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UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Florida farmer & fruit grower
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055765/00172
 Material Information
Title: Florida farmer & fruit grower
Uniform Title: Florida farmer & fruit grower (Jacksonville, Fla. 1893)
Alternate title: Florida farmer and fruit=grower
Portion of title: Florida farmer and fruit grower
Physical Description: 29 v. : ill. ; 33-50 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: S. Powers
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: March 19, 1891
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1893; ceased in 1899.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 5, no. 19 (May 13, 1893).
Funding: Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: PJ-50006-05
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved. Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002038466
oclc - 01387403
notis - AKM6256
lccn - sn 95026761
System ID: UF00055765:00172
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida dispatch and farmer and fruit grower
Succeeded by: Semi-weekly Florida times-union and citizen

Full Text
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1 4M SE -J'P i 1 reA MAGAZ i N.E

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CONSOUDATED JANUARY 1889. ? F


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DACOSTA dt POWEBS, Jacksonville Fla., Thursday, March 19, 1891. Whole No. 1155. '4o1litExlo.E1 r2; "

i* ___. .

I
4 : ,GROVE
ORANGE ,. SPECIALTY
r f1 1' FOR SALE;"- -TRY HASTINGS'SEEDS. GRAPE VINES. ..-

':. One and one-half miles from Peru,Via,one- Chaise!** Luttlchau, best and by week
t half mile from Alafla river. 110 bearing trees A .
I J.i the earliest market grape in Florida..
, In first-class condition 15 to 18 yean old. They are the best. They are grown for use in the South. Write
for -
Catalogue.
Good water healthy locality. Tract contain-' They are adapted to our Florida soil andclimate. Give them a
H. VON LUTTICHJLU,
ing 7)acres. Address P. M., Peru, Fla.
trial. Our new'catalogue for 1890-91 will be sent on application. I 12-4-41 EarletoD,na. ? ,

A FAR H. G. HASTINGS &: CO., k

Seedsmen; and Florists. Intrel hen, Fla. 'E'R'E'
L Moon's Patent Plow-Colter and Gauge beats t
the world. Adjustlble to any Plow one or Only 300 yard from depot.) a
R two honA. Haves 20: per cent in labor for' Thousands of tweet seedlings two to AT yean .
man and beast,and enables you to turn any old from seed directly from the famous Tucker i
kind of grass,vines or:>weeds completely out I SAVE TIME AND MONEY.START grore. Splendid selection of budded
sight. GUARANTEED. Send for circular. less and otherwise. Maltese Oral Med. =.
't" MOON COLTER MFG.CO.. Washington Navel" Tangerine. Peerless,
gents wanted. Hhntsvllle,Ala. Sweet and others. The last named It a new and *
splendid rarlety, early and sweet. Oar prices arethe *
RIGHT$ AND KEEP RIGHT by buying your vinesof lowest. Try as and you will purehas*.
r
.
LAKE & R1PLEY, J.C.BUHNER.KAXUkMT.
:. B AGENTS those who have had experience and have MADE A SUCCESSOF Care E.A.FAULA.XUerslle,PascoCo,71*. #*

FLORIDA FRUIT EXCHANGE, GRAPE CULTURE IN SOUTH FLORIDA and who will O.W.BABNBTT. rr A'At nnnm: 1 .J.B.BABHZTT. :,

give full instruction as to planting and care of vines.
CHATHAM ST. BOSTON. BROS.,
57 .
i BARNETT
HAYNES YOUNG & BAILEY
Price;Catalogues of weekly. sales furnished AGENTS

on.appllca.tlon. : /: ..t. State Agents for the Niagara White Grape Companies' Superior Vine, FLORIDA .FRUIT 'EXCHANGE.

AS. SAITTA, SON &CO.,. t. and Green Mountain, Winles! Us l Jin mis l ions,Tomb and YtgttiVin

1 J FRUIT IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION ". NIAGARA VILLA. Prompt returns. Stencils on application.
.
_139 South Water Street Chicago.ESTABLISHED
Box Orlando Fla.
MERCHANTS. 492, ,
Agents for Georgia,Carolina and Missouri : 1879LRM. w.

melon 900 cars received ;yearly Leaden FALL AND WINTER SEASON 1890 AND 189LK. BURROWS & CO., .,
in Bananas and Floilda Oranges. Consignments -
solicited. Quickest and best returns. UIT COMMISSION MERCHANTSFor .
Reference: Whole fruit trade Masonic .T.PAINE. J. OVERTON PAINS '
Bank. the sale Oranges,Lemons and Banana*,
Bank and Co. Exchange
Pittsburgh, Pa.,026 to 984 Liberty avenue. THE PAINE FERTILIZER COMPANY 64 AND 66 PROSPECT ST., CLEVELAND O. '
,
New York, N. Y., 88 Park Place and 266 ''
Washington sheet.r Ample storage and refrigerators. Correspondence
Stencils furnlabed
Philadelphia, Pa., Jas. Saitta, 11 and 13 J JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA. References-Mercantile solicited. ?aUonalBank; Wau Edwards
Dock street. &Co-Wholesale Grocers; Child,Oroff*Co-

,.. IO WHOLESALE NURSERIES -: Office 50 West Bay Street, Warehouses and Wharves Jacksonville.at the terminus of the. F. C.A P. R. R., Dunk Wholesale Co.'s Boots Mercantile and Shoes Agencies; Bradstreetif; "Ohio Farmer.and R.G.*
r PO I' St.J'ohns.Rlver.'East Clereland.
r ,
MACCLENNY, BAKER CO., FLA. Manufacturers of Commercial Fertilizers.Wholesale W M. BOEHMER & CO., '
A C
GRIPPING A BRADLEY, PROPRIETORS.
Propagators of general line of fruit trees adapted No.625 Liberty Ave.,
t, to Florida and the Gulf States. Florida grown peach dealers in and importers aU kinds of Agricultural Cneralcals. PITTSBURGH, PA. '
1', and peach Oriental and fifteen plum of specialties.plum. Peach Fifty on varieties both peach of Bend us ypur name and we will mall you from time to time much general Information Commission Merchants, De,lers in Foreign
a t .i,t and Marianna plum roots. Apricots nectarines regarding successful orange and vegetable culture In Florida. and Domestic Fruits. Oranges }In ear lots a
almond,pecans Jennings Florid apple, etc. No. specialty.Consignments.
I agents employed. Correspondence solicited.PATENT + and correspondence solicited
German National Bank.
GRAZING The Finest Recommendation to be Obtained in the State.-Florida. Experiment,St.tloo-Jaa. P. Reference
MUZZLE. DePass, Director. I w. SHERMAN & CO. 1
LAKE CITY,Fuu,Oct.29,1890. L ,.
Allows stock of all kinds to graze and prevents MESIRS. E.T. PAINE:A SON. Dear. Sirs-I have used your"Orange Tree Food"on my; BOSTON,
browsing. Tree. and shrubs fully pro- grove' for two year and my trees are growing very finely. It Is an excellentfertUixfr and I RECEIVERS FLORIDA FRUITS.
tected. can recommend it most Mghly. Yours truly, JAS. P.DBPA88.- OF
References, 8..B. Hnbbard A Co.'Jackon- TAMPA FLA.,Oct. 20,l89O. References: Dr.Henry Foster,Oviedo,Fla.;
''L vllle. MESSRS..T.PAINE&; SON. Gentlemen am so far satisfied with the J"@lultaobtalned Capt. B F Whltner, 'Fort Reed, Fla.; First
by the use of your "Orange Food" Fertilizer'of which I used over 60 ton,the past season. National Bank Sanford Fla.; 8.P.&Ucl&-
Price,1.26 each at factory.. V
Fla. J. Robert,
Lake orange
My fruit Is very firm and heavy. Five years continuous use of this bnd shows that It pro- Lady ;
MOREMBN: A: CO.J8w1tRland duces a thin tough-skinned fruit, which carries to market under average conditions In excellent Bend, Fla ; Dr L. L.Newsom,Crescent C1t '.
ElL, shape Not one*bad order"report did I receive the past season. The wood growth Fla.-L Fourth National Bank Boston; H.narnsACo '
obtained by; the use of your fertilizer Is not as great as by some others,but Is HEALTHT and Boeton.
& SON. CERTAIN., Yours truly, J. M. W ATBOU8.
S. PALMER
ABEACH ... ,
: G "
j. 1 66 READE ST., NEW YORK.

t. PALATKA, FLA. MOVER, SOUTHERN PRODUCE A SPECIALTY.

Tree and Plant of all kind suited to this DIAMOND NIAGARA Oranges,Lemons,Pineapples, and all otter
: olt ate. Camphor tree ,A specialty Also EATO N, Fruits and early track, also, dried fralt- ,
etc.
nuts furs,
, Japan Chestnuts, Pecan And Japan,Perslm-. All consignments promptly remitted Us?.
\: moss Stencils and market reports furnished free.
The best way to SAVE TIME AND MONEY" is to buy the References: Bradstreets, and estaMtsh+d
HOBSON & CO., merchants azd banks of the South.

ff JF.] No.28 South Front Street best vines at cheapest prices, and this you can do by }purchasingfrom & .co.
PHILADELPHIA., T B. MAXFIELD ;

COMMISSION' MERCHANTS.I' : the SAN Luis and'NDALU5IA_ : vineyards and nurseries. J.I 75 77 ARK PLACE, NEW YORK.

l GBtfeera Fruit. and VeEetabV l Ueli. We offer none but thoroughly first-class vines, and can refer to Receiver*of Florida Orange,Lemon,8Npe.
" Dr. H. )Farmera' Fruit and Tangerine .

... TWDeJ.D.I Del t Florid, fertBlcerft 'Smnna Ot.l NI 500 'parties in Florida, who have planted our vines. Send at once STRICTLT FANCY FRUIT, BOTH ur QUAUTT,
pAcrnro is ova BOBBY.
J atokM. reed M rchnu, 21tl Ain
/' *; COl. J. Do V. Haaard E/DUBOIS TALLAHASSEE FLA. Stencil*furnished free.
. .John Xollt&s.jrortoMc.Va.j;Prodac* for, price list E Chatham National Bank,N.Y.I ,
I ,.s,_._."Ph adtiph1&. Ja*.A.Harris Curs, Fla.
UtaneHt famWied. when requested; Retures made State-.Agents for the sale of the WHITE DIAMOND GRAPE. Prompt return oa all oongnms) '". .
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In THE FLORIDA DISPATCH' FARMER AND FRUITGROWER.a fMARCit 19,1891

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V, r EUREKA INSECTICIDE. AND FUNGICIDE.


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z -- Sure Death to all Insects.
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,SPtLAYIN-G MACHINERY: *,

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: '-;Berry Grates 'and Baskets. 'Orange( Growers' Supplies '

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s ,, i Send for Circular. H .' .' .,E BEAN .'
,
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r Waycrbss: Railroad 'Wharf, : 'JACKSONVILLE 'FLORIDA .

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,., fJfWP-; -"S"U L P H"U: HS 0 L UT I-G-N ,; ,

.
.:, INSECTICIDE J .
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fir 'c' Is the most effective compound yet discovered for, ,destroying the insects infesting the orange tree, and ,

i is a 'sovereign 'remedy for the various forms of fungi on trees and plants Being free from all' substances ... i

of'a caustic,i corrosive or poisonous nature, it can be handled with .perfect. safety, to the person, and appliedto

the trees at any" stage of growth without I in- ury..

..,',',';This insecticide' ,has been used by some of the the largest orange growers in the State during! thepast .

: year, and ,has given perfect satisfaction.. References, furnished on application.


:5 ;jgqfl; 11U.MITE, UE}. ONE QUART! TO FIFTY GALLONS OF WATER -- ,

y. .For Red Spider and. "Scale,.use .one. .gallon. 'to'fifty. allonsV/TwaterV" Genetardirectioris i: : for using sent on application. :...;.
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>i1' 7 PRICE 20 ,CENTS/ ,PER! : GALLON '

In barrels arid half barrels... .. If there:is no< agent. .in your' 'vicinity write for price delivered. l' .

t j*. Manufactured. by / "/ :. :McMAJSTER: & MILLER, > ..

.. Sau Mateo dad',. C'itra, Fla.' ,

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SAVANNAH FLORIDA AND WESTERN RAILWAY

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_fJ -- The. FF1r. '" : -: .4a, DI..pa-toh: :y L.Ln.e.. : : :

With the Magnificent Connections '
:
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? The Great Fast Express Freight System of the South


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The attention 1 or shippers 1*directed to the.Plant S. 8..Line between Havana,Key West. and Tampa,and:,south Florida Railway.bet ween Tampa and Sanford,8.,F.A W.Ry.between -
Jacksonville,Gainesville,Bainbridge, River Junction and Savannah,Savannah and Charleston,and Ocean Steamship Line between Savannah,Philadelphia,Boston and New
York,and Merchants and Miner Transportation Company between Savannah and Baltimore The beat equipped,fastest and most prompt,lines between all points In Florida and all r
potets North and Northwest. ,Be selvers and Shippers will profit by the following unparalleled connections:
"KOBTH BOUND.SOUTHBOUND.I
service, for all' points West via Albany,Jesup, Bainbridge and Double dally fast freight.service from all points North and West.via Albany,Bainbridge,
r Deeble dally. fast- freight Jesnp and Savannah to all points In Florida; fast freight trains both via Gainesville,Jack
Savannah Eastern,Interior sonville,Callahan and Live Oak. .. .
all rail connection' via the Atlantic Coast.Line to all
Hyfltst freight ,Baltimore,Washington and Four.ships a week by the fleet steamships of the Ocean Steamship Company,sailingfrom'tFrovtdeaee '
,Boston Philadelphia
aad Coast points<. ,-*including" ....l.New. York. : New York(New Pier 85,North River,) direct for:Savannah Monday,Wednesday,Friday.and
Foar connections* a,week for New York via Ocean';Steamship' Companyleaving.Savannah Saturday. 0
The Boston and Savannah Steamship Company's steamers will leave Boston Mar.5,0,
and Saturdays.
Mondays, Wednesdays Fridays for via Merchants' and Mlnen'Transportation Com- 13,17 21.25 and 28 for Savannah direct,making connection on the dock at Savannah with fast
Tw cofiaeetlons a week Baltimore
freight In Florida. .
and trains for fell points
: J&tyleavingSavannah every Wednesday Saturday. Co., Mar.1,11,21 and 31,
Philadelphia
t C .JeUJoSs for Boston'via Boston and. Savannah Steamship. 0 Company- ,leaving Savannah From Philadelphia via Ocean Steamship via New York leaving to Savannah.CeBnecllons .
five from regular sailing day
days
x..,.8,1,11,16,19,28 Z1 and 31. every
and
From Baltimore via MerohanUi and Miners Transportation CO. every Tuesday
ten days via Ocean Steamship Company,leaving
Philadelphia, 'every ; Friday, making close connection with S.'F.'' A W.By.for all points in Florida..
Bav&anah Har.6,16 and 96. '
SfttHag day Steamships$are subject change: without notice.Jbe .
West to Florida. ,For full particulars,rates,stencils and.shipping,receipts apply toanyagcnta
: Jlorlda:Dispatch Line Is the quickest and best freight route from all points North,East and
of the above lines,.or to WM.P.HABDEE,Oen'l Freight.Agent,S v .nnahUa. ,?
O. D.OWKNS,,Trafflo Manager,Savannah,Ga. F.'B.PAPY,Asst.Traffic Manager, Savannah, Oa.' W. M.DAVIDSON! ,Genl.Traffic Agent, Jacksonville,Fla.
/ Gainesville,; .. J. .,DJU.YTONTraV. Agent, Jacksonville.. J.H.BTXPHMIS,Agent,Jacksonville. .,
'J' ASP WOOD,TraY..Agt... Fla. J P.JOBDAK,Tray Agent" Quincy- / or:
0 .---. ; .. oj;,..h .

;* .'> SUNSET ,,.HILL' NU.RSERY/-' :j" EUSTIS NURSERIES!;t4t

x. .11 t; .. i' ., Eustis, ,Lake County, Fla., ":::.:"',y,
.. CATALOGUE, .< l' : : '
!
Offer for sole for Immediate planting
t, with practical hints> to beginners,1*worth aendIng for. It contains valuable Information to '

all. with 'a in of all, the cnoloeat ;varieties of the citrus family grown Peaches A FINE STOCK OF ORANGE AND LEMON TREES::

Pesos',. : FlaaaSf Apricots, Persimmons?, Grapes and other fruit adapted to the .
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k: orate of Florida. ,Onf stock is grown' on high plne land,and Is one of the finest and lartftte. One ana< two year'buds;choloest varieties,all grown on pine land. '; ?,i- .'- '

'- gei#.a the t ., IT Is.GBOwiro BE L. IF ANYONE CAN SUIT YOUR WE, CAN., My If urseries were entirely' ;,uninjured by.the_March freece.. Plant now durtuf the rainy
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s"a..i. ..' J lesson. "Write for'>pecli1rprieee./ '" '" > r .'* V.- ." :. ,-> .. \ -., ,- ,
Y Everyoae should have attr.ai..*''Free on application. Just send your name for onix ..... .; c cLJt. > : ".
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IA.RH.ERRU I T R OWR: : ,:



82.OO PER YEAR] H l,
JACKSONVILLE MARCH
19, 1891. $2.OO PER YEAR
-

Gfrove and Orchard': the flat-bottomed stern-wheelers. At as one of its principal!objective points. I i ing life's duties very'modestly and're
.. Eden Capt. Richards has a pier slop- Land is said to be held here at very tiring "1 _

........... ..- ing easily down from his bluff bank high figures, for lemon and pineapple In ,nearly every boll sheltered by the
The Indian River Country. something like fifteen feefhigh, nearlyto orchards. Notwithstanding these high cotton, I found one or more' of our
a level with the water. From his prices, we were told that a considerable greatest fruit.pests, the curculio (Conotrachdus
.: On a recent visit to this region we lookout the smoke of the steamer can immigration is coming to Merrill's nenuphar), only waiting" till-
were impressed with the evidences of be sighted far down, or up the river, Island on account of the remarkable the cold passed by and the fruit -"set"in
t progress and improvement which were an hour before she is due; and whenat advantages which it offers for the cultivation the'adjacent peach orchard. This

evident, ,showing' the courage of the length _she is close at hand the of tender semi-tropical fruits. goes a long way toward explaining the
i is loaded with
American in business tram-car crates of pine- The shores of Indian river, both l fact that peaches are more liable to
people pushing
apples, the negroes jump on it and givea the be if
on west of Merrill's Island and wormy cotton is planted.in the
enterprises against great obstacles. For few kicks on the plank, when away on the main land, are free from swamps orchard. Is there a moral to this
there is no denying that'',this, regionhas it shoots out from, the palmettoes and and marshes; and they generally:rise story? Does it not emphasize the.''ad- .
peculiar drawbacks.' r the c cocoanuts and down the long inclineof at an angle of twenty ,to twenty-five vantage of clean culture ? .

