• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Preface
 Frontispiece
 Table of Contents
 The norman king
 The fairies and the cruel...
 The alphabet in council
 The funny Mandarin
 The wheel-barrow ride
 The fairies' gift
 The mendicant
 A chinese adventure
 The calm-minded men
 The Sultan of the East
 Grim Griffin
 A pet in the house
 A Christmas pudding
 The king and the clown
 The maiden and the knight
 The windfall
 The guileful papoose
 The fairies on horseback
 Bugaboo Bill, the giant
 King Cauliflower
 Entertaining the caller
 Back Cover






Title: Queer people such as goblins, giants, merry-men and monarchs, and their kweer kapers
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055869/00001
 Material Information
Title: Queer people such as goblins, giants, merry-men and monarchs, and their kweer kapers
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Cox, Palmer, 1840-1924
Cox, Palmer, 1840-1924 ( Illustrator )
Edgewood Publishing Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Edgewood Publishing Co.
Place of Publication: S.l.
Publication Date: c1888
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Kings and rulers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Giants -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Goblins -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1888   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1888   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1888   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1888
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Palmer Cox ; illustrated.
General Note: Title page printed in red and black ink.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055869
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223337
notis - ALG3586
oclc - 20712927

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Preface
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Frontispiece
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The norman king
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The fairies and the cruel farmer
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    The alphabet in council
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The funny Mandarin
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    The wheel-barrow ride
        Page 39
        Page 40
    The fairies' gift
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    The mendicant
        Page 45
        Page 46
    A chinese adventure
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The calm-minded men
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The Sultan of the East
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Grim Griffin
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    A pet in the house
        Page 72
        Page 73
    A Christmas pudding
        Page 74
        Page 75
    The king and the clown
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    The maiden and the knight
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    The windfall
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    The guileful papoose
        Page 93
        Page 94
    The fairies on horseback
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Bugaboo Bill, the giant
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    King Cauliflower
        Page 109
        Page 110
    Entertaining the caller
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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KNOW ALL VEN

BY THESE PRESENTS,


THAT .
H AT.......................................................................




IS THE OWNER OF THIS BOOK,


A N D ....................................................................................



Is THE PRESENTER.








QUEER PEOPLE

SUCH AS

GOBLINS, GIANTS, MERRY-MEN
AND MONARCHS,

AND THEIR


KWEER KAPERS.


ILLUSTRATED.



BY PALMER COX.
Author of THE BROWNIES, their Book,


EDGO-WOO:D :P-"E3LISE-II:NG- CO-











































COPYRIGHT BY HUBBARD BROTHERS, 1888






















PREFATORY NOTE.

A FEW of the pieces with the ac-
companying illustrations, that were
so remarkably popular when they
appeared under copyright protec-
tion in Harper's Young People,"
"St. Nicholas" and "Little Folks,"
have, by the courtesy of the Pub-
lishers of those charming juvenile
magazines, been incorporated here
in permanent form.
HUBBARD BROS.



















































P. ,, LuAr/C














PALM COX


























CONTENTS.








it T THIE NORMAN KING.













FAIRIES AND CRUBI,
FARMER.













ALPHABET IN COUNCIL.




















IiU'NNY MANDARIN.



















WHEELBARROW RIDE.



















F. .LRI E' GIFT.
















-H7. MENDICANT


THE MENDICANT. .


















.1

CHINESE ADVENTURE. .



















S CALIM-MINDE.E MEN.



















SLiLr. N OF THE 4 ST.


















---GRIM GRIFFIN, THE
GIANT.
-- --" :




















PET IN THE HOUSE.

















CHRISTMAS PUDDING.


















KING AND CLOWN.

















MAIDEN AND KNIGHT.






















THE WINDFALL.




















GUIITEFUL PAPOOSE.



















FAIRIES ON HORSE-
BACK.




















BUGABOO BILL.
























KING CAULILOVWER.






















ENTERTAINING THE
CALLER.





























U
































































V











STHE NORMAN KING.
ROM a foreign war returning
Rode the stalwart Norman king,
With the captives and the plunder
Such incursions used to bring.

Oft' the king surveyed the pageant
Winding through the deep defiles,
Banners streaming, weapons gleaming,
Front and rear for many miles.

"What," thought he, "though half my soldiers
Are behind, in trenches laid;
Well the treasure, slaves and glory,
Have the country's loss repaid."


.1. ,,. ,.i._ .






And, at home, his subjects found,
That the country better prospered
While no monarch was around.

So the warring Norman ruler,
When he reached his home at last,








Heard no joyful demonstrations
From the people, as he passed.

"Where's my welcome?'" cried the monarch,
,-.7-' -',- "Where the shouts and wreaths of bay?
S.i Where's the music? Where the arches,
'1 That should bend above my way.?

"Have I fought, and have I battered
Gates and Pagan temples down,
To return again, unnoticed,
Like a market-man to town?




A: "





"Tell me, Bishop, in my absence,
What has changed the people's tone?
Are my subjects dead or sleeping,
That no welcome here is shown?"
"Royal master," said the Bishop,
"With you went the fighting kind,
Those destructive, non-producers,
Who in peace no pleasure find.
"Those that. rather raze a castle,
Plunder towns and. bridges burn,












/ 4 \, '"' ,._ .... :I
',,





3,_ ..'4.. -1) i.*

M I









'C"Y V -
L "..........,
,.~i ., -.-,T..i.- .. -.< ,.








Than with stubborn plows to wrestle,
And the lengthening furrow turn.

"These, who labored while you wandered,
Are inclined to peaceful arts;
Prizing, rather, home attractions,
Than renown in distant parts.

Would it were your royal pleasure,
Now in peace to live and reign;
Taking pride in herds of cattle,
Fruited trees and fields of grain.
I.^ '. I
'- If some must have spears and arrows,
'. Let it be your sovereign wish,
;-,.- That, instead of spearing neighbors,
'.'. "They resort to spearing fish.


them shoot the wolves
and vultures, :- ..
.. That are preying on our flocks;
S And the prancing charger harness,'
To assist the patient ox."

" What!" exclaimed the king in anger,
"Turn my soldiers into swains ?
And, instead of sacking cities,
Guide the plow on stony plains?

"Spend our days in peaceful labor,
Coaxing vines to climb a string ?












I'i fi

f~I!G -' ,.._-'-_

;i;


IF ,'-. L






_., ,...
-~ 'L i






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=. . '-... ..
001--



il'- ....: .. ---=.Z ,-- -
-- -- ? ..










I. . ,J I LI" : .








Reaping rye or weeding onions,
Ill becomes a Norman king!"
"Too much warfare," said the Bishop,
Has retarded useful toil;
While destroying Pagan temples,
You've neglected Norman soil.
Teach your soldiers arts of tillage,
Let the flags of war be furled;
Better rule a peaceful nation
Than to ruin half the world."
No.t \ h r in', s ,o swne
_., 1 :


I 4;; i .




