habit holds her fast
When she sniffs--snuffs!



Sing a song of Springtime -
Dainty sylvan flowers,
Blue-birds in the oak-tree
Foretell Summer hours.
Swallows, robins, thrushes,
Singing loud and gay -
Who could ask for sweeter sounds
Than these on a Spring day?


















































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THE DOLLS' MAYIDAY PARTY.



THE DOLLS' MAY-DAY PARTY.

S Ma'am'selle de la Chine was from Paris direct,
S A dolly of fashion and wealth;
Her eyes were of blue, her hair of spun gold,
i; And her face was the picture of health.
Si' The pride and the joy of her mamma, Miss Nell,
Who, full of sweet motherly cares,
MA'AM'SELLE. Decided a grand May-day party to give,
Just to show off Ma'am'selle's foreign airs.
So the cards were sent out explaining, of course,
What kind of a party wouldd be,
As each little maid was expected to bring
Her favorite dolly to tea.
A board, well-covered, was spread for the guests,
,, f And furnished with excellent taste; CoRINNE
S Knives, napkins and forks, cups, saucers and plates,
I. And chairs for the dollies were placed.
.'t.. ;The first to arrive was Miss Dora Fairchild,
"" With Raggy, a droll-looking doll,
S. Whose queer little head had a seam in the back,
And her legs well, she had none at all '
,UE GRENAWAYS. Ma'am'selle was too wise to be else than polite,
Though her nerves now received quite a shock; .
For the family of Rags-the Cottons-was good,
And came from the best Southern stock.
So she gave Rag a place by the side of Corinne,
A dolly of pride and of paint,FO.









THE DOLLS' MAY-DAY PARTY

Who was so put out by her nearness to Rag,
She thought she should certainly faint.
Next the Greenaways came, Matilda and Kate,
With Flora and sweet Daisy Miller,
And a rollicking doll, who danced and who sung
Till the soldier-doll threatened to kill her.
DAISY MI..,. Just as supper was served, Gutta Percha came in,
The ward of a Mr. Goodyear;
Without any right one rude dolly declared
Among the elite to appear.
And the gay Muscadin put his glass to his eye
(He had come with Ma'am'selle straight from Paris),
' Ah ha let me look! I have heard of that kind,
How queer and how scanty her hair is!"
Ma'am'selle gave a toss of her beautiful head, THE ROLLICKING DOL..
Corinne with a sneer whispered, Trash!"
And all the dolls tittered but Rag, who was grieved,
When down went the board with a crash!
Then a rush and a scramble among the mammas,
Their suffering pets to secure -
And some who got never a scratch in the fall,
Were maimed in the rescue, I'm sure.
SOLDIER DOL.. Sweet Rag was unhurt, lying under Corinne
Whose face was all battered and blue.
While many were killed or disfigured for life,
Gutta Percha was handsome as new.
But alas for Ma'am'selle, the fair queen of the feast!
In peace may her fragments repose!
Her mamma would never have known her again THE XUSCApIN.
Were it not for her jewels and clothes.





















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LITTLE WINONA.




LITTLE WINONA.

I wonder what a free-
Sborn American baby would
Essay to be so carefully
packed as the baby in our
picture ?
She looks happy and
warm, but how does she
ever toss her tiny arms,
or kick her small feet about,
or jump or spring as a baby
should, tied up in that
fashion ?
S Many nations pack their
-=
babies in that way. The
WINONA AND IHlER MOTHER. Italian mother wraps hers
round and round till it looks. more like a little mummy than a live
baby. Only its bright glancing eyes tell that it is alive.
When this baby, little Winona, goes a-riding, she is strapped
to her mamma's back. That is the way the Japanese mother
carries her baby, too, wrapped in the folds of her scarf.
When Winona grows older she will not be packed in this way.
She will trot about on her little feet as she pleases. The little
Chinese girl has her feet bound tightly in wraps to keep them
from growing. But little Winona will run about with her brown
little feet over the green grass, in the warm, soft sand, and will
paddle about in the running brooks, to her heart's content.





PA TTER-FOO T.



PATTER-FOOT.- PART I.

; L the chickens are gone," sang out Charlie Allen,
rushing into the dining-room like a young whirl-
wind.
"Every single chick, but one little white one,"
said his sister Nellie close behind him.
SO, that is too bad The cats have caught
them. We may as well let the cats have the
one that is left, now. I don't want the hen
round all summer with one chicken," said the mother.
0, mother, let us have the chicken, Nellie and I. We'll take
care of it ourselves," said Charlie. We want it for spending
money."
"A chicken for spending money!" said mamma.
"Why, yes, it will be a hen by and by and lay eggs, and
we'll sell the eggs and have the money. Say, mother, can we
have the little chick for our own, if we will take all the care
of it?"
"Oh, you may have it if you'll take care of it; only remem-
ber, you must take all the care of it yourselves."
The little white chicken was caught and carried to a room over
the stable. A basket was hunted up and filled with hay, and a
piece of old blanket put over the chick at night so it would
sleep warm and think it was under its mother's wing. The sun-
shine streamed in through a large window, and there was no
place for cats to creep in after chicken-pie. Feeding the chicken
was the first thing in the morning and the last thing at night






PATTER-FOOT.

that the children did. They picked handfuls of tender grass, and
dug up little worms for it, and carried earth for it to pick over,
so it "would learn to scratch for a living, itself," Charlie said.
It was wonderful how that chicken grew! or rather it would
have been more wonderful if it hadn't grown fast under such care,
and it was well it was out of reach of puss's claws.