The most obvious of these are sand- its own weight, 300 or 400 feet degrees to an elevation of twenty to When the time comes that farmers .!
down
to the wharf.
flies and mosquitoes. The latter can thirty feet. In some places the banks enact laws looking to the conservation \i
FISH AND OYSTERS. are bluffs twelve or fifteen feet high. of their
be measureably barred out but sand. interests, may we not hope fo )
The river is well stocked with good But most of the vegetation along the. see the statute compelling the destruc- ",
flies cannot be excluded except by the oysters, green turtle and fish of various banks, especially the upper part of tion, by fire, of root and branch of!all l ..
use_ of screens so close as to render the kinds, among which are the mullet the river, is rather low and scrubby; : cotton stubble by January 1st of'each ,
I )
atmosphere almost stifling. But these cavalli, snapper, blue fish, sheep: and this, together with the great width year, and the burning of all bagasse, ;
intolerable pests are by no means uni- head, sea trout and the incomparable of the river, gives the shores a flat corn stalks and fence-corner trash by _
form in their visits and persecutions; pompano. Several of these with oysters appearance.The February 1st ? )
they come and go, carried by the trade in different forms were on the country on Merrill's Island,west These' radical measures,' once ,
winds from: the AtlantIc. The salty sumptuous tables of the St. Sebastian I shore, has an appearance of an endless adopted, would soon cause marked 1
breezes do not seem to be 'agreeable to three times a day; and it i is proverbialthat park, the timber being principally scat- diminution of insect plagues, and in a
them. A residence directly on the tourists eat freely of all these on tered pines,with an undergrowth of pal few years most likely would com- 3 t
bank of the stream, or of some inlet the down trip, but coming back they mettoes and grass, interspersed with pletely exterminate the cotton, stainer 1
flowing into itis, for this reason, espec have had enough and perhaps more. an occasional forest of palmetto, live and the cotton-worm, thus adding 1;
ially desirable.But It is said the ocean is filling up some oak and other hardwood trees. greatly lo both quantity and.quality of
the children born on this remarkable of the inlets, thus stopping out the salt At.Eden we found the west bank our best crops, and rendering farms
river are said to grow up water; and this, together with occasional of the river to consist of a sandy ridge less subject to insect ravages. ,
almest indifferent to these pests. We heavy rains, sometimes freshensthe about three-fourths of a mile wide, Another lesson that eventually we 1
were told by old residents, ,whose ve- water to such an extent as to destroy rolling and tumbled as if it had once I will heed is the danger of cultivating
racity was unimpeachable, that the The preservationof been the shore of J
youngsters oysters. the ocean. But,its in orchards and groves, crops that are ",
may be seen, in the heat of the a plenty of salt in the Indian Riveris freedom from: shells seems to indicate susceptible to the root-knot worm.. In
summer, lying contentedly in the sand of vital importance to the health of that, if it ever was the seashore, it Alabama, D. Atkinson, of the Exp ri-
with the puppies and chickens, only the human dwellers along its banks as must have been in the azoic period, .ment Stationin Bulletin 21December, j
now and then sluggishly passing a hand well as the bivalves. If necessary, i. when both earth and sea were destitute 1890, gives an account of the root-rot!in 'I
over a naked thigh or an arm, to brush Congress itself should make provisionto of life. On ,the west side this cotton caused by this nematode'worm. )
off the swarming vermin. secure this. shore ridge drops down to a dead-level D. A. emphasizes the danger of dis-

' THE SAIL-BOATS. MERRITT'S ISLAND, flatwoods, covered with pines, and tributing the worms by rooted plants "
,There is another reason for this which is about forty miles long and wire-grass, and at present so overflowed and tubers, and adds (p.' 9)), "Then the
marked preference of the dwellers fora contains about 30,000 acres, is situatedin in the summer rainy season as practice of cultivating, either for forageor
river-bank situation. Being in the the northern part of th;river. The to be useless for anything but a stock fertilizer, plants liable to the disease '
region of the trade-winds, with almosta sheet of salt water on its east side is range. This ,flatwoods plain stretches (root galls or knots) should be discon- j
constant breeze from the eastward from one-fourth of a mile to six miles away westward to Lake Okeechobee tinued." '
during the daytime, it affords peculiar wide; and is called Banana river. The and the Everglades-RD. In New South Wales the same
facilities for sailing up and down the land along Banana river, on both sides, [TO BE CONTINUED,] trouble! 'occurs, and has been made.e
beautiful sheet of water; and the pea is generally low and covered with a < the subject of an exhaustive investigation :-
4 ple take advantage of it. We met or luxuriant growth of grass. The west- LURKING PLACES OF FRUIT, by Prof.* Cobb, who fully appre-
J overtook sail boats constantly; and no ern channel is the deepest and is the i PESTS. ciates the fact that this pest is capableof
sooner had the St. Sebastian groundedon main river; the banks are generallyfrom making trouble. and gives warning
the oyster beds than a hardy eight to fifteen feet high and What an Entomologist Saw Ono accordingly
Cracker sailor and his son came alongside perpendicular. The southern end of Cold Day. In New South Wales, the parsnip; .i
.in their little smack and offered to the island terminates in a long narrow JCdltor Farmer and Fruit-Orower potato, beet and turnip were most af- ip
carry messages or passengers: who were strip of high, rocky land only a. few A few days ago, during a cold spell, fected, and, as in Florida, the peach _'*
impatient to be gettIng on. rods in width, and from six to eight I investigated several hundred frosted seems to be easily affected and Prof. ,
Every family has a sail-boat, and it miles long. The rock is formed of bolls and blooms remaining in a last C. remarks (p. 179)), "Many'-ari" agri- l
is the usual mode of conveyance. comminuted shell cemented togetherby year's cotton, field. Nearly every boll cultural or horticultural failure at- !
Boat-landings are thickly scattered up natural causes; this is called by the was fully tenanted with dozens of red tributed ,to the use of improper fertilizer -
and down the majestic stream (not a Spanish coquIna and makes good lime grain weevils (Silvanus guadricollis), to poor soil, or wrong cultivation, ,
stream, either, but a sheet). It is the for agricultural uses, also good build black corn weevils (Calandra otyza), a, I has been due to this insidious foe'attacking -*
Venice of America, long drawn out, ing stone. The island is principallypine few squash bugs (Coreus frisfis) and occasionally -t' the very fountain-head of veg
it is true, and with a rude civilizationas woods land interspersed with a green soldier bug (Raphi- etation.' If cotton and, corn, especially
yet, except in the tourist resorts. 'small hammocks and savannahs.; The faster Man's). On the loose cotton 'I cotton, are agencies for spreadingthis .
Owing to its shallowness, every,steamer savannahs are generally underlaid with were swarms of cotton ,stainers (Dys- I ,trouble, as well as affording hiding
landing has a wooden pier, often running marl.We dercus suturellust) from the portly, som- .places for curculio and weevil,'should
.. J out several hundred feet before a. hope to ,make another visit to bre females to baby bugs in bright 1; they not be abandoned in -orchards ;
'uffiC1en (lepth"is found to ,float even this interesting region, with this island I scarlet, and young couples just assum ;and groves ? NEAL. "j

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'm' THE FLORIDA DISPATCH FARMER AND FRUIT-GROWER. [MARCH 19,1891


Bermuda Grass vs. Frost. Orange Culture in Australia. CULTIVATION. i can be hoed under as a manure.
BdKer: J'armer and Frolt-Grower. PLANTING.In Where the soil is well drained naturally Sometimes, when the soil appears to be

Seeing so much lately about the< the first place, no kind of tree as i in shaly land, soft rotten getting "worked out," three or four
inches will be removed and lot of
of frost in clean slate, or shaly sandstone, or light a
damages perseverance should be planted deeply. The roots
humus-or leaf mould-from the for-
mould with gravel beneath, a
J I some
culture to protect the trees, etc.,
naturally run near the surface for est or some rich spot will be cartedon
,
would like to state the following : ]I surface drain open to a depth of a footor
have experimented with Bermuda warmth, air, and nutriment, and< 18 inches between every secondrow < in its place. The mulch must not
for! the last and as 1 I Nature herself places these requisite of trees will be sufficient. Where be placed close up to the trunk of the
like the every the land is of retentive nature tree. For orange trees especially the
grass better day I let my on the surface. The orange espec- a more ,
base of the tree must be left free and
such loam it will
under four of trees! as sandy upon clay,
pet grow, my orange ially loves the surface soil, and will The portion of the root which
open.
be to have covered
the the has taken com- necessary perhaps
in plete possession yard; under grass the trees. Haveheard not thrive if the roots are buried drains at a depth of two to three takes up nutriment is at the extreme

many arguments about its injury deeply.. Indeed, it is an excellent feet; the deeper the drain the wider: end of each fibrous root, and these are

'to*;:my trees by neighbors, etc.; notwithstanding practice, and one that is regularly followed the area embraced in its operations. continually extending outwards-
two of these four, are the in Mr. Purser's orangery, to A waterlogged soil is fatal to the roots; therefore, the placing of plant food,
best. .I have, bearing oranges this year remove the soil entirely from the bas< of trees, and apricots, peaches and pr mulch, at the butt-end of the root
is useless. Garden and
two years after budding. These four of the trunk, exposing the roots completely other stone fruits are particularly susceptible utterly Field. .
,trees are not standing, alone, but are for six inches to a foot away to damage from an excess of +++
mixed in with the others in two rows. from the trunk, leaving a space all water in the soil. Even upon hillsides Insects on Fruit Trees.
They have kept their leaves throughthe around each.root.As I It is quite possible that the soil may At this season of the year. the subject -
.winter, while all the others in the before said the profit in fruit become water-logged where the subsoil [ of insect pests and fungus diseases
!grove: have dropped many or all of growing comes from having good fruit i is clay and the upper soil of a of vines and trees is a live issue and is
.tbeks. SUBSCRIBER. for sale.. Poor, inferior fruit will not sandy nature mixed with clay. It is being discussed at the meetings of ,
,FaiBftm Hall Fla. sell at any price when there is plentyin very necessary, also, to keep the surface Farmers all over the United States.
'. ,O personal experience corroborates the market, and even when there isbut soil continually in an open condi Experience has fully proven that the
..Jhe ,above. In the great freeze little,, the good fruit brings.by far tion. Where there are large tracts to cheapest and easiest method of ridding s
of January, 1886, where there was a the better price. For this reason,, be dealt with the skim-plough, the trees and vines of these pests is by
geod coating of the,Bermuda grass the plant nothing but the very: best sorts horseshoe, the cultivator, and harrows spraying with insecticides. Hence l
ground was not frozen at all, whereas procurable, prepare the soil perfectly,, may be kept almost always movingover pumps and outfits for this purpose, be-
with the the land. It is important to come as necessary to the fruit farmeras
the
frozen
in exposed, spots it was to and plant each tree greatestof
jd-epdiof: three or four inches. But care. remember that the fibrous roots of the his plow or cultivator. The Field ,'
[if:Bermuda grass grows under,the trees To make the soil mellow and fit to trees are those which keep it healthyand ) Force Pump Co., of Lockport, N. Y., .
lit,, must be kept in check with mulch receive the trees it, is best to begin vigorous, and therefore, care must manufacture a full line of spraying

r ,i i4g, ,and the trees must be adequatelyfed preparing it six, or even twelve,, be taken not to injure these by goingtoo outfits and machinery, including a i,
,,.with manure of some kind.-ED. months previously. Trenchploughthe deeply. very superior knapsack sprayer. They
f land to a depth of 12 to 15 inches Avoid piling up the soil, or mulch, have recently! published a new catalogue .t
How they Sell Oranges in DeSoto harrow and roll containing valuable formulas
k deep. Cross-plough, or anything else around the base of
County. the land until it is pulverized, mixed, the tree. Rather scrape the soil and recipes, which will be sent free
Idttorrarmeranf Fruit-Grower: This work be on application. It has been authorita-
and sweetened. can away, even to exposure of the shoul--
'In your valuable paper of January done at intervals, giving the soil an ders of the roots, but in doing this tively stated by the Director of oneofour
'22, there is sounded "a timely note of exposure for a time after each opera.. do not cause any injury to the bark ,State Agricultural colleges, that :t
,warning" as to the selling of the it. by using Field's spraying outfit, the ',;:
tion, to allow the air to act upon either of the trunk or the roots. Any
, orange:crop. There must be some- Finally, plough about six furrows,to a bruise, scratch, or wound is likely to cost per tree for spraying was from
iking wrong with the seller, not the ridge for each line of trees, so that the afford entrance to the germs of "bark- two to five cents, while the estimated
,
CJ ,buyer. centre of each ridge is from 20 to 22 rot," "dry-rot," and "collar-rot," gain was from two and one-half to ;
The: *orange growers of DeSoto feet from the next centre of a ridge. which are always in the air. When its four dollars per tree. Purchase an "
.
county, especially in this section, have Then line out and drive stakes in found that such diseases have taken outfit and be ready for the enemy ..J!

learned by dear experience not to firmly where the trees are to stand- hold of the roots or stem of a' tree- when he appears. .
Ii, ship their oranges to any associationor oranges, say 22 feet apart; but at especially the orange tree-cut the -*
,commission men, as they wish to The Cracking of Fruit and Vegeta-
fifteenth each leave and
every tree way a whole of the damaged piece out,
: instruct us how to pick, pack and wider space for roads. 'Round the fill the wound with a mixture of soft bles.
: ship and to make our oranges 176 to stakes for three or four feet hoe in clay and sulphur. If a root appearstoo The cracking or bursting of fruits
250 count. This leaves us out, as some bonedust, and in about a fort. far gone, cut it off, and cover the and vegetables during growth or at
there are no such oranges raised here. night hoe the soil again on the same sound stump with clay and sulphur.The maturity is often a source of considerable -
From 128 to 146 is the usual count, circumference this hoeing should be same treatment is necessary where loss. A better understanding of
with few exceptions as high as the causes of this trouble might enable -
very done four times, at intervals of a fortnight "gumming" occurs in some trees, the
make the soil nice and mel us in some cases to use preventive
176.This to "gum" being caused by a fungus
seasen, as the crop, is not all low for the tree. Then open a hole which is attacking the vital juices in measures. At present it must be confessed -
,shipped, the growers sold to J. W.Traairaell around the stake to a depth of six to the bark of the tree. that the subject has been too .
t. Lakeland, Polk county; nine inches, according to the size of lIttle investigated. It is plain that all .1
,aad he has paid for all of them, shipped the tree; spread the roots out regularlyIn MULCHING. instances of cracking cannot be re- f
and not shipped; and the growers each direction from the centre and Mulching is very necessary in good (erred to a single cause, and it is quite
have received their money and paid as each root is placed in position coverit cultivation; but the material must note possible that In some cases the real
'their debts, if they owed any. with a little soil to hold it there. > placed close up to the trunk of the source of the affection has not been
'rTfaevcold; wave' knocked the spots When all the roots are covered with tree-in fact, a clear space around the suspected. In certain vegetables, as e ,
.out .vegetables, but ,the guava and about two inches of fine light soil, trunk of a foot to three feet must be the carrot and kohlrabi, as well as in '
orange: are on top, so come down this tread the whole down lightly, and preserved. The larger the tree, the the potato-tuber, the cracking appearsto
,way, ,friends Phelps and Neeld. Wecan. then cover loosely with the rest of the wider the clear space. The object of be the result of a second growth
give, you a few lessons how to soil, which must not be trodden, but the mulch is to keep the surface soil at that occurs after some maturing of the '
handle your orange crops and get left loosely on the surface, so that air an even temperaturesummer'' and tissues has' taken place. When a
$1.50 per crate for: them on the trees. can gain access. Tie the tree to :the winter-to keep it comparatively warm period of dry weather, which tends to

.: I, .FRANCIS C. M. ,BOGGESS. stake by first tying the bandage loosely in winter and fairly cool in summer; premature ripening, is followed by _
{{Fort.>> Ogden Fla.,Jan.30, 1891.Hi' round the tree, then tie two knots also, to allow of the 'aIr getting to the abundant rain, a new season of growth rc
': next to the loop round the tree, and soil, of preventing evaporation, promoting often begins. But the outer layer of
t A.',Chance. .to Make Money. then tie to the stake. The two knots absorption of moisture from -cells being no longer capable of 1,
.1.'-I feel ,it my duty, to inform others will prevent chafing the tree. It is not the air, and, when decayed, of enhan- growth; the formation of new cells
the of the soil. At Par- in the cambium region of the
of:my success plating spoons, casters, necessary to dip the roots in mud cing fertility vegetable -
jewelry, etc. The first week I cleared before, planting, but the fibrous roots ramatta it is usual to rake up leaves or tuber necessitates a rupture of .
$36;'akd in three weeks $118.50. By of the orange tree especially and of all from the adjacent indigenous forests, the other part, precisely as the formation -
addressing W. H. Griffith & Co., others generally will suffer much from and to spread these thickly upon the of a new layer of wood causes
Zaaesville, Ohio, you can get circu exposure to dry air. Of course ,the soil as a mulch; but the best mulch is ruptures in the bark. of trees. The
lars.,, ,Six months ago ,I was poor. .I roots should be as perfect and '''unin the straw of peas, which are grown.for only preventive we can at present pro
BOW, ave'a''Jice: home and.bank ac- jured as it is possible to get them, but the purpo, or the stalks of maize, or pose is the harvesting of the crop before -
r ceuat; all the' product of $3 invested if any should be broken or bruised cut green maize. These mulches will last the second growth has gone sufficiently '
two or three years, and when decayed far, to cause the rupture, says ,"
,-n> StP1ater.S.. L. MORTON.. them back to a sound place. ":.
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1 > 1891J' THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, _FARMER AND ;FRUIT-GROWER. 2J
= : ,
-- ..
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t -
Prof. E..,,S. Goff of the ., .. ",- -
University ,of certain varieties resist much better
to intended
Wisconsin in not as a guide for nurserymen to ripen, is nearly round in shape,'and
The an of exchange. than others the influence that'tend ,to grafting will 'not bs tr ated.- usually bright red in color.. Itis juicy: ,

the tree cracking in ripe apples upon cracking. Prom Thompson's Treatise on _LeConte and sweet, and owing to ,its very small
weather
: wet be
appears to and other,new Pears and Fruits. it
due' Cultivation of Pear Trees.In stone has much flesh for its size.
In some cases, at least l to the absorption _...._.. ..-_-_.- The tree is of good size reach-
of water through the skin; the early spring, plow and cross- ,
Ripe apples immersed in water plow the orchard with a good turn Japanese Plums. ing a height of from twenty,

will often absorb enough of the liquid plow, the deeper the better. It is No fruit of recent introduction has to thirty feet, the top being rather

to burst the skin in a few hours. well to plant a crop of peas or cotton, attracted more attention than the few close in growth. The short,branches :

This process has been ascribed to an or any other hoed crop between the varieties of Japanese plums brought are bark inclined to be slightly thorny, the :

osmotic action between the juices of trees, fertilizing any crop that is planted. here some. years ago, and which of rough, and the young shoots .

the fruit and ,the water. In an experiment The fertilization and cultivationof late years have been so extensively ad brown. The foliage is dense, the "

however, there,, wasp no evi- the crop will be all that is necessary vertised, and quite generally planted leaves are rather long, with the margin.

deace that osmosis had taken ,place. for the trees. These crops may wherever they can.withstand our win.: stalked finely serrated. The flowers are long.' :.
white
After soaking an apple in distilled be.planted year after year until the ters. They are valued both for their ,in, and three or more apr;

water for several days, during which trees grow so large that they shade the size. and for their quality, two desirable little pear a cluster from each bud. This '

the flesh cracked nearly" to the centre, crop too much for profit. Never plant'i characteristics,which are sadly lacking is plum is a favorite, and in its season -*
kind of in in most of native American more abundant on the fruit
the'water gave no evidence of containing any grain an orchard, as it our plumsrIt
glucose, and showed I the' has a tendency to check the growthof is therefore no wonder that the advent stands than any other kind. In qual-
; only it is
faintest, acid reaction. The preventive trees, whereas any other kind of of these newcomers should be ity : superior to any.of our native

in this case is to gather the fruitas crop is really beneficial, because it hailed with joy by all lovers of luscious American varieties. :

fast as it matures. The cracking of keeps the ground mellow and shaded. plums. The, wonder is rather that our Quite a number of the many other

apples land pears: during growth is BUDDING PEARS OR OTHER FRUIT TREES enterprising nurserymen and plum varieties springing from this species
due 'the growers have apparently been content are designated by two general names,
generally fungus parasitei Budding is the process of placing a a fact which is ,
confusing to
with these very a
\ *(Pusicladium that two or three varietes, and
: ) the'
causes scab bud with little
( a adhering wood of
when
) he
'
stranger begins to them.
have instead in study i
\( they not search
these fruits. gone
upon It is indeed
the one tree onto'another, and thus These
pro names are Botankio and Hattan-.
advanced l of this of more and perhaps hardier plums of
stage disease. Thee during on, the one tree a growth and kio, or Bodankio and Hadankio for
the kind f
for it :
preventive is to'spray the ,trees early fruit of the variety of the other. Budding same ; might reasonably ;
they are variously.
the: be supposed that which pronounced as regards -
a country
in season and at intervals' thereafter
-
must be performed while the
could produce those have would be the sound '(of d and /. These ,
with we
: a solution composed, of one stock is in a state of vigorous growth, two names are common and ,
) likely to have others are even
and an eigth ounces of copper carbonate and while the bark will readily slip equally worthyof
occasionally heard in this ,
notice. Such at is the country;
rate
dissolved ,
in any
one of
quart from the wood. This occurs''from
aqua I usually fact. There varieties in but it is a mistake to suppose that,they
are
ammonia and diluted with many !
twenty-five June to September. A cut is
apply to two and only two varieties.
Japan, which are fully equal to the
of
gallons water. The
cracking of made lengthwise through the bark
They of
are
names two ill-defined
ripe tomatoes in wet weather is probably and another cut is made across the so-called Kelsey, Ogon and Botan, classes of .
and
plums
which are already known here. Let are applied j
due, as in the case of ripe of the first
apples, top cut resembling the him who rather loosely,to several varieties which
doubts
this
visit
the fruit
to the absorption of water through the letter "T." A bud is then cut from differ in color and size and somewhat i.
stands in the
skin. But Japanese portion of Yokohama -
tomatoes sometimes
crack the wood of the
present year's'growth also in
shape. The distinction
in dry weather and while still immature during June and July. He only
of the tree whose variety it is desiredto between the
will be two classes that I have. 4
the of
which gratified by sight
must be. ascribed to another i propagate. To obtain this bud takea a been able
greater collection of varieties than can to establish is based on the !
cause. sometimes this appears to result very sharp xnite and cut under the be found in horticultural exhibitin shape. The round, plums are desig-
from an unequal ripening of the bud, commencing a half inch above, any nated by the term Botankio while
this ,
fruit. In this country. Tokio is also well
circle
case a of cracks and running out about
forms about the threequartersof supplied with plums at this season, and those of an oval or pointed shape are
stem and the
portion ,an inch below, taking a small por- called Hattankio. A mistake often ::1
of the skin within this circle often re tion of wood along with the bark and so are other towns throughout( the made
mains country but the region ,about Yokohama by foreigners, and by some na
after ;
that of the
green remain- bud.
Generally this little of
portion tives also is
to that the dis '
and little suppose 1
a southward is -
der especially
has
assumed the color of
maturity. wood is slipped out the
leaving tinction
only noted for its is based on color, though it is
The growth of the'ripening part proceeding bark and bud; but this is not absolutely plums. a fact that most of the Botankios are .g

faster than that of the remainder necessary. To place this bud into the There is much uncertainty in regardto red. The name Hattankio is also ':

a rupture takes place betweenthe cut previously made, raise the edgesof the ,origin and parentage of these sometimes given to the almond while

two portions.The the bark of' the stick, and push the plums. They have been there for botan is the name of the and i
,
cracking of melons often seems i bud into the slit downward under the many centuries, and the varieties differso ha-botan means,cabbage pony and of ,...
due to a similar cause. The blossom bark, so it will a natural much from each other that it is difficult one ,
occupy position the meanings of kio is '
-
many or kiyo,
end of the fruit ripens faster than to trace their affinities. It is
the on the stock and if '
any portionof large or great. If 'these objects had I
stem end.and the expansion of this the new bark extends above the however, believed that Prunus trjflora, anything to do with the naming of the

part causes a bursting of the apex. cross' cut, it should be cut off even. Roxb.,* is the parent of'all the_Japa plums it seems probable that botan referred 1