'"By my swo -ds ke and trusy,-
"Let the females," said the monarch,

M en were m ade for breaking lances, '( "- (\--' ,',---
Not for herding sheep or swine. -, -A',,





"By my sword, so keen and trusty, >-.. 1--*
Bry the battle-ax and trim the vinee l ..


By my shield and helmet rusty,
From the dews of foreign field;
"By the golden crown I wrested m n -'"
From a brother's hand, in gore;
/X









Such a rogue, with robes invested,
Never crossed my path before!
"Mercy shall not III here be wasted,
In preserving such a knave;
If, upon his knees, .Ii he begged it,
With his nose ll upon the pave.

"Seize him, sol- l ; iLI diers, on the instant,
Drag him to a I dungeon dark;
Let my archers, ' on the morrow,
Use the rebel 4 for a mark!"











But the monarch's mind was troubled,
Though his voice was bold and loud;
Like a sword the truth had pierced him,
There among the listening crowd.

All night long he tossed and tumbled,
Sleepless, on the royal bed,
For the Bishop's words kept running
Ever through the monarch's head.

Better rule a peaceful nation
Than to ruin, rob and kill :









"Though his voice," he cried, "be silenced,
All his sayings haunt me still!
"Words by fellow-creature spoken,
Never moved me so before;
And, though pleasure I have gathered,
From the battle's din and roar
"Every soldier and retainer,
Shall lay sword and spear aside;
And in peace to rule the nation,
i., Shall in future be my pride
~I -.__-= ---__ iirllj
I' So, the morning brought the Bishcp,
,- From the cell to light of day;
,ill -" And the soldiers, all astounded,
-l I. Heard the solemn sovereign say:
,i, '',, .'. ,... "Bishop, go your way in safety,
ll.lIIL ,',Free from fetter, chain or lock;
-"' _' Tame the savage, save the sinner,
Gather daily to your flock.
."I will let the fierce Egyptians,
Slumber in their tents secure;
._ -- --- Never more molest the Persian,
Or surprise the swarthy Moor.
"All the liberal arts shall flourish,
Every wicked custom die;
None shall labor, unrewarded,
Or in cruel bondage lie."
"Turn your thoughts to ploughing acres,
Ye who have been ploughing breasts;
Train your hands to chopping forests,
Ye who traveled, cleaving crests.









"Names of fighters, thieves, or wreckers,
Shall no more with glory sound;
But the prizes shall be showered,
Where the greatest thrift is found.
"He shall henceforth be most honored,
Who the largest field has mowed;
And whose fruit trees, vines and bushes,
Bend beneath the greatest load."
Soon a wondrous change was noted,
All throughout the Norman land;
There the Monarch and the Bishop,
For the people's welfare planned.

In the field the soldiers labored,
With a sweet contentment blessed;
While in peace, as once in warfare, ir,
Oft' the Monarch led the rest. '."
While the sound of drum or trumpet,
All the pageant and the roar
Of a martial demonstration,
Stirred them not, as heretofore.
Weapons that,, in many battles,
Paralyzed the Pagan foe, "
Now, on poles, in corn-fields hanging,
Keep aloof the cawing crow.
And in wealth and population, '' -,
Never did a land increase
Like the Norman King's possessions, .
While he fostered arts of Peace.









THE FAIRIES AND THE CRUEL FARMER.

One night some fairies
sauntered round,
Within a farmer's
pasture ground;
And while on rocks
and hillocks green,
They paused to rest
and view the scone,
They held a sort of
running talk,
About the way he
used his stock.








--Wow


NUN--,~~~ i~Irmn


6,0 Aal1~K









Said one, "I've known this farmer long,
A man of will and passion strong,
Whose heavy hand is quick to fall '' I
On patient brutes, in sty or stall. \,
The sounding blows, when to his cart i.
He yokes the steers, would pain your heart.
He plucks his geese to sell the down,':
And they must wander through the town
With but a feather, here and there,
To shield them from the winter air."

Another said, "But harder still
He treats the sheep on yonder hill;
j -i,, To know his own, if they should stray
.-To other flocks or fields away,
With cruel hand he takes a shears
SAnd haggles notches in their ears.
He pokes his pigs, and clips their tails,
And in the nose sticks rusty nails,
STo make them squeal, whene'er they start
To practice at their special art.

To-night we'll tell these creatures dumb,
How they can tyrants overcome; ,.
We'll speak about the wrongs they bear,
The galling yokes and scars they wear;
Remind them of the power they hold, '
And stir them up to action bold. s-
The coward heart still beats behind ''
The hand that strikes the helpless kind;
And should these creatures make a show -' --- ..---
Of bold resistance to his blow, __









', Through fear, he may
be glad to sell
STo neighbors that
will use them well;





So each one do the best he can,
To save them from
this cruel man;
Letonego whisperto the mare,













The counsel of a friend to hear;


A hint is all the goat will need; g'
While more the donkey's mind enrich,
ithAnother to the pig repairshun the switch.







-Vith cunning ways to shun the switch."









Now here and there, with one intent,
Around the grounds the Fairies went.
Some stirred the geese from their repose,
To talk about their painful woes,
And spoke of down in pillows pressed,
That still upon their backs should rest.
And some enraged the chafing boar,
Against the ornaments he wore.
"That nose," said they, "was surely made
To turn the sod, like plow or spade;
But nasal rings, designed to stay,
Now bar your pleasure, day by day."
And others whispered round till morn,
"If courage could About the use of heel and horn;
supplant your fear,"
They reasoned with the patient steer,
"You have the tools, and have the might, d
To toss him higher than a kite."
To goats and gentle sheep they said,
"You have the force, and have the head, -'(4 f'f
To bruise the flesh or break the bone;
Then why submit to stick or stone?"
Then when regard to all was paid,
The Fairies sought the forest shade.

When next the surly farmer strode
Among his stock, with whip and goad,
He noticed mischief lurking nigh,
In tossing horn and rolling eye.
In heads that turned where heels should rest,
And heels that turned where heads were best.









The ready goat, with courage large,
Was gauging distance for a charge;
The donkey's heels flew round like flails;
The heifer danced upon the pails.
The ox and horse, in front, combined;
The geese, the sheep, and pigs, behind;
In vain his whip he flourished round,
For still unmov'd theyheld theirground,
Till forming fast a circle wide,
They hemmed him in on every side.
"Some scoundrel in the night," cried he,
Gave liquor to my stock, I see;
Or else, the cider-mill they've drained
Of every drop the tank contained.
What else could make these creatures rise,
And greet me with this wild surprise ?"
He called for aid with lusty yell,
For serving men, and wife as well;
To help him beat the stock, until
He proved him- self a master still.
But one, ere long, found all his art
At jumping high, or dodging smart,
Was scarce enough when billy's mind
To active measures was inclined.

Another found some cause for fear
In shining tusk, that flourished near;
While round the yard, with injured pride,
The boss himself was forced to ride;
And all were soon compelled to beat
To calmer fields, a swift retreat.









