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UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Florida farmer & fruit grower
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055765/00179
 Material Information
Title: Florida farmer & fruit grower
Uniform Title: Florida farmer & fruit grower (Jacksonville, Fla. 1893)
Alternate title: Florida farmer and fruit=grower
Portion of title: Florida farmer and fruit grower
Physical Description: 29 v. : ill. ; 33-50 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: S. Powers
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 7, 1891
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1893; ceased in 1899.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 5, no. 19 (May 13, 1893).
Funding: Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: PJ-50006-05
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved. Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002038466
oclc - 01387403
notis - AKM6256
lccn - sn 95026761
System ID: UF00055765:00179
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida dispatch and farmer and fruit grower
Succeeded by: Semi-weekly Florida times-union and citizen

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.. ',:; & FARMERS AlsLIANCESEMITROPICALMAGAZIN.E .

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''' 'CONSOUDATED JANUARY 1889.
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T !. w. IDACOSTA_' Preprleter8.t* POWERS' Jacksonville, Fla., TkHrsday, May 7, "1891. Whole No. 1162 ?fEW 8ERI.. .

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"nRA: GE GRovi. /CONTRACT BUD ING.
'
'' FOR SALE. CONTENTS. -.

rw One and one-hait miles from Peru"r1&.one-
':"ti.(. .J# mite : ; OROTK AND OacHAfti>-Cltrus Trlfollata-The Shamrock Orange; Combatting the Scale t Sag We now have a fine stock of Peach Seedlings
half from Alafla river. 110'bearing trees Apiarian Statistics; Frost Tall In Showers; . '. .- . 364' and :Marianna Plum stocks for .
; '.t ,; .In first-claw condition, 15 to 18'years old. Apiarian Statistics-Continued j Apiarian Statistics: Pruning the Banana; Grape Fruit'as a ready budding.We
furnish buds of
'rt !It. Good water, healthy locality. Tract contain. Tonic; '. 365FAKKKK can any varieties that have .t

.. ;.r" lag 70 acres. Address.,M., Peru, fla.BLAKE AKD TsucKKB-Cassara Varieties; Rice Cultlratlon In Clay County; How to Bed Out been brought before the public without extra
cost. Anyone having any new and choice varieties
Sweet Potatoes; Hale and Female Asparagus; Using and Shading the Soil; The Collard-
', :\ & RIPLEY: Street Corn; .368- they wish propagated will db well to correspond
a i} with us before contracting elsewhere. Our
"t, A NOTel Crate; W7lLmc
,, : .'"1. AGENTS ;,.;.;; 0 stock Is large and fine. Will receive contract orders ...
BTOC>t-The Stock Law in Leon County; Dehorning Cattle; . 367 :.
.:41;: to : *..J of any size. All orders must be placed by
'
: FLORIDA FRUIT
EXCHANGE; RncroauL: -Publication Becelred; Notes; The Orange Crop; Sandy Strawberries; Barbed ist. GRIPPING &BRADLEY
Wire Fence; Work for May; .,$> S68 July )1
Pomona Wholesale'Nurseries, Macclenny,Fla,
CHATHAM '
P'; 57 ST., BOSTON., Markets for Florida Produce; Questions and Replies; . . 369 J

I' .Price Catalogues of weekly sale furnished I GIKDEI AND LAwir-Aquatics In the Flower:Garden; The Overshadowing of Our Homes; 379 S. PALMER, .

: .4 on application. I OCR RUKAL Hom-A'Mother's Lament t House Furnishing The Better Way; The.Mad Stone; G. 166 READE ST., NEW YORK

," t Eating Bananas; Cold Air Cure for Yellow Fever; Recipes; '. . 371THXFA&XXBS
G.w.BABNz1T. I. LM IT SOUTHERN PRODUCE A SPECIALTY.
BBTA8L1 AiJJA CB-Bd Books; Alliance Patriotism; President Andrews on the Sub: Lemon and all
1 II. Oranges, Pineapple, other
Treasury Bill; .37) Fruits and early truck, also, dried fruit* j
/ BROS. .The Protest of the Farmer; . .. 373 nuts,fun,etc; j
BARNETT Reclaiming a Farm; No Fence or Stock Law; . 374 All consignments: promptly remitted tet. /
AGENTS about Fortunes "He's Boss Stencils and market reports furnished free. .,,;
o. Facts and Figures ; Sheep vs. Dogs; My ; From President S. S. ,
References Bradstreets and establishesmerehants
FLORIDA FRUIT EXCHANGE.. Harvey; .. 975Price and: banks of the, South.

Current of the State Alliance Exchange; . . .379
; Wb&Hli Oesuussida, Traiii tad,JtgfrKm*. LEMONS.

#f Prompt returns. BteacSs on application.! FLORIDA l!
15*South Water Street .1aaso. -
L Parties to have a of Strictly
expecting crop ',1
Facer Florida Lemons,will find,It to their ad '
F. HOBSON & CO., BUGKILLER.Kills vantage to correspond with us before selling.CUT 'f'
J No.28 Sonth Front Street. ODORLESS THIS OUT FOR. INFERENCE. .
-. PHILADELPHIA.COMMISSION J. B. MAXFIELD -'& CO.;
75-77 ParkPlace, 1

t MERCHANTS. Melon Bags Cucumber Bags, Tomato Bugs and Worms. Potato Bugs,'CabbageWorms New York., ]
Cut Worms, Rose Bugs and;aU other Bugs, Lice eta, destructive to vegetables, Reference-Chatham National Bank, N. Y.; J
it' Southern Fruits and Preaidentparmera' plants and shrubbery. Five-pound boxes,'25 cents each, F.O. B. Jas.A.,Harris, Citra, Fla. v]
Reference!-' Dr. H. Ridgwr.; .. ,;.I
Bank DoTer,DeLI;D.J.Cummfngs,President Smyrna H. G. HASTINGS & CO., Interlachcn, Fla., '
Baak-Smyrna; ,Dell Florida Fertilizer Co, Oabe- ., Line-St. Johns River
Day
rifle.Fla..; Johnson & Stokes, Seed Merchants,219 Seedsmen and, Florists. State Agents. :
e Market St? Palladelphla Col. J. De V. Hazard. 11
Bps National,Fla BaDk.Ph1ladelph1&;Maj.John Muffins. ,Norfolk,Va.; Produce Except Sunday. | j jSTB.

4 etendls famished when requested. Returns made PROF. N. A. PRATT, Consulting Chemist and Mining Engineer. .ELIZA HAH COCK leaves Jacksonville :'
on day of sale. i Q. L. PRATT, Assistant Chemist foot Main St.,at 2 p.m.for Hlbernla;MagnoHa,

y Green Cove Spring, Plcolata, Federal Point, .

,1. Free FlowerspW this Geological,. Mining and Chemical Bureau. : Orange Mills and Palatka. Leave Palatka ,

1 a.m., connects' at Green Cove Spring for 'i
f '< e&thly,price 60 cents per year,Into the home LABORATORIES, 73 WEST FORSYTE ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA., AND CORNER BROAD AND Melrose and Santa Fe.Arrives at Jacksonville ;
of everyone who loves flowers,who has a gar1 -
MARIETTA STS. ATLANTA GA.
12:30 m.,assuring early connections for the
',- ,or who keeps poultry we offer a three p.
',. .J4e BtM trial sabacrlptlon and packet of Chemical Analysis in all its Branches. Geological, Mining and North and West. E.V.H. POST, Gen.Agt; "' 1 1B
\," % flower seeds,over 800 kinds. ,for- only 10 Technical Advice. Phosphates and Fertilizers a Specialty. ; W. EBBKTTS, On Board.
l -I rents In _
1:. stamps.WESTERN GARDEN, 100 W. Bay St. r

4.2-4mo.. Del Molnec, Iowa. FALL AND WINTXB BXASON 1890 AND 189LB.
Very choice Niagara grape roots.rnn .
ON-RESIDENT[( T.PAINE. *. OVBBTOW PAINS* 65,000

GROVE OWNERS. Five-bud cuttings of Niagara
THE PAINE FERTILIZER COMPANY ,000 grape for sale cheap.

Wanted,by a man of large experience, the ,
r Both from old bearing Tines,well matured
management of a large orange grove. 'Only JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. wood and warranted true. to name. .
4- parties who are willing pay a ''good' alary I can locate a few very desirable. home
t ,seed apply. Best references furnished. Office 50 West Bay Street, Warehouses and Wharves at the terminus of the F. C.do P. B. R., steads In South Florida. .

Address "Manager,"care DISPATCH,FABICER St.Johns River, East Jacksonville. C. L PAGE, _

AND FRuIT QBOWXB, Jacksonville, Fla. -- 1.23Aabnrndale.. Polk O&,Fla.

Manufacturers ,of Commercial fertilizers.Wholesale .
PILES FOREVER CURED.If .
CANE MILLS
you suffer with any form of this! terrible dealers In and Importers of all kinds of Agricultural Chein1 ak.

loathsome disease and desire :to get cured Send us;your name-and we will mall you from time to time much general Information. More kinds and sizes of Mills and Evaporators
promptly, permanently and cheaply, use regarding successful orange and vegetable culture In Florida. for Sorghum and Sugar Cane,are made by The

Turkish Electric Ointment. Immediate re- BIy my er Iron Works Co.,of Cincinnati,.,
u & Action,cool and soothing. It Is the only than by any other works in the world. They are A
the tote maters' of the lector Gres Water and
remedy In the world and cures the worst cases The Finest Recommendation to be Obtained In the State.-Florida Experiment Statlon.-Jas. P' Nits Mills, the Genuine Cbot Evaporator, and the
In existence. Beat by 'mall on receipt of one DePass, Director. Automatic coot Evaporator. Send for Catalogue,
free We mean!business. LAKX: CITY, FLA.Oct.2o,1880. Prices,and The Sorghum Hand Book.
dollar samples.
-BO MKS8RS E.T.;PAINS Bos. Dear Sirs-I have used your'Orange Tree FC1Odon my
De& hesitate,bet remit at once,and,address .trove' for two year and my trees are growing very flnely. It Is an exeettenlfermiMr and I
fly, TURKISH PHARMACY Co., ,Albion, can recommend highly. Yours truly, j& .p.DzP.us.

TAMPA Fl&.,Oct.20,1890.Mzssas. .
.E.T.PAINE &SON. Gentlemen am so far satisfied with the results obtainedby so .
the of "Orange Food Fertilizer, of which I used over GO tons the part season. w U q.td aetomakearn 554.taenr
use
your .. Wepile.
too V. b.5.
PEAK..,F6R, FMFIT 'IN THE ,SMTH.ILLUSTRATED My fruit It very firm and heavy. Five years continuous of this brand shows that It produces a he wkes tit.pep.,. s three
:LIST FEEE.Jessa4itgi a thin ton h*akinned fruit,which carries to market under average eondlUoas In excellent 51.54 tmpm1 SukEla..,te.t.4Ij a 5e.j&a.pu.k
shape. Not one"bad order"report did I receive the past season. The wood growth Ipnla foe Y1a.Tud. 554 Ihrefrha.
Nursery Co., Tkelrsas. obtained by the use of your fertilizer is not as great. by some others,bat Is HXAXTHT and 1155 a.tm. IELDT6RCFU Hcspe.w 1 .nt.PCe..u Lwknlaaa. Ys
XJKBTAIN. YOUrS truly, JrM.WATBOUl.
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4 H 2 A THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, ,FARMER AND FRUIT-GROWER. [MAY 7, 1891*-*' ;..
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I, ; ,, THE EUREKA, INSECTICIDE. .. _, ..

1/1I ,

: Sure, death to the Red .Spider,. Rust Mite and Scale, ,"


: Insect. Has no Caustic Soda, ,Saltpeter, Potash .or: ,:

4Y :'- other caustic substance in its composition, and will .


__':not injure trees, plants or fruit. ... :,"

ONE QU&KT SUFFICIENT ... .
FOR FIFTY GALLONS OF WATER., .

SPRAYING MACHINERY: '.. .



.. >1-" In Great Variety. at Manufacturer's' Prices. > .


.. r::; E+ BEAN .

Waycross Railroad Wharf, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA '

...
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1 e ', SULPHUR: SOLUTION ; F

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'.!':' ',, INSECTICIDE; 1. ,: .
.: Is the most effective compound yet discovered for destroying the insects infesting the'orange tree, and, IO'..,

Is'a sovereign remedy for the various forms of fungi on trees and plants. Being free from all substances .

of.a caustic' corrosive, or poisonous: nature. it can be: handled with perfect safety to the person, and appliedto

the trees at any stage of growth without in ury. '

This insecticide has' ,been used ,by 'some of the the l largest orange growers in the State during the

past year,. and has given: perfect satisfaction. References, furnished on application.. .

..t; 'FOR. RUST MITE, USE ONE QUART TO FIFTY GALLONS OF WATER.

"".. For Red Spider and Scale, use one gallon to fifty gallons of water. General directions for using sent on application. ,

': ;:"' .. PRICE, 2Q CENTS PER GALLON .
r .In barrels. and half. barrels.' ', If there is no ,agent in your vicinity, write for price delivered. '

Manufactured:-by .
-
McMASTER & MILLER,
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_;. San Mateo and Cltra, Fla.
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J 'SAVANNAH: ,, 'FLORIDA 1 ,Y
., AND WESTERN: RAILWAY

IIF AND' .
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.P1brl.d: ID :1 x> Atola 3L.lxi.e-. : .
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With the Magnificent Connections. *


!n' : The, Great Fast Express: Freight System of the South. #

.
3. 'Tleytntloa of shippers Is directed to the Plant 8. S. Line between,,Havana Key West''and Tampa and South Florida RaIlway between Tampa and Sanford,a,F.A:W.By.beHweJa -
: k. y1AeGainesville, ,Balnbridge? I River Junction and Savannah,.Savannah and Charleston,and Ocean Steamship Line between Savannah: ,Philadelphia,Boston and New
York,aa<*Merchant*.and: Miners Transportation Company,between Savannah andal t imgc Thp; ,be#,equipped,fastest and most prompt lines between ail points In Florida'and all
poi&ta North and Northwest.'lReoeten t .and::Shippers will profit by the following unparalleled: connecUpns: : .
,2TOBTHDoable BQfl'D., I t SOUTH BOU2VD. _
daily fast freight service for..all.,points West via Albany,Jesup, Bainbridge andJjanyftuit Double dally fast freight service from all points North and West via Albany,BalnLridge
'. Jesnp and Savannah to all points In Florida;fast freight trains bothvla Gainesville,Jacksonville
freight all rail connection the Atlantic Coast Line to all Eastern,Interior ,Callahan and Live Oak.
and Coast points, including. New York,Boston,'Philadelphia,'Baltimore,Washington and Four ships a week by the'fleet steamships of the Ocean Steamship Company,sailing from
11 .14 Lce.' New York(New Pier 85,North River,)direct for Savannah, Monday, ,Wednesday,Friday:and
FOOT connections a week for New York via Oceanl&teamshlp: Company, ,'leaving Savannah.. .. Saturday. -
jH ttdays, Wednesdays Fridays and Saturdays. -" The Boston and Savannah Steamship Company's steamers will leave Boston 7,14.
'Two connections a week for Baltimore. via Merchants' and Mlnera'TransportaUon Company 21 and 28 for Savannah direct, making connection on the dock at Savannah watt last :'
,leaving Savannah every Wednesday and Saturday. _, freight,trains for all points Forida.Ce _
neMlonafor Boston via Boston and Savannah Steamship Company,leaving Savannah From Philadelphia via Ocean Steamship Co, leaving Philadelphia May 10, 20 and 30, .,...
r May 7,14,21 and 28., ... every nYe days from regular sailing day via New York to Savannah.
OOanec$& aa for Philadelphia every ten days via Ocean Steamship Company,leaving From Baltimore via Merchants and Miners Transportation Co., every Tuesday and
Baviaaah. May 6,H and 21. Friday, making close connection with B,F.A: W.By.for aU points In Florida.
BsdHfig! days for Steamships are subject tolchange: without notice.
The Florida r Dispatch'Line Is the quickest. and.best freight route from all points. North/Bart and West to Florida. For full particulars l ,rates,'stencils and shipping: receipts apply to ..
"" *' *
soy:aceato of.the above lines,or to WM..P.ttABDEB/Gcnl Freight Agent,'Savannah,Ga.
0.B.OWENS,Trade Manager,Savannah,Ga. 'F.B.PAPY,Asst.Traffic Manager,Savannah,Ga. W.M.DAVIDSON, Genl Traffic Agent, Jacksonville,Fla.
J.A.BPOTTSWOOD,Trav.Agt,Ga1n lT111e,71a. J.P.JOEDAJT.Trav.Agent,Quincy. J.E.DRAYTOX,Trav.Agent, Jacksonville. J.H.STKPHKJS: ,Agent,Jacksonville.

.. .

: i DARLING' COMPLETE. FERTILIZERS, ETJSTISEostis: NURSERIES, "

..' Lake County, Fla.,
.Made Expressly for the FRUIT,AND,TRUCK''GROWERS OF FLORIDA. .
t'
Offer for sale for immediate planting .,,' bi
:--Manufactured by the.- .

Ii 9 :DurUbBg. Fertiliser> Company, Fawtmcket, B._ -I. A FINE STOCK OF ORANGE AND LEMON TREES

.. 4
Southern Offices and Warehouses, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. One ana two year buds;choicest varieties,all grown oa pine land. ,
'
.W. H. MACOMBEB, General Sales Agent; Bostwick Building. My Nurseries were entirely uninjured by the March freeze. Plant now darteg the nJay
.
!Ottr:Fecttifeef have given Universal,Satisfaction the past season. Send fur Catalogue, season Write tor apeclal.prices. .* .. : .. /& ;
\ flvteg pftoM,and testimonials from same of the leading growers. .' G. H. NORTON:"
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j $2.00.PER,YEAR l JACKSONVILLE MAY 7, 1891.. [$2.00 PER YEAR

1;.
.. C rrove and Orc Ord. odor, or if any, a very faint one. In occur in May'or June, and yet all the The only objection that can, be
New Orleans this tree is a deciduousone fruit matures at the, end of October.In raised to the use of the Citrus Trifol
; its flowers appear a week or two November the leaves turn yellow iata stock is that it will produce 1

Citrus, Trifoliate-The Shamrock before the new leaves, about the 17thto and drop gradually, so that at the end smaller or dwarf trees. I do not con
Orange.As the 19th of March-say on St. of December none remain. sider this an objection but a quality;
Very many of our readers may Patrick's day. This peculiar te and The deciduousness of this citrus more trees can be planted in the same

successfully grow oranges by means the trifoliate form of its leaves entitles increases its hardiness; being dormantin space, the fruit easier gathered, while
of tMs'hewIy imported plant, who do that,tree to the' popular name of the winter and the circulation of the the trees can be better managed and

not now; we have solicited; from Mr. "Shamrock orange," which I have sap very limited, rupture-of the cells will be less exposed to damage by
J. L. Normand a loan,of the annexed given it. and death to, the plant by a freezing storms, high winds or tornadoes.The .
cut,which illustrates the fruit and leaves I have been told that this tree is an temperature' is nearly impossible in limeS'Democrat adds its testimony -

of this valuable acquisition-the three- evergreen in Japan, but in my garden: any of ,our Southern States. in favor of. the hardiness of the
1 leaved wild orange of Japan. Dr. in this city it is always.a deciduous While any variety of the ,orange Trifoliata, and also says that it believes ,
Gustavus.Devron, who is,well'known that it will,be invaluable, not only as
as scientific horticulturist, writes to a hedge plant,' but an admirable stock
tMe.Southerri. Horticultural Journal con for the Oonshiu and also the Mandarin

f cerningthe Citrus Trifoliata as follows: Tangerine and similar species of
I
} This is the wild native orange of I ," the orange, which are dwarfish in

Japan:. It is very hardy;,having stood' : : their habits and,growth.
the winters for seyeral years in the S S ,

latitude of Washington, D. C., with Combatting'the Scale. .
Editor Farmer and Fruit-Growers
put any protection. It is'uch used It was with :special delight that I
, in Japan as a stock to bud or graft have noticed for some time duringmy :
with other more tender varieties of the M h 1 1 rambles through the different
and is used 'l1 nl
orange also extensivelyto
groves on a visit to my pets, the bees,
construct impenetrable hedges. a general activity, snowing\ a deter-
, For the last few years this,new citrus mination to rout scale, spiders and all
,, has been found in the cataloguesof other insect pests.

..,. our.nurserymen, 'but, has not'been My familiarity with them in their ,f
tried as.much as it should have,been. 1 c r different
stages prompts me to say"that
t The Citrus Trifoliata when better
,in most cases, especially where
known and oftener used as a hardy
L infested methodsare
trees
are badly more
, stock for the more valuable and,more
to be used in their extermination.To .
tender varieties of the orange, will : make everything plain let me say
extend the now limited belt of successful that a badly infested tree should, in

and profitable orange culture. i\ the first place, receive a liberal application .
Haying been one of the first to cultivate f of fertilizer ';
ry some quick acting -
the Citrus Trifoliata in the
open and wood-producing; all branches ;
ground in"the United States, and per ,. sweeping the ground either entirely
haps the first to see it bloom and
produce taken off or shortened in such a man.
fruit in this country, I must say ner that they will not come in contact "l J

that I know of no :variety of the citrus with the ground. Now we are ready f
family that can be more neglected, for spraying. My own experiments

more.exposed to extremes:of temperature were made with a sulphur solution
or to excess of moisture and dry- '
(other insecticides may be equally as '
ness, with so much impunity., In good). An examination of the limbsof f
seventeen years that I have, had that j --:.::, a sprayed tree showed a certain |
.t citrus under observation I foundan
never
dissolving power of the solution;
,injurious insect on the tree, or its .. nearly all scale were loose on the .',
.
.
leaves flowers fruit. The Citrus '
or wood. If ,the fertilizer has been ap-
Trifoliata used stock offers another .' ,'.:, '. .i,
as a plied at a time to five the tree immediate -
advantage: the portions above the bud '..t ',,''(' /.
.i. : stimulation then and there,
.
when removed are not lost-when ".. in growing it will entirely throw them
.. ..
treated as cuttings they readily strike .. :, ': off. As the' insect at present in the
: .. s
and furnish stock for the following ;
root
new
egg, if not killed, will hatch on the

year. ground: and ,in maturity never goes a {
The Citrus Trifoliata, ,Karataz- CITRUS TRIFOUATA FRUIT AND J, AVBS. great distance (no limbs inviting it to

Banna,,or Gees, its Japanese'name, climb back), we'only have to contend 1jl
was called by Kcempfer, when he first tree, except seedlings of less than two family will grow well on the Citrus with .those not reached in our first j
saw it, in 1698,' Aurantia ,trifolia sylvfffnsr years, which retain their leaves the Trifoliata, I would advise the use of spraying. The mytttaipis scale, of /
jructu tdn((). The fruit has first winter. Satsuma and other hard varieties lately which I have found only two different. "

.. ,an ,unpalatable] pulp, but the rind or: The unpalatable but very pretty introduced from Japan, for the colder kinds, is a very pretty and neat fellow'
skin of the,same,, .is used as a component fruit is of the size of a Mandarin portions of this new untried orange belt. to look at, but he is bred in filth and
x ,of a celebrated.and popular rem- orange and contains some thirty seeds, I am glad to know that Mr J. L. continually creating filth. I have l'is

cdy.kBOwn in Japan as the Kihoku. which, on being immediately planted, Normand, of Hillside Nursery, Marks- closely examined the bark (or punct-
The tree in Louisiana grows to,the reproduce: the original plant, thus ville, La., has a number of young trees ures or other signs, but without success f'i
-if height of ten or twelve feet, with.nu. 'proving this tree to be a wild plant of these varieties, on Trifoliata stock, and, conclude that his principal
ft merous straight, stout and very sharp and neither a hybrid nor a sprout from at present ready for, sale, and I hope injury is in his habit of creating filth,.

theras(a good substitute for our barbed, some other citrus. When the first these may' be disseminated over a large stopping the circulation of sap and air,,
wke), the leaves are trifoliate, the blossoms, of March do not produce territory as a practical, test. of their CHAS. F. HL NING.
flows -are. very large and have no much fruit, a second and a third bloom hardiness and other good qualities. Orange Lake ApUrlec,Cltnu

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:Th64-; L. ,1'. 1HE FLORIDA DISPATCH P.AR1nrn..A.NP FRUIT-GROWER. [MAY 7. 18St' .
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'' NAMES AND ADDRESSES. ,. y.; ti ....1Il" .
.. ; O. q f! 5th. From what. plant does your honey 6th..._What. do"yon consider the
OFjTHOSE. REPORTINGAIII,9F. ., = : 2nd... What kind of bew.:are they?. 3rd. In what.kind of hivesigF ,, .. J !-- average lengthof. : your.
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; : so! :'.a. -; ..." i8 chiefly come? : season? *
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.John Cnycraft: Astor................. 35 Italian.......... ..................... Crosswise Langlstsotb........ Palmetto, Orange Grape and Button Bush... March to July ..........< .;:::.. 4
BeQJ.j Parks, Altoona............ ..... 38 Italians and Hybrids.................. ....... It 14 44 .. .. .. ... 4 months, April to July, .......
J. J. Dean, Orange Bend.............. 4 Italians and Backs ................... .Portico.......... ........... Comb .... Orange and Palmetto........................ 3 months .....................
}{.; M. Hiespell Poala........:..... 30 Blacks and Hybrids................... Simplicity. ................. Both....... ...1................ ..... 3 months....................... :.
r Aug. Leyonary, .: SO Italians. Hybrids and Blacks......... .1 ......!............ Tulip Tree, Gallberry: and Cabbage Palmetto April to July..............:..,
G. W. Icing Orchid......!.......:... 60 Hybrids ............................... II ;............;..... Extracted. Palmetto and Golden Rod.... ........ ....... 14\ months .. ...................
Alex. Langot.Alva...............i... .30' : ......................,,!........ Langstroth.................. Pennyroyal, Palmetto and Orange ........... January[ to June..............
James L. ICnos,Enos .....-........... I Blacks....................:.::.........Novelty.................... Mangrove, etc.....................-........... 9( or 10 months ...... .....:.::..
N. Graham Smith, Como..... ....... 7 Italians".,..........:..............:... Simp'City.: ................... .. Orange and Palmetto......................... 9 i months.......................
I* B. Johnson, Viola...,....:........ 25 .. ....,.................... ...... .................. Both....... .. ........................ 3 t months.......................
]. S. Womble Oviedo..... ........... 54 :i ................................ LanlfStroth..... ....... ..... Orange, Palmetto and Bay..................... 8 l months.......................
E. B. Plnnket Lake Worth............ 5fJ ...................... ......... ...... ........... Extracted palmetto.. ......... ........................ 3 months.......................
Geo. S. Rowley, Lake'Worth........ I Hybrids, ...".. .........!.....!......... Box Hive:................... Comb., ..... .. ..................... ... ............. ta months......................
J. I,. Wolfender Kvinston.... ....... 7S 1 .............................. Lanptroth.... ............. II Orange............ ...................... 4; or 5 weeks....................
A.,P. Brown, HunUng'tou..f.. 35 Italian.. ...... ........................ Dine Hive.................. Both."... Orange, Palmetto and GaHberry....... ....... weeks ............. .;;.-:......
Townsend & Brown Huntington..... 2S .......................-......r.. It.. .......... ....... 44 i weeks ..............:=..... ,
Francis Trueblood, Archer.. ......... 60 Italians. and Hybrids................ Langstroth and Heddon .... II Orange Cotton.Partridge Peas and Palmetto June to March ,.................