This difficulty appears to be characteristic Now bandage or tie the bud on with I' nese varieties which have long stems, to the rounded shape and not )1

of certain varieties. In a large I a narrow strip of cloth or some thin and this includes all the ,best plums of to the color, since their peonies are
number of seedlings of crossed the country: The,species is recognizedin
parent- flexible bark or cotton twine. Thebandage I found in a great variety of colors; and II
age grown the past season; some of should be put on tight. After a small red plum called the, Sumo- that hattankio referred to the
resem*
; the fruits burst from the blossom end six or ten days examine the bud, and mo, which is very commonly; culti blance in shape to the almond. But ,

almost,. the,stem- ,- and- in some. cases if the bandage appears to be cuttingthe vated. It is one of,the.earliest plums as already remarked these names are '1

the parts curved backward as 11 the bud loosen it or cut it entirely oft.If '. used very loosely, as it is an easy mat
fruit were being turned inside out. this is all carefully done and the *Prunut trljlara Is a very doubtful species ter to find several evidently quite distinct -
The tendency to of It is known in collections only from one to
cracking the fruit new bud is from a similar tree to the varieties of each class for which
two specimens from India. If
Roxburgh
is apparently due in some cases to a stock on which it is the
placed both
ma meant to designate the cultivated Japanese grower and dealer can give you
pathologic condition of the plant. In jority of buds will grow and bear fruit plums by this name, It ii strange that he no other name than Botankio or Hat

an experiment in breeding the tomato, like the tree from which the bud was should not have left more explicit Information tankio, as the case may be. Sometimes:7
a strain of the Cook's Favorite' variety taken. After the bud has grown to concerning It. Prof TamarJ of Tokio, has again these terms have'a prefix
may
grown several generations from unripe the stock, cut the stock off about half called(Annals the Hort Japanese,Is89,30)) plum Maxmowlcz Prunu Hattan chief : indicative of the color, or size or of

seed formed the past season, seventy an inch above the bud, and keep all authority upon Japanese plants, seems Inclined the place where it is grown. I dwell
:four per cent, of cracked fruits, while other' sprouts rubbed off, so that the to refer these plums'to Prunu domes- upon this in order to correct the no-

the same variety grown in the meantime new bud will receive all the sap of the ttca, the ommon plum,but there can'be no tion, which has become somewhat,

from perfectly ripened seed stock or tree. After the new limb or doubt but that they are distinct species. Until fixed in this country, that these terms
formed only cent. of cracked bud has the difficulties are cleared up,hun," Hattan '
25.3 per grown twelve to eighteen each of
designate a single variety the
appears to be the best nan e to nle.ED..AmG.
fruits. Both strains
were grown under inches pinch off the tip end, to check Japanese plums. Am. Garden.
equal conditions except in the selec- the growth and enable it to become

tion of the seed. In nearly all cases stouter, so it can resist the wind and

certain varieties are more subject to I not be torn out As a general thing, THE DINGEE & CONARD CB5S 1 1one
cracking than others. A difference in budding is preferable to grafting, except -
EED
the Yes our Seeds are THE BEST them "* that'S ail S
elasticity or permeability of the for $
propagating on a large scale
'
t can be better,and it you plant them once,you will
epidermis, a difference in the absorp-I It is not best for small fruit growers, want them again, OUR SEEDS ,1,
tive power of the flesh' for water, 'or I for whom this article is written, to do no fear of that. __ ROSES, 1

of the liability to fungus'' attack, or of j :i much grafting, because it is not as especially Rosest Bulbs,Hardy Plants,etc..are known erery where and sent everywhere / ://'/. :;
the to if you don't know a better place,send your orders to us,but first writ for our NEW GUIDC -a rsluk "
tendency, ripen unequally: ':. ,'", causes," convenient as budding. As, this" is.:' Book"f pp.FREE, 0d.e.ko""much a little morel WW do. ThE DIIIGEE&C6ff Ail 1:8.: WEST 1M[;Ph,


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_"'-"- _. -. -.-. ___\__'>O'b THIS, FLORIDA DISPATCH, FAKltfftft AND FBUTT-GEOWEk .. ...C1 1UBcx 191891. :"f)
]
rTobacco'in -,---- -
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.;,"'" ,. <'4 .( '" "
tIEl! beds.. In transplanting I use a peg Culture of English Peas. For several years I, with others, <
MEl'I':
J'f." \. about eight inches long tapered to a Editor farmer and Fruit Grower: have been experimenting, trying to
Ala.chua'County''No.- -:- 1.- point. Having the plants droppedone Your letter asking for an article on manufacture flower pomades from

to each hill and on the side of the the cultivation of English peas was odorous flowers, which led to a wide
Batter Farmer and Frult-Grower.
{Having had some experience in hill, T take an extra plant to begin duly received. I was too busy to correspondence and wide reading on
tobacco culture, both in Kentucky ,with; hold the plant with my left hand reply at once, and the matter has these varied substances so used. With

asd: )Florida'(in the former for plug and strike the roots down with first been overlooked. I regret its delay, Colgate & Co., New York, I have

in the,latter for cigar purposes), I.,will finger and thumb of the right hand. and ask you to pardon my tardy re- been in communication, with encour-
This makes the roots straight and aging words often spoken. About
eadeavor> to;give'the many readers of ply.For
,yeW valuable paper a little of the takes off any surplus dirt that may be this latitude I commence work three years ago an article upon am-
some hoping it be of some 'ad- on the roots. Then make a hole with for peas about the first of December.I brette was sent me, written by a Mr.
'r itage', ,to those may who contemplate the right 'hand, putting the plant inwith always clean my land thoroughly of Ungerer (who I think is in the employof
P.owiSI'the weed in this State. Last the'left and pressing the dirt to all grass and weeds, then break it up Colgate &Co.), which was of much .
I made three sowings of and 'a little downward with the first broadcast. I let it stand about ten interest to, myself and others, recom-
'year seeds/, respectively 1890, : January 2d, January finger and thumb of the left hand and days, and then open the furrows three mending the trial of this plant in various I

15th and February 6th. The also with the point of the peg in the, feet apart. I use eight or ten wagon l localities in the Southern States.
March, freeze destroyed, all my first right hand, taking pains not to let the loads of well rotted stable manure and The article claimed that, in the opinion
the The six hundred of the the writer at the time of its writing
sowing 'which left me a'scant supplyof peg touch plant. depth of pounds guano to of ,
,
plants however, I planted two the hole should be according'to the acre, putting it only in the furrows.I the profit made would be as large as I
acres or ;about 10,000 plants. As'it length of the stem. Every plant cover this with two furrows and let on tobacco and sugar, if the climate

war rather.late and, the ground dry should be set so the bud will'barely be it! stand fully ten days before plant- proved hot enough to evolve the i

and, hot, I failed to get a stand, so above the top of the ground. When ing.I. strong musk odor which the seec,3\;
that I don't consider I had more than the first plant is* set take up the use two bushels of seed to the must have to be of any value. All ,
one,and one-half acres. From this Iharvested plant dropped on the'side of the 'hill acre, and find alter long experience. know the large profit on these; and I /1
600 pounds which I sold at and carry to the next hill, at the same that Landreth's Extra Early is the at once became fired with an ambition 1 f
: pound. time running the finger and thumb best. They are the earliest, the to obtain seed and put to test these very

29.:, .'cen.per'. SEED BEDS.ThIs down the 'roots as before, etc. heaviest bearers :and the most relia desirable plants, building "castles in
the air" as to my immense profits, etc. .
'; year, 1891, I also made three CULTIVATION. ble.I :
sowings of seeds: January 12th, 20th After about ten days or when the use a broad shovel-plow to open I began a search for a source o. sup "
and February i6th.. The first sowing plant is well established, I begin to the beds for planting, and, I make ply and found in New York a druggist '1
cultivate cultivator or harrow this furrow as wide as possible, so as who sent me one pound of seed. These ;.:. .
nearly: ready to begin to draw from. using a .
broad flat surface for the tested but with satisfaction
have
the soil but not to a were not ,
thoroughly
I( If weeds show in peas. When the seed is put in it inasmuch as they were planted too ,
details of making seed beds, as I consider deep. any grass or
ought to cover a width of six inchesat late (June 1889)) and frost caught the
,it too late to'sow seeds., the, row, I use ,a hoe. As the plant F
: KINDS OF SOIL. grows and will admit, I gradually work. least.. When growing they support immature seed. In, 1890 I distributed ,.'
',My land is old, a light sand with the dirt ''toward it, care being taken. each other better and are not so easily seed, then three seasons old, to over
'' the of the lower laid down by high winds, nor burnt sixty parties, who have reported so
clay at. 'a ,depth of six or eight feet, not to cover points
which 'will: produce about fifteen leaves.If by hot suns, as when they are in a favorably that I am encouraged to ....
bushels of corn acre without fertil I get an.even stand I quit cultivating narrow drilL In covering them I try hope that a gain has been added to the
' izers. I think per almost any part of when the bloom-buds appear. to have a broad, flat bed also, using a wonderful scope of the South in her 1'

Florida will produce a good article of If I fail to get a stand from the first small plow to cover with; and I do various fields.

E tobacco. I would avoid planting on planting, I reset as soon as possible.The not disturb or move the seed in cov Now for test ;and experts' opinion, '

1tiCk land, or land that contains more even the rows are the easier ing.I. one instance alone out of many. To "
ranch lime, or on land that is very the cultivation is. always make two plantings, the a party in Florida I sent, on the 20th .',
I! thirsty or that is not well,drained. If after a plant has started to grow first during the third week in December of May, 1890, a few seed, from which
, :, PREPARATION OF SOIL. the bud gets broken or eaten off, I or just before Christmas, and eighteen plants were secured. These
'v I .plow about as I would for corn; leave the top sucker, breaking off all the second the first week in January. plants, standing five feet apart, grewto
, if-possible a month previous to planting others. I prefer this to a newly set They require but little cultivation, two be from five to seven feet high,
, ,then'the land will become more plant. I find it very necessary to look workings being sufficient. When branched from the ground, covered
i' or less compact and retain the moisture closely after the cut worms when the about three, inches high I hoe them with blooms-these alone making it a-

'., better than freshly plowed land. I plants are young. Later on comes the just to pulverize the soil and keep plant worthy a place in every garden, 1
r; then use a drag to smooth and firm green horn-worm and, last, but the down weeds, and give one good plow- besides the leaves being very beautifuland
destructive of all the bud ing before they bloom, but never work in The .
. the soil If the grass or weeds begin most worm, tropical appearance. party
which is when first them unless the weather is warm and Oct. 18th the first three .
! to ; show: before I am ready to plant I hardly perceptible gathered, ,
l t use a: 'cultivator or light harrow to hatched. I frequently use a small spring-like. If they are worked duringa ripe seed pods! the quantity increasing :,
: stir the top lightly. Then I use a splinter or weed to get them out, as cold spell the ground would be open thereafter until one peck at one gath-
I five-inch shovel plow to open the furrows the fingers will injure the bud. Last and loose and let the cold air in; it ering was secured. On "Dec. 12th the

'which are about four feet apart. season I was troubled more or less would reach the roots and injure them plants were destroyed; the ground they f
:: Then put in the fertilizer in hills. :from with the chinch bug; they do not make very much or kill them entirely. occupied being planted to another
eighteen to twenty-two inches apart; holes in the leaf, but suck or sting it.. They will stand a heavy frost or a crop. 'The total product from Oct.
then take a hoe and draw over this so that it wilts at once and never re- light freeze before they bloom, but 18th to Dec. 12th being one bushelof
not after., unshelled pods-I, think about six
enough dirt so that when the hill hasbad
a good pat with the back, of the covers.FERTILIZERS FOR TOBACCO.I They will be ready for market in pounds cleaned from husk-not quitetwo

hoe it will be nearly or 'quite level am not fully prepared to say what two months from the time they are months. Had these seed been
with the surface., Pains should be kind of fertilizer is best for tobacco. planted. I find by my own experience planted as soon as danger from frost
that they will make bushelsof was over the bearing season could
ta1 en'Dotto'draw/any grass or sticksin Last year I used a compost of muck 300
the, hill. I consider the pat with and stable manure with a little commercial peas to the acre with a favorable have been prolonged fully three ,
iRe back: of the hoe very essential, as to give the plants a start. I' season ; and you can put the price months, thus doubling the product.
the: land then retains moisture much have used cottonseed meal with good from $1 to$5 per bushel and see howit Also, had the plants been allowed to
better. results, also with bad results, as it pays! I have not failed in several remain, I am confident! a second,crop
to $5 bushel for first would have been collected, as a ladyin
\ ''SETTING PLANTS. caked and got worms in it and killed years get per my
The land being prepared, I wait a nearly every plant. I think where shipments. J. L. TURNER. Southern Texas, who planted in
reasonable length of 'time bra rain. meal is used it should be well mixed Bradford Co Fla.Ambrette 1888, wrote me her plants had lived

Should it not come in,time,I resort to with the soil. out in open ground in the winter and

making'a'season'with ,water, but only This season I expect to use crushed or Musk Plant. had started into vigorous growth"again:

as. a last, ,resort. Immediately ,after: cottonseed with a very little commercial .I Editor Farmer Frult-Orower.., in spring. How long they would Jive
a': ,ram- I proceed to draw the plants ; say 400 to 500 pounds crushed This is botanically known as Hibiscus I know not, but, I think only two sea-

frog:UK;seed beds, taking hold of the seed and 100 pounds of the commer abelmoschust or in Arabic, Kabb el sons could be reasonably expected.I .
St..ie the, 'ground and pulling it misk. Septimus Piesse, the noted authority submitted these seed to Colgate &

-,'usipg good judgment as whether cial.Now, Mr. Editor, for fear of intruding upon perfumery, an analytical Go., of New York, who replied: "We
f' chemist of London, England, says: find the seed very good and nearly as
tbe >kiU is )large? enough to .be trans- too much upon your valuable "
,' :F&BtedpOr note; Plants that have hadpfeaty space, I will close for this time; 'and "Ambrette is known to the perfumery strong in odor as the imported. What
'' trade as Grains f ambrette and used more need we ask to" make us bold
of room In seed bed have a if agreeable, will write again as the
ti shorter and stem W. MOSELEY. by them as an adulterant and imitation enough to add this to our other diversified -.
DaHch more<< .stocky ,crop progresses. .E.' '
real musk. industries? The'plant I most have
than plants that are crowded "in seed Fairbanks,Fla.,March 16,1891. for .

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MABCH 19,18911 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, FARMER AND FRUIT-GROWElfc.. 227
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rich soil and good cultivation, giving ingredient* and its abundance at the Profitable Cotton Culture. ; cotton is always best in quality and

wide space between the plants,to pre- very doors of many of the farms and My farm is situated in Troup county,. t commands" the best,prices, both,in domestic -

vent overcrowding or weak growth. groves. Investigations show that Western ,Georgia, in a beautiful region I and' foreign markets.f
This is .allied to cotton and; okra of plant food consists of twelve ingredi pf level country, with spring as cl earl raised this method of cultivatida' !. ,. I f

our States. Cotton, according to ents-potash, lime, phosphoric acid, as crystal and running brooks of spar- i last season 104 bales of cotton

Chambers' Encyclopaedia, "is the pro- nitrogen, soda, magnesia, water, car- kling water. There is not a monthin on eighty acres of land, each bale of

duce of the genus Gissypium, which bon, sulphuric acid, ferric oxide, the year that outdoor work would- f 470 pounds. Fully one-half ,of, this
belongs to the natural order Malvac& silica, and chlorine; phosphoricacid prove'uncomfortable. The land is a., will be clear profit. But to meet with

( and is allied to mallow, hollyhock, an indispensable. All soils con- gray, sandY' soil with mulatto clay t such success constant care is necessary
hibiscus;" hence in any locality in tain these in greater or less quantities. almost as level as a floor and well, f and only the best seed must be

which these flourish may'we not hopeto The chloride, soda, and silica'are adapted to rapid cultivation.I : used, gathered from the ,1 best: stalks

see this also? The prices vary according not deemed necessities.Now break about one-half of my land : and the best bolls, and then picked

to demand and supply. let ,the farmer consider: for a with a two-horse: plow, alternating; over by hand. I made over. $8,000

VVE. J. S. R. THOMSON. moment that every crop robs the soil each year, plowing very deep. The ': clear last year on my farm, and have
Spartanbarg 8. C. of these elements in a greater or less other half I bed with squarepointedscooters. : good reason to know that intensive
If ,any party in Florida is desirousof amount; and while nature has been The rows are laid off four ;[ farming pays here in the South fully
trying this plant I will be glad to generous in supplying soils with these feet wide, running a scooter in front !! as well as it does i in the North. My
direct them to a source of seed supply.I in direr have also, ,to the
elements of plant food, constant and a Johnson wing opposite :: neighbors come ,same
want 10 exhibit it at the Worlds Fair cropping will almost entirely take tion in the same furrow. In that fur. J conclusion and are raising; splendid

1893.' from the soil certain ones, potash, row I place cotton seed for fertilizeras .f crops of corn, oats, potatoes and'other
after Christmas things besides cotton. It wile not'belong
phosphoric acid, lime and nitrogen. early as possible, :
More of the Oowpea. the about the- before the whole South become
When this system is followed, scanty forty bushels to acre; f will
Editor Farmer and Fruit-Grower. of March I alive to the best methods of the
loth on
crops and disease, such as frenching, or 15th put top I
I have worried you with two articleson hundred of times and the most' valuable
rust, rot, or, if fruits, yellows, mal of this seed four pounds i produce
this subject, and now propose to di goma, insects in the multitudinousforms acid phosphate per acre. The heavy } crops in great abundance. The,proverbial -
give you a third with a little change in worthless etc. rains wash the sand into the furrows I worn-out lands of -
\ products are
,
,my programme. In my former articlesI the result. and mix it thoroughly with the seed gions will be intelligently cultivated,

mostly confined,myself to the mak- To keep up the fertility these essen- which is very beneficial. Then bed I and the people will, no longer have*to
ing of the cowpea an article of commerce tials must be returned to the soil. ,.flat with square-pointed scooters sell their crops in advance of the.llr-

it and shipping it North and West. Leaves straw top-soil mud muck When the cotton seed cannot be had;. vest in order to meet current expenses.
,
,
,
J do not forget that all the cattle, good etc., may be applied. They are I use instead five hundred pounds of! All they now need is to take new heart
and bad, are not in the West and before and work with a will set aside old-
good as far as they go. But how far guano, per acre just. planting. j ; ,
N crtb.Ve have some fine stock in subsoil is the fertilizerin time notions and conduct their farming
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is this? Science and practice say, A plow run over I
the South, but our people, as a rule, only an inch. order to mix it thoroughly with the i operations as the ,time :and, :soil

do not feed them properly so as to I The 'agriculturists of the older sections soil. On my bottom land I put one I naturally demand. Doing this they

enhance their value as milkers. They i of the world became alarmed thousand pounds of fertilizer per acre t 1 cannot fail to have a success that they
feed them with vegetables and rice when their virgin soils began to yield in the drill and two list furrows and never had at any time in the'past.t .*-;

flour and fodder. This is all wrong, small followed by disease. mix it well with the soil. With the i I G. W. TRUITT, in Am. Agriculturist.
crops
and for their benefit I write this third '
Practice and the aid of science demonstrated planting of the seed I use two hundredand I 'I.i .
article, and it is founded, as be- additional. From i Teaching the Calves to Drink.
that the difficulty could be fifty pounds
fore, on my own experience, and thatis remedied by the application of fertilizers the,, 15th of May to the 20th of JuneI i 1 The successful calf feeder will always
good ,enough for anybody. r, than force in teaching
containing these: exhausted broadcast seven hundred and fifty use more tact -
The way I fed my cow was this : elements, and what is the result pounds per acre ahead ot the plows. 'i a calf to drink. 'He will never