Where safer quarters they could find,
And, time to plaster, stitch and bind.
The farmer wiped his dripping brow,
And thus, addressed his partner now:
"Good wife, I long have thought to sell,
And in some thriving city dwell,























Where we no more may have the care
..Of hooking cow, or kicking mare;








Where sheep and pigs are only found
In markets, selling by the pound;
And fowls but seldom meet the eye,
Until upon your plate they lie.
j--







Where we no more- may have the care
Of hooking cow, or kicking mare;
Where sheep and pigs are only found
In markets, selling by the pound;
And fowls but seldom meet the eye,
Until upon your plate they lie.








While you have ever used your voice
FoR SALE wirwour
Against my judgment, or my choice; RE SR EVE. WI
But now no counsel will avail; o
At once I'll advertise a sale, c cattle.
And make a sweep of everything i; HOes
That lifts a hoof or flaps a wing;
The kind with horn, the kind without, P &"
Q OATS.
The kind with bill, the kind with snout; \omestic
The big and little, high or low, ow l
Shall, unreserved, by auction go."

The sale was called upon the ground,
The people came for miles around;
And some bought single, some by lot,
While some bid hard, but nothing got.
''_ ~The sheep went here, the donkey there,
In other walks the goat and mare;
Until the whole concern was sold,
And other hands the stock controlled.

S\ So all were glad enough to find,
A pleasant home, with masters kind
Where cows receiv- ed the kindest care,
And lived upon .--:-- the best of fare;
Where pigs could : 1 oi stand to eat a fill,
Or root the gras- / sy sod at will;
So geese, in pride, > -, their feathers wore,
Until they needed -.-- _them no more;
While such as lab- --' ored on the land,
Were guided by a gentle hand.









THE ALPHABET IN COUNCIL.

NE day, in secret council, met
The letters of the alphabet,
To settle, with a free debate,
This matter of important weight:





I
-i-,--.----








7,














Which members of the useful band
The highest honors should command.
It was a delicate affair,
For all the twenty-six were there,
And every one presumed that he
Was just as worthy as could be;









While &, a sort of go-between, Was seated like a judge serene,
Impartially to hear the case, And keep good order in the place.
Said S, arising from his seat, And smiling in his own conceit,
"Now, comrades, take a glance at me, There's grace in every curve
you see; And beauty
which you'll never
find In letters of the
broken kind. Now
S' there is I, straight
up and down; How
,', \ incomplete is such a
S\ clown! Without a
foot, without a head,
SA graceful curve, or
.b proper spread, And
J and K, and F and
L, Who look as tho
Son ice they fell, Or Z,
our many- angled
ap friend, Who forms,
indeed, a fitting
end. Such homely
letters, at the best, -=_-
Are heaping insult on the rest." At this there was a
S sudden spring To feet, around the coun-
cil ring, And every letter, down to Z,









Said such aspersions
must not be. "No
personalities," cried they,
"Should be indulged in
here, to-day;" While &, good
order to restore, Applied his
a truncheon to the floor. Said A,
i One moment will suffice To show
you all where honor lies; Suppose
there were no head, like me, To lead
the way for brother B, What would be-
come of neighbor C, Or who would
ever think of D ? I might go on un-
A to the end, And say you all on me de-
pend." Then O, arising to his feet,
Said, I, of all, am most complete; No waste material
is there, But just enough, and none to spare; No horns
above, no tails below, An even-balanced, perfect O."
Said E, "Though all may beauty boast, In service I appear
the most; Well- nigh to every word
I'm called, And of- ten more than once
installed ; While some so seldom are
required, From ser- U vice they should
be retired." Then A i f into sundrygroups
they'd break, To ii S f N f argue points, and
fingers shake, Or tell each other, to
heir face, Their plain --opinions of the case.









While & kept
thumping till
he wore
A hole half through
the oaken
floor.

/ At last he cried.
"I plainly see
You'll never in the world agree,
Though you should stand to argue here,
And shake your fists throughout the year.
Now, let me tell you, plump and plain,
From first to last, you're all too vain.

'Tis true that some, in form and face,
Seem suited for a leading place;
But, whether
crooked,
Straight,
or slim,
Of graceful
j curve, or balance
trim,
The best of you,
From A to Z,
(On second thought you'll all agree),









Without support would worthless be,
But when united, hand in hand,
In proper shape
you form a
band
Of strength
sufficient,
be it
known,
To shake a monarch from his throne.



I'l 7 7I



,-,.." l^N^--^,








So be content, both great and small,
For honor rests alike on all."

"He speaks the truth," the letters .cried;
"All private claims we'll lay aside,"
So, thanking & for judgment fair.
The controversy ended there.




THE FUNNY MANDARIN.

HERE was a funny mandarin
Who had a funny way, .
Of sliding down -
LS^ the balustrade Tlt", /,;
A dozen times a day.

With arms in air and streaming hair,
At risk of bone and brain, i
Around and round the winding stair
He slid the rail amain.

The ."surest" aim may miss the game,
The "safest" ship go down,
-, And one mistake will bring to blame
''" ,'"'' The wisest men in town
S-= re








And thus it ran, that daring man,
Who never thought to fail,

, A,. c \,.) ,





















S A downward, clinging to his fan,








J'i m lie shot with visage pale.
../_... ..
i_.o nddonwrd cinin t hs an
'~~~~~;~ It ho ih iae ae












The servants then, unlLuck men, \
Bican to lau.ih and rin,
\ which, like a lion in its lden, ''
A "L-,u,,,d that man.irin -. .-'-
"..--
" H -,:!" s-aid h1e, Ou laugL h at me ? >,-
N. \, sla ,-S, \ uLI each sha ll le" "'
An I when thev all had mi-t a tall .'
I-I Iau.hei until I n: i d. i -




















iNei
/I
















X2
.4A



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I' .- -., -) . : i -- ",-: "- .," , ".., .,









THE WHEEL-BARROW RIDE.

.-. Down the lane
S_ runs
-i Johnny,
Hopping
- .-" '' like
_a sparrow,
-Taking
S -sister Susan


"I little barrow.





.. ,' .,- : "
:- AR -,, "











Little man be careful

When wheeling round the bend,
**'.:^ W ^^ .. *'.- J -- *










Trouble lies in corners
You surely may depend.















" i '7 "~- Y. '
*._--







Just as we expected!
Spilled out upon the road,
After all the warning,
Now lies the precious load.
Gather up the pieces,
And lead your sister in,
Early in life, alas!






II




I_____________________,',_'._._',"__-"-"_".._.-__-____








THE FAIRIES' GIFT.

HEN the Kidderminster Fairies
heard the rumor going round, .
How the young and favor'd Forester,
who guarded game and ground,
SWas to wed the Florist's daughter,
one as good as she was fair,
They resolved to make a wedding-gift befitting such a pair.
Soon the golden day of promise came, which saw the couple wed,
When the solemn vows were spoken and the Parson's blessing said.
Lo! that night the Fairies gathered
from the East, -S and from the West;
From the North andSouth they hastened
to some land the youth possessed.
Over mountains, .." over rivers,
through the fields and forests green,
Still they mustered by the hundred, at the summons of the Queen.
Every trade was represented, all the 'occupations. through,
From the man who planned a building to the one who pegged a shoe,
And they set to work in earnest, throwing jackets all aside.
To erect a stately mansion for the husband and his bride.