John B. Case Port Orange............ '40 Ita1i ns................................. Langstroth.................. Extracted I Jasmine, Orange, Gallbery;. Small and} 6 weeks .................. .....
} Cabbage Palmetto ....................
J. H. Hill Venice....,.... .......... 31 "..................... ......... SlmpUdty................... /. Saw and Cabbage Palmetto and Mangrove. .................................
J. B.LaMontague,Winter Park....:.. 15 II ........................... ..... Movable Frame............. Both...... Orange and Palmetto................. ....... .. ..............................
y;W. Harrison Huntington..*....:.. 8 Blacks................................. Dixie. ....................... Comb... ..... .. .. ......................... 3 months................. _...
C. P. Hochstein, President ..CityJ. ....... 5 ,I ................................. Heddon Hive...... .......... ......................... ...... ................ ........................... ....
N. Allman Osteen................. 6 4 ..............;................... Box Hives................... Palmetto, etc......*...... ..................... 3; months.................:::::...
Chas. P. Henning Citra.............. 420 Italians,.Hymethus and Syrians ...... Langtroth................ Both...... Orange, Magnolia and Palmetto......... ..... 4. to 7 months..................
James Hobkirk, Citra...... .... ....... 10 Blacks..:. ... ......................... Georgia Pot.-... Comb...... Orange and Palmetto......................... March to July...............:.
W. Heastman,Citra.................. 2S .. Simplicity................... Both...... Orange and Plum............................. ,4 to 6 weeks............1......
J. D. H. Wier, Narrows.............. I. Hybrids ............................... :: ................... Extracted PalmettoPennyroyalGoldenRod& 10 months.....................
II. T. Gifford, Narrows...... ... ...., ,. ............................... ................... 12 months..............;..::;.
Robt. Ayers Narrows....:... ......... 30 itallans andBlacks....... ........... II ...................' II Saw Palmetto................................. months ...................::. .
I. A. Webb, Penial....... ........... II" ................... Iangstroth.................. Comb...... Orange and Palmetto. ........................ ........................:.......:..
R. R. Brakeman Penial............ II Black5Italians./................................. It ................. ;; Orange and Gallberry ........ ............... '9 months.......................
C..W.Wal'JOUer. Lakeland.......:... .... ........................... SimpUdty............ .....j ... ..... ......................... .................................
L. L. Wilkinson Citra................. as Hybrids.............................. I-angstroth......:.......... Both..... Orange:Magnolia and Palmetto:::::::::::::: '5' months......................
J. N. Harris, Citra.................:.. coo Italians and Hybrids............. ... ..................1 Extracted. Pennyroyal and Palmetto................ ... ,.4 months.......................
T. M. Richards Candler :........... 20'" .. ....................Simplicity.. ................ Comb... ..... Orange Palmetto and Golden Rod........... > months.......................
Robert Sinclair: Candler......... ..... 5 Italians.............;................. ........ ...........1. ,. 4. .. .. ........... S, months........................
'W, J. Westover".Candler. 5 ::; .......!........................ U ...................: 'S Saw Palmetto.. ............................... '6'weeks................... ....
B. Sutton, Candler.................... 3 .......:........................ Box Hives................... 'orange and Palmetto........................ 'IS> or 7 months....... ........'...
W. H. Smith, Oak Hill................ II Hybrids................... ........... Langstroth.................. Extracted.. Mangrove .................................... June to August........ ....... 4
''T. N. Adams Oak Hill............... 40 B1 cks................................ Simplicity....... ........... Black Mangrove .............................. ................................. :IIS
J. P. Packwood, Hawks Park........ 46 Hybrids and Italians .................. .1 ................... II.. .. .. .............................. I weeks ........................
O. O. Poppleton, Hawks Park... ..... 26 hybrids and Blacks.................. Mixed...................... I' II ..... ......................... I to 2 months...................
H. Lutbge Hawks Park.............. 10 Italian........:........................Langstro.. ................ U .i is ............................... June 15 to August I ............ M
B. M. Storer Hawks Park............ 98 Blacks..........;....................... .................. .as. II I' .............................. '' days ........ ..............'..
Wm. P. Wilkinson Hawks Park....; IS Hybrids ..........:.................... Portico..................... "I' ......'".................. May 15 to July 15a ...............
W. S Hart Hawks Park.............. 117 Italians and Hybrids.... ........ .... Langstroth................ .II. Black Mangrove, Palmetto and. Gallberry.:.:: # months .................... J
Ira L. Donalds, New Smyrna.... .... 120 Hybrlds .............................. Gallup ...................... .. 44 44 II |. .... May i to July IS................
O.Olson, New Smyrna............... ISO Hybrids and Italians.................. Iangstroth.................. Black{ Mangrove............................... '6 weeks ........................ 1.
E. A. Marsh Oak 95 \ ./j so .................. ... .............. Black Mangrove, Orange and Saw Palmetto.. 3 months............... ..'..
C. B. Putcb. Hawks.Park........... IS. .... ............. ............. lees out on shares........................... ..........................
Mrs. A. A. Needham, SOrrento....... 61 ........... ....... ..;......... Orange Basswood, Partrige Peas and Asters.. iarch to November .,.:.;:.... .f

W. M. Brantley, Sorrento....... ..... 9 ] .; ................... Both...... Orange Asters, and Basswood Palmetto, Partridge.............Peas.....)[ 3 weeks ......... .......' .:....;.

Miss Anna M.Brooks Sorrento ...... 27 Italians..Simplicity.; .................. Extracted- Orange Asters, and Basswood Palmetto Partridge............Peas.....,/) 7 weeks...............::........ ',

J. B.. Hunter Wawahitchka......... 200 : .................. .II. .TytyTuplar Gum, Snow Vine and Orange...4 months.......................
Burton Hawkins, Wawahitchka...... 30 BlaCks. ... ........................... ................. .. .. .1.. ... 8 weeks ................;;, .'... '
R. A. Redd Wawahitchka........... 375 Blacks: and Hybrids................... II '0................ .. 41 44 44 44 44 44 ... 8 weeks....................... .
J. A. Council, Wawahitchka.......... 97 Italians, and Hy: rids............... .. II .................. 44 44 4f 44 44 44 3 months..............._....... .

Thos. A. Daniels"Wawahitchka...... 170 Blaclts............. .................... ................... .. ,;Tyty) Snow 30 days Vine; 4 Tuplar to 6 weeks Gum.6..to..8..weeks'.......;.1.).1.I J 3 months............... ...... ... a'

Alderman & Roberts, Wawahitchka.. I.JOO Italians Blacks... ............:.... :: ....."............ .. Tuplar ......................... ............... .'0.............-..........J.... I
C. C. Corbett, Macclenny........ ... 7 ; ..................... .................. i/ Palmetto, etc....... ..... :.................... February to June ........:;. ; 1
S. Lyon Macclenny.................. 6 Blacks................................ Box. Hives.................. Comb.... Palmetto and Galberry........................ February to June ,.......!......,
Henry Stokes Macclenny........... i2 .. .............:.................... .. .............. .... Extracted // 1 ........................ ,. .. .............
Aaron Gatherte, Macclenny...... .. I5 ...1 ........................ :. .-........ II.. ................... Comb.... ........................ U ., ....,......... !
W. J. Thompson, Macclenny....... coo :: ............. ................... :: :: ................... ........... Jasmine,Tyty' and Honeysuckle ............. .................................
W. H. Rawlerson, Macclenny:...... 35 I ................................. ................... ............ '.......... ............................:::..
B. Malby, Macclenny................ 4 :" ................................. Frame Hives................ Extracted .. .. .......... ....... ..........................
Geo. Combs. Macclenny............. 20 j ................. ........... ... Box hives.................. ............ Jasmine Tyty. Orange and Palmetto......... .............................:... ,
Elias Williams Macclenny............ 20 .. ................................ ................... .4 (t .4 tl ......... ........................ I
John P. Varna. Ft. Gates............ 12 Italians and .ybrids...:. ............. Langstroth.................. Both:::.::: Orange Gallberry, Tyty and Palmetto ::::::: Pebruary to June ....... .......
W. B. Shotwell Denver............... 2 Blacks.................................. Controvertible............. Comb .... Orange, Gallberry and Palmetto.............. March, April and May.......


i3 Frost Falls in Showers. low depression immediately on the ago, that they died halfway to the swapped off and had left it some time

Editor Farmer and Frult-Orower: margin. Large bodies of deep water ground. This was prior to the freezeof before on account of heavy frost on it

r As usual for the past four winters, help much for a little way out, but '86. I transplanted some of the every winter. I witnessed six in suc

no damage at. all has been done :in my small bodies are of but little benefit. trees after I settled here five years ago, cession every morning and the last the

thenmometer : But as to the effects of late frost in and the old dead tops yet showed on heaviest. A few years after''' I parted

I; April 4 5 registered the sand hills, I have heard from none them. Banana leaves were killed with it, it was sold by a Yankee agentto

44 as the lowest. The tenderest ba- but Avon Park ; and it came off un- there, also. Since then, however, no one of his own Northern brethren.

nana leaves were untouched.' .On touched. As to the flatwoods west, frost effects have been seen in that One winter only past and the buyer

Lake Reedy, one mile east ,of 'my south and southeast of this locality hammock. A year ago when so much met the agent and reproached him for {

house in a low hammock near the there was frost in plenty and ice in hurt was done, in March, not a leaf misrepresentation. "You said, sir,

lake margin, sixty feet below l the! hill three or four places heard from. ButI was touched there. Now, I can assign that this place you sold me was below

top I live on, there was frost enough was pleased to learn that while gar no reason for this, only that the the frost line." "Yes, said the agent,

to partially damage very. tender orange. den truck'suffered severely no damage frost shower was harder there nine with a forced laugh, "I did and it is

1\. plants in a seed-bed. was done to the citrus growth, either years ago than it has been since. AndI a -sight below it." When Greek

1 The man who settles 'ten feet above .in groves or nurseries. If so, I have conclude from this and other dots meets Greek then comes the tug of

the level of the flatwoods and of the ;not learned it. taken from other localities, some escaping war. Let the truth be told if it "Justs

lakes, which mostly are _on a' J level j i As I have remarked in the past, and some suffering that any Diana,JJ as the boys used to say in my

with surrounding flatwoods, is safer that frost much resembles rain in its place is liable to be overtaken. Still boyhood. A country built up 'on

than the man ten feet below him or, on deposits, I still maintain ,the position, as altitude in all sections does make a facts will stand, but i if on falsehood it

a level, with the lake. And. I would being more firmly impressed by further large difference, there is some reason will fall. S. W. CARSON.

rather 'take my chances'on a hilltop, observation. An 'incident in yet not well understood why the Midland Polk Co.
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from,thirty to sixty feet above the l lakeor point. On Lake Reedy, half a mileeast heaviest showers are there counter- Attention Voters.-.By. .resolution paused by Pour

flatwoods level without a particleof of my place, in a low hammock, acted. But there are some freaks in (.egisUtare,all good citizens are requested

water protection, than on the south lime bushes three or four feet high frost bite, yet to be explained.I to use Dr. Bn 11'.rough Syrup and recommendsame
= ,side of of i in so damaged by frost nine lived for that i as the people's remedy for coughs, colds
? any body water a sag or i were years on a place years I etc. 2 cta '' ". N
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_l 4T.: >,.,, ,1891 F-.. THEPLORIDA.DiBPATCH".PARVlm.AlO: ) FRUIT-GROWER.: 3IiI '



L-/i' !. ;;,, ; / .:lJA.EJAN: : SIJ.A.'J: :':[ 'JCS-ooc.t1nUed.:: : : i

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NAMES' AND ADDRESSES : 7th: What is yourJargest yield 0 e;s G loth. The average 11th. What b .your avenge ,0. 1,5th.. .What b your! entire...
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rt.. 1. -. :' 1 being' 100. whit price for honey? In ."
from A a crop ( poundS)?
? any one colony? [;
would you place VV' V
': I A this crop? > V .
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.. :CcnDb. Extracted. : Comb. Extracted. Comb. axtracted.f.
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John Craycraft. Astor,.... .....0.. .*.:.:. ............. ....... too lbs. 2 swarms 151Wa1'DU I 2O per cent ............;:;: td cents Both............... ............ 670 i. l l2S
Benj. Parks, Altoona......... ... .... .................... 251bs. 18" > It It ............. 9 .. DtTld ............ ............ '., ,
J. J. Dean, Orange Ben"--- : ... SO lb. ....... ..... 2 ................ 3S .. ." 12 to IS Carats ...... ........... .. ..... ........ .......... ................. \
H. M. Hiespell, Paola...........;...:.. .. SO lbs ....... ..... I" 7 swarm I.. ............ ........ ..... IS to so :: JO.to J2 :: Natural Swarming 100 None .1
Aug. Leyonary, Frauds.............:. .. .. 90 lbs 100 lbs. 5" 10 :: too below zero. l'olW 10 11 ............ .......... ... .. '.
G. W. E3ng, Orchid.................... .f. 32 New location, can't I&Y. ....... 7 DITJde............. ............ l.soo '
Alex. Langrot, Alva..... ............... :'::;:::::::::::::::: .:::: :::: :::::::::: ..... ......... .......................... .............. 50 cents per p11. Natural Swarming ............ lJO $
James L. Enos, Enos ............ ..... ............. ....... I swarm swarm ............... ....... ... IS cents 9 to 10 cents Divide ............. ............ ...........;..:.. i
Smith, Como.............. ............... ..... .....islbs.3 swarms ................ Nothing................ 13 /' ............. ............ 'fI. .......... :
L. It Johnson,'Viola.S. ...... ..'...... ....; 22.5 lb. ............ 2" 10 IWarmJISO I.. ......... .............. Soto 25 cents 1.5 .. Natural Swarming 350 .5o0 ,
]. Womble, Oviedo.a..u.... ... Ib,. zoo lbs. 5 ... ............. SO per Cent. Iu. 1'.. 8 :: ............ ............. .... .
!t. B. Flunket, Lake Worth........*... ......... .......... z5o lbs. 3" 3. swarm 1:10: .............. 6 Both... ........... ........... ...................
Geo. S. Rowley Lake Worth.......... ..... ...... ....:... ... ........ ..... ATerage. ... ........... ......... ........ Natural ........ ................F FTm1
J. L. Wolfender, Evinston...........': .sib : :::::::::::: ; swarms 25 rna 25 per Cent. I24 cents .....:............ .. ....................
r A. F. Brown, Huntington......... 1'''. LastWeruunyforinorcrease 125 lb. 3" 10"/ Entire Failure. 1,5 to JO :: lo cents Both ....Swarming.............. .......2.....;...
Townsend Brown, Hnntington...... ... ......... 2" 15" '1 4$ Into JO 10 Divide .. .........._ ...................
Francis Trueblood, Archer.... ........ 100 lbs. 200lbs0 30r 4":: 30 :: SO percent. 1,5 8 Natural -400 600'
John B.Case, Port Orange.... ........' ........ ..... ....... .... .2 10 20" to 12" S" Both.............. ............. 150
V. H. Hill, Venice .....................,. ...................:.. ............ .......... 18 .. 25" .. .............. DiTide.\......... ............ Joo
J. B. LaMontague Winter Park ....... .................... ........... 2 swarms. 9" At zeroo IS cents 10 II Natural Swarming'........... ...............
.W. Harrison, Huntington............ .................... ........... I .1 4" PaUure. IS'" 10 .. DiTide............. ............ ....(...........
C, F. Hochstein, President City....... .................... :........... ......... 2"o .......................... .............. ................. II ............. 30 ............ ......
J. N. Allman, Osteen .................. 20 Iba ... ......... 2 swarms 4 2,5 per cent. uH cents 85{ cents Natural Swarming .........
Chas. F. Henning Citra .......... ..... w. 180 lbs. ........ .......... 80 u 750r.So :: :: 205 :: i .to6aud Divide................... ... ...................
James Hobkirk, Citra..... ............. 601bs. ......... .., .......... ................. 30t040 IS .......... ... Natural Swarming 40..........:..... '
W. Heastman, Citra.................., 8 barrel 28 lbs. .....:... 2 swarms .5. 2S" scents 130
J. D. H. Wier, Narrows. ............ ., ......... .,......... 20lbs. .......... 8 :: I ................ ......... .............. 7" ," Both........................... ............. ._
H. T. Gifford, Narrows ..... ...... .... ., ....... .8olbi. 2 swarms 12 .......................... ............... 7.. .. ............ ........... >. "800' _
Robert Ayers, Narrows'................,...................... ....... ..... I" 16" ..................! ...... .............. 8tozo DITlde............. ............ ..............i.'.1
J. A. Webb, Penial................ ....., .. ...... .......................... .......... ................ ................. .........1,5 to 20 cents .................. Natural Swar.ming' None None
R. R. Brakeman, FenialC. .......... .... Last year Go; lbs. ...... .......... .... ........... :Failure. JO IS cents ..... .
W. Waggoner, Lakeland............, ..................... ....... ..... ..... ..... ................ ................. ......... IS" ........ ......... .... ...... ...... ..........
L. L. Wilkinson, Citra ................., ................................. .......... ....... ......... ............ ............ .....:....... .............Both. .... ............. ...
J. N. Harris,Citra................. :..:..L. .. ...i ..... 60 lbs. .......... 10 swarms 10 per cent. ............... 7 cents DiTide.. ........... : :: Boo
T. M. Richards, Candler... ........,.. ................ ... ........... 4 swarms 25 ". .......................... .............. .................. Natural Swarming............. ...:. .. .. ....
R.obctSinc1alr, Candler............... 30 lbs. ..... ....... ......... ................ ..................... ..... m to 25 Cent! Ij cents :: :: ........... ..............'.
W. Candler....to......... ............ ......... ............ I swarm 2 swarms At zero. .............. .................. ........... ...... .....,..-..".
B. Sutton, Candler..........:...... .. 401bs. ..... ....... swarms 2." ................ ......... .............. ....... .......... .. .... ...... .............:.,,
W. H. Smith, Oak Hill................ ............. ...... 1,56lbs.3" 5" 3.5 percent. .............. ..-................ .. .. ............ I. : .504'
T. N. Adams, Oak Hill................. ........... .. :...:.. .......... .. .. r.................... ..... ..... ......... 734cents DITfde............. ............ J.4006Sto70
J. F. Packwood, Hawks Park......... No record :::::::::::: :::::::::: 6 coloaieaNo i per cent .............. 7 11 Both............... ............ X8308o
O. O. Poppleton Hawks Park......... record....... ..... I swarm I" 160 II II .......... ... 6" Dinde............. ............ 4,000
H. Luthge, Hawks Park...... ......... ................. .. ISO lbs .......... ............... .. ..... ....... 7. .. ...........1..1.... ......... ... 950
E. M. Storer Hawks Park............. ................... ............ 1 swarm 2 colonies 87" 1/. .............. ............ .... DtTfde............. ............ 8r400
Wm. P. Wilkinson, Hawks Park..... .................... .;.. .. .. ... 4 swarms 10 > 100.. .............. 6 to ? cents .. ............. ... .......... 750
W. 3. Hart Hawks Park............. ................ ... 32634lbs. .......... 2S 83 I. II .......... .. .... 7 to 8" "/ ............. ....... ...... 105,060
Ira L. Donalds, New Smyrna..... ..... ........... .... ... 117 lb.. 2 swarms 3.5 75. :: : .............. 7 :: ,. ............. ........ 5.021SO
O. Olson, New Smyrna ................. zoo lbs. 400 lbs. 3 :: :: IS cents .5 Both.............. .:.. ... ... 5.000
E. A. Marsh, Oak Hill. ............... ...... ............. ... .... ...... 28 ... ................... ............. 8 .. DiTide............. .. ...... 7,1
C. B. Fetch Hawks Park.............. .................... ....... ..... .......... ... ............. ......:...........:....... .............. .................. .................... ............ ........._ '
Mrs. A. A.Needham Sorrento ......... ..... ...... ......... sty'r 325 ......... ... ............. ............. ........... 18cenb 10 cent .................... ............ ................
W. M. Brantley Sorrento .................... ........ ... 3 swarms 5 colonies ............ ...... ...... I23 :: 10 :: Natural Swarming too So
Miss Anna M. !Brooks, Sorrento........'I ............. ....... .... .... .......... .... .... .:.... ..................... 20 10 ............ ...... .......: _"fM
J. B. Hunter, Wawahitchka.......... ............. ....... .135 lbs. 5 swarms .None percent. .......... ..60 cents per pu. Both.............. ......:..... 2ooe i
Burton Hawkins, Wawahitchka....... .................... ............ ; ........ colonies ..... ........ ............. .............. .............. ... Divide./....... 1,600
R. A. Redd Wawahitcbka........... ......... ........... 180 lb.. S swarms Double 20 per cent. ............ 7 cent! Both........ ....... ....... ..... ..........,....... _
J. A. Connell Wawahitchka...... ..... ................... Ito lbs. 3 None 20" ........... ... SO to 7SC. Per gall. Natural Swarming ............ 4zoo .
Thos. A. Daniels, Wawahitchka. .... .... ...... .. ...... .....:...... I" 25 colonies .:............... .. ...... .............. 60 cents per.. plL.. Dindc............. ............ .. ...: ...ti : .
Alderman & Roberts Wawahitchka.. .......... .... ..... V z5o lbs. I Some years zoo None ... ..... ..... 60 It .. ............. ......... .. 100,000.
C. C. Corbett, Macclenny.. .......... ........ ...... ..... ........... ... ....... ,.............. ......:. .... ............ ........!...... ....1............. Both............... ......... .......I..f.. .
8. Lyon. Macclenny........... ....... ..... ......... .... ............ ...... ... ....1........ ... '.......................... .............. ..)....... ...... Natural Swarming .......... .............,..:'i.a. .
Henry Stokes, Macclenny .... ........ ... .... ........... ..... ....... .......... ................. ..... ...................... .............. .................. ........... .....,......,..
Aaron Gutberie, Macclenny......... .............. ..... ............ .......... .... .. ....... ............ ............. .............. ....... ? ............ ..........:....:.YI
W. J. Thompson, Macclenny......... ................... ........... ...:...... ................ '......................... .............. .................. It ............ ..... ...'l.......
W. H. Rawlerson, Macclenny........ ........... ...... :.. ... ..... ... ... ....... ................ .................-......... .............. ................. .. II ..... ........ .....V...........
E. Malby. Maccleuny................. .....,.;........ ..... 3.5 ibs ......... ................ ,... .................. ..... .............. .................. ............ ...-.............
Geo. Combs, Macclenny............. ... ............. ....... ............ .......... ..........,.... ......... ........ ......... .............. .................. .1 .. ............ ...............
Elias Williams, Macclenny...... ..... ....:.... .......... ........... ...... ... ................ ................... .. ..... ............. .................. ..... .............. ............ ............. ..
John P. Yarns. Ft Gates ............. ............... ..... 260 lbs. ..... ..... ........ ....... Failure .............. 'I per pll. DI.lde.. ........... ........ .... ...... .........
W. B. Shotweli, Denver................ ........... ... ..... ............ I swarm I colony 25 per cent .............. t5 cents per comb ............. 3S' ... .......

Total number colonies 4743. Largest-yield of comb honey 325 Ibs. Largest yield of extracted honey, 400 Ibs. Total number of pounds of honey : Comb 1,978 ; extracted I7o 297. Making
a total of 173,375. Average number of colonies to each person about sixty-eight Thirty-three men report on honey averaging aboutsixty hives to the colony. Langstroth hires are the rule. Sur-
I plus honey comes mainly from the Orange Gallberry, Tyty Tuplar, Snow Vine, Saw and Cabbage- Palmetto, Black Mangrove and Pennyroyal. .1

A. F. BROWN. HUNTINGTON., FLA.'t


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Apiarian Statistics. spring months, and by moving my I cut the leaves off about xooo plants the pulp in a salad bowl and serve it

Editor Farmer and Frmt-orower. colonies the first of June to the Halifax about the middle of November. We ice cold and au naureI t is delicious .

I send you herewith for publication, river district, a distance of thirty-five had no frost'' until the first of January, served as a salad, with French

inthe, FARMER AND FRUIT GROWER, miles, I can secure another crop from and during January had a good deal dressing. This is the "Forbidden

a tabulated report of the beekeepers of. the black mangrove, their main source of cold weather and frost and every Fruit" of Paris shops. If you notice

Florida, who responded to my call for I there, which comes in July. And one of my bananas were killed to the the depression near the stem end, you

statistics last winter. again, these colonies could be taken ground. From all appearances I will see that they resemble the printof

This report will be of great valueto further South and another crop secured don't think I l lost anything] by their teeth. This according to popular

all beekeepers, and therefore 1 ask from the pennyroyal during the being killed, for with the.. leaves goneI tradition, is the mark of Eve's teeth

that you give space for it in the columns fall and winter months. don't think they would have borne when she bit the fruit, which was a

of your widely cirCUlate paper.I With proper hives and fixtures this fruit: of any value, for the loss of sweet orange before, but afterwards

deem it i important that it be published moving can be easily accomplishedand leaves took all the vitality from the became bitter. The negroes of the

i in full as given. By eferring will pay well where a man is stem. I write this for-the benefit of South tell the same story about the

to the report you will see that in different well posted regarding the different others. A. J.> ALDRICH. persimmon, though they do not show iJ

districts the seasons and urces localities. A. F. BROWN. 'Orlando, Fla.Grape. the print of teeth. They believe it .

of honey vary greatly. To a wide Huntington, Fla.Pruning. was once well flavored, but was the

awake man .this is valuable, as he Fruit as a Tonic. one forbidden tree in Eden, and when

can secure two or three crops in a the Banana. : The piles of huge grape fruit whichare Eve tasted it, it became acrid and has 1

year, by moving his colonies to lo- B 11 tor Farmer and FrnU-Orower: to be found on the fruit- stalls call remained so ever since.-New York ;

y calities where the honey flow comes Last fall I read an article in your to mind the tonic value: of this fruit Tr&unt. '

at a time when there' is none in his paper by Mrs. H. P. Walker, I thinkit eaten as a salad, or as'an introduction m i > .;

4 own. To illustrate : I can take a was, advising cutting off all the to breakfast. For the latter remove Florida expended the last scholasticyear

good crop in my location from orange, leaves on bananas and they would the thick rind and tear off the $476,490 for the support of common ?. -'

gallberry and saw palmetto. during the then go through quite a freeze safely. epidermis around each lobe; arrange ; schools.- :.V .