For a little white chicken so plump and so fat,
Would have tempted the palate of the best-natured cat;
A morsel so dainty, so toothsome and sweet,
From the end of its toes to the tip of its beak.

"How many eggs do you suppose a hen would lay in a year,
mother? said Charlie.
A good hen would lay a hundred perhaps."
"A hundred! Nellie, mother says a good hen will lay a hun-
dred eggs, and of course ours will be a good hen, when we have
taken such good care of her. And that will be, let's see, twelve
in one hundred, eight times and four over. We shall have eight
dozen. And we shall get as much as twenty-five cents a dozen,
just two dollars. And that is more than enough for what we
want the money for. Won't it be splendid?"
"Don't be too sure," cautioned the mother. "Don't count your
chickens before they're hatched."
0 we aren't; we're counting the i .--." said Charlie.
In a few weeks the chicken was large enough to defy the cats,
and then they let it run round wherever it chose to. They named
it Patter-foot, for whenever she heard Nellie or Charlie coming,
she would run towards them her feet going patter, patter, patter,
on the stable floor, and she would follow them round like a little
kitten.






PATTTER-FOOT.




PATTER-FOOT.

/ OWN by the sea lived grandpapa, and in July
-. the children were invited to make him a visit
: of three weeks. They were promised that Pat-
'.T.IT ter-foot should not be neglected, and one bright
S ',.. \ ..morning they left on the boat for their visit.
They were gone a whole month, a week longer
_.--..-:- than they expected. When they returned home
"' it was evening, and almost the first thing they
inquired after was Patter-foot. Their mother smiled when she
told them Patter-foot was all right, and had grown wonderfully,
they would think.
The next morning, Charlie and Nellie were up early, and ran
out to find Patter-foot. As they were going through the stable,
they heard a funny little crow. "0 hear that funny little crow,
Nellie!" said Charlie, and then, just as they reached the door
that led .into the garden, who should they see but Patter-foot
perched on a box, who stretched up a long neck, and greeted them
with Cock-a-doo-dle-doo !
"Oh! oh!" said both children in a breath. "Why, Patter-foot
is just nothing but an old crowing rooster! "
"I think it's just mean," said Charlie, "and after we have
taken such nice care of her all summer, and now we can't have
our magazine."
"I think it's too bad, too," said Nellie.
"I told you I thought you were counting your eggs too soon,"
said a voice, and turning, they found their father and mother































ry ,




















? _..~PUIB : _,:. .'
ir

INI















AT NIECES.







PAT TER-FOOT.

standing near them, both smiling, and looking sorry for them too.
"But we wanted the money so! We were going to take a
boys' and girls' magazine, and then we would have something
coming that we earned ourselves; it is too bad," and Charlie
choked back a sob.
"I will tell you what I will do for you," said his father,
"Cyou have done so well taking care of Patter-foot. If you and
Nellie will promise to take faithful
care of the hens for six months, feed
them twice a day, and count them at
Night, I will take the magazine for you
as payment; and as Patter-foot will make
a nice chicken-pie for us, I will promise
to give you next spring, six chickens
in exchange, if you will promise to take
care of them; and you shall have all
they bring either in eggs or to sell them."
0 yes! we'll take just splendid care
of 'em," was the happy reply.
And now, a little boy and girl are
doing some wonderful sums in multipli-
cation and division like this:
If one good hen lays one hundred ,yi.s in a year, and you
get tie'rulljfil,. cents a dozen, how many will six good hens lay,
and how much money will that be, without any regard to the
i,,,.. dle-doos.
For all this I have told you about happened last year, and
they have now a nice brood of eleven chicks, of whom six are
sure to be layers of eggs.








HOW TJIE FORT WAB TAKEN.




HOW THE FORT WAS TAKEN.