'Twas a mighty undertaking,
of such magnitude indeed,
Nothing else but Fairy workmen
could with such a task succeed.
There they bustled without resting,
as though life itself was bet, .
Till their little hands were blistered .-
and their garments wringing wet, -.-
How they sawed, and bored, and "boosted up" the timbers, through
the night,









How they hammered, hammered, hammered, to get done ere
morning light;
For the Fairies who from labor by the dapple dawn are chased,
While their work is yet unfinished, are forevermore disgraced.







S ._ _--- ----- -




Irk.I





311




II









Oh, what harmony existed Not a breath was wasted there,
Notan oath or harsh expres- -! sion fell like poison onthe air.









Here the blacksmith and his helper made the solid anvil sound
While they forged the bolts and braces that secured the structure round.
There the mason with his trowel kept the hod-men moving spry,
Till the massive chimney tower'd twenty cubits to the sky,
And the painters followed after with their ladders and their pails,
_______Spreading paint upon
-___- the finish ere the
joiner drove his nails. -
SEven cobblers with
... W their pincers, and
their awls and pegs --
of wood, Were as- .
sisting in the enter-
prise by pegging as
they could. There
the glazier with his
putty-roll was working with a will,
While the plumber plumbed the
building, without sending in his bill;
And the sculptor with his mallet by
/iI the marble lintel stood, Till he chis-
'i eled the inscription:

ii' FOR BEING GOOD.
I \ When no article was
wanting for the com-
fort of the pair, From
( ( the scraper at the en-
V trance to the rods
upon the stair, Then
the wizened little _-.
millionaires, possess-
ed of wealth untold,









Into treasure-vaults and coffers many rich donations roll'd;
And before the East was purpled by the arrows of the sun
All the Fairies had departed, for the edifice was done.

So that couple took possession,
and in all the country round
There was none enjoyed such riches,
or such happiness profound.
There they lived for years in comfort,
and then followed next of kin,
Till a dozen generations in succession
lived therein.
Many walls since then have tumbled,
in the dust lie stones and lime,
But that mansion, built by Fairies,
still defies the teeth of Time.
Winds may howl around its gable,
: snow may settle on its roof,
..'. Rain may patter, hail may batter,
but it towers weather-proof.

Gone are not the days of Fairies,
let folk tell you what they will,
In the moonlight they assemble
to perform their wonders still.
S So be careful, oh, be cautious,
; what you say, or think, or do,
For the Fairies may be waiting
.. to erect a house for you.




j o










THE MENDICANT.

BELL.
ING-a-ling, a-ding, ding!
MISTRESS.
"Who's at the door?"

DOMESTIC.
"A poor, blind beggar-man,
with children half a score,
He never saw a greenback,
never saw a house,
And couldn't tell an elephant
from a meadow-mouse.
He. never saw the -sun rise,
never saw it set,
He never saw the silver moon,
a star or planet yet.
Been blind from his birth, ma'am,
born and couldn't see,
And how he found the bell-knob
is a mystery."
MISTRESS.
"His lot is hard, indeed, Jane; to grope about the land,
All dark behind, all dark before, and dark on either hand.
To never see a human face, or on a book to pore,
Or, at the window stand and gaze into a fancy store.
But beggars can't have money now, my bank account is low,
Just give the man a bone to pick, and tell him he must go."









DOMESTIC.
"My mistress sympathizes, sir, with one so sorely tried,
And gladly would she give the sight that nature has denied;
But pennies now are not at hand, to answer each appeal,
So here's a piece of beef, sir; 'twill serve you for a meal."

MENDICANT.
"Oh, thankee, mum, thankee; I'll take your marrow-bone;
'Twill do to fight a mastiff with much better than a stone.
Through one not half so handy, mum, the Philistines of yore,
Got, as your Book will teach you, all they bargained for and more.
And thanks to cow that bore the bone, and to the pot that boiled,
And to the mistress, and to you, the doggy's game is spoiled.
I'll walk the street in safety now, the turnpike and the field,
For this at once will be my staff, my weapon, and my shield.
And should I reach a river's side and wish to leave the shore,
I'll step on board a boat or barge, and this shall be my oar;
And when I quit these earthly scenes, far happier lands to trace,
This bone, erected at my head, shall mark my resting-place."







.. . ".* 5









A CHINESE ADVENTURE.

- ^ HREE heathen men set out one day
( iTo cross the China sea,-
'. Ah Hong Wun Ho, Gui Tong Pi Lo,
And daring Hup Si Lee.

But there was not, of all the lot,
SA single one who knew
rr, The proper way, in which to sail,
Upon the ocean blue.

They may have paddled in a pond,
Or crossed a ditch or two,
But never ventured
far beyond It*
Where water-lilies --- //
grew. "

With such a glaring, ,
sad neglect ,'l' n -
Of arts that sailors r > -
prize,
Some trouble they .- t
might well expect, 11 .
If hurricanes .' '"-. '': .
should rise. r-i /'l

The first was captain
of the ship,
He kept an eye __
ahead;









The second played the part of mate, -;-
He steered and heaved the lead. .-, -, "-

The third was boatswain, cook, and crew -
Which kept him on the go;
He had to spread the sail aloft,
And make the tea below.

And all who've sailed upon a lake,
A river, sea, or sound,
Would know he'd have to keep awake
When gales were shifting round.

There was distress, you well may guess
Before the facts I show;
For ocean is not always calm,
As navigators know.

The tempests may
through forests play,
And turn the roots on high,
Or change their tack
and nothing slack,
Across the prairies fly.

And havoc dread,
at seasons spread,
S' As here and there they roam;
,,^ ,'-'" i "But short their stay,
_- -". *-- with wood or clay,
The ocean is their home.









The winds
The sh,
At times sh,
As oft_















And--
i













s-







Andj
.3











,L4DED MEN.

aic men,
ory goes,
e Apennines,
Tiber flows.

trod the earth,
.- and white,
manuscript
i o:ht.
Vd control









In that dominion lived a prince,
A man of thoughtful mind;
Who studied, in a searching way,
The rest of human kind.





,i I'1. I'"^ \" r- -- ',' i

-. . i- .
2.I.I



















When men for virtues were extolled,
This student, still in doubt,

Would dive beneath the surface smooth,
To bring their failings out.
Woud dve eneththesuracesmoth
Tobrn ter alig ot








He heard of those calm-minded men,
Who smiled at every ill,
And moved through life without complaint,
Though up or down the hill.
He sent an invitation fine,
With compliments and all,
Requesting them to come and dine
At his palatial hall.

The invitation reached their hand,
And when they broke the seal,
They smiled acceptance, for in truth
They loved a savory meal.

Oh, whether high or lowly born,
The scorned or pet of Fame;
The florid priest, or student pale,
The failing is the same.