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.w :.' F ]' :E ,J1\l] '1'l\T! ElI \. wiI1-again be up.iii a few,,hours.. ;When Male,and' Female Asparagus.It side of this patch of peas last( year) ,
another crop of grass is up,run around has been ascertained by recent: was a strip of potatoes, on the other ;
Cassava Varieties. with a five-inch plow while small. After -experiments with male and female asparagus side was corn. ",
.It Editor Farmer and Frnit.O" OW TIn : this I take a twenty-inch sweep, or plants that the male plants This year corn covers the three
July, '1878, I received from the "gopher" and go between each row' gave an average of fifty per cent. more, spaces and extends beyond; but a ;
Agricultural Department at, Washing. once. Next, with the same plow, I yield than the female, and the shoots stranger could easily mark out in the !
ton, D.*C., a package containing five go between the rows as before, ,only,a were also, larger and the crop earlier.It centre the exact space occupied by
*. parcels of cassava cuttings,"represent' little deeper than the first tim Witha was found that the differences in last year's peas. The crop from that ',":
K ing as many different varieties, and little hoeing, I am 'done. yield were greater in the earlier part space will not exceed one-third of that
/ apparently: four were of one species, The question is asked, : "Does it of the season than in the latter part. on an equal space on either sideorany
viz.,: Manihot aipi and !the.,other pay?" Here are the figures: Last yearI Male plants can be secured for a certainty part of the field for that matter.
Af. utilissima. Two of them failed to planted three acres in rice Those by the division of old plants, or There was no manure put on the ground .
grow, and I. have lost their names;' three acres would, have satisfied me bya better, by the selection from twoyearold surrounding the pea patch, either last ;
the,;:others were named as', follows\ :' yield of thirty bushels, of corn, hadI seedlings of such as do'not bearseed. year or this. Now, what is the cause
Brumilla Sweet, Yellow Heart and planted the land in'corn., I gathered It has been contended for a of this year's failure on that spot? .
Bitter or Poisonous. sixty bushels of rice from those three long time by growers that,there was a My.impression'(founded not on this '..
The first of these is much like' the acres. A few,years ago I planted one difference in profit between the two, experience alone) is that fertility of
common sort except the: blossom, acre in cotton and sold the cotton for and these experiments which have soil is maintained through activity of ,
which is, quite distinct .The second 1280.; The'next:year I planted the proven it to be a fact are timely.- growth, rather than through idleness, .t
.L
is quite distinct in the color' of ,theroot same piece of ground in rice and sold California Fruit-Grower. that nature takes her rest during the :
which is .a,rich salmon, and the the ,product for $21.10.I *. .. winter and rebels against. forced inactivity :
'' believe that of the datwoods Using and Shading the Boil.
new growth much the same, but .a any ) during the working season* i
shade lighter. The Bitter in the color or meadow lands of Clay county will The vines from my acre devoted to Also, that the exposure of the naked f
of ,the root, habit, of growth and produce rice-two bushels of nee to green peas have been removed and the soil to air and heat, under the direct 1.
foliage, is like the common variety one of corn on the same land. ground is now,covered with a,beautiful rays of the summer sun, through some
except the new growth,,',which is very. I never fertilize my rice, neither doI growth of "foxtail" grass. 'I usedto agency which I do, not understand, ;;1
dark, nearly black. ever.plant it on my best land. Medium fight this grass as an enemy to my unfits the ground for a crop in,some :;
_ ,We did not cultivate "it long, as : poor land produces more grain crops; but of late I have been inclined other way, aside from the actual with :
about this time we read' Dr. Swein- ;and, ,less straw.-Green Cove. Spring. to regard it with a more friendly spirit. drawal of fertility. I draw this last ,
furth's "Heart of ,Africa," and one +-ii''< *. I The peas were kept perfectly clean inference from the fact that in other t.'
of his carriers died from eating poison How to Bed Out Sweet Potatoes. 'until the vines had nearly got their cases somewhat similar to the one I 1t
cassava or manioc as he calls it. From The potatoes to make "slips," (we growth; and this recent, rapid,springing have mentioned, the fertility (or con- 4
this I became,satisfied that its poisonous call them draws), should ,have been up' of the foxtail came too late to dition favorable to producing a crop) ,,:
properties were ,not a,fiction' but a bedded out ere, this, though it will injure the crop in the slightest degree, has returned, on the third year, with J
fact, and at the earnest solicitation of still do to put them out.to the loth of while on the credit side of its account the aid of manure.-Country Gentle'
my wife I destroyed it. The Yellow April.. There i is not much' to tell you stand,two prominent items: man.. ',;
Heart is a very distinct variety. The with reference to putting ,them out. 1. It covers and protects the soil **++ i
root: is yellow and so' are, the tender Make a rich and mellow bed abouton during this dry, hot weather. The Collard-Sweet' Corn. ,
leaves of.a recent growth. As compared ,. a.level with the' general surface of 2. It gives me a good coating of It is well known that in all the 1
with the common sort the roots the land, place your potatoes upon it, green manure which I intend to plow lower country of the Southern States, ;
are ,more compact and ,stocky, are, close together ,but' not touching each under, when conditions are favorable, the production of fall cabbage: is 'a
softer when cooked'and more mealy other and cover with four inches of early in September.The I difficult matter. Not only is the I'
when. mashed. entirely mellow soil. It is best to benefit of this green manure isundoubtedly I climate unfavorable to their development ,
The Brumilla Sweet has a root 'of have a good deal of decomposed veg. great. Not so valuable, but the insects which attack
the same color as that,of the common etable matter i in the covering to prevent perhaps, as a growth df clover; but them are more numerous and various. i'
of surface. Pack the that without effort Our Northern readers have doubtless I
sort) and my wife.'thinks' it is, more baking one comes or cost-
easily cooked tender. and has soil well upon the potatoes by beating even forces itself upon farmers of this noticed in the seed catalogues i
rt less of the woody pith.... But the upon it with the,back of a spade. If section, and challenges them to either "Georgia Collards" quoted with ',the "r,;
difference is so unimportant that it the location of the bed slopes a littleto accept it or enter on a long and doubtful remark that they are a headless variety ';
hardly justifies its cultivation 'as a'separate southward U will favor the earlier war of extermination. of cabbage grown at,the South in lieu
sort, while the Yellow Heart, appearance of your draws. The soil In regard to the benefit of keeping of something better. The fact' is that
has both distinct and very desirable after having.been patted down shouldlie the ground covered with vegetation, collard is a very hardy species, of the
qualities, making it as near perfectionas at least four inches thick on the and in an active, growing 'condition cabbage family, enduring the summer
a cassava root. can well be. potatoes, to give them root enough during the mid-summer, let me give heat, resisting the attacks of insects,
JAS. H. WHITE. ,for transplanting advantage. one bit of experience, whose results standing out all winter and becoming
Island Home, Brevard Co.,April'21,1890, In putting out our draw bed we now lie directly under my eyes. Last very tender and delicious from the
We received from Mr. White a have a way of our ,own, differing a year I mentioned in the Country Gentleman effects of frostThough
package of the seed (stalks) of the little from,that of most other persons. my attempt to raise two crops hardy enough to stand
Yellow: Heart variety,.which were.very The majority of potato growers bed of f peas on the same ground, resulting here where grown, the collard is much
hard and seemingly slow to sprout out'small tubers for draws, ,but ,we in absolute failure. The ground was improved by binding the top to the
We have given them to a very intelligent always select the best to be had, believing in a fair condition of fertility when ground and covering the entire stem
'neighbor who is growing cassava that they give better results.; planted. With an eye to labor-saving and leaves with earth only leavingthe
who will plant and report on' their' We furthermore split each potato in (having more ground than muscle) I open tip exposed. In this way
quality.-ED. half 'the long way, and lay 'the'cut set the rows three feet apart and worked they bleach finely 'and are far more
,9. side,down in the bed. ''Half a potatoso them with a two-horse riding cultivator. tender than the ordinary headed cab-
(' Rice, Cultivation, in ,OlaY'County. laid will send,up as many draws as I kept the ground clean, and the peas bage. Like most Southern vegetable
I ,have; been asked., by several how a whole one. 'Then there is another being a dwarf variety gave little shadeto products but little attention has been
to plant and cultivate rice., As I have advantage on the side of the split potato the soil. From these peas I got a paid to the improvement of the col
planted this grain (or fourteen consecutive -. : It'will 'start all its sprouts from, good crop and the vines were removedin lard. But it is doubtless capable of
years, ;I think ,I,have,learned the l1pper side,. whereas the whole po- the latter part of June. The groundwas great improvement In looking overa
: somethingabout: it. Here is.my,: .system tatol'will start as many draws'from the t liberally manured, thoroughly patch of collards here one can see
: under, 'side as from the top. When pulverized and resown to that dwarfest. numerous varieties, 'some with purple'
First, clear away all trash, .as' rice you'pull-a draw started from the un. of peas, the American, Wonder, in leaves, some with green savoy-like
when small,' is easily torn up or.mashed :der side you either break it. off or drills three, feet apart. These were crumpled l leaves and others inclinedto
y .. down then break and harrow, the land move .the potato. If you intend, to cultivated a few times when the mildew be bleaching like the white
r' 1IF well., At,any time between)March,.20 draw your bed more than 'once, this 'attacked them, and soon after plume celery. ,
,and May i make lows ,withA,five-inch moving ,of the bedded potato is they, were plowed under. Once or Recently we have received letters
plow,two,and one-half"feet ,apart: ;andas against you, as it will 'not send up twice after this the harrow was run from two gentlemen in Georgia who
,straight as possible. ,Drop from six new draws near so promptly would over,the ground as the tiny blades of claim to have improved the collard to
to twelve grains of rice to sayaevery one,undisturbed. .The split potato is "foxtail" struggled to make an ap- the point of making good heads. One i.
ten inches of row. Cover with\.the never,moved. by pulling off the draws. pearance. With the dwarf crops, the of these has sent us seeds and the 1
same plow-two-furrows.: -Ex.If ; many cultivations, the plowings and :other has promised them, and we will .
When the rice, with' a crop of grass, i < harrowings, the ground was almost as start at the North Carolina Station in
I is. ::cut off both rice.and grass. ....The ricc_ .accent*,'Z .h ..: especially the mid-summer. On one much further advanced than"wer -
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Y 7,1891i| 'THE. FLORIDA DISPATCH,-,FARMER ANDjFBUIT-GRQWER: ,-. )367

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hoped for, The, great fault with ,all Live' tocl\ not make them sick, that they did not!: hair soon covers the stub. The saw--

., pur-Southern-vegetable growers is,too \. lose a feed or.shrink i in their milk and ing:should. b.e'close to the head as 'ihe '
; ,
... ........,.. ....... ......... .
great a reliance upon the North for healed up quickly. One lady with 'horn' is softand: cuts easy there, ;and

everything .in the way of seeds and a The Stook Law in Leon County. withering scorn said to, me, "I then the hair covers it nicely,and out ". ,._ \.

neglect .to improve the native and Editor Farmer and Frult-Orower. suppose' if you had a cow that""would of sight.-Practical Farmer. : ... :,j
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The no fence law which is ;
naturalized plants adapted to ,the climate. opera kick you would saw'her legs off?". I : \
tive in the northern little .
portion a
The ,collard is evidently a'survival than one-half of answered: "Certainly, _madam,; but, I I Owing to the poor freight accom
f of the fittest" for this climate more Leon county, would fatten and kill her ,first." I 1 modations from this'point, our truck :,:
gives general satisfaction and is in
and there is no reason,why we',should have no doubt that there have been growers are forced to haul their vege- '
truth to the farmers who
not develop from it a cabbage. in every necessary cases where'cattle have been dehorned tables to Panasoffkee for shipment.This I
live in this section of
.a large majority
way suitable to our needs.. Will the that were run down in flesh and exposed is certainly a hardship when you ,
whom would find it impracticable 9'r
readersof; the Orchard Garden in to storms without shelter,' .that take into consideration the fact that
rather to fence their\ farms
impossible :
the'South who have special\strains, of they have suffered and some of, them the citizens built the road and had'guarantee a
Previous to its the annual
the collard aid us in this matter by passage died, but when cattle are in good condition of good service. Mr.:Du-
destruction of cattle and
sending in a few, seeds to.the::North crops to by all and have proper care, I believe val should, we think, keep his prom-
hogs was enough consume profits
Carolina Agricultural Experiment Sta- there is less danger and less suffering ise and see that we get at least a good
but this is all now a thing of the
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tion? than from castration. freight service.-p-Sumter County Times.

, c It is the same case with garden past, and the farmers can now plant The humane,and proper way I believe .
when and where they please.
corn. The early sugar corn of the The law provides for the construc- is to kill the horn before, it gets SYRUP FOR PRESERVING FRUIT.-
tr North is useless here and through the skin. Several firms have
yet every To of
tion by the county of a three-wired : seven pounds granulated sugar
spring,;our people,buy seed corn at the advertised liquid preparations of
fence between the fence and no-fence pot- add five pints of cold water ; stir till
stores for garden planting, raised at districts, and the line of Jefferson ash for this purpose, but: I advise well heated, but do -not let it boil.

the'far North, and meet with almost county. I upon am not prepared to against their use, as you are in dangerof Set ,aside to use in canning fruits' or
uniform failure. Corn, more than getting, too much on, or of spilling them for
whether this law has effected stewing sauce.
as yet _
most. ,plants, needs to be acclimated to say some of it either on, yourself or .\$he .
the amelioration of stock but it "
the.region where: grown, and will not ; I calf. The first calf I dehorned I used '.
has prevented the raising of i Why the Buggy Broke.
at-: first do its, very best far' North or many I a liquid deHorner, and'the calf struggled -
worthless scrubs and its effects in material in
; as Owing to poor construction
South of its ;region ,of growth. That and some of the liquid ran down
other where it has been in
places use and employment of cheap labor.
1 by; care in ,selection we can develop a the side of its head just missing its
for several have
Horse 'Book" tells
The l
invariably
sweet, corn suited to our climate I years eye, and it took a strip of skin off as, "Complete
tended to the of better stock I best made
raising where the for
to buy Buggy
have no doubt, but it must be done by far as it ran, and it.was months beforeit .
the result will be the silveror
the Sent for
same 10 cents
presume money. ,
constant selection for years in this healed up. I now 'us'e caustic
in this county in the course of a yearor stamps, Pioneer Buggy, Co., Columbus -
climate. We have already made a (stick) potash, and find that it is safe
two P. HOUSTOUN. O. .
start in this direction and have our Tallahasse more.Fla. and easy to apply and that it does the :

.common' field corn thoroughly crossed .- work effectually. A cent's worth

with sugar corn, and hope soon to geta Dehorning Cattle. would dehorn a dozen calves if you '

.variety fixed in type. We would be The preceding article might well had that many of the right age. The BENTON&UPSON

glad if any of our,readers not far south have been entitled "No Fence;" so time to make'application is when ,

or'north of this latitude who may havea this !might with equal propriety be horn can be felt just under the skin JACKSONVILLE, FLA.IRRIGATINGACgINE.RY: '

variety which they have been grow- headed "No Horns: It ,is from the which will be at three or four weeks .

ing for some. years, will let us have a pen of Waldo F. Brown, one of the old. Throw the calf down, for you

little to test this spring. Our main most conservative and judicious prac can hold it much easier when it is on ,

work horticulture at the North tical farmers of the North: its; side, than if standing. You must

Carolina Station will be in the improvement I am of the,opinion,that in ten years be careful ,not to touch the .potash

of vegetables and fruits for from now, or perhaps less, that a herd with the fingers, but wrap it with a .'

this climate, ,and the large body of of 'cattle with horns will be as hard to cloth to hold 'it.by. It comes in'

'our .citizens now interested in the find as a herd of mooleys has been in sticks like a small crayon. Wet the

truck business can aid us largely in the past. The practice of dehorning hair over the horn about as large a .

this matter. W. F. MASSEY. is growing in favor, and I have yet to spot as a nickel, and 'rub with the
find who has dehorned herd until it foams like Halfa BOTH
.JtaleJeh,N.o. a man a potash soap.
.,. ,. .,
who is not pleased With the results. minute over each horn is all that is

A Novel,.Orate. % I There are many who know nothing needed, and in a few days you will STEAM HORSE POWER..

Messrs. Bayard and Samuels, of practically about dehorning, who look find a black scab over ,the horn

Monfclair, were in town last week and : upon it as a barbarous practice and and that will be, the last of. it. It

completed arrangements for the establishment cruel in the extreme. I believe it to hurts the calf a little and makes 'him

of a factory here for the be defencible on the ground of hu- squirm, but it makes no'real sore and PIPE, PIPE FITTING, BRASS A

manufacture of their patent orange manity to the animal, and that oftena heals'up and hairs over soon after the :, .

boxes, vegetable crates, crates for weakly animal driven out to lie ex- scab comes 'off. To pass a herd VALVE, HOSE, ETC.:

hams, kegs for nails, etc. These boxesor posed to cold and storm, suffers more of dehorned cattle one would suppose i

barrels will be made 'round or In a single night than it would,in having them to be natural polled stock, as the Write for Estimates. ; j t

square! and when empty can be rolledup its horns sawed off; and it is the ; I

in compact form and returned to testimony of all who have dehorned,

the shipper, thus obviating the neces- that the cattle will huddle into barns ,

sity of buying new crates every year. and sheds like sheep after the opera -

Not a nail is used in their construc- tion. At the Delaware County Institute DiP'lII! DfIS

tion; any.child can put them togetherand : a farmer who had dehorned his

they will stand any amount of herd the previous summer said: 'When

hard usage. Major Alex. St. Clair I[ salted my cattle in the pasture,before Brilliant !IDurable

Abrams has given the old mill site, dehorning, they would chase each other

just west of the depot, for the site and and I had to make more piles of salt !

work .is to be ,begun at once. The than I had cattle, but after dehorning #

factory will be operation i in about five or six would :eat from the same Economical !

sixty days and will 'give'employment pile." At one institute the ladies,

to a large number of hands. The seeing that a farmer was to speak"on
Diamond Dyes excel all others In Strength, Purity, and Fastness. None <*hue
gentlemen heading the enterprise are dehorning cattle, studied the questionand
just as good. Beware of imitations,because ,they are made of cheap and inferior Bateiak
said to be men of means and business put forward one of their numberto DDs' ,
and give ,weak,croeky colors. To be sure of success use only the DIAMOND
poor
standing and will undoubtedly makea oppose it, and she made it warm for
.
for coloring Dresses, Stockings, Yams, Carpets, Feathers, Ribbons, &c, &c. We warraat .
success of the enterprise.-Tavarcs the few who were bold enough to advocate 1
Herald. it. All the stories of rotten them'to color more goods,package for package,than any other dyes ever made,sad to give

. heads and cattle breathing through the more brilliant and durable colors. Ask,for the DIAMOND, and take no other. ,

Do you need printing kind Send top stubs were brought forth, and although Send postal for l'ye Book,Sample Card dfmk for coloring PhotOS.,making the finest Ink, or>.hg ,.
PaCoftta Printing and Publishing House,. these, statements lacked proof, they (ro cent: a quart),etc. Sold by DroggUu., Addrett ,1.
Jacksonville, Fla, *' WELLS, RICHARDSON & CO., Burlington, Vt.
had greater weight with the ladies than
All kind. of books bound and made as goodatraew the affirmations of men who had dehorned For Gilding or'Bronzing, I A '.1 I r i i i Gold &!telfTrr ",
: Bead to DaOoeta Printing and Pub- Fancy Articles, tiS' D I"' mUrJLMHMI. 3 Copper. Only t entq
_i pfeB.. ** Hoae,,Jacksonville,Fla.' their herds, who stated: i it did .' :

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r 388' THE; FLORIDA DISPATCH, FARMER AND FRUIT- ROWER. [MAY 7, 1891

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'i4 croup and colic of extreme infancywere Barbed-Wire Fence. millet 100 feet long will supply a cow for
blWATCNna Pflxft'pI months. Try a row of teosinte also, it
counted out, we.found ourself in Every few months some oversensitive
but becomesof
JP1I" is very feeble at first soon
of about farmer or misguided member of growth.
possession 3,600 lusty a powerful
"RITE .....:. worms. We,learned to like the little the S. P. C. A. takes up space in the PUMPKINS.-Get seed from some native -

papers to inveigh against the barbed- farmer of some well acclimated variety
. M!VY 7, 1891. wretches; they had such fine appetitesand wire fence. There is no doubt that, and plant a few hills. Let them get

... < STEPHEN ,POWERS, ',. 'Editor. were' so hearty in general. Dailywe in thickly ,settled districts where stock thoroughly ripe, but do not let them stay

:.: Pop 0..Address,Lawtej,Fla. shinned up a mulberry tree_of an often range on both sides of a fence, of on cracking the vine a from day after the stem.they show Pick signs and

immense growth and gathered them a they occasionally injure. themselvesby store in a dry, cool, airy place and you
Publications Received. playing or; fighting across the will be surprised to see how long they
Catalogue Sandwich Enterprise Co., Sand basket of l leaves.. As they,grew larger, wires. But there are vast areas in the will keep. Hubbard squash ditto. Grownon

wich,111.-Wind mills,pump,tanks,eta. the one basketful was not enough; United,States where the stock is in a good pine land and properly picked
Address by the Religious Society of the and stored they will keep from six to
Friends on behalf of the Indians.: Friends soon they devoured two per day, then more or less pioneer condition, and nine months. We know this from per-

Book StaTe lOt Arch St.,Philadelphia. three, then four, and still did not where the principal object in fencing sonal experience.
Railroad Reports of the N. N. Provinces is to keep unruly animals out, and not IN THE TRUCK PATCH.-Of course, "
andOndh. Allahabad India. have enough. At last, after about a in, where the usefulness and cheapness nothing more will be planted here; the .

3 ..r month to our infinite relief, they began of barbed..wire fence will com work now'is to harvest the crop. It will :
the trucker to give good heed.to the ',
Note the remarkable prices obtained to give"indications of a desire to mend it to general use. pay shipping directions of the commission

j by the Fruit Exchange for disgorge; i in other words,to go to spin- It will be a good many years before merchant, for in that particular at least ..

fruit in New York the fruit-growers and truck-farmers in he is disinterested. ,
grape -$5.90 per ing. A quantity of brushwood :was IN THE HOME GARDEN.-Stir the .r'

box and'$i1 per barrel. provided, for them to attach their Florida, will be sufficiently numerousto ground constantly, in order that the veg,1
. I secure the enactment of a nofencelaw etables may be able to withstand the Increasing .'

The railroads veto the Peento in cocoons toy and when finally these even for optional acceptance.A heat of summer as long as pos? -
beautiful silken balls were reeled off still longer period will elapse be- sible. Break the crust every time the '
, South Florida and the frost vetoes it in numbers of rain forms one the moment a crust is 'i
fore there will be
to '
by the skillful fingers of this relative cease formed vegetables begin undergo a
North Florida at least five out I
years leggy scrub stock in the backwoods
we found ;ourself in 'possession of slow process of suffocation, failing for
of six: But Mr, Mott clings to it districts ready to torment the cultivator lack of air. ;
stilt about seventy-five cents' worth of raw, ,of the, soil. Bear in mind that the rainy season is i 1

t silk of an excellent quality! Seventyfive The legislation of Florida is largely near at hand, which is the dry season in J
most farmers' houses far as kitchen
cents for climbing that shaped in the interest of stock which so j
We hope our readers noticed a mulberrytree vegetables are concerned. Remember ]

small and obscure item in last week's a month 1 We begrudge even the is only natural enough, since a majority that onions, squashes and Irish potatoes, j
of the voters are stock-owners. will keep for months if properly stored;
market report: 'Sales do not keep blank paper to.write' this story on, This legislation requires not only thata will keep, in fact, until fresh vegetablescan

pace with supplies, and many of the and would;not waste it except as a lawful fence shall be "horse-high, with be broad grown verandas in the fall.all around A broad it home, cov-'

high-priced sorts are being placed in warning to others. Let Chinamen but strong and hog-tight," but that, ering a space sixty or seventy-five feet

cold If the huge storehouse and Greasers raise silk yet awhile. in case it is a barbed-wire fence, thatit square, and elevated six feet above the
storage. ground, is the best possible "cellar" i inFlorida
shall be surmounted by a board as a _
of Waldo'had been built in New Yorkor '
and is wellworth. the cost as a
warning to stock of its existence.
Chicago it would have been of The Orange Crop. store-room for vegetables during the
Practically this requirement does
summer, which is really the "winter of
some use. From a Director of the Florida not amount to much, and the truckers our discontent" in this State.
t generally build their wire fences with- Try a bit of land ''with underdraining
Fruit Exchange we learn that the Ex-.
for an all-summer garden. Tack togethertwo
Paul C. Wyeth, is no longer con- out it, so far as our observation ex-
boards of heart pine an inch thick
nected with the Daily or Weekly Flor. change this year has handled, in tends. They do not usually have and six inches wide. Lay, them, archingup

than of Tallahassee, or the DISPATCH, round numbers, nearly ((300,000)) three domestic animals within their enclo in the bottom of a ditch eighteen
sures to tempt the'range stock outsideto inches deep, so sloped as to carry the t
: FARMER AND .FRUIT GROWER of Jacksonville :.hundred thousand boxes, and that contend with them across the fence. water oft somewhere. Plant a row of

the' DaCosta Printing and these have netted the growers between The forest fires which are so destructive it tomatoes does not right yield over fruit this nearly ditch through'and see the if {-

Publishing House, and is not authorized in the fall and winter will rainy season, if not quite. Report the
and box. Their
$1.55 $1.60 per board fence where result to next fall and will
to collect, moneys or solicit sub- sweep away a a us we recIp-
gross sales have amounted to about wire fence will be only slightly in- rocate. This advice is not based on
scriptions for either ,the publications theory but on observation. The drains
It therefore that wherea
house. seven hundred and fifty thousand jured. seems, may be ten feet apart, or further than .
or printing
fence is intended to resist range that if the soil is a very light sand. ,
CHAS. W. DACOSTA, dollars ($750,000)). The total crop of stock and fire only on one side, the Plant okra and collards (if you like

Publisher. the State :is estimated at 2,500,000 barbed-wire will be found the best them), also lettuce. The collard is
really only an acclimated summer cab-
material for the
purpose.
boxes. The annual meeting will be bage;there are many varieties of it, some
,In'a personal letter Rev. ,Lyman much better than others; and it is well

Phelps says: "I shipped my last,car held in Jacksonville\ May 13. Work for May. worth experimenting withMELONS. .
last .-Both kinds of melons will
This article should hare appeared
of oranges this morning, and in week, but may fctill be of value. now be running. Keep the ground clear

quality and weight of fruit and juiciness Sandy Strawb.rrie>. FARM CHOPS.-Cotton, corn and cane. ahead of the vines, but do not on any account -
.i are usually grown by natives or old resi- lift or move the vines around. The
as, good as anything,I have sent The editor of the Chicago Produce dents, and these do not need instructionso melon is exceedingly sensitive being

