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 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Contents
 Back Cover






Title: Story after story
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055802/00001
 Material Information
Title: Story after story
Physical Description: 1 v. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Bro's
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: [1888?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1888   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1888   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1888
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055802
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224933
notis - ALG5205
oclc - 70222507

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
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        Page 21
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        Page 25
        Page 26
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    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text























































































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Mhe Baldwin Lbmry
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FRIENDS AT SUPPER,
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TOMMY GREEN.
. I had a bath; they 've cut my hair;
I feel so nice and clean,
They '11 hardly know me on the street
For little Tommy Green.






A DOG'S LIFE.




























"I go or I stay, I watch or I wait;
I rev-el on dain-ties, or starve on a bone;
I lie in the par-lor, or crouch at the gate;
I lead a dog's life,-but 'tis bet-ter than none."'






COM-PA-NY TEN.


'''I I' I 'I
























Three rous-ing cheers for Com-pa-ny Ten!
Read-y for or-ders to march, Cap-tain Ben.
Cap-tain is sick I'll be cap-tai in-stead
Right a-bout face! shoul-der arms! go a-head!
/
Ca-ai s ik-Il b aptini-sed
Rigt -bu ceshu-eams o-hd!





TOM-MY THE BOOT-BLACK.




























SGive us a shine," laughs bare-foot Jed,
And i-dle Bob says, "Come, and play;
But stead-y Tom-my shakes his head,
And, man-like, keeps at work all day.






WHAT IS THE FUN?




























There's fun in the let-ter, and what can it be?
The boys ,would know.bet-ter than tell it to me;
For they know that the ver-y first thing I would do
Would be to re-peat it to you, and to you!
Would be Ito re-peat; itt oan oyu






WAIT-ING FOR DIN-NER.



























"How late you are!" said the ea-gle mam-ma,
"The chil-dren are cry-ing for meat."
"The mar-ket was far," said the- ~q le pa-pa,
:"But now they can sit down and eat."






A BOLD HUNT-ER.




























Oh, what a bold hunt-er is Dick!
With his pis-tol he went out for game;
But the black-bird and rat were caught by the cat,
Yet he fired a-way all the same.






FRED-DIE AND HIS CHICK-ENS.









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Chick-i-ty chuck! chick-i-ty chuck!
Now we real-ly are in luck!
Grains of corn so sweet and nice:
Come, let us gob-ble them up in a trice 1






LEFT A-LONE.





























What cru-el par-ents left their child
To suf-fer in a storm so wild ?
A stran-ger comes, more kind than they,
And takes her to his home a-way.






STEAD-Y JIM-MY.





























._... ..... --


His school-fel-lows call stead-y Jim-my "a dig,"
And laugh at his stu-di-ous ways;
They threat-en to buy him some specs, and a wig,"
Un-less he will join in their plays.





A KIND GIRL.












All












This sweet lit-tle las-sie is gen-tle and kind,
She is ears to the deaf, and eyes to the blind;
She vis-its the sick, and cor-forts the poor,
And turns no poor beg-gar a-way from the door.





GOO-SEY-GAN-DER.






























Here 's the ver-y Goo-sey-Gan-der
That up and down did wan-der;
His coat is white, his neck is long,
And quite pe-cul-iar is his song.
8





THE STREET LAN-TERN.




























Here is the lan-tern that used to light
The streets of cit-ies and towns at night;
Gas, and steam, and tel-e-graphs then
Were things un-known to the wis-est men.






GO-ING TO FIND MAM-MA.


____. ___ -- ....-; .4.,









VI
---_- -----






























Mam-ma is dead. I want to find
The road to heav-en, -she went to-day.-
Please tell me -will you be so kind?
Is heav-en so ver-y far a-way?





THE HIGH-LAND LAD.





























The pi-broch is sound-ing, and I must be gone;
Cheer up, lit-tle sis-ter! be mer-ry and gay!
You shall see me a-gain when the bat-tie is done
Good cour-age the High-land-ers con-quer to-day!