One day Lindley's father built a fort for him. He levelled
some ground, cut a ditch around it, and used the earth taken
from the ditch to build a wall for the fort. The wall was









--.7"



7--








THI WHOLE ARMY.




poured in. Re-i forts have ditches around them to prevent the
enemy from getting too near.
When Lindley's fort was done he raised an American flag over
it, and put black sicks all around the walls for cannon. He had







HOW THE FORT WAS TAKEN.

one real cannon there too, about as long as a man's thumb, and
his father loaded it and let him fire it once or twice. There was
room for him to stand inside of the fort, and he used to play
that an army was coming to attack him. The army was made
of clothespins planted in the ground at a little distance. He threw
stones at these wooden soldiers and wounded them.
One morning he ran to his father with a long face and said,
"My fort is gone. The soldiers must have climbed in while I
was asleep, for it's all knocked down." His father went out to
see, and -sure enough! -the walls were crumbled, the ditch was
half-filled with earth, and the wooden guns and flag-staff were
broken. The clothespin soldiers did it," said Lindley again. But
his father pointed to some deep marks in the ground, and said,
"There are the footprints of the enemy who took your fort last
night. Soldiers in charge of forts must keep their eyes open or
the enemy will come when they are least expected. I am afraid
your sentries fell asleep."
Just then they heard a loud moo-o-o!" in a field near them.
It was Old Brindle, the cow. Lindley said, O, papa, I wonder
if Old Brindle isn't the enemy that knocked my fort down." Yes,
Old Brindle and her calf was the whole army.










A IiNITTING LESSON.








JACK'S IVORK IN IMAP'LE 'SUG-A1 TIME.



JACK'S WORK IN MAPLE SUGAR TIME.

In the spring, as
soon as the sap begins
to run, Farmer Chap-
man taps his sugar
maple trees. He bores
a hole in the strong-
est trees with a large
auger,, and sticks a
wooden tunnel or drain
into it. Under this he
puts a bucket for the
sap to run into. The
men have to watch
these buckets so as not
to let them run over.
Two or three pailsful
of sap will sometimes
flow from a large,
JACK WHITTLES WHILE ,HE WATCHESS THE FIBRE. healthy tree, and in a
short time too. Sometimes a largo tree is tapped in two places.
When enough sap is collected, it is put in large kettles and
boiled over fires in the sugar-house. Then Jack's work comes in.
It is inot dull work, for Jack has a big jackknife, and he whittles
and carves out things in wood, when he is watching the fires.
Then when the syrup thickens, he cools some in the snow to
eat. 0 no! Jack's work is not hard. He calls it "fun."
















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THE DOG'S PLAINT.



THE DOG'S PLAINT.

How I despise that carriage
With its flowered parasol!
Nobody knows what I've endured
Since Mollie broke her doll.
No matter where I try to hide,
Nor when I run away,
I have to take that dreadful ride
At least three times a day.
The fringes tickle both my ears,
The wheels run all about,
I have to clutch and hold on tight
To keep from tumbling out.
But worse than all, although I whine,
And ears and tail droop down,
She makes me wear a blue silk dress,
Her doll's old I;i,,,i,- gownj




.. Sing a song of summer song of bird-
. ies gay;
S--. Nesting in the treetops, who so glad
:... as they!

Sing a song of dainty eggs, baby birdies dear.
Listen to their prattling -listen! Do you hear?















































































THAT DREADFUL RIDE.
THAT )i{Ei)FLIIE







THE LITTLE COLORADO SllEPtHER1D.



THE LITTLE COLORADO SHEPHERD.

Freddy Welsh went with his father to the sheep ranch, twenty
miles from home. Here was where the herder stayed and watched
the flock of a thousand sheep, through the long sunny days.
The little cabin was his home at night, close by the corral where
the sheep were folded.
Freddy and his father staid :AL, .
with the herder several weeks -
in the spring, to help take
care of the lambs. The flock
was divided, and Freddy, who I
was only seven years old,
was given the charge of the
lambs and their mothers. .
They were turned out in the O
morning, and slowly made
their way from the corral,
eating the tender grass.
Freddy could watch them
from the cabin until nearly .. I
noon. Then they would be
so far away that he was
sent to turn them, and drive THE LITTLE COLORADO SHEPHERD.
them slowly home toward night. One day he saw a rattlesnake.
"Did you kill it?" I asked. "Or did you run away?"
"Yes, ma'am, I killed it. Of course I did."
"What did you kill it with?" I asked, curious to know.







THE LITTLE COLORADO SHEPHERD.

"A club," said he, "an oak club."
"But where did you find a club?" I asked, for the prairie
was treeless.
"I dug it out of the ground. It was an old picket pin."
"But I don't see how you ever dared to strike the snake,"
I said, as I looked at his little chubby hands. "Most little
boys would have run away as fast as they could. Weren't you
afraid of it?"
Yes, ma'am, some; but I hit it before it got coiled up. It
can't strike until it gets coiled up."
"Didn't your father think you were brave ?"
"He didn't know until I had killed two."
"Then you have killed more than one rattlesnake?"
"Yes, ma'am, I've killed eleven. I have the rattles at home
that I took from the biggest one. It had nine rattles."



There was a crusty sailor
As X as X could'B,
Who at last quite weary grew
Of life upon the C.
He built himself a cottage
Upon the river D,
Where he idly smoked his pipe
And drank his souchong T;
He wink'd his starboard I,
He set his nose askew;
And said, if U asked Y-
"Pray, what is it to U?"





























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