I this,year. The fruit is actually overcharged Trade Reporter must have had his much as newcomers. The great{pointis i just the opposite the sweet potato in

with juice. The heavy rains teeth set on edge by gritty berries.He shallow., to cultivate In the without States stint just but above cultivate us and this STRAWBERRIES.respect. these have borne .i

of Saturday, all day, Saturday night says : "In many cases the berries even in the far North the shovel and the two years it is better to plow them un-
double shovel have been discarded by the der with all the mulching; it gives to the
and Monday ,day, 5.42 inches in were very sandy. There is nothingthat
beat cultivators for light harrows; but soil the vegetable matter which the
all, caused many oranges to split, depreciates a berry more than even those in Florida are probably infe- strawberry plant requires. "We doubt
sand from the South rior to the old-fashioned sweep. very much whether strawberries or any /
that the circulation is
still
showing especially as
,
TOBACCO.-If any plants were left in other crop "run out" if the ground is
complete." the soil adheres more to the fruit than the seedbeds they should be set in the supplied every year with the elements

-...* the farther'north sand does." missing places late in the afternoon. To- that have been removed. If the plants -.
bacco will pay to replant better than are to be kept another year, rake the
,Mr.1.. Aldrich
of Orlando
J. After mentioning other bad qualitiesthe corn; the harvesting does not hare to be mulching all off from one bed and pat
kindly sends us an extract from the done over the whole field at once, but on another, thus making it double,
berries had, he adds: later stalks can be left to mature. which will pretty much suppress the
Galveston News on the subject of On the beds that
It 18 remarkable how discouraging the SWEET .-Keep the ridges grass. are stripped .'
"Silk Culture at Home," and desires the clean until the vines cover them. Set plant) a light row of other '":
springs have been In the South for past
plants only after a rain and set very deep. space to shade the strawberry plants.
to it. the old commlulon houses
us express our opinion upon few:)"t n. Only
PEAS.-Do not'plant near any fruit Very few growers will go to the troubleof
Many years ago, at the suggestion ofa can appreciate the efforts of the fruit growers tree, either citrus or deciduous. Sow setting plants specially to raise run-. .
their drawbacks In fruit
with
many growing broadcast only on new land, to be turned ners from they will continue to propa- .
venerated relative, we procured a for Korthern markets, and all commission
those that have fruit.
under for green manure; otherwise sow gate from borne
quantity of silkworm eggs and kept merchant should spare no pains to keep up in drills three feet apart and cultivate like It the spaces are broken up deep and, -J
prices aa much as possible, so that the about Ue
fertilized liberally beginningof
. in corn.
them the cellar until the mulberry growers can secure at least some small compensation ..
FORAGE CHOPS.-Do not neglect to drilla the rainy season, very good plants J.
leaves.were large enough*. to commence for their labors few rows of pearl millet, Kaffir corn can be raised in this way. But the old
then them and We hope the commission merchantswill or millo maize for the cow next summer bed will not yield much fruit next year. ..".<
on, brought up and fall,when the wire-graae in the woods IN THE GROVE.-The bearing trees do,' t.1

F jet them hatch. After all losses from the heed this }little| sermon, is getting dry, A half dozen rows;of not need. to. be. cultivated. over twice. \.y_. .,,

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MAY 7,1801] THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, FARMER AND FRUTT-GROWER. '969} t t18M'


>l
,,, roles: the soil naturally veryoompaot Charleston, fancy: ,per quart,26&30c; do.,poorto Monday at from$2.4093.96 per box, a few dry ,QUESTIONS AND REPLIES,.:
;'sad the stirring should be as I prime,per quart,1025c; N.C., per quart, Navels going at$1.20. The others were golden ..
sfcaUow 150 to the box All reasonable questions coming from, a.subscriber
; as it can be done. There' is no 109260. russets running not less than
better way' to manage old trees than Potatoes, Florida,per bbL,prime 6097.50; and eagerly; bid for. This Arm will ofer 600) ,':will be answered as promptly as possible,:and

with a ,liberal application of mulching, do. seconds, S$4; sweet do. Jerseys, S&25Q boxes at auction on Monday. DIx d Wilkins .Replies can not be siren by maIL '

provided always,that the ground under 3.25; onions, Bermuda, per crate,$2.25; Havana sold 500 boxes, chiefly russets and brights,on

the mulching is lightly stirred' about ,f2.25; Egyptian, per case,Jl; do. per 100 Thursday; at from$L1593.25( per,box,and will 103. CLOVER. Please find Inclosed

twiee daring the growing season with pound bag, 12.75: cabbage, Florida, per bbL, sell again early; next week,arrival justifyingit. three specimens of clover which I found

prwg-hoes to keep the roots from com '15c.( l.26; Charleston, per barrel crate,TSe.(g) sThe season for grape fruit is now over on growing in mv yard., How it came there
lag too much to the au ace. $l.26; Kale, L. L, bbl.,2990o; lettuce,Nor- the Baltimore market. Quotations are as follows I do not know, but it is evident that it "

Among the young trees, lithe owner folk, per bbL, 1101.58( ; cucumbers, New Orleans : Choice bright 176 200s, I&259&50: do., was planted some time last summer, for

pursues the clean culture system (which, per dozen, fl.S09L75( ; green peas, mixed sizes, $6092.75( as to size; choice rus- there seems to be three distinct varietiesall

we think; is disapproved of by a ma- Charleston,per crate,60c. $1.25;string beans, sets, 176-200S,313.25( ; straight lines,&26O&50, ; growing together in.a little patch. I
jority of the best growers), the Cutaway Florida,wax, per crate, $2$4; do. do. green, 6-112s,$1.501.75.PINEAPPLESThe. have been watching it with much interest -
harrow should be kept running all the per crate, SL509&50( ; turnips, Russia, Jersey; season for Bahamas -all- winter and spring to see how it

while, or at .leastonce through every aid L. T., per bbl., 35<<&50c.; tomatoes, Key; will open in a few days. The schooners would'withstand' the frosts of winter and
week Clean culture can be' successful West, peck box, 60(( 80e.; do., Havana, per Sarah E. Douglas and T.B. Schaf are ,ex-, heat of spring. The frosts did not hurt a

only in'combination with heavy fertilization box,259dc.; do., Florida, per crate,|L50 pected on Saturday; or Monday; with 69,000 to leaf and the warm weather evidently
to make up.for the heavy drain'on 2L60; do.do.*per carrier crate,I2.509&60; asparagus 80,000 each to T. B. Be hall, and the Chas. F. agrees with it, as it is now'growing rap- *

the soil from the wastage caused by the ,per dosen,'.2.50. Roehley; is due on Monday; with a cargo to C.:. idlL-G&ORGET.1tloORK, Ocala] Fla. '
sun'and rains It is these to Dr. J. C.
burning We
beating Nxw YORK, May; 7. C. Buckman A Co. Prices quoted in advanceare .i sent specimens
better to plant watermelons or sweet Neal and he replies as follows:
potatoes ,
Prices this day were: ,Potatoes,17 to ft; sec $10@fl2 per 100. Cuban pines coming via
or something not so subject to the ,The specimens of clovers came not in
onds,J5 to$6.50; cukes, 12.50 to fi#>; beans New York are lower,selling at $1913 per. 100.:
anguillula or root-knotworm as cow- the best shape for easy identification, butI
11.50 to Si; tomatoes carriers, & to S&50: ; MISCELLANEOUS VEGETABLES.. -General
peas ,are; these will cover the ground think,that No. 1 Jfedicago dcnticulata
crates,|2.25 to$3; egg plants,prime,$5 to 18. trade may be written good. Receipts of cabbage -
it be
M.
during the rainy season and prevent the or Burr clover, though may
liberal and that from Florida !
0 8. P continue ,
'e loss of fertility. ALJEL maculata. I think it the first named, as
?UNTO PEACHES These will ripen has seen its bestdays. ,Norfolk cabbage is ar- i I do not find the spot in the leaf. No. 2

from the .middle to the last of this DOMESTIC FRUIT AT AUCTION. riving and indications are for a 'good crop. is Alfalfa, Medicago saliva and No. 3 is
North Carolina peas are arriving freely. Tomatoes -
month. There are few-meaner peaches Medicago maculata. ,
E.L. Ooodsell sold this week as follows: are higher, scarce and active at quotations Medics'have been often tried in
than the Peento when it is picked green, These .'
but when picked ripest is by no means to Florida oranges,Indian River fruit,bright, ;beets are firmer; asparagus is lower, Florida, but as a rule are a failure. Why?
be despised. They have prejudiced the LT5@3.Q5.( Florida oranges, brlghts, $1.10(1( ,as is also lettuce, while cauliflower ,II higher. That is a question, that I am trying to
Northern people against them, and justly S.75;:russets,$1.0592.45. Grape fruit,brights,' Radishes are very; irregular as to supplies,but solve now. {

too, considering the condition in which x3,55@4.50; golden russets,S3.&JQ4.M; russets, steady as to price. We quote tot'thll week: 104. KAKI SCALE. Some unknown

they have been sent to them. But, if. $.5504.( Florida cabbage, $L509L50 per crate; Charleston visitor left in our office branches of the *
gathered when fully colored,just before Ire an. Sgobel A Day sold this.week as follows I1.509L90;; Florida string beans. Kaki or Japan Persimmon badly! : affected

they begin to soften, and forwarded in : $$2.5093; ; North Carolina peas, $1.5693.00 and dying with scale insects On these
the ripe fruit carrier" or pony refrigerators WEDNESDAY.-1,100 boxes oranges, $1.409 per half bushel box; beets,$1@1 25;-new pota- Dr.Neal reports as follows: -

they will bring some money. But, 3.80; boxes grape fruit, f4(9&90( ; bbls.>> grape toes,prime,6@8; do. second, $4@UJji() 'tomatoes I am inclined to believe the persimmonlimbs
after fruit ripe,S.OO@4.00;do., green, i2(Yi3.m; as-
all, it may be a misfortune for any ,f8@lLFRIDAY. you send me are hurt by the punctures
man to make any money, as it will en- -000 boxes oranges, $1.75(34.05(( ; paragus,Norfolk prime, 15@25c; Norfolk lettuce of a sucking bug, either a Rhaphi-

courage him to plant more of these grape fruit,$4.10@UOFruU 2'hIdeJoumal. 75L25, North Carolina, cauliflower, gasler, a Tetyra, a Podisus, or a Leptoglotsus -
treacherous trees. They'are not fit for i5.00@6.00per crate; radishes, $1@L25 per 100; most likely the l latter, as I have often

any except the most protected! situatlens.IN Charleston strawberries,refrigerator, 18@25c; found them'on the young shoots of trees,.
THE FLOWER GARDEN.-Stir the PHILADELPHIA MARKET.PHILADELPHIA Norfolk do,20@35c.) doing great damage. .

Boil gently, around your plants; destroyall ,May; 1,189L Spray the young stems with a weak

weeds, grass,etc.. water in,the even The receipts of Florida vegetables are more ST. LOUIS MARKETS. kerosene emulsion, to which add one

ing and throw a handful of fresh'e rth liberal the past few days, but with good Sr. LOUIS, April ounce Paris green to the half barrel of

or dead leaves over the watered surface weather note an active and Increasing'demand ORANGES.-We quote repacked: Florida- mixture.

early next morning to prevent crusting. ,and prices are well sustained. Fancy; brights in popular sizes, &25@i; .russets 105. BERMUDA GRASS IN GROVES.

Roses may now be budded and layered. TOMATOES.-Choice well grown, ripe and $3@50 1box; Indian, River at Will Bermuda grass injure orange grovesJ. ?
Bulbs of lilies etc. mulched ..
.. heavily partly colored,wanted at from $2.75($25 per $095w50( y box, as to size. Messina on ordersat M. HEDICK.
remain in the until
now. may ground crate; do., ((8 basket) carriers, $t9( .50; fair:to $3. 094.00 for 160 size and 200-slze box. It will unless kept in proper bounds by
September. If cut now, manured and
good per crate, $29240( ; carriers,S2.2592 75; California-Riverside Washington Naval at.f,5,25@5.75 cultivation or mulching. No amount'of
frequently watered, dahlias will bloom small and inferior, per box, $1@L50;'choice ;Riverside and mountain seedling at mulching will.kill it, but a thick coating

again early in the.fall. green tomatoes,per crate and carrier,$5093.. 33.75 1\! box, as to size. Mexican at $3.25 of it will keep it so weakened and the

Florida t NEW POTATOES.-In light supply; and sell (93.75, as to size.CABBAGE. ground so softened that the orange roots .
Markets for Produce.
readily at from$798 per bbl. for choice; medium .-No fresh stock received, but will not be crippled much, if any. We

,$$5.59@6; culls,$3tf150.))( We would supply; on sale liberaL Market'dull]and slow would,rather have Bermuda in the grove

HOME MARKET REPORT. advise liberal shipments. partly on account of the. rain,but buyers were ,than nothing; it shades and enriches" the,

% The Orange and Vegetable Auction Co., of CUCUHBEBS.When choice, meet with holding off,also, in anticipation of large arrivals soil. '
P Jacksonville,properly known as the "Home ready; sale at from $596 per crate; fair, $394. by Monday; or Tuesday. Quote .Alabama 106. CAYENNE CHERRY. Will '

Market," are still selling(at auction) about STRINO BEANS-But few arriving demand and Louisiana at l.5Ojl.75, and Floridaat :you please! tell me, through the Question :

1690 boxes of oranges per week, and expect to strong,and when choice can be placed quickly; $1 1.351\crate. A sale of 28 crates choice and Reply column, how to preserve, can

continue their sales well into the month. at$4@4.50 per box. Mobile at L85 was made. Dealers fill orders or jelly the Surinam or Cayenne Cherry :'

They; report prices good as compared with Eoo PLANTS.-In active demand,scarce and for choice Alabama and Louisiana at, 12.151\' to destroy the bitter developed in cooking :'
prices throughout the country. Jacksonville sell readily at$109"per bbl. crate, and for Florida at 2. ; ?-MRS. TOMAS SLUMS, Altamonte

still leads in highest net value. However,the SQUASH.--In light supply and wanted at TOMATOES.' car was received yesterdayfrom Springs. 1
general depression made Itself'felt.. here in a $292.50 per box. Florida. Condition was fair to good; Will some of the notable housekeepers
t BEETS.-Florida, moving slow at 75c.l soft and overripe. Demand who read this please reply?
felling off of 26.40 cents per box as compared some, however,were ,
i with sales last week. per box. was flrst-classboth. from the local trade 107. STRAWBERRIES. ETC. C.,

Best stick heavy, firm and in desirable OAULtJ'LOW&B.-Arrhlnr mostly in bad and for reshlpment. Sales averaged from W. H., Jacksonville. ((1)). Raw shell :.
sises, russets and brtghts, SJ 50 2.75; mixed order, and selling at low and irregular prices i50 to$3.25 per box-hlgherln; six H.peck box will not hurt strawberries. The best ,

lots, averaging well as to size, I2&X50 ; mixed CABBAGE.: -Florida,mostly arriving poor crates sold at $3 to 350.. On orders, bushel varieties to ship are Cloud and Newnan;
lots 'running' Urge, tl.652. Lot of"all big condition,and as a rule, not bringing 'enough boxes sold at$5 for choice, sound repacked. )Michel the best for hOme use yet tried. i

sizes" low and not wanted. Culls and poor to cover expenses, selling from 1 c.ff1.25'per. ((2) Lime:will "sweeten"low hammock;

stock scarcely; pay expenses: We do not''an- bbl. crate. CALIFORNIA FRUIT REPORT. stone lime is strongest, but shell lime is
tc better this OaAl'Gzs-In liberal supply for the time of strong enough. Make the applicationnow.
tlelpate prices season. In regard to the California fruit trade we
year, and prices somewhat easier; selling today will that. California oranges are now be- .' (3). Orange trees planted now
,average shipments of choice,solid fruit, say will be further advanced( next summer
ing marketed at a lively; rate. The :crop will
NEW YORK MARKETS. asserted sizes, from $292.75; all small sizes than those set next January, provided .
fall short of estimates and Inlteadof4OOOcarloadl
early ,
NEW YOBK :May; L would exceed these quotations; a few skip- ; you take good, care of them, keep them
there will not be much over
t
Florida oranges have 'reached the limit of menu of strictly fancy; bright can be placedup watered through the spring drouth and
2 500 carloads been
carloads. About have
3,000
4em& do' Prices are irregular as to quality. to$4,with rough and coarse fruit hard to well worked;and fertilizer applied where
Chop stock brings full quotations. Strawberries move at any price. shipped to date,and there will probably TheMe be' they can reach it(not touching the roots), !

move freely; with stock of much better GRAPE l,'BUIT.-Hcarce,and wanted at from not over 600 carloads left May; 1st. : so t.hatthey can go to growing when the .
'
iterranean Sweet, Paper Rlmd, St.Michael
quality.; The first Norfolk's, of the present $2.E033.50perbox. rainy! season begins. .
and Malta Blood are short this season,
season arrived to=day: and brought rather good PEEN-TO' cnEs.-carrten containing crops t
and as these are the latest varieties,there will
figures. Follow1ac..arequotatloaa: Apples, 100-$495. REDFIELD A Bon. not be a very; large quantity of them for shipment Dehornfng cattle is not supposed to ,1
barrel Western Baldwin, tu8f4( ; Ben
per in May; and June. We have a good supply ,wholly change the nature of the ani--
Davis, $15696; Western Spy, ice; do.,
; of Bright Mountain oranges,and as t.hel'are There, vicious beasts which
mals. are
Basset
do.
Western Wine Sap,U96; S&509( -
BALTIMORE MARKET. of excellent keeping quality" and the. very
|4; do., mixed lots, W.5093; peanuts, Va., -' still retain their;, natural vices, which
the trade will find these BrightMountain
handpicked, new per 1_., 9&43io; shelled BALTIMORE :May; L best sizes oranges very; satisfactory; for late however are rendered less dangerouswhen i I

No.1,48.i3 f: No., act; pecans, selected 12o; OJU.1fGJ:8-Florlda: : The local market is shipment. We have a sufficient supply; to the horns are removed. That '
da.,atn.tcht.lot.1. ,new,per pound," 8lllc( ; Indian much more quiet, following decreased receipts take care of our ,customers until the middleof '
River oranges,selected,$8 89t; Florida but at the auction sales "there have The June deciduous fruit in California. promisesto one bull out of many thousands may ,'

oranges, feney, 176 to 200, per box, *&L50; been present larger numbers of buyers and be one of the largest ever grown Cherries kill its owner even after its horns are :1

do, Mr to good,mixed sizes,1U5jp.16.do.; the bidding has been quite spirited. The at- are already ripening and carload.shipments removed is no argument .apractice '

russets, &...'76; grape fruit, per box, tIllS; rivals show rather better sizes and are quickly; will fewdayajo go forward be to followed the Eastern apricots markets,.plums 1na, : which ,renders ninety out of

strawb rdu, Florida, prime, per quart, 989 taken at higher prices. Out of town trade Isquiet. peaches,Bartlett pears,etc,later.BsrJJVutt harmless. .
;t5c 9 'peer to f* r, per quart, 'Sfttte; do., << J.. H. Seward A. Co.sold 760 boxes on I,Company" Fruit Trade Joun a;. ',loo practically ,, :1



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I S70 ...._. _._. THE.._ .FLORIDA_j _.>_DISPATCH_ .!4BMER _AND_"- FRUIT-GROW. ". -. -. (MAy _7,. 89t ..


.a rdeIl and ;L :WIl. the. masoner .work.of.a'tank leaves or NEW KODAKS. rendered dryer by' drainage, :Buchanofc
..branches other litter that there has been diminution
.. evergreen or may has shown a
.........
-: "7>-- be used to cover ,the edges. All in deaths from phthisis (con-
Aquatics in the Flower Garden.. be in '.
tropical nymphseas can grown sumption)
.
During the past few years a -great the same tanks, either: planted out or Houses overshaded are not healthful -
change has been effected in'our. parks grown in, tubs, plunged i in i. the tank, You/resshe no matter how commodious or
and 'private gardens in the style' of but these cannot be safely planted till button, well built they may be. Too many
.: "bedding out" toward, something June, and must be, taken out,in the trees near sleeping and living-rooms'
more natural than the .ribbon, border fall and protected in a greenhouse. we doM rest. exercise a very injurious influence and
or set patterns and pictures. It has The Egyptian Papyrus is another tnduce various diseases, notably rheu
also been found that bold masses, of very interesting plant,'either to grow in Seven New Styles tad Sizes matism, heart disease, consumption,
foliage, combined ,with ,flowering water or to plant in a border groupedin ALL LOADED WITH Transparent Films. general debility and an :mia. It'
plants, have a much ,more pleasing a mass. In either case it requiresa For sale by all Photo.Stock Dealers. would seem as if these truths must be
effect than when flowers alone are good rich soil and moisture. It too well known to need any statement.
:, used. The Public Garden in Bostonwas forms a beautiful contrast to the' deep THE EASTMAN COMPANY, But it has seemed to me, in view of
much dmired'last summer, with green and'' metallic shades of cannas. Bend for Catalogue. ROCHESTER,N.Y. the increasing foliage of our towns,
beds of foliage plants representing the This plant and, the Egyptian lotus necessary to call them again to your
badges of the different army corps that have a very remote antiquity, and formed for this purpose are not always remembrance and to ask you to con.. 'r
visited that city, but there were' no figure constantly as sacred plants in under the direction of the wisest. sider the whole subject as one well *
beds so effective or graceful as those early Egyptian art. Both were very The planting from a sanitary point of worthy the attention of those inter-
by the side of the centre walk over the useful aside from their ceremonial and view has not yet received much atten- ested in American public health. A
bridge, which were filled with sub- religious uses, the Papyrus furnishingthe tion. To set out as,many trees as journey through many of our towns
tropical foliage plants. These beds material for paper and ropes, of possible seems to be the object, and during the past nine months, 'and an
doubtless cost less labor and requiredless which samples are found in the Egyptian this is limited only by the means and experience covering twenty years of
attention than the smallest of the tombs. The lotus seeds were the amount of land at their disposal.The professional investigation, have 'convinced
badge beds. eaten and the roots cooked as we poem of "Woodman, Spare that me that this most undesirable

Very effective! groups! can be made cook. potatoes.. ..The. .. Japanese. and. Tree" has won a strong place in the condition of overshading is only too
i by the liberal use of aquatics, palms, Chinese-; to-day plant the lotus" in the" hearts of the people, and while whole common, and has become a positive
cannas and other large leaved and fields after the nee has been harvestedand forests disappear as if by magic, in injury in almost every direction. The
strong-growing plants. Musas: are use the roots'as food. There is a ruthless waste and in serious menaceof results are, in point of fact, much
very effective in sheltered spots, where tradition that the American Indians health and life, the tree in 'the more serious than most people seem
; the leaves are. not torn by the winds. used both the seeds and roots, of the town, whose roots are bathed in poison. to be aware of; indeed, the ignoranceor
:. Among acquatics the Nelumbium American yellow lotus, Nelumbium ous soil, and whose branches are filled indifference generally 'noticeable
\ *dosum-, or, as it is more generally luteum, for food.Associated with deadly vapors, and whose leaves whenever sanitarians make a move in
known, Egyptian lotus, takes the with aquatics and in the repel God's glorious sunshine, stands the interests of public health is de..
front rank. This is the largest of rear of the tank, specimen palms, triumphantly, a delusive ornament anda plorable. .
Water Lilies, with the exception of rubber plants, cannas, ricinus, cala- dangerous menace. So much has A soil loaded with roots and densely
Victoria regia, but it has the advantageover diums, phormiums, with arundos, this natural love for the beauty of shaded is unfit for man to live upon
the latter in being hardy, and can bamboos, eulalias and other hardy foliage been misdirected that many constantly,, and is certainly no placefor
be grown in almost any garden. It is ornamental grasses, in single plants or sicken and die from overshadingeven a permanent home. The air en-
a strong grower and a rambler, and clumps, are most picturesque. Many as many must also suffer from the tering the bed-rooms and livingroomsfrom
requires to be kept under control in other plants will suggest themselvesto wanton destruction of our forests. such surroundings chilly and,,
the flower garden or in the lilypondwith lovers of flowers' for use near thewater The past nine months of this event- dead, and is not at all suitable for res
other aquatics, as the roots edge and; in suitable places. ful year of 1889 have been remarkable piration. Such an atmosphere bnnot
spread so fast that it would soon crowd Spiraeas, i iris, acorus, sagittarias, in the lessons they have furnished bring health to invalids, and is dangerous -
out, all others. Almost any kind of cyperus and others may be planted sanitarians and hygienists. As might to the well. It is invariably
tank will answer to grow it in, pro- beside aquatics that require shallow well have, been expected, the past ten I productive of sickness and oven death,
vided there is a depth of about, three water, such as limnocharis,.pontederia or twelve weeks have furnished a large especially among children and thoseof
. feet of water and brick walls or di- pestia. In half-shady places some death rate from causes preventable, feeble constitution.-W. THORN
visions to keep the plants within limit of the fine-foliaged begonias and caladiums which must act as a warning for all TON PARKER, M. D., in The Sani
About a foot of soil, composed of old planted along with hardy ferns who are interested in the welfare of tartan
sods and rotten cow manure, will be are very beautiful. If water can be the country. I do not hesitate to
needed, and the planting should be combined with rock work it will givea affirm that this death-rate is owing to w
done about the 1st of May or as the of homes in :F
.soon much more pleasing effect in sub- overshading our very CROUPY SOUNDS
L as growth commences. The tank tropical gardening. Foliage plantscan many instances. Each community.
should ,be filled gradually with 'water be used in a variety of ways, and has its proportionate share of value in At night, from baby's crib, are distract
F as the plants grow, and on the approach some of the commonest plants can be health and homes. Whatever diminishes ing to parents who are at a loss for '
: of winter, if the water is deep made most effective and to harmonize this value is a direct injury a medicine equal to the emergency.Not .
enough to save the roots "from freezing with plants of greater rarity if to that community. Overshading is so with those who have Ayer '
f it may be left in the tank; if.not: ,. judiciously introduced.-Garden and a serious fault, and directly lessens of Cherry this Pectoral medicine in affords the house.certain A dose and .
the water should be drawn off and the Forest. the value of real estate, and noticeably speedy relief. To cure colds,coughs,sore
plants covered with leaves, salt, hay, > increases, disease and shortenslife. throat, asthma, bronchitis, hoarseness,
or'litter to protect them.. This makes The Overshadowing of Our Homes. These facts should receive care- and the various disorders of the breath-
s a grand background in a tank where For many years our people have ful and positive ,attention from ing apparatus, Ayer's Cherry Pectoral "
i, hardy and tropical nymphaeas are given. considerable attention to the thoughtful people.Vegetation has no equal. It soothes the inflamed
grown, or a stately object by itself, or subject of forest culture, but insteadof produces a great effect tissue 88
in large tanks and lakes in parks. The exercising their influence in the direction upon the movement of the air., Its and PC in.! Call For rromo: :.:
native and hardy kinds of nymphaeaare : of forest protection and increase velocity is checked, and sometimes in pose.Cap. .
all worthy ot a place in the aquatic ;where:it i is most needed, many thick clusters of trees or underwoodthe Brooklyn) N.Y., writes: "I have used' .
' garden. The pink Cape Cod lily is seem to content'themselves with planning air is almost stagnant. If moist Ayer'8 Cherry Pectoral in my family for .
H especially fine, and the white EurO- "''arbor days" and-employing our and decaying vegetation be a coincident ; thirty years and have always found it
the best for which'
remedy to,
water N. alba candidissimd children in trees ,and condition of such croup
pean' lily ( ) school planting stagnation, the complaint my children were subject."' .
is the largest hardy white variety, a shrubs in parks and school groundsand most fatal forms of malarious diseasesare .
"I use Ayer's Cherry Pectoral in
most profuse bloomer and a chaste streets of our cities and towns. produced. A moist soil is cold, practice, and pronounce it to be un'J my
and exquisite flower. Too much can To witness the faithful efforts of our and is generally believed to predisposeto equaled as a remedy for colds and .
not,be said for the new yellow variety, children as they plant the trees where rhepmatism, catarrh and neuralgia.It coughs."'-J. G. Gordon, M. D., Carroll. >
N. NsrJi&tea, which is perfectly hardy sunlight is most needed, one_ cannot is a matter of general experience Co.. ,Virginia. ,a
and of easy culture. The habit of the help feeling that oftentimes these that most persons l eel healthier on 'a
plant is like N. alba candidissima. It efforts are sadly misdirected and the dry soil. In some way, which is not Ayers Cherry Pectoral '
is'a robust grower, flowering freely the theory taught is not the true one. clear, a' moist soil produces an unfav-
entire season, with a beautiful flower, This love for the beauty of foliage is' orable effect upon the lungs. A moist Sold Prepared by all by Druggists Dr.J.C.A; Mice$1 Co.;,six Lowell.bottle)l.$*."'...
k with broad petals of a light yellow right and natural, and properly: guidedis 'soil influences greatly the development
color, and bright orange stamens., It to be encouraged but it has undoubtedly of the agent, whatever it may '
L is'a great.acquisition. These require been only too often extravagantly .be, which causes the paroxysmal i ANSY PILLS?
winter but to and the fevers. In tj i ad 8Ml M.!K tir
E 'A HO:': protection in ? save bestowed, societies i I ground which has been "

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'l, 1891j THE. FLORIDA- ; DISPATCH,' FARMER AND_ FRUIT-G PWEB. .Sri ..