MY PO-NY AND I.




























Hur-rah for the flag! for the red, white, and blue!
Hur-rah for my po-ny and me!
We are go-ing to Bos-ton as fast as we can,
The cu-ri-ous sights to see.






THE IND-I-AN CHIEF.







'2_i.-- _






















All in the style, Chief. What's your name ?
Choc-taw or Sioux, it is all the same;
Feath-ers a-fly-ing, and rings in your ear,
Beads on your neck: you're a dan-dy, I fear.





AN IND-IAN DANCE.










TIT







If this jumping and praying is what they call dan-ing













I hope I may nev-er learn how;
They fling down the hatch-et, then, yell-ing, they catch it;
Let us leave this wild Ind-ian pow-wow.
lie us leave this wild Ind-ian pow-wow.






AN AN-GRY MAN.




























What an ug-ly, an-gry face!
What is the mat-ter? I'd like to know.
Off he starts at a fly-ing pace,
Fist all doub-led to strike a blow.








*
































A MURDER.
I do not believe that big boy would lie there so con-
tentedly watching for something to shoot at, if he knew
he was so near a dead man. Poor man! he was met by a
band of robbers, who took his money, then tied him to a
tree and shot him.



































THE DRUMMER BOY.
Do you see the little drummer boy, lying with his
eyes closed and his hand over his head? He is dead. He
has been shot in battle. It is night, and the moon is
shining on him and the dead soldiers. Poor little boy, so
far away from home and friends!









































GOOD-MORNING.

0 Nettie! Is n't that the baby ? Let 's go and see
if he is awake." They went into the nursery, and there
was the sun pouring in the window, and baby lying with
1:10 '1"
Iii N 1 1.- -























jumping in his brother's arms.
li; l,! i~ i~i ~i'''I'1~, I'



































GRANDPA.
Dear old grandpa has thrown his handkerchief over
his head., and is telling Bertie about some good time he
had when he was a boy. Bertie loves to hear grandpa's
stories, and almost believes when he hears them, that boys
used to have better ti:c.s 1,S an they do now.



























will open the bars and let them out. He is a kind boy, and

















" good-morning as they pass.
;; fl
f'-- -






















THE RIDE.
Alfred is going out to ride with his uncle. Ernest )
will open the bars and let them out. He is a kind boy, and
does not fret because he cannot go too. He looks very
pleasant, and touching his hat will wish them a hearty
"good-morning" as they pass.





















^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ '-- *^^-- -^-------- ------ "-
















THE MOURNER.
This young man is standing by his mother's grave.
She was a widow, and he had little brothers and sisters, so
i he went away that he might earn more money to help.
He could not come to her when she was sick and died.
How badly he feels!



































THE GREETING.
Henry and Percy* are camping out. Percy is coming
up the river with a string of fish which he has caught.
Henry, going to the river for water, sees him, and shouts,
laughs, and waves his saucepan over his head. They carry













knives, for there are wild beasts about.
laughs, and waves his saucepan over his head. They carry,
'knives, for there are wild beasts about.





































THE DIVER.
Paul leaned over to look in this deep pool, and his
pistol slid into the water. His father and brother are
letting him down into the water to get it. He holds on to
the bank and dreads to let go, but he can swim and dive,
and will come out all right.
, ), ,,z. . f, I '



I _
L:_-.- ._ ._ _.__ ..

TH IVR
Paul' lene oe olointidepol, and his
pistol sldit h atr i ahr n rte r
letighi dw int Bthe w"a~sa~a~aaterz~\' to get it. H holdson

































THE BOAT.
Are not those boys having a nice time, sailing their
boat ? The children on the other side of the pond are
watching it as it sails towards them. Hold tight to the
string, Hugh. If it should slip through your fingers, your
boat would be lost. Could you make another one ?

































CAUGHT BY THE TIDE.
This young man climbed upon the rocks and fell asleep.
While he slept the tide came in, and the road over which
he came was down deep in the water. Here you see him
wading out to meet the boat which is coming to help him.
He will be wiser next time.


