The pot was kept on the stove all the to-day? Not to go back to the old On our bottom land I use a mold- II allow a foolish calf to betray him into

time cooking cowpeas, which were fed world, let us refer to our own beautiful board, making the beds a little higher ,r a passion or display of brute force.
liberally to the cow with bran; after- America and note such yields as than on upland. Before planting I' Do not allow the calf to suck;the

wards she was served with the best 250 bushels corn per acre, 500 run a Thomas harrow across the bed, whole hand or a single finger; but
country hay or pea vines made into bushels Irish potatoes, iioolbs. lint ahead of the planter, which destroysthe placing the palm of either hand over

hay, which I used in preference to the cotton, and other crops as well as early grass and makes the land I his nose, gently bring it to (the milk
Northern hay, which was more palatable fruits in great abundance. fresh and level. With a Eureka planter held in a convenient sized pail,in the
and contained more nutriment.- I put in two bushels of seed per other hand. By separating the fin-
Florida do likewise.
This is a hint which 'I think our the old channel must follow the Quit acre to insure a good stand, using one gers, hold back the sides of the tongue
new by
of fertilizer with seed and insure the entrance of milk as,the
owners of cow stock might profit by.. resorting to the intensive system. We hundred pounds i i '
-There is no use for them to go out of have soils and on upland. As soon as cotton on up- calf sucks. If the milk is warm there
as productive capableas
break the crust in will be less trouble; then give the calf
their way for and spend their money of the world. To accomplishthis land begins to com-
for Northern hay when they can mature any proper methods must be followed.In ing up I start my harrows, running more, or less, of the two fingers; according -
it at home and feed their cows ,at another lettef' I will make some them obliquely across the first time,' to success in keeping it i interested
in the milk. When the calf is
the har-
much less expense. and afterward directly across
relative .
People boast of their cows and the suggestions to. phosphate.A. S. COLLINS. row rows. Then follow with an eight- doing well the fingers will scarcely be

amount of milk they can give, without een-inch scraper and short scooter touching its tonge or lips. If it. acts
considering a much greater question, Orange Spring, Fla I 4 running shallow. Then start the hoes, badly give the fingers to suck and contrive l

and that is how to increase their milking -- More About Soft ,Phosphates.Editor every hand carrying a three-foot stickto to let in a dash of milk, so 'a'sup

capacity. If, for instance,, a cow Farmer and Fruit-Orower: measure the distance between hillson now and then ,will encourage the calf.
,at all upland. I plow this once every to continue. : "I
ordinarily gives a gallon a milking My experience has been very lim-
with the common feed they receive, ited. :Last year, having a few loads twelve days, -using after the first timea I have been obliged to dip my hand
how much will that if twenty-four-inch flat, repeatedly into the milk and thus give
more cow give which I had taken, from a well I haveon scraper very
it is provided with the feed I have my place, I scattered it broadcastover plowing up to the first of August. On a taste of it before the calf would"aIlow

mentioned above. The cowpea is rich, a portion of tomato ground as the bottom land the rows are made its nose to be turned down into
my
b ,is full of substance, and[the milk fromit an experiment, spreading muck on five feet apart, and the stand brought the pail. Some calyes will d nkdur-:
is yellow, will yield the. richest another portion of the same ground.The down to four feet between hills by ing the first. to the third trial, while

cream and produce more genuine but- tomatoes where the phosphatewas taking a, twenty-four-inch scraper and others will need the fingers for a much

Je than-any other species of feed. 'In used were better and continued running two furrows across the rows, longer time.-F.: E. Emery, Agritul- "

fact, as long asmy cow was milking, longer in bearing; and now this spring leaving a belt of three inches to form urisf, N. C. ExpenmenSalz"on.......,
previous 'to calving, I never spent a there, is a marked difference in the ap' the stand. This enables to plow both f. .

copper for butter for use home. pearance of the growth, the weeds on ways, leaving but little work for the CATARRH CURED.A .
AMATEUR. the phosphate side being decidedly hoes. This is better than dropping in clergyman after yean of suffering, ) fromhat
loathsome dltease Catarrh and vainly
l larger and thicker than where the the check and insures a better,stand tryIng every known remedy,at I feat foe nd a
From the 20th of March to the roth prescription which completely cared and
Elements of Plant Food. muck,was spread. I think the benefit saved him from death. Any sufferer from Ibis
Editor Farmer and Frnlt-Orowen will be more apparent this year than of April is the best time to plant 'cot- dreadful I disease sending a self.addrwed
'. tamped to Prof.J. A. Lawrrnw 8tf!
':' Jn my article of a late date in your ton. In selecting seed I take'nothingbut Warren Street envelope New York, will receive the
very progressive journal referencewas last.I, with others, am anxious to learn the best. I have cotton planted recipe free of cnal'8. '

made to the advantages that must the best modes of using phosphate, oh the Gulf of Mexico every other

. accrue to the agricultural and horticultural i- and will gladly exchange experience.B. year and mix the seed with the seed ANSY PILLS!
interest 'of Florida from the F. MILLER. from my crop. This has the effect of -lwi

.Discovery. ,", eC,phosphate, as a manurial Albion,Fla.: making;. the cotton earlier, and early
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:.11I -- THE FLORIDA DISPATCH :FARMER AND FRUIT-GROWER. MAC
.; ... N ..-- [ 19,1891
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advertising; 'less the, agent's usual The Farce of Florida Roads. height. The cold is always dry air

commission' ,' to foot the lawers' fees The Manatee Advocate states that in the lowest stratum, cooled by rad-

I 5 'RM""EMATCRfR. rasnE> I Jc..t..I. "-- and .toward the clear sky aboveit
eoftttuoATt*"MNUAKK.a** live, active and energetic' libel l suit." warrants for January and February until it accumulates in deep layers

MARCH. 10,189L.. aggregating $1,187.01 ; and of this in the long Winter nights of the Arc-

Horticultural Superintendent atthe amount $683.70 was for roads and ticregions' and then flows toward any

r:; .AJ"*.STEPHEN .POWERS, ,,r Editor. World's, Fair. bridges-a grossly disproportionateshare. region from which warm air is ascend-
if; P.O. Address, Lawtey, Fla. Last week we took the liberty to .
It adds : ing.Cold
:,{ : wire General George R Davis, Direc- waves are associated very
Publications Received. The truth In regard to our public roads Is,
.. :' '''Tffest American Scientist, ..January, 1801,.. tor-General, asking him ,in behalf 'of that they require less work and less expensein closely with extensive areas of lowbarom'eter
of
:''&M Diego California the 'Florida fruit growers to make an working than roads In any other State In (regions warm ascendingair
1 The Bdaefttlonal Value of Political Econ- the Union, for we have no hills, no cuts no ) ;j. they usually occur to the west
0&y.American Economic Association, Bal- impartial selection. He replied as gradIng Inexpensive bridges, and we have and northwest of a low area, and follow -
',tlBOH. follows, under date of March 13: plenty of cheap material. Where then does.I after it ; the storm center moves in
aanU er'. Seed this money go? From our county's showingIt
Catalogue; Superb French
Editor Farmer aid Trait-Grower an easterly or southeasterly direction
ad American Hybrid Gladioli; Philadelphia, seems that two set of officers go over the ;
!
21 North lith Street. I have the honor to acknowledge road,first as,superintendents of roads,drawIng these; however, are not the severest

Sebedate> of prizes offered.by the :Massachusetts -- the 'receipt of your telegram of the pay and mileage, and second, as inspectors kind of cold waves, their effects last-
of roads for hick they draw additionalpay but short time.
Horticultural Society for the year 1891.Frfcas : ing a The severer
aggregating#,1,800. Open ,to all., nth inst., expressing a hope that and mileage. It is of course very con- and prolonged cold waves are associated -
4 Catalogue of Rare Florida Flowers and neither a Californian nor a Floridian venient to have two offices for the same with extensive areas' of
work, and draw for both,and ,find very
Fri14e. Jetcamlna Gardens Jessamine Fla. pay we no
.," .. ,. .,' would be appointed to the position of high barometric which make
J 1 : fault with the officials for this, for it is in accordance I pressure
., Chief of the Department of Horticulture with State law; but we do think their first appearance in the regions
: A recent press dispatch says:, "The that our legislators in the last term made north from Lake Winnepeg in Mani

....Cherokee) brought here yesterday, ; and would say that it will be some ;very poor laws, and the legislators toba. Toward the west and of enor- *,
filed with the of who meet in April should revise or erase
bales of for interior 'papers numerous mous extent they spread southeast and4east.
3,500 hay,,. mostly some of them,especially the road: laws.
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points." There evidences accumu- candidates, for this position and given -- The_ farther _east these high

'lating that Florida is gradually workout due consideration when the appointment ,- South' Florida Ohauta qua.. areas are, the more important is the
: is made. Yours Editor Fanner and Fruit Grower part they exercise in the transmission M
)log of this false position of dependence very truly, Permit me to call the attention of of cold waves. The advance of sucha

by going into the hay business GEORGE R. DAVIS, the readers of your excellent paper to cold wave usually does not exceed

> herself. An intelligent farmer of DirectorGeneratUIn the lectures to be delivered at the 300 miles in the twenty four hours.

Alachua county informs us that the behalf of hundreds of Florida South Florida Chautauqua, at Mt. When, however, the cold wave ofa

different stable of horticulturists beg to suggest for Dora, Lake county, by Prof. Robinson high barometer comes in close pro-
livery keepers this position the name of Mr. Pros- and Rev. J. P. DePass. It pinquity with an extensive area of low
Gaiacsville, the past winter, bought: is hoped that all the lectures duringthe barometer, the progress of its cold

about, five hundred tons of .homegrown per'J. Berckmans, of Augusta, Ga. entire two weeks, from March 17 wave is much more rapid, averaging

? hay, chiefly crab grass. We do this wholly without his knowledge to 30, will be ,both entertaining and 800 miles in twenty-four hours, and

and without any intimation as instructive. In fact, the managers the territory over which there will be

To rid tobacco plants of the socalled to whether or not he would accept if hope to make the Chautauqua sessionone twenty degrees fall of temperature will
; of the principal events of the year be over half a million square'' miles.
appointed. As President of the
bud and cut worms, while thejpk&ts in Florida, and especially in the Pen The great advantage of knowing from

:are ;lei',the bed, steep the coma American Pomological Society' with insula. twelve to thirty-six hours in advance

?! elder: leaves in boiling water. mind enriched by a lifetime of experience But at present I desire to speak of that the temperature will fall quickly

After'tke 'water is cold,, take a' very I ,and wide observation ; acute the. lectures of "Farmers' Alliance and ;decidedly applies to multiplied

fine sprinkling and sprinkle the and yet liberal and impartial ; a courteous Day," March 25th. Mr. DePass will business and agricultural interests,
pot, speak of "the aims of the Alliance"and besides affecting the comfort and
plants well this can be repeated.'after gentleman of-the Old European
; Prof. Robinson of "Phosphates. health of thousands of people. Such

,the plants are transplanted,,and.,grow- type ; living on a generous income at Both gentlemen-one the Director of forecasts of cold waves are now made

in the field. It will certainly kill' all a generous ease ; this distinguished the State Experimental Farm and the by the Signal Service Bureau with in-

horticulcurist would in other State Chemist-have the confi- creasing and highly satis-
flies; bugs, worms,. etc. The above our opinion, accuracy
be able the dence of the people everywhere, and factory results, and are much valued '
is furnished by Mr. W. A. Scott.Quincyfferald. .-- to discharge functions of
whet: they may have to say will be by the general public.-Iowa Bulletin.
this high office to all.
acceptably
\
', worth hearing. Prof. Robinson will I _

An equally effective ,application' -- speak with authority upon the important I Remember the Trade issue' of
Soft Phosphates.In .
ami perhaps within easier're fh tomost'people subject of phosphates and will
the Farmer and Fruit-
"Dispatch
the very valuable and interesting probably be willing tjb| be questionedby ,
would\ be a strong infusion article, "Soft Phosphates in Marion the audience concerning points in- Grower" on May 15th."t
of tobacco.
volved. He
County," in the issue of March 5, may even possibly be
induced to present something informally Markets for Florida Producer;:, !
,:, Anent certain personalities recentlyindulged there, occurred an error* (not ,of the on some other subject of interestto .;-it:

r i in by some of the metropolitan printers, but in the manuscript fur- Florida farmers and horticulturists ; FLORIDA FRUIT EXCHANGE REPORT.

brethren, the Green Cove Spring, nished us) which leads us to reproduce and Mr. DePass is full of knowledgeand JACKSONVILLE, March 16,189!.

;judiciously pours this, flagon ,of oil on the entire analysis herewith : Insoluble willing to impart it. "We hope Four sales since report of 12th give total
: that March 25 will be a "Field Day"for average of 12.69 per box. This show an increase
the"waters: "A little explanation, a bit silicate and sand, 18.76 ;, carbonateof the farmers. of 26 cents per box 'over last. report.

of 'bearance' and a speck of forbear. lime, 4.56; phosphoric acid, 27.63 R. T. HALL, Lateat advices promise continued advances

ance, flavored with the golden rule, <[equivalent to bone phosphate.of lime, Pres. South Florida Chautauqua. and the outlook Is encouraging. .
be follows
Oranges can 'quoted today as :
would,.be a better and worthier method:! 60.73)); oxide of iron, .74 ; aluminum, Fancy,176 to 200)( counts,8.75f&L50; choice, 176
sdda Gold Waves. to 200 counts,|3.2550( ; choice russet, 176 to
of.getting'the differences between the 2.071 magnesia, etc., 6.59 ;
During the Winter time severe cold 200 counts, 3.003.25( ; same grades, .126 to 150
editors of the Record and the Times- moisture, 6.55. waves are experienced in America, counts,f2.60g2.75; ordinary grades, 176 to'ttO

Union settled. We give this week another letter Europe and Asia. In North America counts$2 Z-J2JO: ) ;ordinary grades.large ,
'L' &2.00; grape frult.I2, @j.OO; Mandarins,
i "Editorial:cash is a scarce commodity testifying. to the high value of 'this variety I they usually start east of the Rocky I>Fl.00i3.00; Tangerines, f8.003500. Demaad

,; at best-measuring, the brethren's of phosphate, and have the promise fountains and flow southeast over the for two last named grades not very active.
I United States. Similar cold waves Receipts at New York.for week ending Saturday -
: .wads by our own ,purse strings; ;and of others. The evidences are multiplying spread from Siberia and Russia. south March 14th 42,600; Philadelphia,W,0eOj

there is no good 'reason why( an rapidly. From, all we, can west over Europe, and from Thibet Boston,12,739. ',,,": *.

editor's.rfoney should be bodacious y learn, ,soft phosphate is destined to do southeast over China and Japan, as

dumped into the till of the legal fraternity more than any other one thing. to relieve also from the Andes eastward over HOME MARKET REPORT. ", a ,"

r just to prove that 'an editor Florida of the enormous annual the plains of South America. Such JACKSONVILU'XaHI118,MM.-
cold waves are the result of an ad. Upwards of a thousand boxes ol oran .
said "$ft'di heat of discussion ,mole tribute. which she 'pays out' of her poverty justment of the Temperature in the were sold at auction yesterday by the.Offtake

tlien the kw] allows.:- It :would take the fertilizer makers of and Vegetable Auction Corapaay of tMs city.
to great
different strata of the air from the surface -
,* ., . '
x.K t aa. oJ.. The bidding was active,and MM demand<< fer
I lots of space .at the current rates of the North., .\ of the ground up to a great good and even fair fruit was tresg, prices

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MAHCH 19, 1891) THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, ,FARMER AND FRUIT-GROWER. .22$ -


t.
'
bowing a decided advance brer recent advise shippers to let it come along as fast as toes, 15c per quart;egg plants,6c to 150 each; days. On another place near by he
alec. 'well headed, celery, 100 per bunch,or roc per dozen; rad-
This rOJATOEs.-The receipts light and with a lahe., 5c per bunch; garlic, 20c per pound; also has eight acres, making seventeenacres
company is sanguine aa to the out- strong active demand prices are firm on all cauliflower,lOc to2c.FERTILIZER. thus far. The twenty acres to .
look, and believe that this season, as,baa choice well grown tomatoes showing color, at
been the ease in all previous seasons, will from *1.50@5.50 per crate. Green and inferior MATERIAL. be planted by the two gentlemen will
stock moving slow at from *3@4. Corrected Llttl Bros. Company.
by Phosphate
under
make of
close with thirty-seven
a of values acres
period high Many Ship all fruit and vegetables via A.C. D. grapes
Value $43
Planters' True special :
who have been holding their fruit have Orange
been disappointed, because this condition all raiL Orange: Planters' True Value No. 1, $10; Or- the care of Mr. Ink and owned

has been to long delayed. They. overlook the ange Planters' True Value No. 2, $40; Young by him. This will give him some-
fact that the season.has been a month later Tree and Nursery fertilizers,$36; Orange Tree
than usual throughout,and that we are REPORT BY P. M. KIELY A CO. Florida Phosphate manure $30; Vegetable thing to do to while away his time.

now no further along with the crop than ST. Louis, March 16th, 1891. Tree fertilizer fertilizer, 142; Potato Strawberry fertilizer fertUrzer11$42 PeAch But he is equal to ,it, for while in deli-
we ordinarily are the last of February. $41: ;
The Orange and Vegetable. Auction com- Florida oranges are scarcer and a trifle Cotton fertilizer, $26: Corn fertilizer,$27; Cal- cate health, he has unlimited ene'rgyand
pany ;advises its patrons to send in, their higher,$2.5'' @&75 for sound fruit, according to. cutta Bone meal, $35; Western Bone meal,-
fruit Buyers are here from all the leading size,quality, etc. There Is a liberal amount $35: Florida Acid phosphate,$13: Sulphate ofPotash. is accomplishing vastly; ,more than
and many minor markets-competing California oranges in the market at lower .48 to 50 per cent., $35 Sulphate of Potash others who are in robust health
for'the fruit They. would easily''' ,take' at prices. The very cold weather prevailing has .90 to 95 percent $55; Katnlt, $17; Land many
top ten thousand boxes at each sale kept the price of strawberries very low for Plaster $9 to $10;Cotton Seed Hull a heRS30i It would seem that the Niagara grape
To seep them here there must be plentyof this. season-mainly 20c. quart for the majority Canada Hardwood ashes Beaver, $20; Dried of Florida is center about
fruit. As the fruit in each' sale goes to of It. More favorable weather, which Blood $45; Nitrate of Soda, $50; Bright Cot- industry to
the markets that can pay most, for it, it must soon comet will improve the situation ton Seed Meal,$23 75 to$23. O. Orlando in spite ,of the efforts o(other
reaches the highest market in the country very much. Cabbage is doing much better, r. r '
every time $2.5025 per crate; cucumbers, 11.25 doz.; localities in that line. They ,have

Prices yesterday ran: Fancy, in good green pegs$3 per box; tomatoes-none from For the "Dispatch, Farmer and thus far surprised everybody.-Orange
Florida yet; Bermuda, boxes,$1.25. No string
counts, f&5)3) ; brights and russets (unless -
very dark), in medium to small sizes, beans yet. ;Fruit-Grower5' there are numer- Co. Reporter.
I29&50? mixed sizes averaging well, The strawberry: traffic has been far from
; .
<
$1.742; mixed sizes, running large, 'i.0u pleasant or satisfactory to the receivers so ous inquiries concerning its
LWo far this season. Selling has been slow and The "Dispatch Farmer and
tedious:work throughout and a majority of Business Review. ,
the receipts has been forced to Fruit-Grower" issues its first
NEW YORK MARKETS. kets and towns where they were more of a
novelty.. The prices to date have been the Trade Issue and Business Review
NEW YOBK. March 17,1891. lowest known to the trade at this season,not QUESTIONS AND REPLIES