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Our Rural fioihe. absorbing.any sort of dangerous virus finely grated cocoanut and a sprink. them and boil first in water for five
which be the face of of also minutes then in milk and water until
"'"- ...... ... may spread upon ling nutmeg. They are very ,
> V XS >
< rf j i WS V l W rf1N W%- >
A the wound.in contact with the absorb nice when mixed with sliced sweet they are done. While they are cook.
Mother's Lament. '
For Our aural ing stone. Such substance, if ,previously oranges, placed upon a delicate cake ing, stir together for each quart of
Home: is of and covered with custard. Another onions of butter
warmed tablespoonful
I thqagbt mj.life,before she died, ., capable exertinga one
A joyless one and fall of pain; very considerable suction, and, of ,'way to prepare them is to slice them and one of flour; when the onions .
... Bat If those days could be again, course, of absorbing and removing I and serve with heavy, home-made begin to get tender take from the
My happiness would grief abide. poisonous ,matter, its action being : strawberry syrup. By a little experimenting milk, and put them in a baking dish in
Alail we DeTer prize our lot, i much like that of a sponge. It can many other dishes can be alternate layers with bread crumbs; .
Until blessing disappear; scarcely be usefully applied to the made, which will form a very acceptable thicken the milk with the stirred flour
Until. And our do arms not feel can clasp the loved them so not dear, bite of a snake, for in that case the variety to the ordinary desserts, and butter, and season'with salt and
venom is injected beneath the skin.It and one will be surprised to find how pepper; pour over the onions and
He-re.U a curl M bright
gold
as need be believed that the flavor of the banana will of bread
Its fellow locks now lie around, not one porous nicely lastly put on a layer crumbs
One'little face beneath a mound stone more than another is a blend with that of other: fruits.-California : seasoned with lumps of ''butter spread
Covered with snow so white I so cold! mad-stone. Such a stone may assistin FruitGrower. over: the top. Bake,a nice brown. :
Nearly A year she has lain there, cleansing a wound: ,_but is a secondary FRUIT POT PIE.-Butter a deep
'Bat'abl!,,It seems but yesterday 'affair, and should by no means replace Gold Air Cure for Yellow Fever.A cooking-dish and put in the bottom a
,f, While. Since sunbeams'moD .the shone flowers: I saw this: her,play any of the more effective meas- German horticultural journal says pint of berries or more, fully half that
The among hair. ures which any intelligent, modern that one of the latest inventions in will be used. Make a light biscuit
If Bible grief bids her,lesson ns to be does glad impart, ; surgeon will know how to put into medicine is the use of cold green- dough and pat it into a round and
-. only have a'wom n'.heart operation. The day is gone by when houses in tropical countries as a means lay it on the fruit. Pile the remainderof
And WIsh no more than to be sad. any well informed person attributes of combating yellow fever. This dis, the fruit on the dough and sprinklewith
O Death,that then should'st have the power, mysterious agencies in the counteraction ease, it states, can be conquered if sugar. Set the kettle over a slow
Of entering the field of life of poisons, contagious and one removes to those elevated regionsin fire and into one side pour enough z
To cat down with thy crooked knife miasms, 'or their effects to charms, anymore which oaks will grow. This fact boiling water to nearly cover the
pie.
Thetender, ,buds before they,flower I IEMMSTT
B. FETXK. than to mutterings and incan- recently inspired ,a celebrated Cuban Cover closely and boil gently twenty- ;
._ tations and pow-wowings. That thereis physician with the idea of reducingthe five minutes. Slide the pudding on a
House Furnishing-The. Better any mad-stone having in itself any temperature of sick-rooms by arti- platter and serve with liquid sauce.
Way. power, _to_prevent the effects of the bite ficial means. and- wonderful cures- re PRUNE CUSTARD.-Slowly stew the
It seems a pity that the young of a rabid animal apart from its poweras sulted. Now it is proposed that t tin fruit an hour and a quarter in a por-
woman who ,is about to. establish' a a porous substance to absorb any districts liable to the epidemic, each celain-linedkettle. Remove skins >
home and has a sum of money to poison with which it may be in contact town shall erect a great glass house in and seeds by hand and rub the pulp ,;
spend for its garnishing, cannot ,be and so, if you will "draw it out" which plants of cold and temperate through a colander or strainer. Have
persuaded from, laying it out all at of the wound, is a thing not at all to regions may be grown, the temperature sufficient juice to make the pulp thin.
once" says Ev/er's Bazar. She robs be believed by any intelligent person.If being artificially cooled insteadof Return it to the stove and heat almostto
herself of so much future enjoyment bitten by a dog supposed to be heated, as in our greenhouses; and boiling. For each pint of fruit stir
The spic and span sets of. furniture rabid, instantaneous and effectual that they shall be devoted to the in two well-beaten eggs ; remove immediately
which.are carelessly ordered from an cautery should be resorted to. 'If'the treatment of patients suffering from and stir in lemon flavoringor

upholsterer,' 'and carried home and wound be at all considerable it is the fever. any tart extract desired. Set away.
stood around her parlors by his men, much the best plan to be put fully un- -- in a mould.and serve with cream. .apal a
will never afford her half the satisfac der the influence of chloroform andto Recipes.
tion she can get in.room for whichtoday have the, cautery thoroughly and SMALL COCOANUT PUDDINGS. Scientific Dress Gutting.- '
she buys a ,chair, and ,next deliberately.done by a good surgeon.- Take two ounces of butter, a quarterof .
week, seeing there must be a table to National Economist. a pound of sugar, two ounces of The very latestand, best developed .
accompany the chair, she starts on a fresh cocoanut grated fine, an ounce Ladies' Tailoring System in use ,is
fresh shopping excursion.and finds a Eating Bananas. of citron shaved fine, the rind and that of Bailey & Adams. It, is not a
table which is exactly what she is' People who are simply accustomedto juice of half a lemon and four eggs. chart or model, but simply a, tailor's ..
looking for; and in another month, seeing bunches of bananas suspend. These ingredients ma be made into square of inches. With it you can '
discovering the need of a bookcase ed at the fruit stores have but little one large pudding instead of small draft any kind of garment and every
a'screen, she has again the delight of : conception of the great ,variety in flavor ones, but will require more time to style of sleeve known. Years of ex- .i
the hunt, and the gratification,of obtaining to be.found in this fruit. Those bake. Melt the butter and sugar, together perience as. teachers in dress cutting i
,,the prettiest screen and bookcase bunches which are cut the greenestare slowly over the fire ; when they schools have enabled the above firmto 1
in the city. Such a, room ,is a of course, the poorest eating, and have, boiled two minutes pour them develop a plan of instructions by
growth a gathering together of house- there are varieties which are naturally out and let them cool; then mix in I object lessons which makes it so simple
hold treasures little by little, and piece much coarser in flavor than others; the cocoanut, citron, the grated lemon that anyone who can read can learn j
by piece. Each article, bought only but, it is quite rare for us to get the rind and the eggs. After beating to use it without a teacher. For cir-
when the need arises, or when ,something finer eating varieties in the Northern these well together, add the' juice of culars and price list address Bailey& ;
is happily..found to just meet.the markets, on account of their delicacy, I the half lemon, put the mixture into Adams, KansasiCity, Mo. .. .
need, will have family history which which,will not admit of transportation.The buttered pudding cups or patty pans, -i .-i- 4
makes it an ,entertaining as well as a ordinary yellow and red bana- sprinkle with sugar and bake half an FOR DYSPEPSIA* "
valuable possession. Each couch,and nas of our markets are very good if hour in a moderate oven. Indigestion, and Stomach dliordtls,use } .
footstool is an achievement; each rug not cut too green before their' ship- ESCALLOPED ONIONS.Large, Span- dealers BROWN'S IRON BITTERS. .. '1
All ,
keep It fl bottle. Genuine ha
per
and. curtain represents a triumph. ment. In addition to the way in ish onions, are best for this dish ; peel trade-mark and crossed red lines on impptK )3 3r
Such a home, built up gradually, with which most people peel and: eat them .
careful planning in each part, 'with by hand, the chefs throughout theco.untry ,
thought and loving consideration in have contrived to make from
all its details, acquires a meaning far them many delicious dishes and rel- \ II
deeper than could be purchased by ishes. The banana, though quite fragilein H' '
the longest purse from the most fash, texture, will. readily undergo the : .
iosable cabinetmaker.The operation of freezing and retain all its
delicacy and can be used in custards f f
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''Mad-Stone.' and creams of, various sorts. f I' j,
The opinion of the writer is ,asked In the West Indies the natives cook [.,.,.,....-PI" f
.
,as to the, value of mad-stone, and bananas while they are quite firm. fEfiiCfNC JrtBEjSffiraFir
whether it is of any value in snak -blte. The fruit is cut lengthwise in slices
Mad stone is any highly porous pieceof I about one-third of an inch thick. The Wift StMttdi-Inpitfid DipstiN ""'IMr.'t

stone with a flat surface which may slices are then browned in butter. If SOLD 'BT ALL DRT7GGTCML :
be. pressed closely down upon a the fruit is fully ripe, it can be managed f : 1\
wounded surface., Its action may be by dipping it into a paste.of flour PRICE 25 CENTS PER BOX.

appreciated by applying the,lips to the and egg which has been prepared; buta Prepared oil )1THOSBEECIf .,St.Heleus LM lrg
bowl or stem,of a chalk pipe such ras little more butter is required for B. ', ALLEN & C0. _
JP. 1 Sole Age***
are called bubble pipes by children.It cooking it in this way. ::
is :FOR Urtl'llIO: STATES, Z6* easy to see that such. a pipe ,or a A very delicious dish can be made '
Who (if 'your druggist does not keep them) will mail Beechaa'sOR
stone ;
porous o.aay sort may be useful -, by cutting well ripened bananas into :
in f receipt of pn e-fat'rngutrtfr* (Pled aaaatioQ t t&fe paper.) .
cleapwBg a wound\ and actually thin disks and covering 'them with| ,

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,.. l .Lb' ..The Farmers' Alliance < .


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.'.. ; ORGAN OF THE STATE FARMERS ALLIANCE AND INDUSTRIAL UNION. > .
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VOL.V.' "Agriculture is the Basis of Wealth No. .19. :'
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.TOM_ SAW ER, -: Staff Contributor. each day, and the poor are losing even on the Sub Treasury Bill of your issueof Frenchman, "So much de vorse for
the little they have. Naturally, the the 16th. de. facts." There is a tangible and

Bad Books. poor man resents' this condition of I. The Sub-Treasury Bill, according visible accession at harvest time ofquantities 1
'AST' Ain z.MORTEM STATCHXNT.' By E. W. things-a condition not recognizedby : to President Andrews, is, artfully of corn, wheat, cotton,
Howe, Atchison, Kan .ThlOlob Pub-
; 1,1- Uftblng'Company,189L : our constitution and laws, and in framed to make the farmers sell at etc., but perhaps he does not call this :
The 'hero If' hero'he may be called, who his blind wrath he. may do mischief, low prices and buy at high, prices. wealth, but only "farm produce."
,doe*.absolutely nothing not utterly,.despicable hence this Alliance movement is one 2. After the farmers have sold at I really believe that in the minds of .
,i*supposed? to write this statement and that calls for all the intelligence and low prices there will be a great increasein the majority of financiers and the mer-
commit suicide.' The statement has nothingto patriotism of a great people. It is a the volume of currency, and that cantile classes generally there is an '"" ,
make it worth reading. No review of
social life or analysis of human motive, not mighty force for good or evil as it may will increase the price of-everythingthey idea that it is only their manipulationof .
eTen the grace of literary style. It is an be directed. There is a chance, now, have to buy. farm produce. which makes it
abyss of filth and stupidity,that readers will for each individual Allianceman to 3. The volume of money will be wealth. I believe this idea rests at ,:
do well to avoid, and the only wish that its show the stuff that is in him, and by doubled ,just after the farmer has the bottom of their minds somewhere, "j;
perusal' is capable of arousing the heart Is his own efforts make the Farmers' nothing to sell and just when he wantsto though perhaps if the question were *'
that Mr. Howe had committed suicide before
he wrote.It. Alliance an institution to which every, buy. directly put to them they might deny .1
THX MADONNA or PASS CHRISTIAN. A patriot will look in this hour of our There are many more argumentsto it. i
Tale of the Resurrection. By Qeo. F. country's trouble. In the presence of prove how the Sub-Treasury schemeis There is no more indefinite terms ,)
Ormsby. Chicago: DonohneHenneberry all our apparent' prosperity, the fact artfully contrived to "aggravate the than wealth. Produce, manufactured
A Co. remains that the most of our peopleare evils" of which the farmers complain, goods and money all go by the name 1 1of
This is a most stupid and vulgar book,
written to sell to readers of depraved tastes.It wretchedly poor,and the demon of all of which might be disprovedone wealth; but the last named, money, "
has not the merit of wit or wisdom. Its unrest has taken possession of ,the by one-but will disprove them is not wealth at all, although in the :i
pages are simply'dull and unclean. masses. TOM SAWYER. selves when set face to face with another popular estimation money signifies. '
The two criticisms above are taken pag set of warnings.The wealth more than either of the other .
from:;the New Orleans .Picayune and President Andrews on the Sub- farmers after receiving 80 percent two. Money is not wealth, but only :
they are refreshing reading. If our Treasury.BUI. of the value of their produce the government-made token or "me ,

great journals will have the courageto Editor Alliance Department: from the government, and paying i dium of exchange" between the two 'J.'
attack such books by name and Of this Sub per cent on the advance, will, it is great divisions of wealth, produce and ..
hold them up to the public in all their plan-the -Treasurytwo represented, become so well off, al manufactures. '
I rottenness 'we will have less of such things may be safely predicted, though according to the preceding Produce is new wealth, in the sense ",
that the old school of
literature. ,The,most astonishing feat- mists and the old school political of farmers'newspapers econo- warnings, they have been obliged to that it is newly brought into the world. :
ure of,our ,civilization of to-day is the sell cheaper and buy dearer than be- It is as much newly created wealth asa i
will
number of vile books being published surely object to it, fore, they will, notwithstanding the new born child is a newly created :
and for similar

,write : story and give it an,attracting finance has been a new outsideof which they suffer, become' capitalistsand harvest does bring to the nation a sud- !
, title just as the common originated lenders to the less favored public den accession of wealth.
the financial school which,
; strumpet of 'our ,cities assumes some to they at 2 or 3 per cent. Manufactured ,articles ,are, also '\
fanciful name to gild her shameless belong, and the latter because a new Both of these prophecied disasters wealth, but they are not newly created
of farmers' reform has been
occupation, then..it is 'ready to adorn plan outside of the old, school originated offarmers' cannot come true, because they would I wealth, but are made or manufacturedout
the show windows of our book stores mutually prevent one another. of formerly created produce.,
and be read in secret by our young .newspapers to which the edi- If the farmers under the provisionsof I The farmers in the SubTreasuryplan
of these
people. It is a dreadful evil, and it tors papers belong. the Sub-Treasury Bill were, forcedto demand of the government moneyto
is'well that we have' some 'journalistspure That President Andrews, of,Brown buy dearer than before and forced be"handed direct to them for their'
enough and brave enough to University and the American Agriculturist also to sell their produce cheaper than newly created wealth, instead of
fight this devil wherever i it appears. should back up one another in before, it is very evident that they through the intervention of bankers,
TOM SAWYER.Alliance arguments against the Sub-Treasury never'could amass enough money to and to save them from the grip of such
p 4 plan is therefore natural. Both are in become lenders. But on the other thieves as "old Hutch" and others.
,Patriotism.It the same boat, both are actuated by hand, if by means of the SubTreasury They ,have a right to this, and they
requires just as much patriotismto similar feelings, and both are particu- plan they are so fortunate as to be would have a right, when they received '.
fight the money-hunting monopolistas larly distanced and superceded. able to do what the banks are now their honestly and lawfully ;
the beef-eating Britisher or the Hitherto political economists have doing, that is, receive money from earned money, to either spend it or f
Italian whose soul revels amid the delights been the teachers of finance, that is the government at a low rate of inter- lend it as they saw fit.
of maccaroni and stilettoes,'and to say, as much of the so-called est and lend it to the public at a But there need be no fear of the
the Allianceman who to-day deserts science of finance as they understood higher rate, then it follows that the farmers turning usurers, because if
his. cause is as much a coward and themselves, (and that is not saying Sub-Treasury Bill would not have money were handed directly to the.. "4.
traitor ,as American would be who much, ), and the general public have forced the farmers to buy dearer and wealth producers there would be little
might run away in time of battle. The been their pupils, while the docile sell cheaper; nor would it have aggravated need of borrowing.It .
principle is the same,and the post of farmers, "the poor ignorant farmers," the evils under which they suf- is the hoarding and contractionof
duty is the post of honor at all times. stood down in the very lowest class fer. Nor would the general public be money in banks and by financiers
Our struggle concerns all, men and of pupils, if indeed they could be In any worse case from class legislation which creates the necessity ,for bor.
every lover of our common country is called pupils at all. The old time to the farmers, than they are now rowing, and from the necessities of
interested in the issue. Our ,social agricultural papers have also been the from class legislation to the bankers, the borrowers it is that the financierslive
system ,is so rapidly drifting into a farmers' teachers, and now that... this who lend to the people at 6 per cent. and flourish and grow fat. Let
raoaied aristocracy,who are trying by hitherto, supposed to be hopelessly, ,These two senes of warnings have the government make over the money
every means to< acquire supreme con. stupid and most backward pupil has mutually knocked one another on the when and to whom it rightfully be
trol of our political affairs as well thatit suddenly risen up to teach them is not head and killed one another requiescatin longs, that is the wealth producers, i
is the duty of every man who loves to be endured, not to ,be thought of pace. and borrowers and lenders would alike ,{
r his country help the Allianceman or submitted to, for one moment. Now for another argument. The disappear. .
along in this struggle. There is in Solemn admonitions and still more American Agriculturist says: "It is a Thewritercontlnues: "If the scheme ...
England middle class whose intelligence solemn warnings of inevitable disasters mistake to think that harvest bringsto works well with farm produce it is to
wealth and conservatism serveas to follow if these wild schemesare the nations a sudden accession of be extended in other 1iaeses,

a balance wheel in the political persisted in, are held up before us exchangeable wealth calling for ex- the farmers are not greedy, they.are
r machine, but in free America,' whereour in every shape and form that their imagination pansion'in' the circulating medium." not monopolists, they don't want to i

institutions'recognize neither lord can conceive.Let I might say to the writer that the keepall the benefits of the Sub-

nor peasant tJ we,have no middle class. us examine together some' of facts, the plain facts are against him ; Treasury principle to themselves, because -.

pur. .rich. are" ,growing. -.. :vaetly:: Ji*-richer;,.,';'' "-). these, spectres 7. presented. lit "an.,!"article. 'but perhaps he would say like the they. ,.are averse, to class legi J ,!,j k'V. ..-{ f..
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.
r But then It is feared at "should The sCtfse4arxaer.t; :"1880 to 1887, average price per RICH FLORIDA LANDS.'

I' this device for increasing money.take We take tnV following.extract from bushel, $1.07. .
this wide sweep, 'the owners of warehoused the address-of,:President:LrKL. Polk '< CORtf.

' t goods would be in'a condition to, Citizens' Alliance No.: 4.,%of Wash, .. 1860 to 1870, average price per
s to become purveyors of lable.f nd Ington, 'D.. C.: % f\ bushel, 96 cents.
tD'the efitlre.'world.. .'; Yes, quite so, Will we, as,a people, profit by the 1880 to 1887, average price per
and why not} ? t lesson of the past? 'How stand we bushel, 46 .
1 J By this plan,would be.brought about to-day? To the student of industrial cents.COTTON..
'> the most salutary revolution the world progress and economic development,
1 has ever seen it would 'l lay ',the bundamn :dn anoraaloils condition of affairs i is: 1860 to 1870, average price per
; the dnly true' foundation, for I presented. The rapid expansion of pound, 485 cents.
f zM hohest system of finance. On the our railway system, Stretching 156,006: 1880 to 1887, average price per

i principle that money, the medium of riiiles all ovet our land, and furnishing pound 9 cents.
i exchange between ,the different kinds transportation equal to the demandsof So that to-day a dollar costs the
; of wealth, should be based upon that our productive power-the successful wheat farmer two and one-third timesas
; wealth itself, not on the bonded debt development of manufacturing en- much, the corn farmer over two
; of the nation nor on the :hoarding up terprise in all its varied departmentsthe and one-half times as much, and the
p
of quantities of totally useless piecesof magical growth of villages, towns cotton farmer over four times as muchas
stamped metal-nor even on the, and cities, the grand rumbling of it did from 1860 to 1870.If Farmers Stop and Think
national "credit" so much talked trains, the ,inspiring scream of whistles a farmer had given a mortgagefor WHY Spend the best years of your
, i 1 1 about, but on Its bona fide national the ringing clatter of hammer $1,000 in 1870, he could have life cultivating the soils of f the frozen
wealth. and trowel, the musical hum and paid it with 1050 bushels of corn. North and West raising crops on which
i That is just what all the civilized swelling din of workshop and factories Ten to seventeen years later, it would the freight is often not realized, when
:nations of the world want to arrive at. the mighty rushing tramp of our have taken, without interest, 2,702 you can buy land l from the undersigned,
As I have said before, under, this. busy millions, the tinkling ring of bushels to have paid it, and so with rich and fertile as any known lands,
1 system of free and fluent currency, i hammer and anvil-all join to swell his other crops. The farmer pays his and where you can raise a crop that the
flowing'to and from its rightful recip-- the grand chorus of the world's happy debts with his labor. His crops cost United States Government will pay a
ientslike' life blood to and from the song of industrial progress; and yet, him as much labor now as in 1870, fiouNTY of$I 00 on each acre.
heart:"" -borrowing and the need for agriculture, "the art of all arts, the but he receives only from onefourthto HOLD On, this isn't all You can sell
! borrowing would almost cease. Money science of all sciences, the life of all one-half as much for them. Mustwe the said crop right there in your home'
then would flow easily into its life is drooping dying. be told that the law of supply and
proper 'languishing, market for $%50 per acre. You ask for ,
k channels of exchange, nourishing the Instead of the happy, cheerful songof demand regulates prices? How, then, the "How" and the "Wherefore."
whole,body. Not as,, now remaining plenty, contentment and peace, may we explain that we produced Quite right-facts and figures count best. .
in some parts in a diseased, because' which should bless the home of the nine and one-half bushels of wheat
'
Plant the Land with Sugar Cane.
congested, condition in the national American farmer, we hear the dismal per capita in 1881, and it was worth
body, some classes, 'apoplectically and universal wail of hard times all $1.15 per bushel; while we producedin TO OLD Farmers and careful perusers -
bloated with money while others are over the land. 1889 only seven and one-half bush- of papers, the fact that there is now '
I in'a'bloodless and 'anemic conditionfer Let us investigate, briefly, the situation els per capita and it worth only 79 established near Kissimmee, Fla., the
'want of it. The writer, however, and see if we may find the cause cents per bushel? The operations of St. Cloud Sugar Refinery, is stale
} makes mistake in saying that this is of this unnatural and dangerous con- this ancient law in trade have been news. We are talking to all our'j.,
a. "device for increasing money" to dition of affairs.. practically annulled or supplanted by friends. Sugar cane can be raised as A ..
all ,depositors.: There should be no In 1850 our farmers owned over 70 the more imperious law of greed as cheaply as corn, and Uncle Sam will 'r.,*.
increase of money where and when per cent. of the wealth of the country; now enforced under the mandates of pay you a bounty of two cents per poundon
there has been no increase of ''newly in 1860, about 50 per cent.; in 1880, monopolistic combinations for the pil- the manufactured sugar. The St. '
made, wealth, or produce, as at har- about 33 per cent., and to-day they lage and robbery of honest labor. Cloud plantation in Osceola Co., Fla., .L:
c vest-and the Sub-Treasury plan own less than 25 per cent., and yet In the great State of Illinois the averaged 4,500 pounds of sugar to the .- ;
e makes a simple method for its decrease they pay over 80 cents in every dollar corn crop of 1889 cost its farmers acre last year, and it will go 5,000pounds :
.as this produce is consumed that is collected in taxes. $9,935,823 more than the crop was this year.METHODS .