THE GEESE.
Here you see Mother Goose setting on her nest, and
Father Goose close by to keep her company. Do you know
how long Mother Goose will have to sit before she will have
a family of little goslings? Just four weeks. She only
leaves her nest to get food and drink.


































THE WATCH-DOG.
I 'm afraid this is not a very good-natured dog. If
he were he would not have to be chained up, and those
two men would not be hurrying from him so. Perhaps
they have been troubling something they ought not to,
and the dog is trying to drive them away.










A_





























THE BIRD'S-NEST.
This bird's-nest must be in a tall tree, for you see how
large the branches are all around it. Can you count the
eggs ? One, two, three, four, five. What a nest full of
birds there will be by and by! The mother bird is flying
away to get food and drink.
,-~,_,



































LITTLE ALICE.
Why, how late I have slept !" exclaimed little Alice,
as she sprang up in bed and saw the sun shining in the
window. "I must get right up and tell my grandma what
a lovely dream I had about papa and mamma. I wish they
could come to the country, too."






MISS MAR-I-GOLD'S DOG.



*,
























So ver-y po-lite was Miss Mar-i-gold's dog
That when she went out for a stroll,
He would go through the town, hold-ing fast to her gown
In a man-ner ex-ceed-ing-ly droll.





ON THE SHELF.




























They've put the meat up-on the shelf
Such bones! I want one now.
If I could reach, I'd help my-self.
I wish I could. Bow-wow!






A FUN-NY, FAT BA-BY.





























A fun-ny fat ba-by in a white bib,
With a pair 'of white flap-pers for paws;
He stands on the shore one hour or more,
With a fish be-tween his jaws!
1i
,' ,+n
\ .






A FAM-I-LY QUAR-REL.



























' By hook or by crook, 11ll get in-to this nest,"
Said a sau-cy young rook to his moth-er.
"You had bet-ter not try," she said, in re-ply,
"But be off and build you an-oth-er."






s A ,





























THE QUARREL ENDED.
These boys have long been enemies. Now they are
going to fight it out. They are so much engaged they do
not see the school-master, who will give them both a severe
punishment, which will serve them right.
..... , !..


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I ~TI QU."E ',!,, ., ..
" ,, ,
r Tesebos hvelon ben nemes No tey,'r
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Ein ":o:- -ih tu.Te r omc n~~eited
_=_:__ --e --_ _..-_aser .... --l giv --mb t a s v
. ----hm nt _:--ic wil_-__th m ig



































TWO SOLDIERS.
These men are deadly enemies, and belong to different
armies. Meeting in an unexpected manner, both draw their
swords and begin to fight. A woman who sees them rushes
in and, by her cries and entreaties, stops the conflict and
makes them friends.






































WHAT IS THE MATTER?
These men are very much troubled. They are looking
across the field toward their house, which is on fire.
They are afraid that the Indians have been there, and that
their children have been killed or carried away. I hope
they will find them hidden away somewhere in the woods.

k



































FLEEING.
These men lived alone in a cabin in the far West. One
of them is not well and strong. Some bad Indians burned
their cabin while they hid in a clump of bushes. They are
now making their way to the nearest village in great'fear
The strong man is carrying the weak one.













N






















S-INDIAN S.
What would you call these wild-looking men? They
e Indians. One of them is riding a horse, and the other is
y large and looks cross. Perhaps that officer is telling
something they do not like to hear. All Indians are
.Some are good;
---R, "".,.. .___= .
S-". ''


































GREAT DANGER.
Into the hands of wild Indians or the teeth of wolves
I hope you may never fall, little children. Those hungry
wolves will soon tear in pieces that fallen Indian and his
horse. The other Indian shot at a wolf and hit his com-
rade's horse. But let us pass on to a pleasanter picture.