Indian River oranges, fancy selections,per only here but in every market ea't ana west' f; ... May 15th-26,000 copies. Adrer-
box.t59@i;Indian ttlver, straight lota.' i; to which the fruit has been shipped. The reasonable questions,coming'from a iubsorl-
other sections, in 176 to 2UO, 13@325; bright, prime cause of the low prices and bad marketwas bert will'be answered as, promptly as possible, 'and tising rates on application.
15J, 82 &&2.75; bright,126, U.25@LOO; ruswjta, the. weather which remained cold without charge If addressed to the editor at Lawtey. .
steadily everywhere and the appetite for the Replies can not be given by maIL
t $2.2&@Ji,7a;Tangerines HK3tt) per box; grape
fruit,f2.tJ1 per box; strawberries, 80@35c per melons strawberry,the first fruit of the sea A Pruningof the Grape Absolutely
quart; beets,75c@l per crate; peas, $2 )i per son,never had a chance to ripen, and is still 70. HULL ASH. J. C. Parsons Cler- '
crate; beans,$2.50\ 3.50. OLIVIT BEOS. immature. mont, Fla. This is very difficult to get Necessary. '

NEW YORK, March 17.-The orange market hold of; it is bought up by fertilizer fac Perhaps no part of the work in, the
continues about the same. Indian River, NEW YORK MARKET NOTES. tories. George E. Wilson, of this city,
vineyard has so much to do with quality
fancy *8.t0,4.5r: choice brlghts, l O' to l6's
carload if write
and aw's, $2.7o<(s3.25; 112's and 133s, $202.25; NEW! YORK, March If, 1891. lately received a' ; you as pruning. Insufficient &1
96's,L50@U75; russet, small sizes,$50&3.75; FLORIDA ORANG Ea.-Recel pt for week,43,316 him promptly :you may be able to pur- pruning
grape fruit,|2. 0A( <5: strawberries fancy, 25 bxs;receipts since OcLI5, 613,967 bxs. Arrivals chase some of it. Cannot give you price means overproduction, and overpro
3&o; medium, 12.fl.i5c.. ; vegetables continue have been quite liberal and of very'irregular duction }
steady;choice string beans, $2.5u@3.:>; peed, quality. The demand has run somewhat yet. means poor quality. Butwhy
L50(9tt( ; cabbage, $2 2J30; fine and green eggplant lighter and- while positively fancy grades, 71. GUINEA PIGS. C. T.McCrory, prune at,all? Let us illustrate. If on
,$8@10;tomatoes $J@4; asparagus, i$5( ; being In moderate supply, have been pretty Titusville Fla. No Guinea pigs can be
lettuce, Charleston, tiavannah and Florida, firmly maintained in,price the common and a given highway you have a team
$ 94; cucumber are wanted and will sell at medium qualities' are barely steady. Gilt- found in Jack nviIIe. Write to Joseph which can haul three tons and
fancy prices; plnneapples, extras, ,1&@20o.; edge selections of Indian Rivers are still Macheca\ or S. O. Ten, New Orleans. your
medium*,10loc. Q. tt: !ALMJC&. reaching 5.00 in instances,but for average POTATOES. load is ten tons, the only thing to,,dp i
NANSEMOND R.
prime lots of mixed sizes Si is rarely exceed 72.
is take off of the load. It i is
to
ed and some very good lots have been sold R. B., Satsuma Heights. We do not part ,: '
DAMAGE TO ITALIAN FRUIT. lower. From other sections scarcely anything .- know where you can procure them unless precisely so in the vineyard. At 't the '

NEW YORK, March 17.Home excltment sizes larger shows' than quality 176's have to exceed to be$33.23 shaded and as it may be from Rev. Lyman Phelps, close of the season one ,acre, of good\

has been caused in the foreign fruit. trade in quoted. Much of the fruit,is light and pulpy Sanford. Concord vineyard in round numbers "
this city by reports from Italy to the effect and Is not of character to attract buyers.The LIST .
C. G. Ith
that the orange and lemon crups have been Tangerines and Mandarines arriving are 73.r ROSE French, will have 150,000 buds on the new ;
destroyed by recent storms. President Con- mostly. of Inferior quality and seldom good aca N. Y. The list of Peter Henderson's soil will
tenein of the Italian chamber of commerce. enough to reaco outside qoutations.STRAWBERRIES. roses was published in the issue of wood.: The capacity of the !, \
'who at present is at Sorrento, Italy, haa'Wrlt.ten .-Arrivals from Florida February 4, 1B90. we will say mature five tons., :This '
to friend here in which he
a letter a are increasing and show Improved qualityon
says that the damage to'orange and lemon the whole, ,(bough many lots. are still 74. SHELL LIME., Are oyster shells requires 25,000 buds, or one-sixth"oC\
crops has been enormous,and was caused bya quite common. There is now little difference burnt as good as land plaster for soil the whole. So see our vineyardis ':
gale which swept all the leaves off the between the refrigerator IotA and those you
trees,leaving the oranges and lemons without received in open crates. Since Wednesdaythe Have you or any of your subscribersused loaded up with buds enough ,for, ';1'
protection. The crop, he estimates, will be demand has i-hown. some improvementand ,above with good results? What will five.
reduced about 75 per cent. if arrivals show fine quality a good are chemical constituents except lime? thirty tons. It only carry _
There are from fifty thousand to seventy trade. may be expected from now on. Early Hence we must unload 25 tons or mother 1
G C. Hawk's Park. ,
thousand boxes of winter-cat fruit stored In the week sales were slow at a range of .
there, leaving about an equal amouut on the 15@25c.( per quart for ordinary to prime,and Oyster shell lime has often been used words prune away five-sixths of j
trees for shipment. Had it not been for the on Tuesday some delayed express receipts In in Florida to correct the "sourness" of the bearing wood. Now supposewe:
gale Sorrento would have shipped during the very bad order had to go at extremely low ,
land. The is fixer
three hundred thousand boxes of raw plaster a better off four-sixths two- -
fully
spring Toward the close sales of good to only prune or:
choice are ranging 20@30c., but the stock and retainer of ammonia and we should
The lemon crop suffered chiefly from hall must be rather exceptional to reach'the outside consider it rather more valuable for the thirds, leaving one-third or enough,for f

which chilled the fruit. Sorrento will not export *' figure, most sales being at 20@28c. A refrigerator soil. Its constituents besides lime are un ten tons. What will be the result? ,
this summer over twenty thousand to carload Is due to-morrow Saturday
( -
thirty thousand boxes'of lemons, instead of ).. Small lots from Charleston are selling important. Oeraler says, in "Truck The land has strength for only five !

as formerabout.. one hundred thousand mainly at 25@:>5c Farming at the South" (p. 50): :"It is supposed tons. It is loaded double its capacity
boxes-1Yn es-Union bpccuil. Florida cabbages have sold very well, generally to form combinations in the soil ,; 1
at$2.50 per bbl.crate common lots going and the result is a lot of second qu'al.
which attract from the atmos-
nitrogen
lower and a few 'exceptionally fine J
REPORT BY REDFIELD & SON. reaching 12.75. Florida string beans in fair phere-probably silicate of lime. Not- ity ,and refuse grapes. This is no ,

PHii.ADKi.pniA, March 12, 1891. demand and firm, but prices show considerable withstanding all these advantages the theory, but the facts of nature, as' un-'
range owing irregular quality of stock truck farmer will have
continue Few rarely recourseto changeable as the law of gravitation.The .
The receipts of Florida Oranges offered. peas arriving( ; fancy Lake *
liberal,the balk of which is of poor or me- City lots reach $2@2.C9,but we see none from lime. Only in case- of an amount of bearing wood left in j
dium quality, for such the demand is slow other sections worth over $1@1.50. Beets emergency, an unexpected lack of ma-
and in order to move them, we are obligedto very dull and seldom fine enough reach nure, would,he be warranted in bringingout pruning varies with different varieties., <

make concessions in prices. Choice to top quotations. the latent of his soil With Concord leave five canes' of
fancy fruit is not plenty', and prices steady,' power by a ,
We quote: heavy application.". nine buds each. Delaware, J leave'
Fancy Indl River, desirable sizes, $100 Jacksonville Markets. <
..>f 4.50; strait" lines Indian River fJ,60.g4; other three, and Catawba only two. 17 ne.
choice selections of brlghta, 176 to 2vO, **&3.60; WHOLESALE PRODUCE. More ,Niagara Grapes.Mr. and train to secure the fullest and'
1 other choice selections of brlhts,128 to 2uO,
176 20W Corrected by Thos.Nooney ft; &0111. P. P. Ink of this has most distribution of foliage and
choice to fancy russets, to city just even :
POTATo- Early Rose, barrel, $4 Bur-
12.175.( ;; & fruit to fancy and russets larger,.sizes straight,V6 to lines.124, banks, $3.75 Magnums, $350 sack; Florida; entered into an arrangement with Mr.I. fruit., Because it more perfectly enables '' l

.- $1 2592; Tangerines,choice to fancy, I6(5( ( ; : cabbage.360 5 per barrel; tomatoes, crates, $1; H. Babcock, of New York State, you to do this, a three wire trellis .
lemons,
i fancy box. $3.7j@3.50; bananas
6J
Man Ierlne choice to fancy,;$3.0@4 ;grapefruit "
in good demand.$2.2503. bunch,$L25@1.75;peanuts,fancy 6c per pound under which they will plant at once is better than two, and a four wii'
STRAWBERRIES The market now cleanedup peanuts,extra,5c per pound; pecan nnts,15c. better 1
and prices some better, the recent low per pound; almonds, 17c. per pound; E wal- twenty acres in Niagara grapes. They than three.-Am. Garden.
prices having greatly stimulated the demand; nuts 18c. per pound; hens, full grown,35c; have'purchased forty acres of land a -------- '!
active to-day lor choice stock 25 to 35c. per chickens, half grown, 20@25o each; eggs, 29o
,
quart.STRING. per dozen; Mntt'sapple cider,$4,25keg; Moti's short distance- west of the city. Operations Believing that Orlando had grown

BEANS. The receipts light, and peach[ cider;$5.75 keg;onions barrels,10X$i: onions will be pushed with all possi- out of a stock range, property owners
choice teider Valentines wanted at $&5u@4 ,crate $i 75;cocoanuts,$4 W per ; ap-
crate,while good young Refugees are' selling ples,$ (@85Xperbarrelgrap's.400 per basket; ble dispatch in order to get vines in as have erected thousands of dollars
fairly well at$.5003;old and stock SL25 cranberries $4 per barrel turnips, $2 per bar-
poor soon as possible. worth of fences around their lots
@1.50. rel; beets, fiSO per ; carrots, $&5t) per ,
BEETS.-Most of the stock arriving is too barrel; parsnips,J8 'per barrel; squash. $250 Mr. Ink has been very successful amply sufficient for all ordinary purposes '
per barrel; beans, S3 per crate celery,75c .
aad and from per
mall of poor quality selLng at
75c.to $1 per crate. dozen; egg plant,$d per barrel. Peach elder, with grapes on his own place. He of protection and beauty."'

CA.t1LtFLOW.&R-Scarce. and wanted at from 5.25 per keg; grape$7 cider,$S 50 per keg; California began with a small vineyard of three Scarcely one of these is of the legal
grape Juice, per kegi
fGtteperbbl.JEoo PLANTS.-If choice,$ @12 per bbl. RETAIL VEGETABLES. acres which has now reached a bear- height of five feet. Must we be put ;

orate.CQUASH.-In good demand, ..5O3( per Corrected by Hassa Bros. ing age. The vines are very vigorous to the expense of rebuilding 'sixty 'i

GREEK PEAS are scarce and when' choice, Irish potatoes,lOo per quart,or 50c perpeck; and are flourishing under his careful thousand dollars worth of fence tc)' '

sell readily$&0@9.50, per crate. sweet potatoes per quart,or 25c ier peck; He has added six against Mr.#
acres
CABBAOE.-Tne old cabbage nearly all gone, onions,lee per quart,or 700 per peck; carrots, management protect our property 4
and choice solid well packed Florida is in active II 100 per quart,or tfOo per peck; turnips,yellow, to: this plot this season-the planting Reel's cows? Let the citizeas tbe :.
demand at $50$8 crate, with a good 50o per peck beets,60c per peck; parsnips,600
prospect for further improvements, and we per peck; cabbage, lOcto,15c per head; toma-I having been completed but a few heard from.-Reporter. .'J



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:: n THE. FLORIDA, DISPATCH, FARMER AND FRUITGROWER. (MARCH 19,1891



Jtd .and ,Lawn THE WALK. NEW KODAKS. as they generally run too deep to be
To make this "trench one hundred turned up with the plow. The roots
\... ..- _....- ,and
.0f feet long, four feet wide and six inches should be carefully picked out

,' : A Suburban. Home.s'The .- deep_was dug and faced with boardsat piled up to dry, where they will not

I ." ': elegant- residence of Messrs. .J., the sides. Four inches of broken ."You tit take root again from lying on the moist
press
'Crawshaw & Son, near Lawtey,: i is, a, bricks, rubble and coarse mortar was ground.
good' illustration, of the beauty and thrown on the bottom and the upper button, Cojnmelyni nudifora (Common Day

,cB..... fort'that. can be created, in Florida. two inches finished with a good .Flower). Very common in cultivated,
by a little, study and persevering industry. article of cement. Just in front of we do the rest. land of a rather moist nature. Stems'

Although 'possessed of ampletans the house it 'expands into a half oc prostrate, slender, much branched,

;, .these gentlemen have done tagon. This entire length was madein Senn Sew Stylw aad Sizes two to five feet long, rooting at every

nearly::all'the work about the premises one stretch, and the result is the ALLLOADKD WITH Transparent Films. joint, making it very difficult to pullor
For sale by alt Photo.Stock Dealers.
themselves. They laid the brick in swelling and shrinking caused it to hoe it up, as the stem breaks at the

*their cistern? plastered 1 it,. laid, :the crack in places. Mr. C. says if he THE EASTMAN COMPANY, joints in attempting to pull it up.

piped! ,. ,drains, etc., ''l laid i the walk, put had it to do over he should do it in Send !Catalogue. ROCHESTER,N.Y. Leaves ovate-lanceolate, sheathing,

up(the',trellises, planted or,moved all sections, which would prevent the one or two inches long;: flowers blue,

the. 'trees: shrubs, etc. showing" that cracking. from a spathe, half an inch or less,in
men with determination! and a fair trees; grevilleas, or Australian oaks, diameter; petals three, one smaller .
share of American gumption can do athousand FLOWERS AND SHRUBBERY. too tender for this latitude J bamboos, than the other two. This plant is far J'
The most conspicuous ornamental both and dwarf the Canton
and one things which mostpeople' giant ; more troublesome in flower gardens
'of wealth' 'usually think they objects in the yard are the,different hybrid and other 'rare citrus trees ; than in fields or truck gardens, whereit

mint have done for them by workmen, varieties of the arbor vita? and the kakis, pears, figs, etc. On each side ,can be largely destroyed with the

.from a'large city. roses. TJie' golden-tipped arbor vitae of the,avenue, in front of the house, plow.

e (Biota' aurea) is'a beautiful little there are fifty Texas umbrella trees .
*-I J" 'THE CISTERN. shrub ; nothing could be handsomerin recently planted.We Viola hastata.

In accordance with the usual l practice ,its way. There are two or' three have mentioned only the. .plants There are several species amongour

)in Lawtey, .t the ,house is raised on other varieties, not well identified, all that did well.-ED. American violets which are rarelyseen t-

posts'about six_ feet above the ground, of them doing well. At first most of .. in gardens, although they possess ;

giving a broad, cool, 'airy' ""cellar them dwindled, but after a couple of Jamaica Sorrel. much charm and beauty as garden-

underneath i ,, an admirable place for aworkshop drains were laid through the yard Editor Farmer and Frult-Grower: plants. Our common Northern Viola ,

.; 'and'a storehouse for fruit (made of boards four inches square, Several persons have recently ap- eucullata, Viola pedal, the Birds-foot
and sunken three feet below the plied to me for seeds or roots of the violet the little
G aid vegetables. Directly ''under the charming yellow-
kitchen. is the cistern, eight feet in surface) those near it began to flour- Jamaica Sorrel who, or sells information them.A about flowered Viola pubescens, and the white-
ish. Others strange to say, seemedto any person flowered Viola Canadtnsis, one of the
diameter'and ten 'feet deep., The soil .' advertised roots of
flatwoods of is take on anew Vigor simply from party formerly best plants which can be grown in a
being a stratum clay
the Sorrel
Jamaica at twenty-five cents
being moved from one. place to an rock garden sheltered by overhanging
reached at a depth of about' thirty
in the Florida in
A apiece, Agriculturist
other. trees are all excellent subjects to naturalize -
;inches and in this ,
one soon comes to
is 1889, as well as I can recollect, but
The bordered
house on three in the garden. Equally at-
matter what of
water, no time year,
files
of the of that
sides with trellis which having LO paper much less well
which interferes with the: work of a on the fol- tractive, although
putting in" a cistern. A' has to low roses are making a handsome period, can give no satisfactory reply. known, is the Halbert-leaf violet
pump
be kept in operation :while the digging growth :. James Sprunt, Marcchal Those having seeds or roots to in spare ((1': hastata), which grows very locally _"
would do well to advertise the
goes'on, and when the cistern'reaches Niel, Celine Forrestier, ,. Reine Marie in Northern Ohio, and is found in the-
FARMER
columns" of the
Henriette Richardson Solfaterre La- "cheap AND forests of the Alleghany Mountainsfrom
the desired depth a little well has 'to ,
On the ,west side of the FRUIT GROWER. Pennsylvania to the northern
be' 'in the and marque.
dug: center kept pumpedout the readers of
until all the rest of the 'work is house there are three Marechal Niels there Among be several your paper who borders of Florida. It is a yellow-

completed, when it is drained.dry and which do not flourish ; the proprietor had must in persons the flowered, slender, nearly glabrous
have
experience growing
filled with and believes this is due' to the heat of the species, distinguished: by its halbert-
quickly groat cement
who all
Sorrel and could tell
before:the water can 'rise.. : afternoon sun with the,reflection from' Jamaica shaped stem-leaves, which in one remarkable -
its culture and
the about capabilities, three-
form
house adding to its fervor. Thoseon Southern are
Above the clay the wallis laid ,with where it can be procured. ".
the other sides are' making a luxuriant lobed, or even trifoliate (var. tripartitd).
whole brick> the cistern carried of Gov. P.
: being Except at the home A. doubtless thrivein
growth, and a neighbor hasa This pretty plant
up t about,three feet above ground; but, Marechal Niel on the west side of K. Safford, Tarpon Springs, Fla., I cultivation under the conditions
down in the clay the wall is composed i have not seen the plant in cultivation.If the of
his house which has flourished exceedingly which are favorable to growtn
of i orickbats; : (which are, much,cheaper, I he would kindly give the desired information which
for four years, though it Viola pubescens, to botanically,
and( equally as good), with goat it would be highly apprecia.
and
Garden
rests against a veranda and has it is very closely rejated.} ,
between them and the
clay. abundant ventilation without exces- ted. by many readers. Forest.
soV'The wall is strengthened by, three, sive heat. '. MRS. JENNIE S. PERKINS. i '4.

buttresses outside, each two bricks Mr. Crawshaw thinks the reason 871,Mulberry_ ,_,St, Macon.Ga-4. ,, March 7,1891. Consumption Cured. ,:,
square, and; two flues. One of these fail to succeed > An old physician retired.from practice,bad !
why so many persons Some Troublesome Florida Weeds. placed in Ms hands by an *ast India missionary -
fluesserve, $ for a filter; it is eighteen with this magnificent ,rose, the Mare the formula of a simple vegetable
No. 13. for the and permanent cure of ,
inches' square, extends to the bottomof chal Niel, is, that they neglect it and Consumption remedy Bronchitis.speedy Catarrh. Asthma
the, cistern, and from it a pipe allow sprouts from the,hardy stock to I-I. H. SIMPSON, MANATEE.] and all throat and lung atreetlonsalAOapoal-
tlv and radical care for nervous debility and
pauses up into the pump in the kitchen spring ,up, and rob the growth above. Urtica Urens (Small Stinging Nettle all nervous complaints." Having tented Its

overhead. Passing"through this brick His is budded on the Cherokee, and Dwarf Nettle). This is an annual, cases wonderful, and desiring curative to powers relieve In human thousand suffer of.'
wall,the ,water is very pure and lira he is only now venturing, not without eight to twelve inches or more high, ing.I will send free of charge. to all who wish '
pici;; and Mr. Crawshaw said,that,even misgivings, even after it has got a found in cultivated and waste grounds.The It with, this full recipe directions in German for preparing'rench or and English using., .t'

hiss\ ,Newfoundland dog-a thorough growth of two years, to allow a single stem is beset with venomous stings; Pent by mall, by addressing with stamp* J :s
naming this paper. W.A.NOTES,82 J Powers
gentleman, by the way-would not shoot to come up from the root, to be leaves ovate or broadly elliptical, pe- Block, Rochester,N.:Y.Tult's.
drink well-water if he could ,help it, budded for a friend who has always tioled, three-veined, opposite. It is .

but.-would go thirsty a long time wait: failed with this prin.ce of roses. naturalized from Europe. This shouldbe

ing',,for,cistern water. ; The Celine Forresticr a noisette completely destroyed before? goingto '

The;other flue serves:as a waste rose, is perhaps the most thrifty seed and getting a foothold. :

pipe. The four-inch tin conductor grower"of all ; a very beautiful yellowrose Canna flaccida (Indian Shot, Head Pills :

forks.about two feet above the cistern, full-and of fine form, one of the ache Plant, Wild Canna). This plantis

' and Jn the fork there is a valve. This best of the yellow roses, in bud, in found in swamps and in 19W culti- '

may be turned throw the water down flower and in habit growth. vated hammock soil. The stem is .ens f f mnlat the digestive eajthe torpid organs liver regulates, .tr.nrtk_-

i into the cistern, or it may be thrown The Richardson proved refractoryand from two to four feet high; leaves )bowels and are unequaled ao an )j J

into the other branch of the,fork and I ICi he failed to 'get one started untila smooth, two to four inches wide and ANTI-BILIOUS MEDICINE ,

carried across into the waste ,pipe.The friend, who had a stout, old clump, from nine eighteen inches long;

waste flue reaches to,the bottom allowed it to be split 'down throughthe flowers large, yellow, irregular; cap In malarial recognized districts*they their posses.virta.).P arewidely <'e-

ofjhe cistern ; so when a rain precipitates middle with a saw, giving a sule often an inch long, covered witha altar properties that poison.in freelnjctheayaterafrom Elegantly .B....