- so'making a flexible currency a' need From 1850 to 1860 farm. values, in- worth after it was harvested. ? This isn't the only big ;
which.even Mr. Edward Atkinson,the creased 101 per cent. The: mortgages on land lots and chance of your life, however. The J
great Boston political economist, allows !- From 1860 to 1870 farm values in- chattels in that State in 1880 were cultivation of rice lands about Kissim' 1

to be a necessary reform. There creased 43 per cent. 204461334. In 1887 they were mee is to become an assured, profitablefact. =
would be plenty of money to go roundto From 1870 to 1880 farm values in- $416,379,068-an increase of indebt- There is no richer or better !
other depositors without recourseto creased only 9' per cent. edness in seven years of $211,917- truck and market-garden lands in the i
fresh coinage or more printing of Notwithstanding this alarming decline 734-or 103 per cent. world than the land on the rich over-
treasury'notes if all the hoardings in in farm values, the aggregate On land alone the increase was flow, or bottom lands about Kissim- 11
vaults and banks were set free. wealth of the country increased 45 $44,953,000, or 40 per cent. mee. Write, for confirmation, to CoL
The writer fears that produce'would; per cent. from 1870 to 1880, and the If every surplus bushel of wheat A. K. McClure, editor PhiladtlphiA J'
be redeposited. I see no:danger. If agricultural population increased'over and corn of the crop of 1889 in that Times, who has personal knowledge.; ,
it is redeposited: it must' have been 29 per cent.' State had been applied to the mortgaged Then in lands 'e groves, or
previously taken out of the warehouse, From 1850 to 1860, agriculture led indebtedness on the farm landsIn groves already cultivate or bearing,
and to get it out the government: certifiCate manufacturing 10 per cent in increasedvaJue 1887, there would still remain I[ can satisfy you that your best interests
have been given and of from to 1880 $?17784,97 be paid out of other
,4/ must up products; 1870' tp lie in seeing me before any one else.
cancelled. It would no longer pass manufacture led agriculture 27 percent crops or earnings, or it would have BEAUTIFUL HOMES. The healthfulness .
as.a medium of exchange. showing a difference in favor fallen short $3,875,250 of paying the and beauty of Kissimmee'have
i It would:'be at the will of the gov- of'manufacturing of 37 per cent. interest.In never been questioned. No
ernment for how long produce shouldbe The value of the ten leading staple the great State of Michigan,
consumption no
diphtheria no pneumonia
,
stored, and whether if 'withdrawn crops of the country in 1866 was with all its diversified industries, the -in fact, read our medical
it should be ,redeposited. All these $2,007,462,231. The value of the farms aremortgaged to the amount of report. Beautiful cottages, villas or
little carpings only serve to show how same crops in 1864, eighteen years 5130,000,000, at an average interestof lots suitable for residences. Write '
every little straw is eagerly caught later, $2,043,500,481. During this 7 per cent. And to pay the interest for terms and particulars. .
the time the cultivated acreage had nearly on the farm mortgages for one
hold.of to make up a case against SOUTH
COME untold
greatest reform of ,the age, which is doubled, the farm hands had doubled, year would require 455,544 bushels And get
embodied in the of the Sub- and agricultural implements and ma- more of wheat than the entire net quantities of the grandest climate in '
principle .
the world free with each acre of ground: ";,
Treasury bill. E. M. KING, chinery had vastly improved, and yet crop of the State in 1889.In .
} Alliance Lecturer for Putnam'County the crops of 1884 sold for only 2 percent the great State of Iowa $199 purchased. Come where you can till <;:
E---I\& ,,, more than the same crops, of 000,000 of mortgaged indebtedness the ,soil twelve months in the year. 'I
.
1866.. i hangs over its farms-a sum equal to At least write to me for full particulars..

'' CATARRH 'qREB., 'The average value per acre in yieldpf .$104 for every man, woman and child WM. CANNON, _'' r
all our crops in 1867, was $19, and in the State. And this is exclusive of Kitslmmee,.Fla. ; .
A clergyman,after years of Buffering from Agent forthe lands of the Dtestoa Companies, .
tbftt toftUMomedfoeaM Catarrh, and vainly hi 1887, twenty years later, the ave- farms occupied' by tenants. All over for the Associated Railways land,and the .' '; 1:
,' trytaff er ery knowa,remedy at last found a about the:face of this broad land the most lands of XteaLmmee Land Co. Page value $9.
presenptfcm which posapfeteiy J cured and was Phosphate, sugar cane, rice, trucking, ,
are* dtae.ae deatb.Any sufferer from tfal WHEAT.i$6o princely) heritage ever given to man, '
t'
dedft l seeing a aelfaddrecsedttompM fruit, grazing, timber, general farming, .
eareteee,to.'Prei J.A.Lawrence SB to 1870, average price per. may be read the same sad, sad story ; and home lands. Send for map showing
Warren ttreeVlfew York will.receive:the bushel and if would read the fearful lands, .
"
$1.9?- you 'i
're" P of > .
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t :374- ..:. THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, I1.'dR .--'.FRi--- UIT-" :.ROWEB.. [lAY 7.1891

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record of the frightful ravages of WIth.the. space between roofed over.. ,- \I'oma&1entallwaslnet.; .forg&tton, but on that a ;dozen hogs can destroy in a
money power en the industrial ,energies and a few feet away a smaller jcabin\! a JanrT It ,seeflMVtfca t"the useful mayalways couple of,days, hunting as ,they will
'' of our people, go ,to your,census with a projecting roof at one;end. be,madeornamental" ,in ,a, de- for.the,ears of corn ,accidentally left
bureau in this city and you will fire This structure was known as ,the a'c.: -f.* ; \ i in ,the shock while ,husking; and
piled up the abstracts of 9,000,000 of Asmoke house." Still further away, :'The log barn was torn down and should the farmer not reset the'fodder
mortgages .on their ,homes-a mortgage in the open field stood a dilapidatedhorse rebuilt,.with additions, ,diagonallyacross at once, and .it should be rained .on,
for every seven of! our population barn of logs. All of these : the road,from the house, in the it will hardly be worth handling..
or averaging about one mortgageto buildings were old. The fields enclosed II midst(of a grove of: young oak ,trees., Only on yesterday noticed a.field;of
.every f family in the whole union. with zig-zag rail fences, had been Here' it was not,only picturesque, itwas corn that had been cut.for wheat seed-
.But this law,.of supply_and demand under cultivation! for several years sheltered .in all .weathers, and ing last,September, in,which were one
inexorable and unchanging in its and their surfaces were smooth and those engaged in the. care of ,the hundred shocks of twenty hills square
effects and operation as applied to free from stumps. North of the,house stock were grateful at all times ,of the leveled with ,the, ground by a, lot of
money.! ,Scarcity ,of money means was a neglected, discouraged, looking year for the protecting,trees. ,By and hogs. The fodder was richly worth
1Hgh.pnced money; a plentiful supplyof orchard of apple trees, and a patch of by superanuated chairs found their $25 to the owner, had it not _been
money means cheap money. The ground fenced in with rough, broken way from ,the house to "thegrove., molested, but unfortunately he has a
high.priced dollar lessens the price. of pickets, was called the garden. This Then a big rock-a-by swing was built, gateway, through his farm, and the
labor products, the cheap dollar raises lay in front of the house door to the and as the ground was kept free from gates,being remote from his residencehe
the pnce of labor products. Look at east. Over all the fields and the or- rubbish, the stable clear of all offal does not know when some careless
our.public debt. In 1886 it ,was $2- chard, choking the little garden, fill- and leavings, "the grove" grew to,bea person has turned all the"road hogs" ,
783000000. We have paid in principal ing the corners made by the fences, sort of picnic ground for the family into his ,premises ; and yet he must
interest and premiums on that about the barn and even leaning out and visitors, and more than one delighted suffer hardships, while his fe cesare
debt the vast sum of $4,198,931,361, from the foundations of the house guest was heard to exclaim, among the best in the country, and
'and yet, it would take more of labor were great strong weeds of every vari "Well who ever heard of such a nice along that same roadside; he has. a
products to-day to pay the remainder ety known to the climate. The good barn-yard !I" In the road in front of whiteoak plank fence, the plank hav-
,than it would have taken at the prices house mother looked discouraged, butt the house stood an old oak tree, one ing been hauled eight miles, and
; in. 1886 to have paid the original debt. e shrewd-eyed husband said, "Thisis of the most symmetrical of this stal-- has locust posts of the finest qualityto
Again two farmers each had $1,000in one of the most promising signs of wart species. It stood in solitary protect said'crops.. But here when ;
:1870. The one deposited his .the land. These giant weeds show grandeur, towering above every other one possesses a stock law, or no-fence
money in a vault, the other investedin the strength of the soil. Next year tree in ,sight, but when one year's law, requiring every one to keep his
: wheat and bought 500 bushels. we'll have com much taller than the clearing up was done, there was lefta own stock within ,his own enclosure,
To-day the cash farmer,can buy with weeds." line of a half dozen oaks-running the ignorant white man and illiterate
his money' 1,500 bushels of wheat, And so it came to pass, though it 'west from the great one and they were colored will come forward and vote
r while the wheat farmer, with his 500 looked as if the work to be done 'graded in size as though they might against,the law, as though'we. were:
bushels, can buy only $333 in money. must prove a lengthening chain. Yet have been of the same family, count- trying to rob them of ,their dearest
A That is to say, ,the capital of the one it is by keeping pace with the seasons ing the first as the great-great-great right, the right,to graze the roadwayand
has,increased without interest 50 percent that farmers' families create the beauty grandfather\ of the smaller ones. This keep cows and hogs alive on the
the other has depreciated 66 spots ,of the world. row''' of trees was the pride and delightof products of the forest as nature pro-
per cent If this money, lying idle Through the fall the weeds were cut the house full of romantic, boys vides for wild animals. Let's hear
E; and drawing no,interest, can thus' in- down and burned, and as winter came and girls and in, the busy, happy time, from those who experience the benefits
crease\its powers so alarmingly over on fences were repaired, fields were as the farm grew in beauty and .pro of stock laws.
the products of labor, what mind can fertilized with great banks of stable ductiveness, a name grew for it: I wish also to know if the yalue of
r., : or grasp; the enormity of the evil ,that is i manure, discovered when the weeds There was no consultation, no bottleof lands has not been enhanced in those
r* .r inflicted in the industrial energies of were. destroyed. Fuel for ,the, next wine was spilled at the christening, localities where the' fence or stock law.
the. people, when_ money is loaned_ out year was: prepared by clearing a patchof and no one knew exactly how it came prevails.
at ruinous rates_of interest? woodland here and there, enlarging about, but it was named Oakwood. I, am very sure that I'd select such a
t i'Ijr; 1866 we had'$52 per capita in. and squaring some of the fields, Farm by common consent, and it was : locality were I to purchase, and.pay
.circulation. During,that year we had and in one place opening a beautiful astonishing, only at the time no one from $2 to,$10 per acre more for,good;
632 'business failures, involving liabilities view of? the Tippecanoe river, which thought of it, to see how readily the land where such laws exist, than .for
to the amount of $47,333,000.In '. formed the northern boundary of the neighbors adopted the name.-Western similar lands where they do not,';even
: i88p .we had less than $7* per farm. Rural. if there was an abundance of timberon
capita in circulation, and during that The garden, too, was extended, and the land, fork costsa, great deal
: had business failures No Fence or Stock Law. of labor to maul haul and
year we 13,277 on examination there were found, put up
,involving.liabilities to the amount of overrun with long grass and, weeds, Will some of your readers who live ; rails "ad infinitum," trying to fence
$312,496,742. currant and raspberry bushes, 'and.a where there exists "no-fence" laws, i against "professional hog and cattle
The farmer sees, United States 4 few courageous grape vines. In the or,where every'man is held responsible fence,breakers." From my reading I
: per cent. bonds, which would be spring it was astonishing to see the for trespasses of his stock on his infer such state of affairs as everyone's
.! utterly worthless but for. the sturdy, respectability that the old garden assumed neighbor's farm, please give an ac- being compelled tOkeep his own stock
blows of his strong arm, due i in 1907, with its clean walks, its prim count'of how well it works ; and es from injuring his neighbor's crops is
I, which were,bought at 54 cents in- the beds of vegetables, its collection of pecially do desire. to have the experiences the rule in the finest agricultural districts
dollar,, selling at $1.25 to the dollar, pungent herbs, thyme, sage, camomile and observations of one who of the European.countries.
when he knows\ that a mortgage on pennyroyal and mint, to say has tried both methods. would also It is.appalling the estimates of cost
f': not one farm in a thousand the nothing of the bank of old-fashioned like to know where any neighborhoodtired to renew the fencing on small farms in
same time at ,one-third, its value, at flowers that bordered the side next of the "no-fence" law and en- those counties and. districts where
the rate of 7, per cent: interest, could the, road. acteda: law requiring the,farmers to there has been no stock law enacted.
be sold at its ,face value. He is The grape vines were trained to fence against others' stock. I have, Supposing the 'country to average,
alarmed when he sees under our.finaneial rustic frames and within two seasons never lived where the stock law ap farms of 160 acres, it would take
1 policy-. the; major part of the amply repaid all the attention andcdre plied, (only to hogs), and then the 15,000 rails to fence and sub-divide
wealth: ,of 63,000,000 people pass into they received. The orchard owner was required to confine his them ; at $3 per zoo for labor makingand
E the hands of ,31,000 men.Reclaiming trees'were. pruned early in the spring, hogs in,his own enclosure, and was putting up and cost of timber,
.- the earth about the roots loosened and responsible for damage they did, $450; the interest on same at 8 per,
a Farm. enriched with wood ashes, and the should he fail to confine them.. This cent. $36 per annum, and i-io of
The place was not wholly devoid of suds from the weekly washings was law gave perfect satisfaction, and I original cost per'year for repairs, 451
beauty, though ragged and unkempt used to scrub the trunks and pour never knew, of any one's hog depredating 36 $81, or over 50 cents:per acre for
in,tHe last degree, when its new possessors about the roots. ,How the old trees on his neighbor's produce. To fencing per annum. Two-thirds of
first.saw: it, on one of the.loveliest freshened and grew and blossomedand me' it appears that half the cost offences this amount should be saved to the
,days of September. An artist held on to their fruit until it was will be of vast importance, and bulk of the farmers, and"if there are
might 'have been delighted with,it.as well ripened. Their_ strength was no the crops will be much! safer. I haveso not more advantages to the' poor as
model, ,but to the, eye.,of a thrifty, longer;allowed to,be frittered away on often seen acres of corn"rooted.up, well as middle class,of farmers, I am
middle-aged farmer, whose law and a worthless lot of sprouts, and withina young clover destroyed and the ,matured honestly mistaken on .the"'fence question.
L gospel were,order.and cleanliness, the season or two. they proved, them- corn broken down and destroyedby .-Southern Fars.Maay.Perseiaa; .
tU ensemble spoke only of that most selves to be,of no ordinary stock, and hogs being turned,in on it by degraded .
$//it 'hopeless of ally ,mortal*,. ."a slouch ofa the bins of 'the, new house which was thieves, or else a washed fence : 1ft 1 Hta '
"'* built well rotted rail outside' down from oak or booaehoMJ3rown's eue&'
former : __ during the first season, were or giving hungry '',
Irea :Bitters
I There" stood. tfctffeMiieg,',.' 'two 'filled with'as fine fruit as the -family' hogs an opportunity to get into a corn- '1JItem.tsdt lilt!.11.......,.seeM lie tWla.Ifa .....'

,k I f !t'&\1nd-log' .. cabins. *l.iSSaSSBr..,. _'.. IT''.feet..1-,' '.apart.... :\\j r liad)left on. the farm in Ohio. The field, and oh| the nice stalk fodder and caw ::"'- ., Wh. .
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: esM: Figures: about-Forfcraes.Tlie .' that: would. .-make it, unprofitable" to From President 8. S. Harvey. ,/. .

J'present wealth of jOhn 'D.: ,keep useless dogs; :'and'those ,that are Editor,Alliance Department:

lUefatfeiler estimated at $132,000- :kept:should'be' so.regulated' to in- In the Wall Street Farmer of May t.

Doe;:afid his annual income$7,61i- sur&to'the'ptiblic safety in person'and 2, 1891, I find my name used as a.. .

ooo, which:isbpercent'onhiscapital.:' property. In Texas the deaths,from' director of the Farmers' and Citizens' ,'

f If he should live till l .1915, and' his that: most,are tdtsease,,hydrophobia, Alliance Exchange. I have no know! I JI J\

! wealth &hould'continue accumulate' averages more':than fifty every year, edge of any such organization; I have

i at ,the,fame ratio as;; it .;:does; now, it and most of these are innocent child-' never been written to or consulted .
, wouldamount: to"'$548,000.000, andin'less ren. It is'a humiliating fact'''that the about any such scheme, and my name : % t

J than'''fo.rty"years from:now he average legislator' has not enough is used without my knowledge or con-

I' would be;a billionaire, William W. backbone; rd ,his plain duty in, this sent: I have no connection with any

, Astor Is now. worth $134,000,000, and matter in 'view of''the fact that the company, or scheme, in New York; r

; his income is $9oO, ,0 :per'year/ In owner of the predacious curs are also neither has the Farmers' Alliance Ex- Florida Central 'and Peninsular .

twentjr-five years he will be worth, if armed with the ballot The present change of Florida, of which, I have
:
t he .lives (and ,he is a ''young man), laws, or"lack of good laws, is a monument the honor to be President, any officein RAILROAD,, Go

! $700,000,000, and before 1920 he will to the demagoguery of the New York or any connection with THE FLORIDA TRUNK IINE

! ,be a.billionaire demagogue.-Farm'and Ranch. any office or company there.
In justice to the State (Formerly the F.R.A N. Co.)offers Increased
The national banks of this __ Exchange
!}' : country 4 facilities this season for travel to Florida,
I" realized an annual profit' of' IS percent "He's My Boss and myself'' will you please publishthis having in addition to Its old and 'popular
connections the LOUISVILLE A WASH-
( or more' for .their capital of When the "presidential special," in your next issue? VILLE R. R. at the River Junction'' and the

; $500,000,000, for, :fifteen years after bearing Mr. Harrison and his, party Very respectfully, GEORGIA Suwannee River SOUTHER route to* Florida d: FLORIDA),arranged(the

y the close of the, war and more than rolled into Atlanta, we stood on Broad S. S. HARVEY, for a new ruute from' the West and Nortu-
;; 10 per cent since. In his annual report street bridge and looked 'down upon President Farmers' Alliance Exchangeof cello west via carrying Montgomery through,Bainbridge sleepers aad from Monti CIN

. J :.for 1877 William H. English, at.least five hundred small negro boysof Florida.Consumption" ... 1 O CINNATI The road TO has TAMPA.f"now no less than e

: President of the First National Bank' all sizes and all stages of dress and Cured.An Seven Points of Connection Withthe f

{ OrJ;Indianapolis, ,Ind., says that "the undress, and laughed tsee their> old physician, retired from practice,bad North
f bank-had returned,to its stockholders boundless enthusiasm and to hear placed In his bands by an Fast India missionary .
: the formula of a simple vegetable namely, Fernaudlna, Callahan Jacksonville _
,i every :dollar, of its/original capital of their happy shouts of "Here's my remedy for the speedy and permanent- cure of Live Oak, Lake City, Monticeilo) *nd River
,
"that it annual dividends Consumption, Bronc itis. Catarrh Asthma Junction, making comfortable connections
$500,000; ) paid
"Here's boss "Here'sour
I
; marster, my and all throat and lung affections,also a pojl with Chicago Kansas City and all northern *
oitsrstock, 'of 'i6i per 'cent 'from blessed marster cum ter see us," .tlv and radical care fur nervous debility and cities, for whIch this road Is specially In*

i the.tiaie! it:was chartered! ; in 1864: tot as they swarmed up the track behind all wonderful nervous curative complaints.powers Having in thousands tented its of augurated. '
thaVtime,- thirteen years, ,and. that In'' the moving'train their mouths cases and desiring to relieve human suffer The Florida Central
; were f
, ing, will send free of charge to all who wishIt '
a&Mitoa to all this it accumulated wide open and their ecstatic eyes fixed this recipe in German, French or English and, Peninsular Railroad
a'paid up'cash of,$1,000,000. President with full directions for preparing and using. Is the greatest artery of travel through the' .
t capital upon the who stood, on, the Kent by mall, by addressing with stamp finest part of Florida, traversing twenty-
AJ iHtle.exercise, in simple arithmetic rear platform bowing and smiling to naming this paper. W.A. NOTES,82J' PoweraJBlock four counties Gadsden, Jefferson, UuvaU
will show one'that the stockholders Rochester,N.Y. Alachua Lake, Leon' Suwannee, Nas"anf.
the crowd. Oh that little
;any rag-tag I Levy, Orange, Hlllsborough Wakulla,'
n ofthis bank got$2,000,000 in less howling moblIt! was much more There are at least three good reasons Columbia, Clay, Marion, Yolk, Manatee,
Madison, Baker Bradford, Humter, Her- _
than ,thirteen years for the use of worth seeing than the President, who ,for why corn culture should be shal- nando and De80to.-In: their richest. portion.

$500,000 and 'got the $500,000 back is quite an ordinary looking man, in i l low. First, if,the seedbed has been It runs or through BILL COUNTRY the MIDDLE where are FLORIDA the fine REGION old-'

. besides. This will serve show one deed. I'm sure he never can say properly prepared it should be. let
t way by which special legislation in the after his experience here ,in Atlanta, alone. It is a useless draft on the Farming Lands and the New Tobacco .

interest of,corporations has enabled a that he hasn't seen the negro in his1' teams. Second, by deep culture you Farms

few shrewd men to absorb the current own element; surrounded by every loosen up the seed bed and in case of reached by no.other line)lie-some of them
conducted on a large scale -e are Quincy,
products of labor for the last'quarterof natural condition. His "seven senses" drouth it prevents the moisture from Tal'uhassee (the capital), '
,a. 'and quite a large share each son and other towns,from ,
century, must bear ample testimony to rising. Common sense teaches that ample dwellings, .
t7 of;ihe original stock of wealth besides. this.-So. Affiance Farmer. the moisture could so readily rise country,is coming a MouuceU0.111.

This:gives a hint of how the number: f where the soil loose, and it has to ploy tttretchlng tue resources down through.

( of millionaires has' been increased from The Farmers' Alliance of the State climb from one grain to another, each Ihe Peach Country"

baker's, ,dozen in 1868 to over :ten of New York has been in session this grain of earth drawing from the one of Baker, Bradford,Alachua and Levy counties -

thousand in 1890, and why, everybody week.at'Homerville in that State. A below it. Third, and worst of all is ,through the prosperousStrawberry

whoearn their bread by honest lf constitution was adopted harmonizingwith the breaking of the roots of corn. It Farms ,.. .n-I
suffers from hard times True the national constitution of Lawtey,8Urke and Waldo.perhap.lupe-rtor/
Com adoptedat is through these roots that the stalk in profit to the orange grove-It goes through;

monwealth. Ocala, Fla., recently. President receives its food. The stalk and root the the finest heart gloves of the,one state having, penetrating some of
.
'
4 \ L. L. Polk, 'of the National Alliance, are dependent one upon the other fora 70,000 Full-bearing Orange
\ Sheep vs. Dogs in his address outlined"tr e' work,done living ; destroy either and the other Trees k:
: A large amount of honest effort has in the West and declared, ,
emphati will die. Every man knows this.Tutt's passing for nearly a mile between them:=,
! been invested trying to induce'farmers cally that the Alliance was no asylum' making its way southward to the Gulf,and to'
1 Texas Farm' and the more tropical portions of the State. In
ow for disgruntled politicians, and advised ah of
' Ram been portions the Hlate It reaches point of
has guilty of,this indi local,bodies to shun'everything in the Scenic interest. i

cretion.; At first blush there' erjl to nature, of politics. "We want ,no Wakulla Springs In the West,the Suwannee. ":

be'many'reasons' why farmers ,should, third party" he said, "only apart and Pills famous River, ,as silver beautiful and romantic the lake as region It .is,>* ."\

do,this., A small flock well kept, can; reasonable code) of laws for farmers, and the lakes themselves with their mar1, :
''fair roundlngs of rolling land interspersed with .;
under conditions be made
profit and economical administrationof
a more pleasant homes In green grove,sloping down. !
6 able:without'selling or the government" But the Alliance ThJa popular remedy Dn_ fall u>the clear lake fronts By means of this 1
demonstrate Cfaetaally euro road you can most. readily reach the \
/ of wool.. This has been cannot, it:seems, ,keep out. of politics. Dyspepsia Constipation Sick Hunting and Fishing Grounds.: ;
in every part of the country. But f)
The settler will find on the line of this road>
standing ,opposite to all the reasons For Bilious DisordersUse Headache, Biliousness a greater opportunity for a varied selection of !

, why farmers ought to have: 'sheep,:isoae. Hereford's Acid Phosphate.DR. AB& all diseases arising from. a land from than lightest ou any soils other to those road and In !the rlaid ttt&te with

:'pr po der tlng'reaSon' why 'the 1:' D. SCHAUB, Muncie, Ind., I Torpid Liver and Bad Digestion. clay whether and for marl regular, and mixed of richest farming hammock,stock or i
cannot do it ,Dogs dogs dogs : "Have used it in bilious disorders ,
;: says I Tact natural result in good appetite dairy farming peach or strawberry culture, '
i I .Tfce: country is infested'with''hungry' and it did all that was desired. I think smd Mild flernli. nose small|a feffaal* orange The groves tourist and, will vegetable be gratified gardens.with its '
I cars ,in such numbers,that not,only..uskeep it an invaluable remedy." ly Hat coated and easy to swallow, scenery. The berlth-seeker on Its ample 11
SOLD EVERYWHERE.KORNAHRENS': route can find some spot adapted to .Iii.., e
:
! rakiflg welt: nigh.:hopeless'bulmen -a. wants. On the hard clay road of Middle) 4
; women, and, children arc_ endangered The Lee County Phosphate Company Florida the horseman will ride with, speed
"
and satisfaction, and the Florida Central,
in life and limb by them, are banking thousands of tons and Peninsular Is theSportsman's J

The writer has known more than one of pebble,phosphate ten miles up the STEAM--BOTTlING--WORKS.; Route. I?' <"'

case in Texas wherein children were river, where they are mining and buming J. H. KORNAHRENS, Proprietor, NOTE.-Passengers from Northern eeaaee* V

compelled to;quit, school on' accountof the. shell ,out They sunk 91e.of Manufacturer of and tlons Peninsular having tickets to pants over the In Florida Booth Florid Cestr'?

predatory'packs of curs that made their lighters in ten feet of water with Soda Water,' arsapartlla,(Ginger sonvllle have the privilege the of being! takes into J.efc4'.
over Company.l1ne and aHewed
every public read dangerousto; pedestraas. about seventy-five tons aboard one Ate, Seltzer and Syrups of a stop-over within the going limits office-
all Kinds. ticket, with return to their route for decUaa*'
The law last week. The -
strangely ,enough,,, day phosphate was tion free of extra'charge Send for map of'
i efccrifBiBatcs agan t the i sheep andin pumped out and the lighter raised. J&*Sole: 'Agent for the P. W. Cook Brewing Florida,. mailed free.
favor of the, unutterable curse-the They have about 100,000 tons of phos- Go's Pftsener Export Beer,in pints and half-pints. A. G..MICDONELL,G.P. A.. .'