II
Ii

:__ ";,r -'1 i -- i' "i -', N. 1 I '
I--- I : .' ,; -
I I I ..
S'- I



























INDIANS EATING.
Did you ever see Indians eat ? They have no knives
or forks-not even a plate. They sometimes eat dogs, if
they can get nothing else. Their food is roasted whole
over a fire, and then they all sit around it and eat, tearing
it with their hands and teeth. It is not a pleasant sight.
9



































THE MEDICINE MAN.
One of the party of travellers is very ill, and an Indian
medicine man has been found, and he is fixing some medicine
for him. Some of them are very good doctors. But I would
not like them if I were sick. Would you?








M 4-_-----
























THE ZULU SAVAGE.
Here is a picture of a wild Zulu. He does n't look
very pleasant, does he? I think if you little children
should see him coming you would run and hide. But
when you remember that he does not know anything
about God or Christ, you will pity him.
I:















about GOod or Christ, you will pity him.






THE GREAT GRAY OWL.


























In the shad-ows dark of the for-est deep,
The great gray owl doth his cas-tle keep;
Fierce is the glare of his big, round eyes;
"Too-hoot! too-hoot! too-hoo!" he cries.





A FO-LITE DOG.




























I'm a shag-gy old fel-low, but she is a beau-ty,
So soft, and so white, and so ev'r way nice;
To see her served first is my pleas-re and du-ty,
And what she leaves o-ver I'll eat in a trice.



































THE MAY-POLE.
How should you like to be at a May-party, and while
you were dancing around the pole have some fierce-looking
soldiers come in your midst, stop your dancing, and cut
your pole down? This picture tells a true story. Ask
somebody to tell you about it.





A SELF-11N V IT-ED GUEST.






































Chip! chip! Neigh-bor Dog, may I eat from your tray?"
"Bow wow! Mis-tress Spar-row, you cer-tarn-ly may;
I have eat-en my fill, and as for what's left,
Eat all that you wish, I shall think it no theft."
44.1
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Chp hi! eih-orDo, ayI at foi yurtry?
"Bw ow MstrssSprro, ouce-ai-l my

I have ea-en y fil, an as or wat'sleft







































Old Daisy is thirsty. She has been eating grass and
lying in the cool shade of the trees, and now she has come
to the pump for a cool drink of water. Does she not look
kind and gentle ? She gives nice milk, too, and the chil-
dren love her.
.-- .=:..- .-
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THE CILDRN'S FIEND
Old aisyis tirst. Sh ha bee eatng,"gras an








dren love her.





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FIDO.
This blind man is making a net. He is very poor, and
Fido begs for him. Should n't you like to drop something
in his basket? Willis Page saves all of his pennies, and,
instead of buying candy aid gum, puts them in Fido's
basket as he passes on his way to school.
'.* \ i 1 "'



























S-













DASH.

Dash is not afraid of the water, and one day when his
master lost his hat he sprang in and brought it out. He is
just going to shake himself, and when he does the water will
lv so you cannot see him.
.. '








Dash is not afraid of the water, and one day when his















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-- -_- -

















BEAUTY AND UGLINESS.
Once upon a time a boy as beautiful as a fairy prince,
with the loveliest pony ever seen, and an ugly dwarf, with
a common-looking dog, tried to amuse people. All w.re
delighted with the pony and his master, and the dwarf
came to grief. Do you wonder at it ?







i-


























SPORT.
Sport has been to meet his master, who is coming home
on horseback. His master throws his glove, and he picks
it up and runs on before. Sport is not allowed to go far
from home, so he is always ready to look after stray pigs
and cows.





HIL 2Ii_ __ i



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BAD NEWS.
Mr. Norris and his family are taking supper. Rose, the
housemaid, has rushed in and is telling him that a great big
bull-dog has come into the yard and is fighting poor old
Watch terribly. Watch is tied, too; but his master will
Soon help him out of his trouble.

A('I
























!f











GOLD.
These men are miners. They have been digging in
the earth for gold. They have a plate full, and are looking
at it by the light of a torch.. How happy they look!'
They think they will have a gre't deal of money now, and
not have to work any more

































A BAD PICTURE.
Why, boys, boys! what are you doing? For shame,
to be quarreling and fighting! Fortunately for you there
is a lady coming from another room, who will restore
order and teach you a better way to settle troubles than
by fighting.
