,a quantity of fresh water into the thrifty section well rooted, which, dense, bristly coat. It is an ever coated. IH>...mall. Price,2 et. %

.cistern the overflow is from :the ,oldwater when set out began to grow at once. green perennial, spreading by hori-- Sold Everywhere.

at.the bottom, rising through, Besides there is a Japanese maple, avery zontal rootstocks deep In the ground,

the. flue.at the ,outside. ..* pretty shrub ; some camphor. which must be dug out with the spade, .Office,39&41 Park PlaeeiY. ,. .

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MARCH 19,1891] THE FLORIDA EflS<CS, :FARMER' AND FRUIT-GROWER. 231


The Wane of the Petticoat.. ses. As 1 airi one of those who think worked years' on this grove and this
Our I\U1JaIfJ.Qm The petticoat must go. boys should! ,be trained to "be. good year it promises to repay him for''all
.- --- #-" -" The fiat has gone forth, from dress husbands; no less than girls to be good his trouble. He has been fortunate
"Lifted Over." reformers first of all and lastly from fash. wives, I insist that my two boys shall enough to be in the State and to see
At Under mothers guiding baby steps, ion. The divided skirt, which is do certain dailychoresabout the house his grove in full bloom, and his own
When places come at which the tender feet warmer than two common petticoatsand without any prompting. Each of two were the first orange trees he ever
Would trip,lift rip the little ones In arms permits the wearer to get over the has charge of a stove, and must keepone did see in bloom.-Slarke Telegraph.
,
Of love,eyed sel item down h4ond the harms
80 did our Father watch the precious.,boy ground in a gusty day without stoppingat supplied with coal and the other
Led; ."e"r'the stones by me,who stumbled oft every corner to unwind, gains i in with wood without any prompting.The .
Myself,but led my darling en. popularity with all classes. It costs penalty of neglect is that the The
*: .saw the sweet limbs' faltering, and saw ready made from$i.5o to$20; according clothes of the culprit shall be put Superiorremedy
bough-ways before us,where my arms would '
fail to whether its of worsted pongee away in his drawers without ironing; ,
untrimmed of India silk accordion- and of the is fond of
So_ reached from:heaven, and lifting the dear or as one boys ,
child, plaited and b stitched, and can be shiny collars and bosoms, the omissionof
Who smiled In leaving me, He put him down made at home of any material one two weeks' ironing' taught him the for all diseasesoriginating .
Beyond all hart, beyond ''my sight! ,and bade pleases.But propriety of taking up his duty and in
.
Him wait for mel Shall I not then be glad,':
for street wear many women,are bearing it, right along. This penalty, impure blood ; :
.And thanking Gd,pre's on to overtake
j -Helm ,Hunt Jackson giving up petticoats altogether, wearing failing in the case of the other boy, the
.'. instead black worsted tights (ladies' whenever his' chores were undone he
,''f'C';' Hints About Boys. bicycle trousers), jersey-fitting, reach- took his next meal in the kitchen; andas
Each: ''boy should sleep alone, rather ing from the waist to the ankles. Theseare this was very trying he has decidedto MEDICINE

than two together? where this is possible worn over the combination under- take up his duty and do it. 'r .
; should sleep on a hard mattress garment, with the stockings between Five or ten minutes at the most suf-- which l' .
of husks and straw, never ,on featherbed them, and the boots buttoned up over ffces to do the work required, which may always *(
; should have 'as few covers as'will them, giving warmth, but nothing to might easily be done by hired help; but be relied
make'comfortable, and never be over- draggle about 'one's ankle, or to step in that case the boys would get entirelyout uponto
r"" warm. (Beds are often cold becausethe I on' going up stairs or to trip going of the'way of feeling any domestic: give the best.
cold comes' up through the mat down stairs. The properly made dress responsibility. When boys and girls'can satisfaction,
tress; when this is the case, lay a blanket skirt hangs as well over tights as over be depended on to do certain nec-
V on,the mattress'under the sleeper.) a petticoat and gives 'an amount' of i essary but'disagreeable duties without is ,
Hearty boys should not sleep i in'warm blessed freedom to women who, born I being "punched up," I think they AVER'S
rooms, but there is no objection_ to with two legs, see'nothing reprehensible begin to be men and women' Until I
sleeping in rooms from which the chill in clothing each leg under the compelled my boys to take' care of SarsaparillaCures
has been taken, as in a room opening drapery of the dress which is retainedfor their own rooms theyvere disorderly
into a warm hall. The rooms shouldbe its grace, when fittingly made. in their rooms,.l leaving garments lying
thoroughly ventilated, windows I Jersey tights do away with cotton around instead of hanging them up, otherswill cure you
open wide as they will go; opening'' a i drawers and save, in labor expendedupon whittling on 'the carpet and taking no
window'an inch ,or two gives no venti- sewing and washing, many times pains to keep their rooms tidy. Now
lation at all. their cost. This averages about$3.50per everything is in place, neat and THEII0RTOFMANSTRENtitH.VITALITY
Boys under fourteen years of age pair. Shaken well and aired daily, orderly. Finding out.how much workit
need.not less than nine hours' sleep the bicycle trousers require to be takes to sweep and tidy a room !
,each night; to grow' up into 'vigorous washed not oftener than once in three makes them careful; and when they go How Lost! How
men this is most important. On farms weeks, since they take the place of to college the habit of keeping their Regained,
boys are often' called so early that petticoats, not touching the skin at rooms in order will be well fixed. ;H/PNCij ,
they do 'not get much more than half any point. ; r 4 s.
enough sleep; result, they make men For summer wear the jersey trousersare Death to Roaches.I .
of weak minds and weak 'bodies.. Intowns' too warm and 'their devotees ex- tried every remedy I could hear lO.'FJKNOW
boys often lose sleep over their change them for a divided skirt,whichis of, and I was always inquiring.' They
school books or in roaming the streets. worn over a lisle, balbriggan or a seemed to fatten on my poisons; at THYSffE
No, boy under: fourteen should be out cotton combination suit (reaching to least their numbers did not suffer di ,
after dark, and no boy under fourteen the knees), and no cotton drawers are minution. One day I took up an 'old THE SCIENCE OF LIFE '
should be required ,to study at home ; required.An almanac and idly turned its tattered A onthe Scientific Errors and ofYoathPrem&tareDecl1neNerTOU.l Standard Popular Medical Treatise,,
the school day' is long enough for that. added advantage of the tights is yellow pages, and on the last fragmentof and Physical Debility,Imparities of the Blood.

No?,objection, however, to,his reading that the stockings are held up betweenthe a leaf came upon this: "Equal por- EXHAUSTEDVlTAUTYUNTOLD
in the ev nirig.Vhen he goes to bed, outer and inner garments without tions of corn meal and red lead mixed
it' should be 'to sleep, not to worry suspenders of any sort. with molasses, and spread on plates, i MISERIESResulting
over l lessons. Fashion has set her stamp upon will destroy'roaches." And it did. Iput

,The boy under fourteen, or sixteen house gowns made with plaitings of it in several dishes and set themon from Folly,Vice,Ignorance,Excesses or
either, should not be allowed 'to be silk or lace inside the dress skirt, so the floor, and at nine o'clock stole for Overtaxation Work,Business, Enervating,the Married and unfitting or Social the Relation.victim
called In the morning with an alarm arranged as to provide the witchery of softly out to see if they ate it. The Aroid unskillful pretenders. Posses this great
clock', that he,may rise early'to study., dainty trappings about my lady's slip dishes were so covered with roaches work.binding,It embossed contains: ,800 full pages nit.!: ,royal Price fives only Beautiful sloe by
The boy should go to bed with warm pered feet, and yet put the weight of that the mixture was scarcely visible. mall,postpaid,concealed in plain wrapper. Ilk,- ...
trath'e Prospectus Free,it apply .ow. The
feet or he cannot sleep. The.feet arebest the flouncings upon the skirt which, in The next night there were fewer at the distinguished author Wm. H.you Parker, )(. D., n-
warmed in cold the of feast. And in. week not roach eelTeathe GOLD A D.JE\VELLED ltIBDAL
; by bathing 'water princess "style gown, depends a a from the N'adoaalltfedJcal Association for
and then'rubbing with a coarse' towel from the shoulders and not from the i was seen. I lived seven years there this PRIZE ESSAY on NERVOUS and
? until''dry.. He should not go to bed hips.The after in the same house and never saw of PHYSICAL Assistant Physicians DEBILITY.Dr.Parkerand may be consulted corps confi
4) hungry, but a: glass. of milk 'or a bodily emancipation of women one.-Good Housekeeping. dentially THE PEABODY by mail or MEDICAL In person, at INSTITUTE the office of
piece of' bread and butter is all her dawns.-Ladies' Home Companion. No.4 Bnlflaeh St.,Boston,Mass.,to whom all
needs on retiring. He 'should sleep r Orange trees this season are bloom. orders directed for as abore.books or letters for advice should be
with face.;away from window, for the Training Boys to be Husbands. ing nicely in fact,. every little tree
early light and the ,moonlight shining The,old miners of California- ,. when that is large enough to hold up an
i into the.eyes is injurious to the delicate they did not become wrecks from their orange is fragrant' with bloom. But For a DISORDERED. LIVER ,i
'organs. If the rising hour is six, bad habits, made the best husbands in of alKtrees that have come to our "
tHe'room should: be darkened else in the world, because they had been notice the Sundell orange grove on Try BEECHAM'S PILLS. ;:
the summer season he will be awake through the mysteries and the miseriesof Kingsley lake is certainly the fullestof 26cts. aBox.SORGHUM
ened: bachelor and knew bloom and the most of .
at break of day, two hours before housekeeping fragrant vc ,. ..
'OF .ALa: D +a xBTe
the,rising hour. When requiredto how to appreciate a good wife, Very any. This grove consists of 12 acres .
lose,sleep, he,should be given time few men are really able to do this. A of budded? orange, trees. They are --
to.'m;' ake'it'':up. When sick, sleep ',is correspondent an exchange corroborates well grown and handsome, but the ,
often of more value than medicine ; I these views: prettiest part is that they were'at the
give him all the sleep'he asks for.-N.JL I have observed that the most intel. time of our visit perfectly white with A trrrUB book that every farmer ought to leave
l) Hand Book" which be
'\ Trl 9fn ligently helpful husbands and fathers bloom, not only on the outside, but is had the free."Sorghum by addressing The Blymyer Iron may Works
I"HORSPOKD'S are those who have been accustomedin parting the leaves the' inside of the Co. of crop Cincinnati for Sorghum it averT fodder Talaable ,and:
:ACID PHOSPHATE their boyhood to help their'mothers tree was discovered to be as whiteas this pamphlet gins full Information about tbe
: -' '., .7"1 and sisters about the house and the outside. Mr. Sundell has different species,best modes oi e<tTftSios,etc.
Uful m fern c of dyspepsia.; : premi! I fend and get It and read it. '
,} ;1. :_ '; r. .

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MARCK 19, 1891)) THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, FARMER AND FRUIT-GROWER. .330, -


.
"
bowing a deckled advance brer recent advise shippers to let it come along as fast as toes,I5c per quart;egg plants,5c to 15c each; days. On another place near by he Po<
alec.Tata. well headed ce\ery, lc() per bunch,or 60c per dozen; rad- .
company is sanguine 'to the out- FOM ATOES.The receipts light, and with a 1she 5c per bunch; garlic, 20c per pound; also has eight acres, making seventeen
strong active demand prices are firm on all 6auliflower,lOc to2tc.FERTILIZER.
look, and believe that this season, as,has choice well grown tomatoes showing color, at acres thus far. The twenty acres tobe

been the,ease In all previous seasons, will from $i.50@5.50 per crate. Green and Inferior MATERIAL. planted by the two gentlemen will
close with a period of high values stock moving slow at from $ @!. Corrected by Llttl Eros'.Phosphate Company.
who have been Many Ship all fruit and vegetables via A.C. D. make thirty-seven acres of grapes under
. holding their fruit have all raIL Orange Planters' True Value special, $43;
been disappointed, because this condition Orange Planters' True Value No. 1 $10; Or- the care of Mr. Ink and owned
has been so long delayed. They overlook the ange Planters' True Value No. 2, $46; Young him. This will him
by
fact that the season,has been a month later Tree and Nursery fertilizers.$36; Orange Tree give something -
than usual througnoat; and that we are REPORT BY P. M. KIELY & CO. Florida Phosphate manure $30; Vegetable to do to while away his time.
now no further along with the crop than ST. Louis, March 16th, 1891. fertilizer, $42; Potato fertilizer $42 Peach
weprdinartly are the last of February. Tree fertilizer$41: Strawberry fertilizer,$41; But he is equal l to it, for while in delicate
The Orange and Vegetable Auction com- Florida oranges are scarcer and a trifle Cotton fertUUer,*28; Corn fertilizer,>$;27; Calcutta health he has unlimited energy
pany ;adv'es Its patrons to send In, ,$2.5X$3.75.for found fruit, according to. Bone meal, $35; Western Bone,meal,. ,
theirs
fruit Buyers are here from all the ,quality, etc. There is a liberal amount 35: Florida Acid phosphate,$13: Sulphate ofPotash > and is accomplishing vastly more than
ing ,and many minor markets 'competing of California oranges in the market at lower 48 to 50 per cent., f3.'lt' Sulphate of Potash -
for the fruit They would easily ,take at prices. The very cold weather prevailing has .90 to 95 per cent $55; Kalnlt.! $17; Land many others who are in robust health..
top prices ten thousand,boxes at each sale kept the price of strawberries very low for Plaster $9 to $10;Cotton Beed Hull asbe ,S30i It[ would seem that the Niagara grape
To keep them here there must be plenty this season-mainly 20c. quart for the major- Canada Hardwood ashes Beaver, $20; Dried
of fruit. As the fruit in each'' sale goes to ity of It, More favorable weatheri which Blood $45; Nitrate of Soda, $50; Bright Cot- industry of Florida is to center about
the markets that can pay most for it, it must soon come will tuatlonvery ton Seed Meal,$23 75 to$23.50. Orlando in spite of the efforts of other
reaches the highest market in the country much. Cabbage is doing much better, ,
every time $2.505335 per crate; cucumbers, $1@L25 doz.; localities in that line. They have
Prices yesterday ran: Fancy, In good green pews,>f3 per box; tomatoes-none from For the "Dispatch Farmer andFruitGrower"
. counts, I&5&3; brights and russets (un- Florida yet; Bermuda, boxes,$L.25. No string I thus far surprised everybody.-Orange
letS very dark), In medium to small sizes, beans yet. ; there are numerous Co. Reporter.
I29&50; mixed sizes, averaging well, The strawberry traffic has been far from
11.7 'J2 2; mixed sizes, running large 'L6U(51.vu. pleasant or satisfactory to the receivers so inquiries concerning its i < '
car this season. Selling" has been slow and 1
tedious work throughout and a majority of Business Review. The "Dispatch, Farmer aridFmitGrower"
y
the receipts has been forced to outside markets -
NEW YORK MARKETS. aud towns where they were more of a issues its first
novelty. The prices to date have been the
NEw YORK March 17,1891. lowest known to the trade at this season not QUESTIONS AND REPLIES. Trade Issue and Business Review

Indian River oranges, fancy selections, per only here but in every market ea't ana west' f; 15th
box,'t50@>;Indian River, straight lots f gi; to which the fruit has been shipped. The reasonable questions coming from a subscriber -- May -25,000 copies. Adrer-
other sections, in 176 to 2UO, 13@325; bright, prime cause of the low prices and bad market .will be answered as, promptly as possible and tising rates on application.
16J. Ie 60A2.75 126 was the weather which remained cold without ,if
; bright, U25@2; russets, charge addressed to the editor at Lawtey.
t 2.2e&275 Tangerines. HX3 per box; grape steadily everywhere and the appetite for the Replies can not be given by malL .
fruit,12,03 per box; strawberries, 30@35c per luclous strawberry,the first fruit of the season ,
quart; beets,75cGMl per crate; peas, 62.0i per ,never had a chance to ripen, and is still 70. HULL ASH. J. C. Parsons,.Cler- A Pruningof the Grape Absolutely '.
crate; beans,|X$3.5U.< OLIVIT HBO*. Immature. mont Fla. This is very difficult to get : Necessary.: "
,
NEW YORK,'March 17.The orange market hold of it is bought by fertilizer fac-
; up
continues about the same. Indian River, Perhaps no part of the work in, the
fancy $&.tO&t.5c i choice brights, l Q'.to!;6'8 NEW YORK MARKET NOTES. tories. George E. Wilson of this city vineyard has so much to do with quality
audio's, 12.70(5325( ; 112's and 126s, $2@2.25; NEW YORK,March 14, 1891. lately received a' carload; if you write
96's,SL50@U75( ; russet, small sizes, $5003.75; FLORIDA ORANG-Recetpts for week,43,316 him promptly :you may be able to pur- as pruning. Insufficient pruning
grape fruit,|SOtoJ: strawberries, fancy, 25O bxs since Oct.15 Arrivals
;receipts 613,967bxs. chase some of it. Cannot give price means overproduction and overpro4duction
36o medium 12l5c.. you
\
; ; vegetables continue have been quite liberal and of very"irregular
steady;choice string beans, $2.Su($3.5'J: ; peas, quality. The demand has run somewhat yet. means poor quality. But why,

f2.5'Jtd( ; cabbage, $2 2J30; fine and green eggplant lighter and while positively fancy grades, 71. GUINEA PIGS. 0. T.McCrory, at all? Let us illustrate. If one
,$8@IQ tomatoes. $ $1 ,& 5 prune
.. ; ; asparagus &> ; being In moderate supply, have been pretty
lettuce Charleston, bavannah and Florida, firmly maintained in_price the common and Titnsville. Fla. No Guinea pigs can b a given highway you have a team
98$4; cucumber are wanted and will sell at I I medium qualities are barely steady. Gilt- found in Jack nviIIe. 'Write to Joseph
fancy prices; plnneapples, extras,. 4lS@20c.; edge selections of Indian Rivers are still Macheca or S. O. Ten New Orleans. which can haul three tons and your
medium,10loc.: O. tt FALMKB. reaching $5.00 In Instances,but for average load is ten tons, the only thing to do
prime lots of mixed sizes$1 is rarely exceea- 72. NANSEMOND POTATOES. R.
ed and some very good lots have been sold I R. B., Satsuma Heights. We do not is to take off part of the load It,.:is, .