' dogThe.. ot1Reristued: the latteris one the banks ready for ship- .J2' ,EAST BAY STREET i a '- JacksoavH4,FlA. ,
phate
,. '!; ,w:!s.vP H NKaa Jpy.Traffic Manager. >
I ttatexed.. T ere oaght' to' be'a law menL"- fif. Myers'Press.: t.. Mayer&Mutter Block JacksomUletA..ft\ ';";. 4;.&B.fi AXWBLL,General aUafer.
.
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.. ,




;t-; "SiC FLORIDA DISPATCH, FARR AND) FRUIT-GROWER [Yu.7.J Ql''

--- -- .
_. -

: M \ Price Current of the State Alliance: BARTER COLUMN.,

If % 'II1.8.; ..... #* LO IISPATCI( 1.G'ROWEll
1 .D.A.U e. ,
J? Definite exchange offers inserted: free., State what KIAIE.
.JAOX80KVXLIJB,'May 6. you have and what you want. tfumERfR Jl. ARMRSAUTANCEraootsatraaties

I :f. j.W11Ite Cam,per sack of 110 Ibs.............8200E Open to subscribers only. ...: .
.E )(1 iHtI Cora.per lack of 110Ibs. .......;.... 195WkRe
Oats,per sack of 126 Ibs......:.... 296 -
HteedOfttsvpersaekof; 125IDS........... 260 For best offers of useful articles I will ex- PIANOS. .
:
ff': ,*.-. jUr,No. Timothy, per ton..i,.... -...i.. 1760f change almost a nil set of common house and CHAS. W. DACOSTA, Publisher
:. 1. wleftt Bran per ton ......: ..... ....... 2900. kitchen furniture which Is mostly In good 0000 SC 1. Ground Feed,fresh (corn and natal) per condition, and some things new. Also 10 Terms of Subscription:. UNEQUALLED' IN
Melt WO Ibfl......:................::...... 180 acres of good garden land, a first-class force
4. & Peed ] erl&Ckotl00lbl..........:.. 145faT pump and. a variety. .f ornamental plants For one year......*.............*...,........$2 00 Tone Touch Workmanship 5 DurabilityBaltimore
Pare Wleal,per sack of 100 lbs ...i..... 180 who has an organ or guitar for sale, or ex- For six months ..... ,................,.__. 1 00 )
Pearl Grits, per barrel,6 bbL;lots, 1135, change H. B. OX.IVXB,Palm Springs., Orange 49 Subscriptions in, all cases cash in advance ,22 and 24 East Baltimore Street.. ,
loss. .......... ...................... 440lees. Co., Fla."CENTAWORD". ..- New York, H8'Firth Ave. '
Pearl,Heal,per barrel,.b bbL Iota, H.30, : g Washington, 817 Market pace.DEA.FN'ESS. .
....................:.................... 4 40 Rate of Advertising application.
H ,Cottonseed. Meal, bright car load per COLUMN. REMITTANCE should be made by Check,
ft tea.........*........77.7*.........7......",. 2460 .,.
m Meal 100 sacks Postal Note,Money Order,or Registered Letter
CoUonsood bright per
f .tea........ .......... '.....'.I.->..'26' 00 To Insure Insertion In this column advertisements ,to order of ,
r Cottonseed Meal, bright, 50 Backs, per must accompanied by the money. FLORIDA DISPATCH AND FARMER
tea. .7 : .. -.T. 26 50 Advertisements must not exceed fifty words. ITS CAUSES AND CURE,
Dark or Sea Island i iiQ"d.M i-ij Postage Stamps received in payment. AND FRUIT GROWER;
ton less. Jacksonville, Fla. Scientifically' treated by an aurlst of world.
Pure 'tine ton..jj Count every word.including;name and address.
Ground Bone, ,..to 965 per wide reputation, Deafness eradicated and

'PROVISIONS.LABD .' Grtfflng it Bradley, of Pomona Wholesale [NEW SUBSCRIBERS ONLY.] entirely cured, of from 20 to 3J:years'stand,ng, tatter

-Leaf.."80 B tubs,TKo; leaf,50 tt cans, Nurseries Macclenny Fla.,advertise first all other treatments have failed. How 1-
734J8c t lear.iS: tt cans,80::;leaf, 10 tt caner 80; page of this number for contract budding the difficulty Is reached and ,the cause removed f.

lea,5 B-cans Per,bushel 8c;;leaf 80c.8 to cans, 80.MEAir j This want Is them.'BUDDING a rare. chance to get trees raised as you BIGPremmmJMTer fully explained In circulars,with affidavits .

COTTAUNK-Superior to lard &%e per ft. and testimonials. cures from prom!
MX AT-O.R.tides,box lot,7c;uncanvassed WAHTKD.-Two experienced and nent people, mailed free. "t?
l1& Y. Uc. : successful budders desire work. JNO. and
B'LOUa-lat patent, $6.40; 2nd patent, &20; Wx.CBJCAL, Aubnrndale Fla. References: Dr. A.FONTAINE East 14th St., N.Yi
clear, $6;,family, S5.60. A. H.Manmvllle,Jacksonville; Dr Dareaux,
RICE Oboice.TJ c;prime 6}&; good 6clColrrESCholce ; Lakeland; W.- B. Walker Auburndale.
green, ,22c; prime green, 6-7-2t. A A ft-fl A PIANOSP4Iuuu
f 2lo, WANTKD-50' bead goats. Address LockBox
SUGAB-Granulated,6%; New Orleans clarified -
810, Bartow, Fla. *-72tOBANGK THE
a GK; N.O. brown fo.IBXBH
fP POTATOBS"'Earl1'' Rose per bbl ; TREKS WANTED-Seedlings suit ..I"LORIDADispatch ORGANS
t early Goodrich,per bbl,|4; Peerless, per bbl, able for budding. State size,quality,whethersweet
f4. j or sour distance from depot and price Farmer and FruitGrowerFor Placed In Southern Homes since 1870-Twenty rears*
SUNDBIBS3.OHXK8K Address GDXICK BEOS, Mt. Dora, Fla. successful bnsinesa-ealeaoTer ;'ixMIllion Dollar
a 4-30-61. and ready increasing; Why Becausethe Country M
-Cream. 120. t one year and a copy otWbitner's flooded with Cheap, Inferior Instruments bUM
OB OJCEB8-XXX cream,9c;'XXX soda, FOB SALE-Belalr Premium, Villa Franca,
SELL-NOT 'TO USEand
Tan marines, Beach's No.5S"eet8evI1Ietirge! TO
PeT.A.8K-BaJ1St8rl1nc.I8.25;Alliance,$235; seedling grape fruit and sour stocks. W. B. Gardening in Florida the publlo has found out thai
,
Ntekel,18.26. WALKER, Lake Mattle Nursery,Auburndale WE DON'T SELL THAT KIND

'PowDiRlfle! kegs,M.5O;'half kegs,{2.75; Fla. 4-8021 ALL FOR $2.00 Oar Instalments lead the world. Onr Prices,TiESS
quarter kegs,|1.8.. Slater, St. Augustine, Fla., has Northern than factories Terms *>i rt. Mtthods,'Viirwt.Indnoements. ., +
AXLE GREASE-Per case 8 dozen, 175. farms, ranches,. hotels, city property and create. and we pay freight'
BBOOKS-Per dozen, 91.75(12( merchandise to trade for Southern realty. Whitner's Gardening in Florida is a i Write for Free Oat&ogueeand! Circulars xpUffiiBf
BRAN-Car lots, $1.25. ; less, than car lots, Make offers. 4.9-bt handsomelyprinted and bound book of folly-all in plain print. Easy to boy from a..

fl.BLA.oJtI1fG-Per" doz, lure 60c; per doz, Do you need printing of any kind? Send to 250 pages,being a comprehensive treatiseon 'II IUDDEN&BATEOL

small, 890.BASIxo..' DaCOsta Printing and Publishing. House, the vegetable and tropical products of' Southern Music, House U
*
POW'DEB-Bread -leaven, ,cases, 8 Jacksonville. Fla. Florida, by Prof: J. N. Whitner, A. M. "" SAVANNAH.OA.v
dR,&('..96. The Florida Real Estate Journal Arcadia. This book is much after for its
,, OA.lDLJI8-Boxe per lb, 100; half boxes, ',:, Florida-with State Map-can be had for only sought
1 ten cents. South Florida lands cheap. 2-19-12 practical information.
.If>DA 112-lb kegs, 4o; 112-lb 'drams, 1-lb $2.00 buys the book and our
packages, 6c;' 60-1D cases 61Ac; 1"and alba J Bay a home cheap! A pleasant home cane FOB MEN'ONLYI)
packages,M > secured on the Installment plan. Nice paperfor one year.

y 8AL.T 150-lb sks,car lots,68c;,less car lots, house and two lots In one of the most pleasant This is certainly a grand offer. Sendin or ''I: 1"AII.Df" ,
.. locations In the city. Address, CHAS. W. me tadOSiB Rlon
PAPER-Wrapplng, gray,85c; manilla, DACOSTA,Jacksonville, Fla. *' orders at once.' Mkness ef Body and I
lyres : Send us your orders for note paper,pens; C.-W. DAC6STA, of Errors or Excesses ia Older y.
t -Pearl (about 40 lbs In bx), 43or Inks and all supplies. We. will treat you B......,"eltle a AS OODfBHyB..t.T 4. Mnr t....larf' ..-4etn.rbeMAL
.
Jacksonville Fla. : DO86USkPARTSOf MOT.IbMlaUlT
right. DaCofeta Printing and Publishing ..raJl,.. 1IOKK TRKATMTtToatMSU ta a ..,.
cases 1 oz, per Ib 65c; House,Jacksonville, Fla. ...tMUfJ rr.MtOSUtMaa4r...*.%.teutrlel. Write O...
card's eases 2 oz,per Ib 53o.SAARHalf Wanted Villa Franca Lemon trees and |)M ripU<. a- aad pr.oA .. )
MEDICAL Y
barrels,20o) White Niagara Vines. Must be best stock FLORIDA BOTANICAL DEPOT MAms ERIE CO., BUFfAo,N ,
.
KXBOBENE-Uy.the barrel per gallon .130.. and cheap. Address, NICOL, care FARMER ,
I T'WllfE-Paper twine,per Ib,'164,. .. AND FBUIT-QBOWKB 2-26-* NO CURE NO FEE! Cured
SOAP-"Glory." 100 pressed bars 12 ounces, I THEO. A. HELPER, Agent, MOoPw54 H myself. DR.HAMILTON,
wrapped, $360; "Best Family" 60 pressed Do you need stationery of any klod paper
and Ink? Send to DaCosta Printing and WetheredriHe(8alllasnMd.The ( : ) .
bars;14 os,wrapped,S3; "Silver100 pressed pens WHOLESALE DEALER d XEDICmU.
ban, 8 oz, 12 50; "New Booth," loO pressed Publishing House Jacksonville Fla. *
fears.. ,' Ifi oz,wrapped, *3; "New South," 150 Repair your old family Bibles. Make them Roots Herbs Barks and 'Berries. Garrett Picket &Wire Fence Machine ;
pressed ban 8 os, wrapped. '75c "Troy. 100 good; as new. DaCosta Printing and Pub- Weans to the poatA..A.o nU
pressed bars,8 oz,wrapped$2-"Plantaton; ." [ House Jacksonville, Fla. i
jibing Highest Prices'For ,versa favorite. Tfce.ta ds
Will Cuh
: 80 1-lb ban $2.iJ"Plantation. 02lbban par
wrapped, ; Do need stationery Of kind-paper In Q..ra.we4..Frelchl
t ,wrapped.fit. 0; "X M UM MUU,"20 3.Ib and you InkT SendtoDaCostaPrintingandPublishing paid. Agents are reporting -
.ban,wrapped, ; "McQlnty," UO 1-lb bars ('en8 House Jacksonville, Fla. '* Blue Flag Root, or Blue Lily; Butterfly big sales. Macmnes,
wrapped &20); "Big 801 I efl,$290TOBA000"Alliance Wire, etc., at wholesale
Root Root Cotton Root
Standard,"43c; "Alll- Wanted-A live newspaper man to canvass ; Comfrey ; direct, from factory to
"33c. for the State for two leading publications. Apply Farmers where I have no
aaee Kxehangc, Send samples. Bark; Dandelion Root ; Deer Tongue agent. Catalogufree. Address .
to C. W. DACOSTA, DaCosta Printing
BABDWABX.KA1XS .' louse,Jacksonville Leaves ; Dogwood Bark; Ginseng Root; the manufacturer
-Ke ,, 49d |2 26; 80d U30 12d 12.S5' ,
old family Bibles. Make them S. H. GARRETT. MANSFIELD. OHIO.
lid lU6i;8 and 8d..45:6 and 7d 12.60; 4 and 6d good Repair as new.your Da''osta Printing and Pub- Jerusalem Oak Seed; Poke Root; Prickly .

shlng House Jacksonville Fla. Ash Bark Prickly Ash Berries Rose
; ;
PIowa-Scooters,8 lb4 Inch, erllbipe :
"B mob. per Ot 2 Ib4He Petals (pale); Rose petals (red) ; Sampson JS.INCUBATORfrSImpIr
,
: be 1 l'fo gues,Sj4to 5 inc i. per {b4 .c:
4 th, "/%"; 2 inch; 53e. shove, a11.lzel Snake Root; Saw''Palmetto Berries ; Perfect:aad IfKeeolaUTina ,

sh&d styles' per Ib 4X; heel sweeps,. all sizes PROTECT YOUR GRAPES, Stillingia Root or Queen's; Delight; Sassafras Icarattterdtohatcha. Hundreds in saeoMatnl larger pero opin jUit oa.
*
sad. styles per lb&Sfcc.PbOWSTOCSB (
WITH THE OHIO GRAPE rSOTVOTOBS, t.6&D otht
|of fertile eggs at|less rest l any
-Single. 86c,fl and 850. Root Bark Watermelon Seed
;
; hatchwr. "send" le. tar Ulna Oatalogn
'HOBS-D. H. Scovil per: : dox, )-0,ff.60;do Thoroughly tict Qreulanfree CEO.H.3TAHL, QUINCY ILL
the 'grapes, while Wild Bark thin virgin Gray
1,$4.80.do,36.20'do,870; ; 1 planters han. Cherry ( ) ;
.
dies,per do,0)$,9&50; do, 7, $8.75. ; do, 1M,.|4, maturing. frtot.it awl ripening. Moss; Black Moss.
de H."
)Hl.u-Iron bound loop, per dos pairs blight and atltdta. Write for particulars of curiiifr, etA Ad- CONSUMPTION.
Grapes thus .
fMfr Iron bound eye,I&50;red top cosce
; common
AVA sty*yft end rtp *.to pet dress office, 89 Newnan St ; warehouse and

T AO i-Btralgbt,6K 1-2.Per pair 85o;;6H IICtlM.f wharf, Colcord's wharf Jacksonville, Fla. I haft.poait1ft'rezr.q tar. the& dleaaaa br H.
8-1,_; &.20c7;; lO-Ct6cTtwUt; i ,, (fc Itadeoftpectanj ns. \boa..d. of eases of the worst kind sad of lose
R &-1.tic;: 8411i, prepared 'tsroof Jns..POLLARD, Jr. R&ad :c haft beta eared. Indeed so strong..toy faith
AxLM-Sbonarm.half patent,J x8,U Inch, > paper. FARMS Washington, Iowa; ITRADES in Its tfflcacy.that I will send two BOTTUS nozwith'
per set,W 25;do ,18iK,per set, >I&25: do '13x7, InstantaneousAttacbfflent sells and trades:ads, property merchandisein aVALUABUCTHEATISE: on trio disease to any sa-'
$.%; long arm hall patent, 3Sx64' 16 do Iowa, Missouri Arkansas, Nebraska, Illinois f.c.who wIll send me tbrf Bzpceas and P.O.ad4ress.r. .
1X7,|840.;oomaon Iron,per 100 poundeof4 40; Kansas Texas, Florida. A. Blocnnt, H. c., 181 Pearl St", N. Y.
few Iroa.per 100 pounds,$125. WA hundred
;BABBBB.WIRE-In Cincinnati', 3o; In bunches eon be covered la a few minutes. .

AUantA,AXD U..43.o.6etilDS O.usaa-Bed. clover per bush SOMERSET, Kr, Sept.20,1890.They .'
OF THE ,
worked to NURSERIES
eo.),ft..; Timothy; per bosh ((46lb), x.20; and my entire satisfaction '
I
Orohftrd pass, per bush (II lb), fLTO; Blue Easily put on, prevented mildew.'
ga wA L per bale( Ib),98 46;Red top bash, will: waS,mere next year.
We; Georgia per bush, \l&\\ Johnson J.M.8Icut eo3f. Milwaukee-Florida Orange Co.
fTftss, per bosh,>& ; Georgia per ,bush OTTDVWA, IA., Oct.B i860.9ba .
fLaB; aapane clover per bush,".ill. -. PiOtector I regard as very valuable
.SHOE,-Men's tap sole brogans,6 to U,S1JS, I covered are now to perfect Selected strain Choicest Varieties of Citrus Fruit Trees a Specialty. 'rBuddingWood

mea's half double sole brogans, 6 to 11, $L2); fiE Those not covered are au gone. for.sate.at alt time ,. r
.. 1MB'. Donaldson brogans,7 to 11, |L2o j.; boys more neztjrear.Jr. : '

talfeon brojrans, 1 t.o. 6,We boys plain bro- .T. HicnroOTH. Our stock Is large and complete. .PROMPT ATTENTION TO CORRESPONDENCE. For
fja-ns 1 to 6.91OO: boys E"Me.,1 to S TOp; PRICES BOO,'SI.50; 1OOO.92.6O
mnn's K&glteh ties< 6 to II.fL1itc"omeaaI : Special Discount for larger qWant bis.' Catalogue and Price-List, address, .
to 7,ILler; misses s,1 to 2,.' 'sc-; kIWreBa. Sample 160 seat oa receipt of Fifty Ceata.Giro :
.7,to 11,69e.saWeet A. DUNCAN Dunedin ':: R
to .Vitopa. J &UPllIIIMiIK co., Ire ,,1..... ", : : Manager, -.* ; ,. *!.,i1 :

'. JI'!'{" -.:''> < .' .!t. -, :, .- : i 'nzh :::- '.". : $' > '

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] !:r. 18tl -1::, THE 7LOBID.A..JIBPATOHF AND FRUIT-GROWER.- ... 377I :-:;
i' f

"... ..
t Six: days e rllci than
S60. $60. any varierr Ex.te.ted Qionndsat attbeAgrteuit7 I'At i Y41a' .

Gtnera N.Y. Color
THE lEST IRRESPECTIVE OF, '_ICE. greenish white pulp
I
-- tender, sweet and< dllrioua. e 44 West Forsyth Street,
.< The oulr grape
that ranks first both In
i, j earliness and quality.Each Jacksonville, Florida
Tine sealed with
our registered trade-
'C mark label. Send for We guarantee to do the finest work in the
circular it kiviux tu r t ..r Information. Agents wantedA.ddressSTEPiir.N State. Northern work and Northern price
HOYT'S bONS. New Canaan Ct.I .
Work sent to us by express will receive

? prompt attention and be returned on short '

notice. Country-orders solicited. Write for
k u.+om
H
I
I- laundry list. 4-2-Sm
Z O.Ni A

..,.,........ 2 O dwc

DIRECT SALES. ti ozcq E. W. SMITH & CO.
.A.1"RJmOJr.I'aV11' AID YEORABU: Oaow=RL' I Id -UA oR i ,
'
e The -.SCntawq.4-teet wide,at tlSJO 5 cub with
order. J'uU.WCk In warehouse. Send for circular MAP PUBLISHERS
K. 8. HUBBARD State Agent.
Federal Point.Fla.
W. ANDM.ANJ1FACTURERS.

JACKSONVILLEMARBLE c Ma -' .

. I Do all kinds of Map Work and keepon
GOIPANT a
... aS Q' hand a full supply of Maps, Atlases,
J. J. CALHOUN & CO.,
,., *Axu7AcTvazaa olr = ZH No Drawing Paper, Map Cases, Spring

Monuments, Headstones, EXCLHSIVB EBALBR3 Map Rollers, etc., etc.

Grave-borders; and all : = Maps and plans engraved, printed,
NATIONAL TYPEWRITER .
Manner of Marble colored, and mounted.

zw o WANTED-Ererr Bookkeeper. Business Man and
and Granite Work. AND SUPPLIES.. Beginner to know tbat the Key to, and Exposition
of Bookkeeping teaches at sight and aid bookkeepers u
Catalogues and designs sent on and experts; post-paid to any address OD. '
application. 52H West Bay Street, I CURE FITS receipt of one dollar. ,'-':

AGENTS WANTED. Nos. 17 and 19 S. SIXTH STREET.PHILADELPHIA. .*-.7 .
JACKSONVILLE PLOBIDA.AMSDEN When I say cure I da not meaD merely wHop them .,
We also deal In Wire and IronFencing far'a time and then hare them return again. I mean a
Poultry Netting. 'Farm radical cure. I hare made the diaeaaa of FITS.EPILEPSY ,
J and Lawn Fence Gates or FALLING SICKNESS a lifelong study. I IN CASH
Etc. $5' 000.00
warrant my remedy to core the worst cues. Because PREMIUMS.
others haft failed is no reason for not now rece1Tinc a .
cure.. Send at once for a treatise and a Free Bottle of None lets than 13>.00. Contest closes May SI,lvt.
my Infallible remedy. Give Express and Pst Office See WEEKLY NQciKCK!: for particulars. Samples free.
H. G. LOOT JH C., 183 Pearl St., N. T- Best paper In United States.
JOHN R. McLEAN Publisher CIncinnati O.


GEO. S. HACKER & SON Isi&jiis"i'1 (


-MANUFACTURERS OF--- Send for Circular telling


Laura St. Jacksonville Fla. ',',:. When to Spray,
25 ; How to Spray

J.,z.y."' 1 t I I.c I.: and Agents what Pumps Wanfed.to use., .

R
t .. r > THE GOULDS IF G.CO.
"tj
C == Seneca Calls N. Y. .'....


The'JEWETT &DWIOHTCO.MANUFACTURERS 0en C :

I j' .... .- mE SICKLY
Spll! 1Na ,tispc trofuisoT s; o p wp
pWoi a1NYlD CINCINNATI.CDITEVAPORATOH. o

EAST COAST POULTRY YARDS. -.w' o :i: LOOKING CHILDREN '

Fourteen varieties of land and water fowls. ..en
abject to SPASMS are most likely troubled with
| Indian Games, Imperial Pekin WORMS The beet remedy for thin I.the celebrated) "i
I II if I THE ZIMMERMAN, And Building Material. .B.P.FAHNfiS70C VERMIFUGE:.
Tile Standard Machine Ducks,> Bronze Turkeys. Been 00 c*
Dtff rat slstt sal pr!.... IlUttr&ttd Catalop.tr... Poultry supplies of all kinds. Send a postal arly that tU-niti&l; are B-L tbn a.nldingim I tatJeGI t
CHARLESTON S. 0.
THE BLTMTJCU IKON WORKS CO.,CladMftU O. ,
card for my new Illustrated catalogue and
price lists.

THE GLORY OF MAN Eggs to Hatch. POULTRY
HAw'XEYE
K. W. AMRDEN Ormond. Flu." !

STRENGTH VITALITY'KNOWTHYSIE MACHINE. .& l lTrade


Hsv Lost! How Regalned, ,
Works on

H E Ii eitherSTAN01N6TIMBER Mark. I

_. ow
.oF :LIFE STUMPSWlllpullanor. UOLt.IS' CANNED MEAT FOB POULTRY 'I
Will Make Hens Lay I ; .
BUGGIES HARNESS at i PRICE dlnarr Grut .
tnIKNUIUTES Will Make Cklckens Growl '
BQ Direct fr..FACTORY sad MT MIDDLEMEN MAKES A AID GOOD FOR Mo n.TINo FOWLS. 1-9
Prflt. A.eO-oo LEATHER 3i TOP BUGGY Steel
Axle: :Tire.Hlekcrr Wke..,W...... .4.f .6. CLEANSWEEP This food Is strictly fresh meat carefully !
4 P.....wagon, 'II. O. S tai Opta B-ccy. avvnwBiKBVKci nv cooked,ground fine,seasoned and hermetically
1 tan Cart$'.10. A good 910 JIJ'Eantu, f,.... .f twe Agree'a elttle*.A m*"a boy tad ala.nocu. opeatIt. .
THE SCIENCE: OF LIFE ? Chalae rod to kawfa. Th enp en a Uw sealed' In 8-lbcans. Being ground flue,It
BUG'Y AND GIRT CO. erMth" will for th. MMhlB It will eely eon
U. *y *r pay .
can be readily mixed with son food and fed
A&k the and Standard Popular Medical Treatise ft postal cud t. en4 for M IllurtrttBd Cateleaee ISrio& ,
atlM Errors of YoathJYsmatarsDedlnsKsnrous (:Cincinnati( Ohio. TM and UttimonUl .4.44.tho. Ma...fMt.rers. HO as to give each fowl an equal share. Prto
Met rfeystesl Debility,Imparities of the Blood. DAMES MILNE & SON. SCOTCH IROn, IOWA. 30ctspercaniperdoz. Address HOLLIS '.