In time they saddled up their steeds
And started on their way;
To make a journey to the town,
Required a summer's day.
The farmers rested on their spades,
Or laid the tools aside,
And stood to watch them as they rode,
Across the country wide.

The birds saluted \ them with song,
From branches / high in air,
And monks looked -.>-'. outof convents strong
To bless the 'worthy pair.








They took no water on the road,
No wine, no meat or bread;
That they could better justice do,
To what the host might spread.



I' '.' -






-, '. i
It



Pill















And as the sun went circling round,
Their belts they often drew;
To ease the hunger-pain within,
That seemed to gnaw them through.
",~~ ,{-,,, "--.._.",. . ,_- !,',tD

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That seemed to gnaw them through.








They needed not a bitter draught
Before they drew the rein,
j,.r1 To help them relish any dish,
However coarse or plain.
The prince received them in a style
-l Befitting men of power,
And showed them to a cheerful room
To wait the banquet hour.
Above some embers, glowing red,
A caldron took the heat,
That might have served to stew a calf,
With all its parts complete.

While on the table, sat in sight
A dish of oval mold, '
That could, beneath its cover white,
The caldron's burden hold. J)"^-
The guests, in waiting, sat one side, ,
And felt their lengthy fast; ....
And many a keen, enquiring eye,
At pot and table cast.
Said one, "I think our host has got
A sheep or calf in stew;"
The other said, "I think you'll see
A pudding come in view."
A pudding! At that magic word
Their eyes shone like a flame;
For pleasing thoughts will ever rise
At mention of the name.








A pudding! with, perhaps, a peck
Of plums, within it rolled;
And quarts of yellow sauce prepared
To cover all like gold!

Oh, cheeks may fade, and eyes grow dim
And limbs grow weak and lame;
But still, through ages, fresh and fair,
The pudding charms the same.

^4 Sustained by such surmises sweet,
? I ) They sat in waiting there;
Believing, still, the dish in view,
S .Contained the princely fare.

But, meantime, in another room,
A sumptuous feast was spread;
Of soups and meat, confections sweet,
And wines both white and red.

By every plate a flagon stood,
At every chair a slave;
To promptly pass, with nimble hand,
Whate'er the heart might crave.

And here it was the host's intent,
They should 'at once repair;
When it was proved they could, unmoved,
Great disappointment bear.

SEre long the prince returned and said,
S"Approach the dish and view,
.The tempting feast that's been prepared,
->>Q For famous men like you."








Then forward to the table ran
The men with anxious air;
For each one strove to be the first
To lay the treasure bare.

O, lightly blame their acts so rude,
And pass their failings o'er;
The knock comes heavy, hard and fast,
When hunger's at the door.

One raised the cov- er from the dish,
A spoon the other delves;
But great was their surprise, to find
It empty as themselves.

Then said the prince, "Your fame is spread
Through nations new and old;
But, doubting still, I sought to prove,
If truth indeed was told.

No disappointment, 'tis averred,
Your patient blood can rile;
And now, in keeping with reports,
I look to see you smile."

Then rose the two philosophers,
Upon the instant there;
Though not a sentence, or a sign,
Was passed between the pair.

And both commenced to roll their sleeves,
They tucked, and rolled, and drew;
Until it seemed their shoulder blades
Would come at last in view.








And seizing on the struggling host,
They dragged him to the pot;
Where, though the fire was extinct,
The water still was hot.


7-- '- -- -- -



1 I 1 i 1Y 11 1 1




ill/i" ~--llli~ ./Ai















They plunged him in the steaming bath,
They soused him o'er and o'er;
Until for mercy loud he called,
And did for servants roar.








And worse the usage might have been,
But people rushing in, e.' .l
Responding to the master's call, "- "
Prevented greater sin.

Now, when the two philosophers
Had reached the door to go,
They turned, and thus addressed the host,
In accents deep and slow.

"We leave you now, but with regret;
When you attempt again
To prove that this or that is so,
Beware of hungry men.

The temper that is meek and mild,
When appetite's appeased;
May shame the mood of tiger wild,
When one is hunger-teased."

But, "Stay!" replied the noble prince,
"You leave not as you came;
A banquet has been spread within, i '." .
And you'll enjoy the same.
There may you eat and drink enough,
No vengeance shall be sought;
Although it cost me usage rough,
I've proved what long I thought.

When hunger enters in the nest,
Then patience flutters out;
No room for both within the breast,
However broad or stout."









So down they sat, as well they might,
To break their lengthy fast;
And oft' the silver cup was drained,
And oft' the plate was passed.

And when that couple took the road,
It was by people told,
They knew not whether sun or moon,
Or stars above them rolled.

But soon the story got abroad,
And circled far and wide;
How they had failed to stand the test
The cunning prince applied.

It traveled still, as rumors will,
And told against their fame;
They were not masters of themselves,
Although they had the name.

So down from walls,
in school? ) and halls,
~~-- --->-, .
Came portraits / once so prized;
To lie in dusty .: ...\ lumber lofts,
By spiders. / ,, criticized.

I ,I

-, 7- .-- -









THE SULTAN OF THE EAST.

"HERE was a Sultan of the East
Who used to ride a stubborn beast;
A marvel, of the donkey-kind,
That much perplexed his owner's mind.
By turns he moved a rod ahead,
Then backed a rod or so instead;
And thus the day would pass around,
The Sultan gaining little ground.
The servants on before would stray
And pitch their tents beside the way,
And pass the time as best they might,
Until their master hove in sight.
The Sultan many methods tried:
He clicked, and coaxed, and spurs applied,
And stripped a dozen trees, at least,
Of branches, to persuade the beast.
But all his efforts went for naught;
No reformation could be wrought.
At length, before the palace gate
He called the wise men of the state,
And bade them now their skill display
By finding where the trouble lay.

With solemn looks and thoughts profound,
The men of learning gathered round.









The beast was measured
o'er with care;
They proved him by
the plumb and square,
The compass to his ribs applied,
And every joint by rule
was tried;
But nothing could
the doctors find
To prove him different
from his kind




Said they: "Your Highness!
It appears
The beast is sound
from hoof to ears;
No outward blemishes we see





To limit action fair nd free.
Each bone is in its proper place,
Each rib has its allotted space;
His wind is good,
Sthhis sinews strong,
Throughout the frame
-- there's nothing wrong.









In view of this, the fact is plain
The mischief lies within the brain.
Now, we suggest, to stop his tricks,
A sail upon his back you fix,
Of goodly size, to catch the breeze
And urge him forward where you please."
The Sultan well their wisdom praised;
Two masts upon the beast were raised,
And, schooner-rigged from head to tail,
SWith halliards, spanker-boom, and sail,
In proper shape equipped was he,
As though designed to sail the sea!
And when the Sultan next bestrode
That beast upon a lengthy road,
,: : ?-.- With favoring winds, that whistled strong
i "' And swiftly urged the craft along,
T f he people cleared the track with speed;
SAnd old and young alike agreed
'.. A stranger sight could not be found,
i "' ii '. ", 'From side to side the province round.






tII J:.- "
", '" *', .