DAMAGE TO ITALIAN FRUIT. thing lower.shows From quality other sections to exceed scarcely 33.23 any-and know where you can procure them unless precisely so in the vineyard. At the

NJtW YOBK March 17.-Some excltment sizes larger than 176's have to be shaded as it may be from Rev. Lyman Phelps close of the season one acre, of good
has been caused In tne foreign fruit trade in quoted. Much of the fruit.is light and pulpy Sanford. :
this city by reports from Italy to the effect and is not of character to attract buyers.The Concord vineyard, in round numbers,
that the orange and lemon crops have been few Tangerines and Mandarines arriving are 73.r ROSE LIST C. G. French, Ith will have buds the
destroyed by recent storms. President Con- mostly of Inferior quality and seldom good aca, N. Y. The list of Peter Bender 150,000 on new
tencin of the Italian chamber of commerce, enough to reaco outside qoutations.8TBAWBEBBIES. son's roses was published in the issue o p wood. The capacity of the soil will,.
who at present Is at Sorrento, Italy has Floridaare
-Arrivals from
written a letter to a friend here, in which he increasing and show Improved'quality February 4, 1890. we will say, mature five tons. :This

says that the damage to orange and lemon on the whole, though many lots are still 74. SHELL LIME.. Are oyster shells requires 25,000 buds or one-sixthof,
crops has been enormous,and was caused bya ( .
quite common. There is now little difference
gale which 'swept all the leaves off ,the between the refrigerator IotA and those burnt as good as land plaster for soil l? the whole. So you see our vineyardis

trees,leaving the oranges and lemons without received' in open crates. Since Wednesday Have you or any of your subscribers loaded with buds for;
enough
protection. The crop, he estimates, will be the demand has shown some improvement used ,above with good results? Wha up t.

reduced There about are from 75 per fifty cent.thousand to seventy and if arrivals show fine quality a _good are chemical constituents except lime? thirty tons. It will only carry five. _,
trade be expected from '
thousand boxed of winter-cut fruit stored in the may week sales were slow now at a on.range Early ot G C.. Hawk's Park. Hence we must unload 25 tons"or mother ;

there, leaving about an equal amouut on the 15@25c. per quart for ordinary to prime, anon d Oyster shell lime has often been use words prune away five-sixths of
trees for shipment. Had it not been for the
Tuesday some delayed express receipts In in Florida to correct the "sourness" f
gale Sorrento would have shipped during the very bad order had to go at extremely low o the bearing wood. Now, suppose.we
spring fully three hundred thousand boxes of prices. Toward the close sales of good to raw land. The plaster is a better fixer only off four-sixths or two-
prune :
oranges choice are ranging 2G@30c., but the stock and retainer of ammonia, and we should ,
The lemon crop suffered chiefly from hall,' must be rather exceptional to reach'the out consider it rather more valuable for the I thirds, leaving one-third or enough,for
which chilled the fruit. Sorrento will not export 1
side figure, most sales being at 20@28c. A re- soil. Its constituents besides lime ten tons. What will be the result?
this summer over twenty thousand to (rlrerator carload Is due to-morrow (Saturday are un J
thirty thousand boxes'of lemons, Instead oas f ).. Small lots from Charleston are selling important. Oemler says, in "Truck The land has strength for only five |

boxeaT1mes formerly about-Union one bpectal.hundred thousand mainly Florida at cabbages have sold very well,generally Farming to at form the South"combinations(p.50): in"It the is supposed Boil tons. It is loaded double its capacity, *

at$2.50 per bbl.crate common lot go- which attract from the and the result is a lot of second quality -= j
atmosphere
Ing lower and a few exceptionally: fine nitrogen
REPORT BY REDFIELD& SON. reaching $2.75. Florida string beans in fat -probably silicate of lime. Notwithstanding ,and refuse grapes. This lsno q .'

demand+ and firm, but prices show considerable all these advantages the theory but the facts of }
PHILADELPHIA, March 12, 1891. nature, as:unchangeable -
range owing. irregular quality of stock
The receipts of Florida Oranges continue offered. Few peas arriving; fancy Lake truck farmer will rarely have recourseto as the law of gravitation. 4
liberal,the balk of which Is of poor or me- City lots reach $2@2.f',but we see none from lime. Only in case of an
dl-m quality for such the demand Is slow other sections worth over Jl@1.50. Beets emergency, an unexpected lack of ma The amount of bearing wood left in J

and In order to move them, we are obliged very dull and seldom fine enough reach would he be warranted in pruning varies with different varieties.,
to make concessions In prices. Choice to top quotations. nure, bringingout |
fancy fruit Is not plenty, and prices steady.. the latent power of his soil by a With Concord, leave five canes" of 4

We quote: heavy application." nine buds each. Delaware I leave' '
Fancy Indian'River, desirable sizes, 14.00()() Jacksonville :Markets., ,
f 4.50: strait, lines Indian I3.60.4; other > i three, and Catawba only two. Prune 1 1
"j choice selections of brights,17d to 2.0, H&3.50; WHOLESALE PRODUCE. More ,Niagara Grapes.Mr. '
and 1
% other choice selections of bri!hts, US to 2uO, train to secure the fullest and 1
$575. choice to fancy russets, 176 to IOU: Corrected by Thos.Nooney&: Sons. P. P. Ink ,of this city has just most even distribution of foliage and ,
$2 W 8; choice to fancy russets,straight POTATOKS.-Early Rose per barrel, $4;Bur-
$9t2J( ; coarse fruit and larger sizes, 00 to 128,, banks, $3.73; Magnums. 53 50 sack; Florida entered into an arrangement with Mr. fruit., Because "it more perfectly; eria j: F

i $1 2 : Tangerines,choice to fancy, f5JCS: cabbage.l./5 per barrel; tomatoes, crates, $1; I. H. Babcock of New York State bles to do this three wire trellis'
Manderlne choice to fs ncy,;3.&@4"ft);grapefruit fancy 360 lemons, box.: S3.7i@3.50; bananas you a
In good demand,$225c 3. bunch$1.25@1.75;peanut,fancy 60 per pound under which they will plant at once is better than two, and a four wire I
8TBAWBEBBIE8.The market now cleaned peanuts,extra,50 per pound; pecan nuts,100. '
up and prices some better, the recent low per pound; almonds, 17c per pound; E walnuts twenty acres in Niagara grapes. They better than three.-Am. Garden.I \

prices having greatly stimulated the demand; 18c. per pound; hens, full grown,35cchickens ; have*purchased forty acres of land a -. ,.q\ ''Si*$
active to-day lor choice stock, 25 to 35c. per half grown, 20@25o eAch; eggs, 29o
quart. per dozen; Unit's apple elder,$4.25 keg; MotL's short distance west of the city. Operations Believing that Orlando had grown
STRING BEANS-The receipts light and peach cider;$5.75 keg; onions barrels,$5: onIons will be with
choice teitler Valentines wanted.at $3JXX3 t crates 11.75;cocoanuts J4 fIG lOd; pushed all possi out of a stock range, property owners

crate, while good young Refugees are' selling p1es6Q65dperbarrelgraprs.4Ooperbasket; ble dispatch in order to get vines in as have erected thousands of dollars
well atf2.50@3;old and poor stock ",2., cranberries $4 per crate turnips, $2 per bar
fair rel; beets,12.50 per barrel,; carrots, $&50 per: soon as possible. worth of fences around their lots,

BEETS.-Most of the stock arriving is too barrel parsnips,t3 per barrel; squash $250 Mr. Ink has been successfu 1 amply sufficient for all '
very ordinary
small and of poor quality and selLng at from per barrel; beans, S3 per crate celery,7 r pur .
75c.1 to II per crate. dozen; egg plant, $.S per barrel.. Peach cider, with grapes on his own place. He poses of protection and beauty. I
CAULIFLOWJEB-Scarce and wanted at from $5.25 per keg; grape cider,$S 50 per keg; Call with
small
fMMperbbl.JEoo fornia grape juice, $7 per keg began a vineyard of three Scarcely one of these is of the legal

PLANTS-If choice,#@12 per bbl. RETAIL VEGETABLES. acres which has now reached a bear height of five feet. Must we be put .
KQUASH.-In good demand. $2.50&3> (}(
orate. per Corrected busa Bros. ing age. The vines are very vigorous to the expense of rebuilding sixty ',

GREEN PEAS are scarce and,"when choice Irish potatoes,lOo per quart,or 50o per peck; and are flourishing under his careful thousand dollars worth of fence:"Ho'
ell readily,$d.0,a i40 per crate. sweet potatoes pt-r quart or 25c i er peck;
CAB BAG&-The old cabbage nearly all gone onions,lOa per quart,or 70c per peck; carrots, management. He has added six acres protect our property against ))Ofr.<' .

and choice solid well packed Florida Is In active JOe per quart,or 80c per peck; turnips yellow I to this plot this season-the planting Reel's cows? Let the citizensbe
demand at fl.50$8 crate with a good 50c! per peck beets, 60c per peck; parsnips,60c 1
prospect for further Improvements, and 'w e per peck; cabbage, lOcto.15c per head; toms having been completed but a few i heard l from.-Reporter. -


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;:; r 2I-..on THE" FLORIDA. DISPATCH" FARMER_ AND FRU1T-0<- ROWER. (MARCH 19, 1891E

'

E Jrd e. l and ,Lawn THE WALK. NEW KODAKS. as they generally run too deep to be
To make this "trench one hundredfeet turned up with the plow. The roots
-:- .- -...-- long, four feet wide and six inches should be carefully picked out .and

., A Suburban, Home. deep.was dug and faced with boardsat piled> up to dry, where they will not

;:t"The elegant- residence of Messrs.: ,J., the sides. Four inches of broken "You take root again from lying on the moist
the
-Crawsfeaw' & Son, .near Lawtey,; is, a. bricks, nibble and coarse mortar was Areas ground.
good illustration_ of the, beauty andC thrown on the bottom and the upper button, Copimelyni nudiflora (Common DayFlower
fort'that can be created m ,Florida two inches finished with a good ). Very common in cultivated;
by a'little. ,', study 'and' persevering in. article of cement. Just in front of we do the rest. land of a rather moist nature. Stems

dWry.. Although 'possessed of amplemeans the house it 'expands into a half oc. prostrate, slender, much branched,

,. .these gentlemen have done tagon. This entire length was madein SenD :New Styles aid Sizes two to five feet long, rooting at every
I ; 'the work about the premisestheinslves. one stretch, ana the result is the AIX LOADED-WITH Transparent Films. joint, making it very difficult to pullor
'They laid the brick in swelling and shrinking caused it to For sale by all Photo.Stock Dealers. hoe it up, as the stem breaks at the

their cuternt plastered it, laid 'the crack in places. Mr. C. says if he THE EASTMAN COMPANY, joints in attempting to pull it up.

pipes! ,, drains, etc., Il laid the* walk, put had it to do over he should do it in Send for Catalogue. ROCHESTER,N.Y. Leaves ovate-lanceolate, sheathing,
up(' the' trellises, planted or.mov, d-all sections, which would prevent the one or two inches long; flowers,blue,
tne''trees: shrubs? etc. showing that cracking. from a spathe, half an inch or less ,in
mef Kith -determination ,and a fair trees; grevilleas, or Australian oaks, diameter; petals three, one smaller
share of American gumption can do a FLOWERS AND SHRUBBERY. too, tender for this latitude \ bamboos, than the other two. This plant is far
thousand and one things which most The most conspicuous ornamental both giant and dwarf; the Canton more troublesome in flower gardens

people l 'of wealth' usually think they objects in the yard are thedifferent hybrid and other rare citrus trees ; than in fields or truck gardens, whereit

mt have done for them by workmenfron varieties of the arbor vita and the kakis, pears, figs, etc. On each side can be largely destroyed with the

'large city. roses. TJie golden-tipped arbor vitae of the avenue, in front of the house, plow.

.\ .. (Bioa'lt r a) is'a beautiful little there are fifty Texas umbrella trees .
1'' "' 'THE CISTERN. shrub ; nothing could be handsomerin recently planted.We Viola hastata.

its There are two"" or' three have mentioned, the There several species
In accordance with the usual practice way. only plants are among
}in Lawtey, the house, is raised onpoets other varieties_ not well identified, all that did well.-ED. i.our American violets which are rarely
; of them, doing well. At first most ,of .
in
about six_ feet above the ground, seen gardens, although they possess
them dwindled but after a couple of Jamaica Sorrel. much charm and '
giving. a broad, cool, airy "cellar" beauty as garden-
underneath i ,, an admirable place 'for a drains were laid through the yard Editor Farmer and FraJt-Grower: plants. Our common Northern Viola ,
Several have
work-shop 'and a storehouse for 'fruit (made of .boards four inches square, persons recently applied cucullata, Viola !ldata, the Birds-foot
and sunken three feet below the to me for seeds or ,roots of the little
and vegetables. Directly ''under the information violet, the charming yellow-
kitchen, is the cistern, eight _feet, in surface) those near it began to flour. Jamaica Sorrel who, or sells them.A about flowered Viola pubescenst and the white-

i diameter and ten feet deep., The'soil ish. Others 'strange. to say, seemed any person advertised foots of flowered Viola Canadensis, one of the
"1 being flatwoods, a stratum of clay is to' take on a new Vigor simply from party formerly best plants which can be grown in a
the Sorrel
being moved from one. place to another Jamaica at twenty-five cents rock garden sheltered by overhanging
reached at a depth of about thirty apiece, in the Florida Agriculturist in
inches, and in this one soon comes to trees, are all excellent subjects to na-
The house is bordered on three 1889, as well as I can recollect, but turalize in the garden. Equally at-
matter' what time of
water no
,
year
files
of the of that
which, interferes with ,the work of sides with a trellis on which the fol- having LO paper tractive, although much less well

putting in a cistern. A''pump Has to low roses are making a handsome I period, can give no satisfactory reply. known, is the .Halbert-leaf violet
seeds
be kept in operation'while the digging growth :. James Sprunt, Marcchal [ Those having or roots to spare (V. hastata), which grows very locally
advertise in
would do well the
to
goes on, and when the cistern'reaches Niel, Celine Forrestier, Reine Marie in Northern Ohio, and is found in the
of the FARMER
the
be'dug'in the center and kept pumpedout marque. On the west side of the the readers of Pennsylvania to the northern
until all the rest of the ''work :is I house there are three Marechal Niels Among several your paper borders of Florida. It is a yellow-
there be who
which do not flourish ; the proprietor must persons flowered slender, nearly glabrous
,
completed, when it is drained dry and_ in
have had the
filled with and believes this is due' to the heat of the experience growing species, distinguished: by its halbert..
l' quickly groat cement Sorrel and who could tell all
before:the water can 'rise., : afternoon sun with the reflection from' Jamaica shaped stem-leaves, which in one remarkable -
., the house adding to its fervor. Thoseon about its culture, capabilities, and Southern form are three-
Above the clay the wall j is laid ,with where it Can be procured.
the other sides are making a luxuriant lobed, or even trifoliate (var. tnparlita).
whole brick, the cistern being carried Except at the home of Gov. A. P. '
thrivein
growth and a neighbor hasa This pretty plant will doubtless
upt about,three feet above ground; but, Marechal Niel on the west side of K. Safford, Tarpon Springs, Fla., I cultivation under the conditions

dowp in the day the wall\ is composed. his house which has flourished exceedingly have not seen the plant in cultivation.If which are favorable to the growtn of
tirickbats( : which much. would the desired information
( are ,cheaper he kindly give
for four years, though it Viola pubescent, to which, botanically,
and'equally; as good), with. gr.oat. it would be highly apprecia.
Garden and
rests against a veranda and has it is very closely related.-
between/\ them and the clay. F abundant ventilation without. exces- ted, by many readers. Forest.
The wall is strengthened by, three, sive heat. MRS. JENNIE S. PERKINS. > .

buttresses outside, each, two bricks Mr. Crawshaw thinks the reason 871,Mulberry St,.>.Iacon.Ga.. .. : ,March 7,1891. Consumption Cure d.
square: and two flues. One of these fail succeed An old physician.retired from practice bad
9 why; so many persons to Some Troublesome Florida Weeds. placed In his hand by an >ast India ml--
flu sxserves; for a filter; it is eighteen with this magnificent rose, ,the Mare ftionf ry the formula of a simple vegetable
t i inches square, extends_ to the' bottom chal Niel, is, that they neglect it and No. 13. remedy Consumption.for the Bronchltl speedy and permanent Catarrh Asthmaand cure of

of the. cistern, and from it a pipe allow sprouts from the hardy stock to [fj. H. SIMPSON, MANATEE.] >" all throat and lung affections,also a po.l-
tlv and radical care for nervous debility and
passes up into the pump In the kitchen spring up and rob the 'growth above. !. Urtica. Urens (Small Stinging Nettle all nervous complaints. Having tested Its

overhead. Passing..through this brick His is budded on the Cherokee, and Dwarf Nettle). This is an annual, cases wonderful and desiring curative to powers relieve In human thousand BufferIng of-,
wall.the water is very pure and lira he is only now venturing, not without eight to twelve inches or more high, ,I will s nd free of charge to all who wish
pad; ;and Mr. Crawshaw said.that,even misgivings, even after it has got a found in cultivated and waste grounds.The It with, this full recipe directions in German for preparing trench or and English using. 1 J'

hjjs\} ,Newfoundland dog-a thorough growth of two years, to allow a single stem is beset with venomous stings; bent by mall by addre lng w'lh' stamp;
naming this paper. W.A.NOYES,82)Powers
gentleman, by the way-would not shoot to come up from the root, to be leaves ovate or broadly elliptical, pe- Block Rochester N.Y.
drink well water\ ,if he could ,help it, budded for a friend who has always tioled, three-veined, opposite. It is .
but would go thirsty long time wait failed'' with this prince of roses. naturalized from Europe. This shouldbe

ingfor cistern water.. ; The Celine Forresticr, a noisetterose completely destroyed before? goingto '

The.',other: flue serves):as a waste is perhaps the most thrifty seed and getting a foothold.
pipe. The four-inch tin conductor grower"of all ; a very beautiful yellowrose Canna f1auida (Indian Shot, Headache Tutt'sPiIIsitImnlateethe

forks.about two feet above the cistern, fulHnd of fine form, one of-the Plant, Wild Canna). This plantis
' and in the fork there is a valve. This best of the yellow roses, in bud, in found in swamps and in I low culti-

may'be turned,to throw the wat down flower and in habit of growth. vated hammock soil. The stem is ens the digestive torpid organs liver regulate, atr..ctlle tote
into the, cistern or it may be thrown > The Richardson proved refractoryand from two to four feet high; leaves I bowels,and are unequaled a a*nANTIBILIOUS

into the,other branch of the'fork and he failed to 'get one started untila smooth, two to four indies wide and MEDICINE

;, L carried across into the waste pipe. friend, who had a stout, old clump, from nine to eighteen inches long;
The waste flue reaches to the bottom allowed it to',be split 'down throughthe flowers large, yellow irregular; cap- In malarial recognized dltrleta,a*they their pone Ylrta*.peculiar rwidely

othe,cistern ; so when a rain precipitates middle with a saw, giving a sule often 'an inch long, covered witha from properties thai poi on.In freeing Elegantly the ay.stem Bgsur
II ,a quantity of fresh water into th'ciMera thrifty section, well rooted, which, dense, bristly coat. It is an ever- coated. !><>...mall. Price,2Set %

the overflow is from ;the oldwater I when set out began to grow at once. green perennial,'spreading by hori- Sold Everywhere.

at,the ,bottom, rising through Besides there is a Japanese maple, avery zontal rootstocks deep in, the ground,
the,
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MABCH 19,1891] G THE FLORIDA IttS 'ATCfi f AKMER AND FRUIT-GROWER. 231


The Wane of the Petticoat. ses. As 1 air one of those :who' think worked years on this grove and this I
Our l\urral'I fiorne; The petticoat must go. boys should ,be trained to "be good year it promises to repay him for all '