1Al.
























This strange gentleman is calling on Maggie's papa.
He is trying to talk to her, but she feels half afraid of him.
No wonder; he does look rather fierce with that glass
stuck in his eye. Her sisters Annie and Lucy are watching
her. I think they pity her.
I ..i.f
---7 =-- -T -= -- I
-~~~ _ -_

BAHU MGIE. lt I

This strange gentleman ~~isaligo gge'pp.
tie~~~~~~~~~~~~~~L istyn't al ohr u sefeshl ari fhm
No oner hedos ookrahe firc wth ha gas

stuck in his eye. t~~~~~~ie sitr nieadLc re,?'h
her. hik the pit her







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.. _





















A PICNIC.
Here' is a picnic party. I hope there are lots of little
folks back under the trees eating their lunch, or swinging,
playing ball, croquet, or hide-and-seek; chasing butterflies,
and gathering wild flowers. Perhaps they can take off their
shoes and stockings and wade in a brook. What fun !



































CROSSING THE CREEK.
One morning Mrs. Hen said to her chickens, "We '11
spend the day in the back lot, catching grasshoppers. You
shall have your fill of hoppers once." Mother Hen carried
one timid chick on her back through the creek, where the
water was low, and the rest crossed on a log.






*--- .. -- --- .


S-- -- -

.'III, -_-_., ._.. __
.i --: .. .. .

























A BAD MAN.
Is n't that an ugly-looking man ? These boys have
caught him stealing eggs. He has them in his hat, and he
is telling the boys that if they ever tell of him he will beat
them nearly to death. But he cannot scare them; they
will do what is right.
-,' .. ,






_----_---_---- _--r--- -' ... '. -- 5gis... -,--- -- --


































NAUGHTY PUSS.
Puss has jumped upon Rover's back, and intends to
fight him. How cross she looks! Her tail is as large as
a squirrel's. Fido is ready to help Rover, but Jip is run-
ning away as fast as he can. Naughty Puss! get down
and run home to your kittens.
.- 7
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p_-
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A, s i. is r_ t :-hv r, b












ning a fa'". -s. ec.. augt y



































TOPSYS BED.
Has n't Topsy a queer bed? I suppose she was awake
a good share of the night, watching the mice, and when
she came across Mr. Roe's hat she said, What a nice be
this soft wool hat will make." So into it she crept, and
there she is, fast asleep.
7his sowo a wl ae"Soit tse rp.
l\er sh is a sep



































DOT.
Dot has found Grandma's bonnet and Mamma's fan,
and put on Sister Sue's sack. She has perched herself up
in the parlor, and with roguish eyes is waiting for Papa
to come home. She hears his step, and is listening. Won't
there be a laugh when the door opens!









-- .-- ....--.. .
























lil


BEN.
Sailor Ben, just home from a three years' whaling
voyage, meets a party of boys and girls from his native
village, just starting to spend a day at the sea-side. He
they do not recognize him. He's a jolly sailor.
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_______ 2' __ I___

BEN Zl iI
Salo Bnjut oe ro atheeyer' waln
voyage, ~~~ ~ met apry fbysadgil ro i ntv


village, jutsatngt pn dya h sasd.H
knw theatog hyhv gonmc alr u



thy o otrecgnz hiH sajolalr


































TROUBLE.
That man with the cap on is not a kind-looking mail
He is telling those people that they cannot go any further,
The leader of the people looks troubled. He is a kind.
looking man; but hle will turn back rather than make a fuss
Always avoid a quarrel.
Always avoid a qyuarrel.














''i






















BRAVE PAUL.
Paul was coming out of the school-yard, when he saw
a runaway horse coming down toward him. He sprang
into the street, caught the horse by the bridle and stopped
him, to the great joy of the little girl in the buggy. He
sprained his wrist, and his mother is doing it up.