RA

m we
















GRIM GRIFFIN.

; RIM GRIFFIN was a giant bold,
.-" ', Who lived beside the sea;
S.. A terror to the country wide,
Sj"-'"- V From Galway to Tralee.

S ,. The farmers knew his heavy tread,
~'1 \\ which seemed to shake the land,
\ lii:en coming from his castle tall,
: That overlooked the strand.
S At times he carried off their fruit,
,A. t ti res their stacks of grain;
At times he took the fattest brute
iT "hat grazed upon the plain.
And out before his castle door,
In- heaps lay hoof and horn;
S \ And rpi of pods without the peas,
S- '' And cobs without the corn.

... ;
: -- -,
S ...'"
.- --"
:.-__- ''. -, -"k-7-- -'.,; '"%.' ~ c,/ ",,. .- ..; _- .








But not alone to farmer's goods
Was Griffin's acts confined.


l __ ___'"' -r-___. _


Ii ,
--- -- ^ - "- "-- ,_",., 'W " :.,' ,"r



























At certain seasons of the year,
To fish his taste' inclined,
..,


Jig-I 4 ~..,











- i






To fish his taste inclined,








And when the hardy fishermen
Came toiling near the strand,






At' last th e_-e o n s



















zoroo1 7h dispers
_-




The giant would disperse the crew
And drag their net to land.

At last the men, of nothing sure
Forsook the coast for good,







And left the giant to procure
His fish as best he could.

Then often with a mighty pole,
And lengthy line to match,
He sat beside the foaming tide,
His morning meal to catch.

At times he hooked a weever dark,
A salmon or an eel,
And next a grampus or a shark,
Would try his rod and reel.
At length it chanced a hungry whale
Was swimming by one day,
The baited hook the monster took
And gently moved away.

"Ho, Ho!" the Giant laughed aloud,
"I've got no common bite,
The line is long, the rod is strong,
I'll have a feast to-night.

"There's not a fish that works a fin,
In river, lake, or sea,
However strong or broad or long,
Can prove a match for me!"

Then rashly round his waist he wound
The surplus line with care.
Determined should his hands give out,
His weight would still be there.











Now as the giant and the whale
Joined issue in the tide,







e-,r,. n v.















W-er- -- v i








The screaming birds around them flew
Describing circles wide.

But, weight and strain and boasting vain,
Were all of no avail,











For off the rock he slid amain,
Behind the rushing whale;




A] ^' '' -l "


" L .' ---"
, -. --


--" T- '"







.I- =_-









The-- Ise 'p_










And Galway's coast was miles behind,
The Isles of Arran past,









When still the giant, like the wind,
Was moving seaward fast.



Y .
.



I '- ,





kM *-. -
lj, ; .i. I,,









'7 .'. ._-_ !,-

-I-7






Then people hastened to the shore,
To view the pleasing sight,
:- --- "- -" 7]-..) --- <"- ::" --~-----'
."-- 2.7 .. 2-. --' ),- ',=-,.i'Q 7-- _ -_-_ _-.7
""- m .,(:l":' h s ene o t-- ---. ? -=. 2 ----
.. .... ..-- .... : ; .. ... .... .









And clapped their hands till palms were sore,
And shouted with delight.
"Ah, strong be line of silk or twine,
That round the rogue is tied;
And strong be tail and fin of whale,
That take him hence," they cried.
"Let fish with saw, and fish with sword,
Soon carve him up with care;
And dish him out upon their board,
In slices portioned fair;













"That shark, and gar, and sculpin lean,
The hermit-crab, and pike,
The lamprey, and the lobster green,
May all be served alike.
"And there, five hundred fathoms deep,
Below the rolling tide;
The King of Herrings order keep,
And at the feast preside."









The sun went down, and home returned
To roost on crag and tree,
The weary birds, that many miles,
Escorted Grim to sea.

But he no more returned to shore, 46.
To make the farmers fly; -
Or stray along the rugged coast,
To catch his morning fry. __

Yet, sailors steering o'er the main,
To lands of rice and tea,
Report, a thousand miles from land,
A wondrous sight they see.

Upon an island, bleak and bare,
.. F They mark a giant form,
That flings around a baited hook,
In sunshine and in storm.

But whether truthful tales they tell,
As round the seas they go;
Or simply spin a sailor's yarn,
The world may never know.

This hint remains for young and old,
To treasure in the mind;
Let folks be e'er so strong and bold,
They may a stronger find.

Like Griffin, they may strike a fish
They cannot bring to land;
And find, too late, the line of Fate
Too well the strain may stand.























A PET IN THE HOUSE.
There once was a man, and his name was Von Crouse,
Who kept, just for pastime, a pet in the house;
At first it was small, and could scamper and play,
And seemed a great source of amusement each day.
For many a time would Von laugh until sore,
While watching it caper about on the floor.

He called the pet "Habit," and said, "when I please
I'll kick him outside with the greatest of ease."
Though people would argue, "I fear that your pet
Will prove a heart-scald, ere you're through with him yet."









But time rolled around, and the pet became strong,
Its body spread wider, its nose, it grew long;
It filled up the space every day more and more,
At last would no longer pass out of the door,
But rooted around in a boisterous style,
And tumbled the bed and the stove in a pile.





I -,.
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7 \, ._ 1;.,; .





-4 ~-
,. --tllv].j':*;'. ':^-;.








.- .- -"

No longer a joy, or a pride, as at first,
But, classed as a demon, would rank with the worst,
Von Crouse saw his error, though at a late hour,
And then to eject him he strove with all power.
He blamed himself roundly, and as people do,
When thus brought to sorrow, he blamed others, too;
One hardly likes calling the fault all his own,
And shouldering the burden of censure alone,









He pulled by the ears, and pulled by the tail;
He coaxed and he cudgeled, but nought would avail;
The door was too narrow, the window too high,
.__._ His pet was content
in, the mansion to lie.
And "Habit" kept growing,
and gave him no ease,
But crowded him out
of his home by degrees;
Deserted by friends,
S:"'" I and derided by foes,
And cursing his folly,
as one might suppose.
And such was the terrible
-_-- fate of Von Crouse,
A warning to all who
'I J.-::'. .. -- k eep p ets in th e h o u se.
Beware of bad "Habit,"
though small in your eyes,
Oh, muzzle the fiend, ere the fangs are full size;
Ere home is uprooted, the mind tempest-tossed,
The heart petrified, and the soul, perhaps, lost.


A CHRISTMAS PUDDING.
.HEN Christmas bells are ringing sweet,
And people hasten through the street,
To gather in a goodly store,
That tables may be heaping o'er;
The Fairy band, so legends tell,
Prepare a Christmas feast as well.
They boil their pudding, dear knows where,








But some place out in open air,
And then on sticks, --, .
as best thv may, **,,,^ ... : : '. -
To some retreat ,
the prize CC'l\ney. I 'it p.
The rogues, then on.ce -l ,i
\-aVcr, at Icvl-t, i. Il,
Enjoy, a r-ich
an:] royal fca& t. .1'. 'm


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: .. ,-, ,- ,,,,





," -, '- .a _


I-

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THE KING AND THE CLOWN.