DREHEP MEAT & WOOL CO., 30 North
EXHAUSTEDVITALITYUNTOLD A SCHOOL' Q 2 tJ+ FAVORITE NEW HIGH: SINGER.ARM. Boston Mass. f Mention paper.I

Style as shown in cut,with full
MISERIESBssMsltiDC s attachments,self-settinjr
:*ItHng young men for the active duties of life lie and pelf-threading shuttle. HORT2CULTURALSUP
bartered by the legislature of Virginia, and You can getx.u.aChne801rt.y
from Folly,Vice,Ignorance,Excesses or endorsed by the Chamber of Commerce Council, 9 of manufacturers. fare Canvas- 'LIES. we=:.aJ?
Overtaxation, KnerraUnr.andunflttlnr the victim end prominent citizens the city where located. era1 Commissions Of 195. Sent on
I1fWUT AH IH1
for Work,Basins,the Married or Social Relation. )catalogue circulars and testimonials address trial. Warranted 5 years.
and ctbec
work.Avoid It n&skfflful contains 800 pretenders.pares roTslgro.Possess tills Beautiful great: I.crDUNSMOKB.: President,Staunton,Va. C8-WWTW SEWlIfl I sUCWE CO.. ttsmaH. S P.;

bladtag,MBbossed,fuireutT Pries only f LOO bjrsftsA .T-We pay HORTIL'ULTUpe FREE. tar f4 me-*:
..,pos..ajd.eoBcealed hi plain wrapper. Ulus- A "Grave" Subject Msaplete HEED UK imbHskecU
train Prospectus Freei U you Thedisdaialie Jacksonville Marble Co. is Freight."OSCOOD"
H. Parker D i ; JOHNSON 6.STOKES
author Wee )(. re- ,
'oeiTeeftte GOLD AND JEWELLED MEDAL One ft the largo and most responsible! C1'e ..f... a.. ....w... PWW.....r.fRJ .
hirers and retail dealers in .
ftoattfc. .NotioBaJ Medical AuoeIadoa for monui
j tfcta PRIZE B. SAY on NERVOUS said ancf headstones in the United States, 7 118.StandardSCALES
I FflLTSICAX DBBILITY.Dr.Parkerand, wo always giving satisfaction. They yeo cf '
1 of'A 4Mant Physicians may be consulted confldsjstUBy land works at 530 W. 20th street,] ow'Yo THE SELF-RESTORER ,
,' by bail or In person, at the oMee of 25 Laura street, Jacksonville, ) TO N Sent on trial. .
THJt P.RA1leBY MEDICAL ,j 535 an rdQSfi00D r
Ne........ c..BMteII.x..INST.l.TUTI Fla., and Orlando Fla.,and agpoifite ,J loww. "Sorrery.'OUDI'-'te'II.' i'%: '
for ItoeQ wtettets. for she ihonM. lie ati In the Southern Ties. end &TJIMPSlN.lliPaltt: c.II.Y aad old:postage paid* Addres
__AI Mftt. West 11 oatMl Co1ti: buAn..BoIt8II.K.uD.I .
d Wn

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. _878_, : ';,4 .FLORIDA ;DISPATCH FARMER. AID FRUIT-GRQWER. [MAY.7( 1891: ...4I

f
r '

:THE LEADING FURNITURE HOUSE OF; THE STATE.,: 'c\ .
> : / !

c.&R C1 '
LARGEST STOCK SOUTH OF BALTIMORE.

Co 'tLi1 Q. Latest Designs in Parlor and Bedroom Suites in Antique Oak

'JJOJldelce' eb ,-C' '7' Mahogany, Cherry, Walnut d Imitation. Hall Stands, ''ti
(
Sol ICIte J' Bed-Lounges Willow, Reed and Rattan '

,, Goods, Desks of all Kinds and
40 AND Styles. .
: WE SELL
42 W & "*" 'f
'YOU 0 &AY
THE BEST *BBBBBBBBBBB te. Sr .

i .GOODS FOR THE LEAST MONEY. Of JA.OKS i J

{ HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS OF ALL KINDS. ONVILLE F' )
'
Carpets, Mattings Curtains, Window Shades, Hanging Lamps, China and L4T .
I
.?: Crockery Sets, Tin Toilet Sets, Mirrors, Curtain Poles and Brackets. '

:.i. ; Hotels, Boarding Houses Shins, Steamers Offices and Private Residences Furnished from Top to Bottom. ,, I :
_
.
When writing,'please mention this paper. \
, .

LITTLE BROTHERS FERTILIZER- AND PHOSPHATE, COil 1


;'... Jacksonville, Florida.

4 Dealers in and Manufacturers of High Grade Fertilizers:

Orange Tree and. Truck Fertilizers. Cotton and Corn Fertilizers. E!

All Grades of Fertilizer materials. Hand at Lo'W'ell-t Market .
'
#
We manufacture all our own goods South Jacksonville. Our fertilizers are made from the best materials.

.. .:. We' : {have recertly! :'purchased the factory and good will: of the South Florida Fertilizer Co., at Orlando, Fla. j

., "- ,,'/; c j. ALEX. LITTLE and Treasurer
: ;... : :- Secretary ;
.
: '. _-.*. JACKSONVILLE FLA.
_ ,
;J i <
c
., :;f X ;':' I '.
CUTWORMS GRASSHOPPHRS.! CATHRPILLARS

!
'. .
THE SEMINOLE INSECTICIDE AND CUT WORM 7
i DESTROYER will kill the cut worm, destroy the grasshopper ':'' : '
f exterminate the caterpillar and all other insects,.that: .
feed on and destroy the young vegetables and plants. Vege"'
table and truck growers should investigate the merits of this ;
i wonderful preparation. 4 ;P
ii i For'genera. information, prices, circulars, etc., address, !
THE SEMINOLE. INSECTICIDE CO..
Box 210. Jackfconyllle.,,Fla. 'I
[Mention this paper.JOHN.| r '


., J (111If ,:. CLARK, SON & CO., i


.. ar (GROCERS} AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS .c


-DEALERS IN- -
FERTILIZERS\
Coal ', Grain Wines '..
Hay, Liquors, Cigars, Tobacco,, Etch, ,
ABSOLUTELY THE BEST. Qaalltj JTcrer Varies. 29 jean'actual test In the Held pron.them to be .
JACKSONVILLE,
vneqsslled tor ratelng large crops. The purity of the: component materials and the scientific ac-: FLA.HHrlC "
caracywith which they are combined make Bradlej's Fertilizers the most perfect well as the moat
economical plent-food the'orange or vegetable. : grower can use.. Send for beautifully illustrated PRICE LIST OF WHISKEY.

pamphlet < ..........__. ...tl.75 J. .U"JUa Bye........___$s.oo. "
BRADLEY FERTILIZER CO ,27,Kilby! St. Boston. {7" Re3rnoUs stAUGUSTA Orange'ValleyMpriBBJ V ll *T.t.iiT_...rir.TTin___..,......... 2.50 2.00, I Old Vh.clala B_urbo.----Glade._..._______,4.88 4.00;... r:
,OA. North Caro'ma Cora.,...._...... 2 5O Kentucky Soar Aash......... ..;6.08 .
CIUteD C11lb_____....._ Old pftikgrx..n..____ 5,00.
ISontrose Velret. ........!'" .. .....'8. o.
Established. ,. 1856. 200 Acres in Fruit Nursery.. J's extra:, 1-Pnon'25c.. 2 gallon 50c.v 3 gallon 75c. Remit b.Y poet oMe8' '
'''''.:; I money order,,check or registered letter. We cannot ship C.O.D.to dry towns
ONE ACRE UNDER GLASS. I A complete price list of Groceries, and Wine list, sent free application..


,"F:>.
..A..ta; Georgia ; -, ,

$ We offer for Fall and!winter delivery an immense stock of Fruit and Ornamental tree, F "; ;, fflgGRAPE I ': ,
Roses,Palms,eta salted t.* Florida. All the new reaches lately originated in Florida. ..:-:.. :' :I .,,'
-Also a wperb stoek of Brergrgeas,Camellias,Greenhouse plants,eta,0r '#.
prodaete hare bee. 111 Florida for thirty-three'e&ra part. Catalogues free. NEW_GRAPES . '
.Ne Agents. .Addreas .
... '_JP. J. BRRGKMANS, JAPANESE.INSEGT DESTROYER i 5t$ .
,. ".'. '..4.. '. .1'--.., 1.". Augusta Ga.. destructive iaMcU. Contains poison.:.Price null Kc. Stamp accepted.FrI* C a. ......from."t' ,.....
_r, ,... .. '. ....... .'... 1/t'/.. ,-.. ."':.'t.', ::..>-.'-', ';.:.' .,. : : no by
t'it.;; : .
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'MAY t iQl1 -_ THE FtiOBEDA DlSPAlXHFAKMEB AND J'KUIT-QROWER. 37*., .

..
.. .

The CMe Steamship Co. SAVANNAH[ LINE.Time .. I


v / *" <* < 53 to 55 hours between Savannah, New York and Philadelphia 7


New York, Charleston and' Florida. Japes.Tke and between Boston and Savannah 65 to 70 hours.


magnificent' Steamships of this Line are appointed Ocean Steamship Company. AC

t* gail as follows. : _. ,
(S/TANDABP TIMK.)
Front McW'VorZ Front Jaektonrllle,
'{P1- STEAMER. Florida (Central or 90 Meridian Time)

FrIday. 'Mar. 27th. at3P.x..ALGONQUIN'.Tbursday. Apr. .2d. at ,10:30 A.x.Moady .
Mar. 30th. at3 P.x. .."CHEROK.EE".. Sunday Apr. 6th, at l:30P.M. Pass.tage' Rates :
.Wednesday, 'Apr. lit, at3P.x..YEMASSEE".Tue day. Apr. 7th. at 2:3)p.x. # -
Friday Apr. 3d. at 3 P.)"SEMINOLE".., Thursday, Apr. 9th, at 4:30.a..x. Between- Jacksonville. and New York: lit class, 125.60;Intermediate,$19.00;Excursion,H&50 f
Monday .Apr. 8tb, at 3 P. X. ....IItOQUOI8' Sunday Apr. 12th; at. '7:00.a.x. Steerage. ,|12. 0.
Wednesday,Apr. 8th. at 3 P.x."ALG NQUIN" Tuesday Apr. 14th, at &00.&.x.f Jacksonville and Boston E1.00JIntennedtate.$21.00 Excurslon.H7.30 ,
:Cabin ; ; Steerage, 14.96 ,,
Friday. Apr. 10th, 'at 8 P.x. .."CHEROKEE," .. Thursday Apr. 16th. at 10:00 L' x.) of Company .-
THB Mae?Ifloent Steamships this are appointed to call as follows: ,
.. '.. ,
.YEMASSEE 1:30
at
Mommy Apr. 13th; at 3 P.x. Sunday Apr. 19th. P. x.
f WedBe aay.Apr. 15tb. atS p.x. ...SEMINOLE"... Tuesday. Apr. 21st, 'at 1.80P.M. FROM SAVANNAH TO NEW YORK.Centrarot' .
Friday, Apr. 17th, &t8P..X. .." ROQUOI8" Thursday, .Apr. 23d. at. 4:00<< A.x.. -
Monday Apr. 20tb. at8r.x.'ALGONQUIN" Sunday Apr. 26th. at 6:00A.K. ( 900'MeridIan Time.]
Wednesday,Apr. 2&1, .at 8 P."OHZBOKFE".Tuesday Apr. 28th. at 7:00A.x. KANSAS CITY Capt. Kempton .*._ Friday May 1- ILSOam
Friday Apr. 24th. at 8P.x."YEMA8S :E".. Thursday; Apr. 30th. at 9:00A.K. OHATTAHOOOItEE.: Capt. Daggett....?......Satarday, la 2l.W m .
Monday .Apr.'27tb. at8P.x..BEMINOLE'.,Sunday, May .3d. at 12Noon. NACOOCHEE,Cap Bmltn........__.*....................Monday.. .' 4308 p p m
Wednesday,Apr. 29th, at_8 P.x. ...:IROQUOIS"... Tuesday May 5th. at 2 P.11;. CITY OF BIRMINGHAM Capt. .Wednesday 6- 400am
CITY OF AUGUSTA,X'apt. .Friday. 8fcOOam
!TALLAHASSEE Capt Fisher. ............._.?Saturday, II 9- 7.00pm
St. River Line. KANSAS CITY. Cape Kempton .. Monday AI 11- 7.99pm
..::., Johns; *. CHATTAHOOCHEE.Capt. .,...Wednesday, .II 13- 10.am
"
NACOOCHEE,Capt.Smltb 151100m /Ii
CITY'OF BIRMINGHAM Capt. Burs....._.....Saturday* 1612(0?( pm
and Intermediate Points the St. .......... )
:Tor: Sanford, ,Enterprise ; on CITY OF AUGUSTA Capt.Catherine Monday 18230 p m
1 TALLAHASSEE.: Capt. Fisher. ;:........WedDe day. 20- 3.00 am
: Johns River; KANSAS'CITY: Capt.,Kempton .....*.... .'!':-. t. Friday "2'J4.00 a m
UHATTAHOOChEECapt. Daggett ..........-.'....Saturday, S- 600p m
Steamers NACOOOHEE Capt Smith................?._...Monday!, 25- 6.30pm
Elegant Iron Side-Wheel
/ The CITY OF BIRMINGHAM, Capt. Burg.. ._.Wednesday ': 27- 800 am.
TA.CKSCN'CTTLIJE: CITY OF AUGUSTA t. .. Friday;. 't0- 10.00am
:
OI: : OF .
TALLAHASSEE Capt. .. .. Saturday. 30-(ILSOam

..,. .' Capt. W. A. SHAW, FOR BOSTON. .....

;', :"".,> FRE: 'K: : CES.A.e: GATE CITY CapUDoane' .<.; ....".................Thursday.May 7- 6.00 nm
'\" ,' W LUND Jr. CITY OF MACON, Capt.Lewis._...........Thursday! 14- 10.31)
; Oapt.T. : GATE CITY,Capt. Doane.. ................................Thursday. 21- 4.00pm a m
: Are appointed to. sail from Jacksonville; ,dally except ,Saturday, at 8:30 p.m:, and from CITY OF MACON Capt. Lewis....._.. ..Thursday 23- 9.a m
,Sanford/daIly except Sunday,at 9 a m.
FOR }'J.JTT.A.T\ELPHIA.

SOUTHBOUND. SCHEDULE. NORTHBOUND.Bead (This Ship does NOT Carry Passengers.)

1 Leave 8:30P.M.Down. .......;:...................JacksonvIlle ......"."."............Arrive. Read 11.J5'p.Up. x. DE8SOUG,Capt. Askins..MMM...............Tuesday .May 533)p a
.8.rO p. M..,......; ......,....,........Pol tka ......... .'..... .......Leave 7:00 P. x. DESSOUG.Capt.Askins. .?.-.?_Friday.. 1 15- 11,3. am
1:30A.M,........... ......,:............v/utor/ ..... ......................., 2:00 p X. DE8SOUG, Capt.Asklns .-.Monday. 25- 8.3Op JJI '"
a '2:46: A. )..*.......................... St.:Francis..,......................, M 12:45 P. x.
6:00: A.x........t.....................Beresford ........................... 11:45 A. M. THESE :PALACE STEAMERS; ,
8:00.A. x........................... Blue springs _. .................... II 11:00. x. Connecting with the Savannah,'Florida and Western Railway(Waycrou Short Lias
offer:
r Arrive 8.-00A.M.....<..................... ,..Sanford... ......................... 9OOA. x. : to the.Traveling Pnbllo and Shippers advantages equalled by no other Ito )
.. 9:15A.M. ..........................'Enterprise' .....:.... ............... 9:30 A.. H. Through. Tickets: ... and Bills of Lading Issued to principal points North, East and North' ."..
Also Steainer. EVKBOLADE I: (freight onl yj from Jacksonville for Sanford Mondays:and via Savannah.' For Information and rooms apply to '
Thursdays at 6 P.x. Returning,leave Sanford Wednesdays and Saturdays at 6 A.; x.. J., P. BECKWITH, GeneralAgent, H. R. CHRISTIAN Soliciting Agent
71 West Bay Street,Jacks nvlJJe. 71 West Bay Street,Jacksonville.}
General Pasgecger:,and Ticket Offlcp, 88 West. Bay Street. R. L.WADER Alit; C. ANDERSON Agent
F. JO. IRer HeitJEt,. $Ia.'J Agent West 3t, Fla.,, New Pier No.85 North River! New York. City *.9 vaia i*, a).
< { Jl{ ,. ass. ,88 Bap ; Jacksonville. RICHARDSON'4: BARNARD, Agents,r."wll' Wharf, Bwton: ; .
W. F. ba n EH FAY,Traveling Passenger Agent,83 West Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla. W. L. JAMES Agent 13 8.Third Street,Philadelphia. '
JT. O..F LOT, Frt...Agt,on wharf;toot'Bogan St.,Jacksonville Fla. J. HABHAGEN .., Eastern Agent. Sav.. Fla.& Western Ky.Co,4J.1l t N. Y.
.- ..jo i%. .. WARD;F1a..Fit..AEerit. fool'Laura'St.,Jacksonville, Fla. G., For M.Tickets SORREL apply,Gen to; S 1anager..,.F. &.W Railway- W.E.office.ARNOLD,Gsn.Trav. Agt..._ .s-,.JaeitsonviIie! Fla, .

J. A.. LESLIE Snpt,, foot Laura St.,Jacksonville' ,Fla.9CAR8HAL .
H. CLYDE Asst.Traffic ,6'' New York.
Manager Bowling Green .
EST+BI4!: II D 1176.W
THEq.jb.. E .ff,Traffip Manager' ,5 Boding! Green,N.,T. .

WM. 'P. OLTDE & CO., 'Genl Agents, .

M.8.vtM "WbarreBj!Fklladelphia. 5 Bowling Green' ,. K.' T:. :{:-r..;.T .:XA.M .A.. :JBOTJ3ELSJ ;; 1

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WHOLESALEGrain :

& Clark Fertilizer Co. '
Williams .
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Garden Seeds and Fertilizers.2O .

NEW YORK.

.BEST BY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FIAf '?:

Branch Office No 'Reynolds St. Au m.Ga
720 ,: '.: i
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." C. D., DUNCAN., Florida Salesman. HANDLE, ONLY THE BBSTANL; MOST RELIABLE SEEDS. A COMPLETE STOCK 01 a;'


Hay Corn Oats Flour Bran Wheat Grits M al '
li
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Americus Orange Tree Fertilizer, .-. ,

rr ... Americus Orange Tree, No. 2, COTTON SEED. MEALr J Q.th Bright- and Dark.; .

: '. ,Americus Ammoniated ,Bone Superphosphate> .'
Americus 'Pure Bone Meal. Americus Bone and Potash "
. STATE AGENT FOR PURE GROUND ;
BONE
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: ,
,, -:> : < Americus Strawberry Fertilizer, J. E. Tygert fir Co.'s &

i :,-,: .Americus Sutohate of Potash NITRATE SODA, 5 5St.r

Florida Vegetable Fertilizer. Brand; Fertilizers MUxUAl < mGUABAITTXKB ? PoTAS iI .

AKAI.T8I8. I

.. comps ..,.... .. SULPHATE' POTASH' : .,
R .xUOJl8: C.F.Winton, Mandarin Fla.: Dr. H. Knight., Belle view- ,.Fla.. ; M.E. Oran_ e toe and Vegetable ,
Wl ,Ciermont,Fla. M. Godfrey Mlnneola Fla.Addrewalloomspondenceto --
son ; WiLlIAMsVk, CLARK FERTILIZER C9.AugastaGa..L 5FKBTILIZER.. KAINIT, ETa. :

.These Fertilizers have no superior in the market and a trial will convince. "
.1

. : & .A. VB >tm: :M.c: > JSr ;::1 MAS. 0 N' &, _G. ., molmle Md Retail healers JD r.rt'p' sad *

'... .

.T hlJila liller IinilcoU & COi'S' } "CULTU"VEGETATOR"tATOR" !I WINES. ,. LIQUORS, CIGARS, ETC.!


O for Vegetable and Fruit Trees. Analysis and prices upon application.
(Wiaaltiite. Fertilizers and Salelgenkter
BAKER BROS., State Agents.tea leule Dealers I. MILWAUKEE and 13.} & E. BEERS, rr .
.w. W. BAKJlB'8 'BOrrED BONE MANURE Decomposed with Pot&lb. $90.per .
eletNtvered. Guaranteed. Analp1I Send for Catalogue and ample Old BoHiinioH White Rye and Celebrated Silver Xbt.g SoarlCash) 1875.
B.8.;FULLER & .CO.,special Agents, Palm, Springs, }l'1a. '
lAw PRI0KS" OK TOBACCO STEMS RC CAB LOTI.w .' ;Office and Warehouse, 1x5 West. Bay Street, Jacksonville,'Fk.. .., "
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;_! -: 'THE FLORIDA .DISPATCH, FARMER AJND JFEUTT-:GBOWER. rI Y7"l 1 i
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I ,;',3: _:.- :;FERTILIZERS. FERTILIZERS. .: ,- t r"


.., '''.: .. .

v,-' t r ,' >, ;s >i -

: :.Blo. d and ,Bone,. '. Oliicago Bone Meal, :r"(:

,', ..', ,M s.".... ::Pure 'Fine Ground Bone, jDark, and Bright Cotton_ Seed Meal,
,
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> ,' ,Animal. :Bone and, Potash, ', Tobacco Stems, .

,':,. .., Blood f ; :Bone. and Potash, t Canada Hardwood Ashes if

[Pulverized .A.nimal Bone Sul-oliate of IPotasli :&c.GKEO. .
d ., {. .

'Fruit'.. .., :. ;.-"..;*:J..d: V:1n.e.: :Baring T'ree. : :A.Orarage :

; J : Tree Fc:;>od" 'You.ng 'I'ree. :

:- ,' i 'VeKe"tab1e an.d potato: GrCvv'er.I > ,
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: .. ,WILSON, : 5O -West Bay Sreet, Jacksonville Fla.TOBACCO t

,r-,. .
: : G RO'C7CTERS:: ATTENTION: I fMaKAY
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<:>.: -

;::. .' .THE PLANT SETTER. '.

... ."' 1> t
:. ,THE. ONLY MACHINE MANUFACTUBED THAT WILL SUCCESSFULLY SET PLANTS/ OF

a ,..... ANY DESCRIPTION. t
.

.i:; mi;: .: TOBACCO PLANTs, TOMATO PLANTS, CABBAGE PLANTS, V\

POTATO PLANTS STRAWBERRY MrANTS.
: .; 0'... SWEET ,
.
;: :.Y. : .. ., ANY KIND OR SPECIES- OF PLANT CAN BE SET IN ,k FAR SUPERIOR I .NNERTHAN Y
',. "
\ CAN BE DONE BY HAND. '

i :'>/" ;' ..' __-_-_-_-_ ...-....-._ ,
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::-: )'\' ':1:, '. ", OVER 500" SOLD BY ONE. AGENT IN ONE COUNTY IN ONE WEEK.
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TO all the weary workers who yearly wear themselves out setting plants, stooping over their work, rest is at hand

," Plants.are set quicker Plants are set better, Plants are set straighter, Plants are covered nicer::.Plants will grow

=; faster, than when set by hand., '
"
.* It saves time-it saves labor-it saves stooping works well in dry ground-it works well in wet ground. :

It opens the ground, (does not plaster the sides of the hole as when setting with the "peg" or by.hand), puts the,plant'r

", i in the ground and presses the earth around the roots (not at,the bud) all at one stroke without stopping.' ,." .'

.J- It is simple, light, effective and cheap. !

;:: Truckers need gardeners require it-nurserymen want is-tomato growers must have it,and tobacco planters cannot ;

do without it; in fact it is an indispensable article on the farm. ,, '. ', ;'
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rr I For particulars, ,address GEORGE GRRELNHOWi% i

4 Sole Agent for Florida and General Agent for theTSoutht' '

A TALLAHASSEE, FLA. :. <. ",,
.__ Agents wanted in every County in the United States. Will lease State and County rights to the proper parties* ; t
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-- AGRICULTURAL TOWN OF -'1


.. S : RANGE G.- iY McINTOSH, Marion County, ..Fljrida.Located : k

'
Y.. : .. kot' on Orange Lake, the home of the native orange. Rich J Wgh hammock lands,
:i .". S tt,4IC. :; rising seventy-five feet above the lake.level. Flourishing orang&grwea. Prominent vegetable
shipping point. Well watered. Natural drainage. Railroad, telegraph, office.
and school t IUUes.' Universally pronounced one of the Very best locations in the State.

'f O : k An inspection wUIl&tJaf7.. ,most critical. Inquiries may be,addressed to,

VASpeciaIC omPi te Manure. S. H..OAJTSKIIX.B .

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: .F FirOruge Trees, Young ind'Old, Fruit Trees, and Small Fruits. ..
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Producing 'a Healthy, Vigorous :Growth and Bright, FiraTFruit: .. : '
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That Holds: on' Until: '.it is Picked.' "'. "I'I C Y G i'E::: l:: ... S.353m .::.. F

OUR MAXIM ., "FEED,THE PLANT, AND

.' .. THE, PLANT WILL FEED YOU .viRflCTlO,. ,, ', !:

Scientific research,verified by practical experiment,.have enabled us to determine theCItUi '
"ood.form of plant food to produce not only sweet fruit (the most salable),but also. J. E. POORMAfr Agent ', 'i I

We:Malm bat our ORANGE GROWER'returns to the soil In suitable form and in proper ,
lAme those constituents which fruit abstract,and will give larger yield,by
a vigorous condition of the entire plant.', Our.,ORANGE GROW R supplies the require Cincinnati Ohio; ., l
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elements of plant food and In suitable forms;" :, _
,,, .- Kxperienoe has proven that Potash to beat adapted to the orange tree,and our ORANGE Catalogue Free. Agents Wanted. .
GROWER contantalns the largest amount,principally in the form of 1pha1e.' The Bone .'
used to more quickly available than the raw bone,' being carefully dissolved, 'hence more
readily. token by the roots of the tree.; Many failures are recorded with the bone,and we are }
led to believe that the soil of Florida; has sot the power to dissolve bone and make plant JOIN THE *
food of It,which heavier soil po *e* es.r. We have aimed to put it in the right form to yield I
Bp ita plant food gradually through the season. :a:01E: : :EN V .l.iS: 1IN
It H an unquestionable fact;admitted" by all.that the growth of an orange tree I is the 4
labor of many years and we can not afford to wait a whole season for the bone to be rendered
soluble. Onthe other aand the trees should.not be forced by stimulantslike flsh,guano
cottonseed meal,which,being rich la ammonia,are consequently too, forcing. Experience Building and Loan Association,1And
IMS taftfeer demonstrated the wisdom.of"frequent applications of fertilizers,especially
Uftoter tends,say two or three times a year,in January,February or March and in June and
'J.,. It should be scattered broadoaat around the trees,a little way:from the trunk,and as Own y
fro ta. S the branches extend and should ,be worked lightly in the soiL About one-half a Home. .
y&B&d should be applied to young trees when first set out,working thoroughly into the soil,
that 1BaF not come in contact,with the tender roots. Another half pound should be scattered '
around the tree after it is set out,on the surface and raked in. ?The terms of this Association have never been'e Older true should be treated as follows:, Two pounds for second year,three pounds for should enable every man to,instead of paying rent to a landlord have same sam PAT far...
tfeird year,increasing'the quantity a year entil the tree is ten years old. A fullgrove same property in a few years., It offers best terms to, '.,;......
beafiBg should have from 1,260 to 2.000 pounds per acre. .1'.,
Bee*for pamphlet, and prices,and ali other information to STOP JU MORTGAGE :
A. M. BOND, GeneralAgent_ 'Write,for particulars,to the above named Association ,_:;:: ,, :, -

...',;:;':...... BOWKERFERTILIZER CO,, Jacksonville,,' .,Fla.: 5 Everett Block,,Jacksonville, F1a' :J; 4 ;
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