11







-N y hs bn vy ad is ds t y
















easy-chair, and her brother and sister are close by, anxious






hay and cheerful.
Pi 'i






6NELLY.









easy-chair, and her brother and sister are close by, anxious
happy and cheerful.














happy and cheerful.




ROB-BY AND HIS MASK.




























Ah, Rob-by, I see by the rogue in your face,
You will fright-en some poor lit-tle lad if you can;
But I'm sure I must say 'tis a shame and dis-grace,
Un-wor-thy of Rob-by, my dear lit-tle man!

















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HAPPY JACK.
Jack is happy because he has so much to do, and Ned
looks after him with big, hungry eyes because he has
nothing to do. I think if Ned tried as hard to get work as
Jack does, he would not stand there staring, with his hands
in his pockets.
AS-"








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POOR LUCY.

Lucy was playing with Sport on the long stone steps
in front of her home. He saw a cat, and started after her
so quickly that he sent Lucy rolling down the steps.
Mamma heard her cry, and coming downstairs, met nurse
bringing her in. Sport was a careless dog.






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A VISIT TO THE CITY.

"I have brought the children to spend a week with
you, sister. Take them everywhere I shall have to re-
turn at once, as I must reach home to-night." I wish I
could tell you all the nice places to which the children
went, and how much they enjoyed themselves.




















I-
-~-.-. -:
































must be a good scholar, for he has such a pleasant face.
Do you see his books, and can you read the figures on his
slate ? That building is the schoolhouse, and he is
almost there.
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almost there. -....









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Well, Frank, what will you have, candy or tarts? "
"Neither," said Frank, drawing himself proudly up.
They will not make me grow. I want some oatmeal for
my mother to cook for my breakfast. That will make me
grow fast and strong, and I '1 soon be a man.
grow fast and strong', lndl I'll soon be a man.










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an and Hattie took their shovels in the nursery, to











door, and told them to look out of the window. Mamma
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was watch ing. The saw papa, and in a twinkle were in
his arms. He had been one three weeks.
mak pah ntesow"te ad Nreoee h
doorand tld thm tolook ut ofthe indw am
was watcing. Thy saw ppa, and in atwnke eri
his rms.He hd ben goe thee weks

















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She will be too smart for them.
A BRAVE GIRL.
This boy has been hiding all night from the Indians.
They mean to kill him. His sister is bringing him a bowl
of milk, but she does not want the Indians to know it, so
she looks around as if she were not afraid of anything.
She will be too smart for them.










'-'-- ," - 7",- X '

























FIGS.
Of course you know that is a negro, and that he lives
in a warm country. But can you tell me the name of the
fruit he is eating? He is eating fresh figs, of which he
has gathered a basketful. I wish we had his basket to
divide among us.
"!s $'_. ----















l--. ',,,',"' t, ba ,,tiu. I-Fih c"" Td "'" ba l






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GOING AWAY.
These boys' father and mother were both killed in a
railroad disaster, when Jamie was a baby. Grandma has















been father and mother to them since. Stephen, the older
boy, is now going to live with an uncle in a distant city.
The boys do not like to be separated.
II ,
11 ",' :,' I I











Theseboys'fath r and mother werebothkil in a



railroad disaster, when-__-- Jami,,, was-a b.-n d h










beenfather and m--_.e-r- tth n ., S, the older







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THE TRENCHER CAP.

Willie came in from school and found Nurse fast
asleep. Now," thought he, "I '1 have some fun." So he
took off his trencher cap and put it on her head. She
started up in a perplexed way, raising her hand to her head,
while Willie laughed and shouted and enjoyed the fun.








Now, Nurse, aren't you foolish to be so frightened!





fun. They are fooling you.
























Now, Nurse, aren't you foolish to be so frightened!



fun. They are fooling you.





