THERE lived a queer old king,

Who used to skip and swing,

And "dance before the fiddle," and all that sort of thing.



i, ,: 1 I! '
Jil l

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I I 1" ,il J! 'I'I,, ',,










0~








In princely robes arrayed,
The games of youth he played,
And mingled with the low buffoons at fair or masquerade.









His royal back he'd stoop
To chase a rolling hoop,
Or romp in merry leap-frog with the wildest of the group.

S At last a cunning clown
Got hold of mace and crown,
And instantly the people hailed him monarch of
the town.





Because the crown he wore,
And royal sceptre bore,
All took him for the romping king they'd honored heretofore.

His Majesty would rave,
And bellow "Fool!" and "Slave!"
But still the people bowed and scraped around the painted knave.








Well might the sovereign yell,
And threaten prison cell,
And rope, and ax, and gibbet;-but he could not break the spell.

,,"I i'' -' -






-i_ l -il ,- U II
,11i~ II I' '-,I ,,

; 'A
II.T oin ill...


I- .. .. _













So passed his power away,
His subjects and his sway,
For king was clown, and clown was king, until their dying day.
: -_ ,,' ,, ,+ ,


: ~ ~ S 2-,x-S__-: ",s '"e ', :',:'( '
-:___-5- .. -_-.__.- .n _i j.,
......... .. -"a cl.n an on wa""-'~ti h ird in .1










THE MAIDEN AND THE KNIGHT.

A FAIRY TALE.

HE day was lost, when from the fight
Young Harwick rode, a valiant knight
Who fought till every bridge was crossed,
And every hope and standard lost.
The King himself, upon the field,
Lay dead, beneath his battered shield,
Before the Knight forsook the fray
And rode to rescue Lady May:
A maiden fair, of high degree,
That night she was his bride to be,
Had fickle fortune scorned them less,
And crowned their legions with success.
She must not in her home remain,
Where sack and pillage soon must reign;
But time was short for him to fly
And save her from the. danger nigh.
As Harwick bore her from the Hall,
The foes were shouting round the wall;
As through the park away they rode,
A blazing pile the castle glowed.
Where shall they fly? Behind them rose
The shouts and clamor of their foes.
The North Sea, half a league before,
Disputed boundary with the shore.








Could they but reach the Norway coast,
They would avoid the conquering host;
But vain the wish, no ship is near,
No boats upon the marge appear;
Now something more than strength of steed
Must serve them, in their hour of need.
Oh, wonder-working fairies, Hail!
l When human arts and efforts fail,
And hope departs, ye choose the hour
To introduce your mystic power. '"
Now, from the shadow of the wood,
SA band of fairies came, and stood
Before the Knight and maiden fair,
Who, much perplexed, were standing there.
So sudden came the troop around,
They seemed to issue from the ground;
The wondering couple, all amazed,
In silence 'on the comers gazed;
And, in the midst of their distress,
They hardly could a smile suppress,
To see the strange',and motley crew
That round them in a moment flew.

A few had beards, unkempt and wild,
While some were beardless as a child,
With dimpled cheeks and sparkling eyes,
That told of youngsters early wise;
A jacket here was black as night,.,. 7
Another there was red, or white,











'! --Lh,, -. r, /.Y





I
/I T, .. .


4:' W u-/ .-,
'' L,, i

,,. i -.~ i '
'' 1 s~~
















-. _



While some were many colors dyed,
Or spotted as the leopard's hide;









Some wanted both a coat and vest,
While some had these and lacked the rest;
But all were jovial, keen and spry,
And trimmed to either run or fly.

F- Now, one who seemed to be the queen,
SWith tiny wand and mantle green,
And scarlet hat of comic mold,
S/ 9 Addressed the pair in language bold:
"Oh, gallant Knight and lady fair,
S But trust your fortunes to our care,
^'1 I ArL And you may safely quit this shore
Without the aid of sail or oar.
'!"ti^ We'll leave you on the Norway strand,
t' Away from persecution's hand;
t ,^^ Nor fear the magic power we wield,
N14" ii, For never yet was case revealed,
SIn story old, or ballad new,
Where fairies wronged the good and true."
.. , f What moved the elves to cross their way
And proffer aid, we cannot say.
It might have been the maiden's sigh,
Or tear that glistened in her eye;
For nothing can a fairy see,
That sooner wakes its sympathy.
But fairly was the offer made,
Nor was the answer long delayed.








"Oh, witch or elve, whatever you be,
--W Ye trust our keeping all to thee;
-nEmploy what arts you may command,
But guide us from this wretched land."

She reached her wand and touched the Knight,
---ri -And lo! his suit of armor bright
--:- Appeared to melt, and fade away
To sweeping wings, and feathers gray;
With curving beak and talons long,
He stood, an eagle swift and strong,
Prepared, among the clouds to fly,
Or scan the sun with matchless eye.
She touched the, , lady,-quick as thought,
Another ~ wondrous change was wrought.
Instead of robes of silken fold,
Instead of gems and chains of gold,
In place of shining locks of hair,
The plumage of the swan was there!
With graceful mien, and look sedate,
She stood beside her royal mate; .
Prepared, with him, at once to brave
The howling winds, or foaming wave.

The fairy waved her wand around,
And both rose, circling, from the ground;
But though like birds they were in kind,
They still possessed the human mind;
So, wing to wing, across the sea,
Their course was taken, fast and free.








"A pleasing sight," the fairy cried,
"Behold them journey, side by side,
What tenderness and trust is there,
I'll warrant you, a loving pair "

For hours, above the dashing spray,
Still flew the swan and eagle gray.
At times they skim- med the ocean blue,
At times among the clouds they flew;
But whether thro' the darkened sky,
Or thro' the foam- ing spray they fly,
Still, side by side, they kept in place,
With equal speed and equal grace.
The eagle proves no laggard bird,
When by the driving tempest stirred;
The swan can spread her pinions white
And pass the arrow in its flight;
But tho' that night they did their best,
And crossed the deep without a rest,
Nor turned aside from straightest line
That old sea captains could assign,
Yet, when arrived on Norway's shore,
The fairy band was there before I

But how those elves in strangest guise,
Had reached that coast, is but surmise.
Perhaps, upon the winds they rode,
Or scudding cloud in haste bestrode;
Doubtless, unseen by man,- they flew
O'er surging sea, through ether blue;









Or, ran around the sea entire,
Like currents of electric fire.
































But this is certain, all were there,
And waiting for the coming pair.








The queen, approaching, waved her wand,
And touched them, as they reached the land.
Oh, happy change! at once away
Goes curving beak and feathers gray;
The scaly talons fade from sight;
He stands again in. armor bright!
---7 7- And ere he turns, to view with pride,
-- The trusting creature by his side,.
SAway goes plumage, white as snow;
SThe spreading feet and pinions go;
The lengthy neck and yellow bill
Sc Have vanished, at the fairy's will.
SAgain she stands a maiden there,
In form and face exceeding fair.









