• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 A story
 My lover
 Say please
 Jumpity-jump
 Shadows
 The chimney bird
 Back Cover






Title: Tell me a story
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055781/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tell me a story
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Blanchard, Amy Ella, 1856-1926
Waugh, Ida, d. 1919 ( Illustrator )
Worthington Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Worthington Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1888
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1888   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1888
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: illustrations by Ida Waugh ; verses by Amy Ella Blanchard.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055781
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222844
notis - ALG3090
oclc - 70222517

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    A story
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    My lover
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Say please
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Jumpity-jump
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Shadows
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The chimney bird
        Page 16
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text
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LEASE tell me a story, Peggy."
Well, then, and what shall it be ?
About a star or a fairy,
Or children like you and me?"

Not children. I'm tired of children,
They always do something wrong.
I think a star would be better;
Don't make the story too long."

"Well, once a bright star was shining,
'Way up in the dark, night sky,
And it had a little sister,
That was shining too, close by.


And the moon was their own mother,
And she said they must come in;
But they said they didn't want to.
They'd like to see day begin


So they shone, and shone, and shone
there,
Till they had a great surprise:
For up came the sun so brightly,
That it most put out their eyes."











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AVE I a lover? I can't say no, He loves me dearly, and I'm sure
For some one always tells me so. His love is warm, and strong and pure;
And I let him ? Of course, you see n all the world he loves me best,












It does no harm to him or me. Thinks I'm the sweetest, prettiest.


Do we quarrel? Why, how you ask He says he'll have no wife but me;

Me questions. Take me quite to task. Wherever I am he must be;
We quarrel? Yes, we sometimes do; My steps he guards with loving care,
But then, we kiss and make up, too. When we go walking anywhere.
What does he lover? I can't? Is he tall ? You think I'm proud of him, you say.








Blue eyes or brown? mouth large orsmall? Such are not found, dear, every day.
HisFor someyese one always tells me so. His love warm, and strong and pure;
And h e is quite tall, so they say. You'll the world he love for your ownbest,
It does no harm to him or me. Thinks I'm the sweetest, prettiest.


Do we quarrel? Why, how you ask He says he'll have no wife but me;







WhMe questions. Take me quite to task. Wherever I am he must be;








You look so gravely all the while;
We quarrel? Yes, we sometimes do; My steps he guards with loving care,








I'But then, we kiss and make up too. When we go walking anywhere. be his mother,

WhyWhat does he look like dear he i Your baby think I'm proud of him, you say.
Blue eyes or brown? mouth large orsmall? Such are not found, dear, every day.
His eyes are large and soft and grey, I only hope when you are grown,
And he is quite tall, so they say. You'll have as true love for your own.


When will we marry? I must smile,
You look so gravely all the while;
I'm old enough to be his mother,
Why, dear, he is your baby brother.



























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"' \- SAY hLEASE. ,, ..
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S O, not a bit of breakfast,
For chickens big or small;
Until you ask politely,
No single grain shall fall.
So, say Please, if you please,
Any way you want to,
With a cluck, cluck; peep, peep;
Or cock-a-doodle-doo;
With a caw-caw; quack, quack;
Say any one of these;
I am, not particular,
If it only means please.

Mr. Rooster, Mrs. Hen,
Set a good example,
Show the other ones the way
With a little sample
Of your Please, if you please,
Any way you choose to,
Crow or cluck, peep or caw,
Else I must refuse you;
Breakfast will be dinner,
Unless you all make haste;
And your dinner will be supper,
Before you get a taste."

Then up spoke Mr. Rooster,
And crowed his very best;
Cluck, cluck," said Mrs. Hen, and then
Soon followed all the rest. / J
It was Caw Caw! Cock-a-doo!" .
In voices high and deep,
The big ones crowed and cawed,
The little ones cried Peep,"
But everything meant Please,
We want our breakfast, please,"
Till Nellie said "I never knew
Of chicks polite as these."



















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eJUMPIrlTY-eUMP.



UMPITY! jumpity! jump!
My little sugar lump
Has kicked off his shoe,
And one stocking, too-
Such a baby to jump!

Trotity! trotity! trot!
Curly haired little tot
Must have some fresh air,
'Neath trees green and fair,
Before the sun is too hot.


Rockity! rockity! rock!
Baby-boy in a white frock,
All over the floor,
Like ships from the shore,
Baby and I will rock.


Niddy-nid! niddy-nid! noddy!
Such a sweet little body,
Now curl in my lap,
And take a good nap,
Off to the land of noddy.





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SHADOWS.


ANCE shadows, dance to us, bow to us so;
Come as we come to you; go when we go;
Grow big and little; grow short and grow tall;
You shadows that live on the side of the wall.

Fly shadows, fly from us; fast as we run,
You cannot go from us while there is sun;
Bob up and down again; fall when we fall;
You shadows that live on the side of the wall.

Hide shadows, hide from us; sun's in a cloud,
You will not play then, you're growing too proud.
Ah! there you come out, first one, and then all;
You shadows that live on the side of the wall.

Play shadows, play with us, just as we say,
Mock if you will, you cannot run away,
We are quite sure you will come when we call;
You shadows that live on the side of the wall.

Shadows, good-bye to you, we'll come again,
To-morrow, perhaps, if it does not rain,
There is no finding you, when rain-drops fall;
You shadows that live on the side of the wall.





































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Y Hav q rHIMte Y BIwrD.

'itTLE flying chimney bird,

Do you live with soot and smoke?
I should think 'twould spoil your wings,

lined your eyes, and make you choke.

You have queer taste, on my word,
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LitTTLE flying chimney bird,





Little black-capped chimney bird,
What a place to build a nest.
Do you live with soot and smoke?
I should think wouldd spoil your wings, perhaps,





Blind your eyes, and make you choke
You have queer taste, on my word,
Little, flying chimney bird.

Little black-capped chimney bird,
What a place to build a nest. do;
Good enough for bats, perhaps,
They are not so nicely dressed;

But for you, it is absurd,
Little black-capped chimney bird.

Little bright-eyed chimney bird,
Were I you, I'd take a tree,
Like the other birdies do;
Don't you look so pert at me,
Just as if you hadn't heard,
Little, saucy chimney bird.











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