THE BOY WHO WANTS TO LEARN.
Robert is very much interested in machinery. He
spends his noon hour among the workmen. Now he is
watching a saw cut its way through a large stone. The
workmen like to talk to him because he is so kind and
polite. He will be a wise man some day.
" ":~ .- I i""- :---- -- .. -- -
i -,- f'a i -- ..








































FREEZING.
"Why, Minnie," said Ted Fisher, "here is Dicky
Knapp asleep in the snow. I'm going to carry him home.
You run on and tell his mother." Dicky's mother had to
call the doctor before he woke up, and then Ted knew
that he had saved Dicky from freezing to death.
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COMING HOME.

Miss Peters and her brother have just returned from
a long journey. How glad their parents are to see them !
Will they not have inice stories to tell their little brothers
and sisters! I'm afraid they 'll get so interested that
they '11 have to be told when it's bed-time.
12
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at the vessels far out on the water. Harry does not want







his father to go. He need not be alarmed; his father loves
That sailor is trying to persuade his friend to go towell.
at the vessels far out on the water. Harry does not want


his father to go. He need not be alarmed; his father loves
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the land too wel!.















goiit
Sa pie a a lie. S


























Mamma are very proud of their little boy, and think he
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THE YOUNG ORATOR.
Benny is spea-ing a piece about a soldier. See h
flourishes his little .sword, and straightens up. Papa
Mamma are very proud of their little boy, and think he
be a smart man. But this is not always so. Smart
sometimes make bad and useless men












IN,
























NOT A BAD BOY.
Well, Mr. Policeman, you are mistaken this time.
Don't you see that Guy has not a bad face? You have
frightened him half to death, but he has not stolen any-

go when he tells you all about it.
'l,' ,'














@o when hie tells you all ablout it,












7--1
I'r'i.'AI---- -~--' -- .



























THE LITTLE NURSE.
"Mamma," said little Rose, Benny is so much better,
let me stay with him, and you go and take a walk." Beimny
said, "Do go, mamma;" and she went. Rose told all the
news and some new stories, and Benny fell asleep. Then
she leaned on the bed and went to sleep too.















-4 W.
'k



















THE LITTLE FLOWER-GIRL.

Little Ruth went into the garden to gather flowers.
She had filled her basket and picked a small bouquet, when
she saw a beautiful butterfly getting his breakfast out of a
flower-cup. "Now," said she, I'll have you." But when
she thought she had him, away he flew.














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GRANDMA.
It is a warm day, and grandma has fallen asleep over
her book. Tim and Jack are watching her nod and doze.
Tim says, Let's tickle her nose with our feather pen; she '11
thinks it's a fly." They love grandma, and are kind to
her, but they are full of fin.
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her, but they are full of timn.










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earnest about it. Little boys ought to use their.eyes when
they go to walk.












----


























SCOTCH BAGPIPER.
This is Sandy, the bagpiper. He has wandered away
from his heather-covered mountains in Scotland, and is
playing his stirring tunes to the music-loving Dutchmen.
He is not a very handsome man.
- _.-.-- . _



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pl ,y n i' tirin'tu ,,,t ,"'...I, .,,.ic-.,: :'""" "-"






































Nettie's baby-brother has just had his picture taken.
Mamma had to hold him in her lap, as he could not sit
alone. You can see her hands, but she did not want her
face to be seen. Is n't he a plump, sweet baby ? Nettie
thinks he is just splendid.
---- -- ----






















THE BABY-BROTHER.
Nettle's baby-brother has just had his picture taken.
Mamma-c had to hold him in her lap, as he could not sit
alone. You can see her hands, but she did not want her
face to be seen. Isn't lie a plump, sweet baby? Nettie
thinks he is just splendid.
































II1




KINDNESS.
Wha is the matter with this man ? I will tell you.
A little kitten fell into a very deep well. This man was
let down with ropes, and he brought her out more dead
than alive. The water was so cold that he is nearly chilled
to death. How kind he was.








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THE BABY AND WOLF.
You dear little baby Do you know that old Watch
is saving your life? While you were asleep a great
hungry wolf came in and would have eaten you up, had
not old Watch seized him by the throat and killed him.
When you get older you will understand what Watch has
done for you.
.: .. \: --


















When you get older you will understand what Watch has




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