"Then," said the fairy, "marvel not
That we are first upon the spot.
The charger never shook a heel,
Nor locomotive turned a wheel,
Nor feathered creature split the air,
That can, for speed, with us compare.








The wind, with all its puff and blow,
We leave behind, as on we go.
As meteors shoot through empty space,
So fairies move from place to place,
With speed that one can only find
In creatures of the spirit kind.
'Twas meet that we should reach the shore
Your former natures to restore,
Or else, forever you would fly,
But objects for the hunter's eye.
Now, though we travel east and west,
We love our native land the best;
So back again we all must speed,
For others may assistance need;
And fairies, since the world was new,
Have lent their aid to lovers true;
And always, till creation's end,
Will still be found, the lover's friend!"








THE WINDFALL.

N a westward reaching railroad,
Over plain and mountain laid,
Journeyed once a woeful member
Of the famous tramp brigade.


Out at knees, and out at elbows,
Gone his credit, gone his tin,
His defence a heavy cudgel,
His adherents next his skin.


Gnawing bones, by dogs abandoned,
Sleeping under stacks of hay,
Stealing rides and haunting dairies,
Moved this nomad, day by day.


Baby-feared and dog-detested,
Shunning water, soap and light,
Buried pride and blunted feeling,
Nothing sound but appetite.


Those who saw him, in the -evening,
Slouching round their barn-yard go,
Doubted much if in the morning,
They would hear their rooster crow.









While he tramped across the mountains,
Where eternal lies the snow,
As the night was darkly closing,
Wild the wind commenced to blow. .





::{ 7_--5- = ---=--









`, ; .. ':"2-',_ "








Soon the rain, in torrents pouring,
Brought the slush about the knee,
And the lightning stroke descending,
Split in twain his shelter tree.
Fearing such another summons,
Might do more than singe his hair,
Down a narrow gulch he bolted
Seeking better shelter there.








Soon a cave the wretch discovered --
Formed by over-hanging stones,
But in terror backward bounded
On beholding human bones. ''

Then a change came o'er his visage
And his fears began to lull,
SWhen he saw a bag of gold-dust
__ Underneath the. grinning skull.

Years before some
n' famished miner
S Lay and perished
there alone,
With his treasure
for a pillow
f And his couch, the
flinty stone.

There lay pick, and pan, and shovel,
Worn with years of rust away,
And the well-filled buckskin showing
Mines were paying in his day.

Snow had covered bones and treasure,
Safe from sight the seasons through,
But the recent heavy freshet,
Brought the cave again in view.









Wrong to take e'en what another
Has no use for, high or low;
But perhaps this hard-pressed brother
Now in question, thought not so.

/ Bending low beneath the windfall,
In which shining thousands lay,
Moved the traveler for the railroad
When the storm had passed away.

Now no more to ride on bumpers,
Or to burrow, like a beast,
In the haystack, but to travel
Like a nabob of the East.

Thus the storm of rain and lightning
That beset and tried him sore, ,
While it seemed to seek his ruin, -
Drove him straight to Fortune's door.

This is truth, than fiction stranger,
Truth in picture and in rhyme,
Some may doubt it, but this ranger
Knows the party like a dime.

In that far-off sunny region,
Where the people delve for gold,
And the earthquake oft reminds them
Of their sins so manifold,









He who tramped is now in clover;
Like a prince he lives at ease,
With his pleasure-boats and horses,
And his servants, if you please.

Vain would be the task now closing,
Vain your patience, vain my line,
Did no moral thread imposing,
Through the homespun fabric shine.

Know the darkest night that lowers,
Or the hardest luck that falls,
Oft but ushers brightest hours,
Oft the richest fortune calls.

When misfortunes round you gather,
Crowding, crushing, pile on pile,
Sink not under, brave them rather,
Think upon this man and smile.




,*. ,e 2":C-
f -^ '-"









THE GUILEFUL PAPOOSE.

WHERE wild Sierra's forests wave,
The youthful heir of Piute brave 4
Sat by the station, lone and bare,
While stopped the train a moment there.

With hands across his stomach locked,
From side to side he wrung and rocked,
And filled the passengers with dread,
So loud he screamed for meat and bread.




SAnd few who heard






Descend enough of bread, and cheese,
I Air? Lo_ the loud appeal,
'-=~- Unmindful listened to the "squeal."
A dozen baskets open yawn,
From every lunch a part is drawn;
And down about the youngster's knees,
Descend enough of bread, and cheese,
And cake, and pie, and chicken legs,
And sandwiches, and hard-boiled eggs,
To fill a bucket heaping o'er,
Then onward moves the train once more.

,But ah, deceit, so often found
In pale-face tribes the world around, t
Is not a stranger to the brain
Of Red Men on the western plain.









The truth, unvarnished, must be told,
A trick it was, the parents old
Had taught him well the part to play,
And thus he bellowed every day,
While they kept back from public eyes
Until the urchin won the prize.
And much they praised that babe of guile
As, squatting there in Indian style, 1"'
They put beyond the reach -~ ''
of flies_ / / b -.

V -'7--7 -- -_- .-_.
S_-,** '7. ."_,._-- .. -. '_ __. ",'.11' 1..






















Then heavy sighs of sorrow drew
'WL



ii-



.. .. -. L4.














And wished another train was due.









THE FAIRIES ON HORSEBACK.

As songsters hid in leafy bowers,
To rest their tongues till morning hours;
And bats came forth from dusty swings,
To shake the cramps from folded wings;
The Fairies sought some enterprise
That promised fun and exercise.



I .&

















Where thickest grew ,
.like thieve4:--1 .I.- -, I _:-







ForB h e had rested of




nd re been cnceae 2a-
all the day, te ,





Beneath the shade of t
mullen leaves. ,









"Some plan," said one, "we must contrive
To gain ere long a country drive;
The farmers all have been assessed,
The summer roads are at their best;
The snapping whip and rattling gear
Around on every side we hear."
Another spoke: "Of late my mind
Has been to such a scheme inclined;
On me depend to play my part,
With daring act, and ready art,
And aught the work in hand may claim,
Or, strip me of the Fairy name.
Where yonder brook through clover plays,
At least a dozen horses graze.;
Though most through service long are tame,
And come at mention of their name
A few are wild and full of fear,
And frenzy as the mountain deer,
And promise those who gain a seat
Upon. their backs, a lively treat.
The village harness i shop is stowed
With saddles ready for the road;
And bridles, that will serve our need
And bring to terms 1 'W the wildest steed.
To Buzzard Moun- tain Peak we'll ride,
Then canter down a the other side,
And coming homeward
round the S base
S Leave horse and trappings in their place."









Next evening, as one may suppose,
Who well the Fairies' nature knows,
The stretch of ground that lay between
The saddler's shop and pasture green,
Presented
such a
Believinstirring sight,
To gIt filled
with wonder
birds of night.



















Some brought the horses to the store;
Some to the field the saddles bore;
Believing this the surest way
To guard against a long delay.




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