-dwvtiv.-'i' : The,fiat has gone forth, from dress husbands no less than girls to be good his trouble. He has been fortunate
"Lifted Over' reformers first of all and lastly from fash wives, I insist that my two boys shall enough to be in the State and to see
AM feeder mothers aiding baby steps, ion. The divided skirt, which i is do certain daily chores about the house his grove in full bloom, and his own
When places come at which the tended feet warmer than two common petticoats without any prompting. Each of two were' the first orange trees he ever
Would trip,lift up'the little ones In arms and permits the wearer to get over the has charge of a stove, and must keep did see in bloom.-Starke Ttlepa i
Of love,ami set item a bejondfthe harms
80 did our Father watch the precious boy ground in a gusty day without stoppingat one supplied with coal and the other .
Led: e"'er"the stones by me,who stumbled oft every corner to unwind, gains in with wood without any prompting.The .
)yteir,bat led my darling en. popularity with all classes. It costs penalty of neglect is that the
".SAW the sweet limbs faltering, and saw ready made from$1.50 to$20; according clothes of the culprit shall be put The Superiorremedy
Koughways fall, before tts,where my arms would to whether it,,is of worsted pongee away in his drawers without ironing;
untrimmed of India silk accordion- and of the is fond of :
So reached from heaven, and lifting the dear or as one boys .
child, plaited and briar-stitched, and can be shiny collars and bosoms, the omissionof ;
Who smiled In leaving me, He put him down made at home of any material one two weeks' ironing' taught him the for all diseasesoriginating ;
Beyond all hurt, beyond ''my sight,and bade* pleases.But propriety of taking up his duty and in r
Him wait for mel I Shall I not then be glad, \:1
for street wear women bearing it, right along. This penalty
many are : blood
And. thanking O.d,press on to overtake impure ; A
-Helen Hunt Jackson giving Up petticoats altogether! wearing! I failing in the case of the other boy, the i
--+.. instead black'' worsted tights (ladies whenever his' chores were undone hetooK
'"f"'T Hints; About Boys. bicycle trousers), jersey-fitting, reach- / is next meal in the kitchen; andas J
'Each: 'boy should sleep alone, rather ing from the waist to the ankles. Theseare this was very trying he has decidedto MEDICINEwhich
than two together, where this is possible worn over the combination under- take up his duty and do it. '
.'? should sleep'on a hard mattress garment, with the stockings between Five or ten minutes at the most suf- ,/ /,
of husks'and straw, never on featherbed them, and the boots buttoned up over fices to do the work required, which may always if
; should have'as few covers aS'will I them, giving warmth, but nothing to might,easily be done by hired help; but be relied
1: make comfortable and be about ankle in that the would uponto
,never over- draggle ones 'or to step case boys get entirelyout
(, warm. (Beds are' often cold becausethe on' going up stairs or to trip going of the'way of feeling any domestic: give the best. '
'cold comes' jip through the mattress down stairs. The properly made dress responsibility. When boys and girls'can satisfaction, !
;when this is the case, lay a blanket skirt hangs as well over tights as overa depended on to do certain nec- 1
b on.the mattress'under the sleeper.) petticoat and gives 'an amount' of essary but disagreeable duties without IS ,
Hearty boys should not sleep i in'warm blessed freedom to women who, born being "punched up," I think they AYER'St 1
rooms, but there is no' objection to with two legs, see nothing reprehensible begin to be men and women' Until I
sleeping' in rooms from which the chill in clothing each leg under the compelled my boys to take' care of 1
has been, taken, as in a room opening drapery of the dress which is retained their own rooms they there disorderly Sarsaparilla
into a warm hall. The rooms shouldbe fonts grace! when_ fittingly_made. in their rooms,'having garments lying
thoroughly ventilated, windows Jersey tights do away with cotton around instead ot Hanging them up, Cures others,will cure you j
open wide as they will go; opening' .a drawers and save, in labor expendedupon whittling on 'the 'carpet and taking no ji i
window'an inch or two gives no venti. sewing and washing, many times pains to keep their rooms tidy. Now 1
lation at all. their cost. This averages about$3.50per everything is in place, neat and THEILQRYOFMAN5TRENGTH.VITALITY 1 1j
Boys under fourteen years of age pair. Shaken well and aired daily, orderly. Finding out.how much workit j
need ,not less''' than nine hours' sleep the bicycle trousers require to be takes to sweep and tidy a room !
,each night; to grow' up into 'vigorous washed not oftener than once in three makes them careful; and when they go How Lost ---
How
men this is most important. On farms weeks, since they take the place of to college the habit of keeping their Regained,
boys are often' called so early that petticoats, not touching the skin at rooms in order will be well fixed. rH coF. j
they do 'not get much more than half any point. ; 1
enough sleep; result, they make men For summer wear the jersey trousersare Death to Roaches.I FIFE ,
of weak minds 'and weak bodies. In too warm and their devotees ex- tried every remedy I could hear p 1 1
towns toys often lose sleep over their change them for a divided skirt,whichis of, and I was always inquiring.' They
school books or in roaming the,streets. worn over a lisle, balbriggan or a seemed to fatten on my poisons; at KNDWTHYffi ;
No boy u'r.'der'fqurteen. should be out I cotton combination suit (reaching to least their numbers did not suffer di- .
after dark, and no boy under fourteen the knees), and no cotton drawers are minution. One day I took up an old THE SCIENCE OF LIFE '
should 'be required, ,to study at home ; required.An almanac and idly turned its tattered A on Scientific the Errors and of Standard Youth-Premature Popular Decline Medical Ntrroa Treatise ':;r-,
the school day is long enough for that. added advantage of the tights is yellow pages, and on the last fragmentof and Physical Debility,Impolitic of the Blood

No,objection, \however, to,his reading that the stockings are held up betweenthe a leaf came upon this: "Equal por- EXHAUSTEDYITAUTY ,i 1.
in the y ni g.Vhen he goes to bed, outer and inner garments without tions of corn meal and red lead mixed 4
It'' should be 'to sleep, not to worry suspenders of any sort. with molasses, and spread on plates, UNTOLD MISERIESResulting 1
over lessons. Fashion has set her stamp upon will destroy roaches." And it did. I .
'The boy under fourteen; or sixteen house gowns made with plaitings of put it in several dishes and set themon from Folly,Vice,Ignorance,Excesses or :
either, should' not be allowed to be silk or lace inside the dress skirt, so the floor, and at nine o'clock stole for Overtaxation Work,Business, Enerratinsr,the Married unfitting or Social the Relation.victim
called in the morning with an alarm arranged as to provide the ,witchery of. softly out to see if they ate it. The Aroid unskillful pretenders. Poueu this great
clock', that he may rise early to study.The dainty trappings about my lady's slip I dishes were so covered with roaches work.binding,It emboued contains% ,800 full pages pit.!: ,royal Price Sro.only Beautiful$1.00 by

boy should go to bed with warm pered feet, and yet put the weight of that the mixture was scarcely visible. mail,postpaid Prospectus,concealed Free,If In you plain apply wrapper.now.'JHostraihre The-
feet or he cannot sleep. The feet are the flouncings upon the skirt which, in The next night there were fewer at the distinguished! author Wro H. Parker, M.D., rseeiTed -
best wdrnied cold the of feast. Arid in week roach the GOLD AND JEWELLED MEDAL
in not
:,by'bathing 'water princess 'style gown, depends a a. from the National Medical AMoclatloa for
and then''rubbing with a coarse towel from the shoulders and not from the was seen. I lived seven' years there- this PRIZE ESSAY on NERVOUS and fi
r until dry. He should not go to bed hips.The after in the same house and never saw of PHYSICAL Assistant Physicians DEBILITYJhr.Parkerand may be consulted corps confi
'J hungry, but a glass. of milk or a bodily emancipation of women one.-Good House/lee ing. dentiall THE PEABODY, br mall or MEDICAL(In person, at INSTITUTE the office of ,
piece of bread and butter is all he da wns.-Ladies1 Home Companion. ICo.4 Bal lleh St.,Bo.tonMass.,to whom all ;.
,. needs on retiring. He 'should sleep Orange trees this season are bloom. orders-directed for as above books or letters tot advice should be '1
with faceaway; from 'window, for ,the 'Training Boys to be Husbands.The ing nicely, in 'fact,. every little tree
early light arid the moonlight shining .old miners of California, when hat is large enough to hold up'*an
mto the'eyes is injurious to the dehc they did not become wrecks from their orange is fragrant''' with bloom. But For a DISORDERED. LIVER i
bad habits made the best husbands in of alKtrees that have to .;',
te" rgans. If the rising hour is six, come our
th'e/room should\ be' darkened else in the world, because they had been notice the Sundell orange grove 'on Try BEEGHII'S PILLS. !
the summer season he will be awakened through the mysteries and the miseriesof Kingsley lake is certainly the fullestof 26cts. Box ;
at break of day, two hours be- bachelor housekeeping and knew bloom and the most fragrant of a ,
OFAXell: : n vc;r..cr..xar.r8. }
fore the rising ho r.Vben requiredto how to appreciate a good wife, Very any. This grove consists of 12 acres i
lose sleep, he,should be given timeto few men are really able to do this. A of budded orange, trees. They are -
make*,it up. When sick, sleep, is correspondent an. exchange corroborates well grown and handsome, but the SORGHUM. :
often of more value than medicine ; these views: prettiest'part is that they were'at the
D give, him all 'the sleep he asks for.-N. I have observed that the most intel. time of our visit perfectly white with A urn book that, Hand every Book"tanner which ought to have be :
is the "Sorghum BUT
Y; Tr l Mlfe. ligently helpful husbands and fathers bloom, not only on the outside, but had free.by addressing The Blymjer Iron Works a
t are those who have been accustomedin in parting the leaves the inside of the able Co.,of crop Cincinnati syrup-making' HORSFORD'S ACID PHOSPHATE their boyhood to help their''mothers tree was discovered to be as whiteas I. this pamphlet gires full Inforsutloa about tile .,
:fJi/.J moltftrms of dyspt sii : '" .* $ and sisters about, the house and premi-! the, outside, Mr. Sundell' has :\fiend different and spee get it;".And s,best read modes it. ot c<fTfcttOBy. .J
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!1T 1 The Farmers Alliance. ,
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,=4-.. ,. ORGAN OF THE STATE FARMERS. ALLIANCE AND INDUSTRIAL UNION. : ',"r,;' '

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'VOL. V. "Agriculture is the Basis .of' Wealth." No. 12.
.- .. .. _

....., .
TOW t- l].SAWYER- i. t., ,,> -_.i.t.-, -. Staff Contributor.-. The,way to make the Farmers Alliance no petitions going: up about those manipulated for party purposes and
grow is to fight it. .Get an old farmer breech-covering breeches, etc., etc. were persuaded to give,their own aims
Notice.Secretaries.of .
\ ,.' ( stirred up on any question, from religion We can stand the tax on shot-guns, only a secondary place, they accom-
County, and SubAlliwishing' and he is and if could have Winchesters This is but
to politics, ready to fighta we a tax on plished next to nothing.
ances. I receipt; .books. can get buzz saw.'Vhenever. and pistols that would amountto history repeating itself. It has ever
!tt&Mme: by applying to 'the under the opposition begins to prohibition we could stand that too; been so and it ever will.
signed. '* A. P."'BASKIN/./, pat us on the. back and call us.good but when our.breech-covering breechesare What an opportunity is ours! A
".' fellows, we at once begin to relax our taxed from the bottom hem all crisis in our National history has been
Sec. Fla. State Alliance.
," t" .tt 1;.' vigilance:and waver in, our purpose. along up both legs, across the seat i reached and I unhesitatingly affirm
: :. 4" We want fair treatment and proper and through the pockets to the that the weal or woe of the country,
Y '
[ !:: ; : Alliance Notice. : u respect from all the world, but ,we do waistband, it hurts our feelings collectively that the National prosperity or dis-
I'shall be pleased if Secretary_ or not want. any coddling nor any soft and individually. In most aster awaits the actions of the farmerin
President of the County, .Alliance of soap. We are prepared to welcomethe portions of Florida breech-loading the election of '92. We have
each county will notify/me:;oftheir", kind encouragement of every goad shotguns are merely luxury, but c I reached the point in our history as a
place, of meeting.: It: will save me citizen, but we want something more have never yet found a place in all nation at which the Roman republichad
much trouble 'in,getting to.my. appoint- than words. You all remember the our fair State where breech-covering arrived when bribery and corruption ,
ments. Fraternally,. old proverb : "Kind words butter no breeches were not a necessity. Now, gained the day and her doom as
C. COLLINS, parsnips, but beef liver pie is-fatness my friends, don't.Iet us worry Congress a nation was sealed. And let the
State Lecturer. the soul. If don't recollect about but we'll existingand
to you shot-gun taxes, keep pestilential corruption now
Box 42,:Anthony; Fla.. ':. the proverb don't say anything aboutit. the breeches question red hot. leavening with its diabolical in- '
TOM SAWYER. fluence not only our political but
No Pip in the Indian River Aliip I caught two I. R. trout yesterdayand f our social life as well; let the infamous
!. '.. ances.. ... devoured them. They weighed Alliance Outlook. bribery, '''both of voter and legislator,
I*find that the farmers of this Indian nearly ten pounds 2nd I am only gain-: Editor Alliance Department: go on unchecked; let hope of political
River\ country are alive to their' interest ing one pound in weight per day. Will the Alliance aims be attained? preferment and a dip into the public
'and are'flocking into the Farmers How are we to reconcile this,apparent Will agitation be successful, or will purse bias men increasingly in the
Alliance. The Brevard County .Alliance i discrepancy? ,the whole thin end in smoke? Suchare future as in the present and past,
has just closed its first session That august (or April) body' knownas the ,questions asked on every and Ichabod will be written over
and the outlook is very encouraging.The the Florida Legislature will meet hand. Asked by the politicians, the ,the citadel of our departed libertiesand
membership is quite an intelligent next month, and the indications now middlemen, the gamblers in farm we will die to freedom,
body-above, the average, and they point to the l liveliest, session since the produce and especially by the monied to liberty, die to all the glorious hopes
have good ,business ideas. They,are l last There is to be a Senator. elected class, the capitalist It is beyond that have gilded our National horizon
patronizing the Exchange 'at Jacksonville and a road law repealed. "Me and cavil the question of the hour. The with brilliant coruscations, promisinga
'for such heavy'articles as fertil- Bob" will not be candidates unless Alliance gains in the last election and day of the most splendid and unlimited -
izers, stoves, wagons, 'etc., and, they ---(?), nor have we any desire to especially the solid front shown by the National prosperity. Die as
claim great saving 'of money.Of work .on the public roads. I think the farmers, particularly in the West and we deserve, having sealed our own
course, they think that the Indian Alliance members of the Legislaturewill Northwest, have awakened the monied doom and signed our own death-war ,
River., section .is the best portion of have sufficient patriotism and busi-- classes as never before to the fact that rant.
Florida, ,and every mother's son of ness sense to elect a man who can the key to all needed reforms is held On the other hand, we may by our
them will swear' that their salt ,water and will properly represent the Stateat by the tiller of the soil. The questionis patriotic and united action save the
mullet and 'pompano are superior to all events the Alliance will be no longer, can the farmer attain his Union, in a nobler, grander sense
eur Ocklawaha bass and bream ; but held responsible for the actions of a ends, but will he? Does the Alliance than ever it has been saved in the
,they are foolish in that line. People body,which they will control. I have fully grasp the situation? Does it past. We may save our national life
become prejudiced jn favor of the prod. supreme;faith in the solid good sense realize what is needed? Are the farm- and liberties, and leave to our childrena
ucts of their particular locality and I of the brethren we have sent to Talla- ers a unit in the matter and will theybe commonwealth strong, because free,
have no ,doubt that when I go out hassee, and I look for good results true themselves and, refusing to happy, because prosperous, and safe
Weft:in' April I will find brethren from,their deliberations. be turned aside from their purposes, because of God's,smile upon the clean
r bragging about the Chattahoochee TOM SAWYER. strike the iron whilst it is hot and attain record. Let us, as Alliance men, with
mud cat. Titusvllle,March 12 that which professedly they seek unfaltering advance, beat back'the,
Brevard will have five more sub- t and which admittedly they may take unrighteous encroachments of capital
Alliances organized in a few weeks, Breeches and Shot-Guns. if they will? upon labor. Let us join hands with
and under the able leadership of Capt. Some of our good citizens who Such, I believe, is a fair descriptionof all the moral and religious forces in
R. G. ,May, of Rockledge, the orderis know more about the game laws of the questioning and expectant 'atti- the nation and with them demand
( ,bound to flourish. The. coast at Florida than they do of the Constitution tude of all classes at the present moment that every incubus resting upon the
Rockledge and Cocoa is a charming of the United States sent up a As an Allianceman I want to nation and hindering or preventing 1
section, and I have not seen such a: petition to Congress to decrease the ask, what are the lessons taught by the her truest progress, in everything that i
lot"of the "damyankee" since 'the duty on breech-loading shotguns.The past? Wise men learn by the mistakesof makes a nation truly great and good,
Philadelphia 'Exposition. Old "Rebs" duty on those weapons is, 30 percent the past to avoid blunders in the shall be hurled from her path. Let us
"
and veteran "Yanks" sit around there ad valorem,. while the duty on present and future. History teaches demand a sufficient currency, the out-
ua4er.the palms and on the coquina breech-covering breeches, pants, trou. that no one 'thing has wrecked the lawing of all trusts and immoral com-
rocks, and talk over the brave old sers, bifurcated garments, or unmen- hopes of :the farmer and laborer in binations of capital. Make gamblingin
days; when it was considered the tionables, is 35 per cent. ad valorem, their conflicts with capital, as has the stocks of whatever* characteran
proper thing to shoot at your neighbor besides 40 cents a pound. One good want of unity amongst themselves, offense punishable by fine and
and hit him if you could. They shoot breech-loading shot-gun will last ;a and without,this success is absolutely imprisonment. Let us unswervingly
off their mouths now. man until he is too old to go hunting, impossible. Unless we clearly recog- demand that the mail, telegraphand
Bre. Rogers met rile here and he but one pair of breech covering nize,what we want .and are preparedto railroad services of the Nation
made this people one of his grand breeches, pants, trousers, or, bifur- stand as one man for it, we mightas shall be worked solely for the
talks, then he skipped out for an Alii cated garments, or unmentionableswill well lay down ,our arms at once. good of the people and, not least, let us
ace gathering'400 miles away., soon wear out, especially when What are the teachings of the last demand a nationally observed weekly
The man,who thinks ,that the .Alliance your anatomy and your chair are too election? .First, That in every case rest-day and the abrogation of all
F is drooping, or has got the pip, (friendly. So it will happen that in where Alliancemen knew what they liquor licenses-the ,national. prohibition
or the die-back. here ,in Florida, is just a little while you :will be payingthis wanted and were prepared to sacrifice of the traffic which, above every-
: mistaken. It,may .be a.li.ttie.sleepy in 35 per cent. ,ad valorem and 40 everything else for it, 'they were over- thing else, hinders our religious, moral,
some places; but you just,stick,a pin cents a pound avoirdupois to make I whelmingly successful; whilst, wher- physical and financial, growth. .. and
t in it or throw a rock at*it, will you? yourself presentable. Yet I hear of ever they allowed themselves to be prosperity. F. F.
; ,
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!I.. :2TI i :;:.q I'beJ Farmers Alliance. : '

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> : ORGAN OF THE STATE FARMERS ALLIANCE AND INDUSTRIAL UNION. "r '

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Ii r :VPL.:'k "Agriculture is the Basis of Wealth No.; 12.
" .- -- .. .. .
'. .
T0___ [..r.j._SAWYER.- f i-. ,:' -,.:(.&--, rStaff: Contributor.! > i i ii The way to make the Farmers Alliance no petitions going ,up about those manipulated for party purposes and
grow is to fight it. .Get an old'farmer breech.covering> breeches, etc., etc. were persuaded to give,their own aims
I: Hotice. \ .'> ,; stirred up on any question, from relig We can stand the tax on shotguns, only a secondary place, they accom-
Secretaries.of'County' and Sub-AlliI ion to politics, and he is ready to fighta and if,we could have a tax on Winchesters plished next to nothing. This is but
I f antes. wishing receipt-books: can get buzz saw.'VheQever. and pistols that would amountto history repeating itself. It has ever
I the:.:same by applying the 'under the opposition begins topat prohibition we could stand that too; been so and it ever will.
I: signed. ''' A."P. 'BASKING, us on the, back and call us.good but when) our:breech-covering breechesare What an opportunity is oursl! A
.. Alliance.A111ancoNotice. fellows, we at once begin to relax our taxed from the bottom hem all crisis in our National history has been
Sec. Fla. State .
.' I'.;- ; vigilance:and waver in our purpose. along up both legs, across the seat reached and I unhesitatingly affirm
if't; I/' / -. We want fair treatment and proper and through the pockets to the that the weal or woe of the ,country,
{' : .
i 5 respect from all the world, but ,we do waistband, it hurts our feelings collectively that the National prosperity or diSaster -
I'shall be pleased if the Secretary; or not want, any coddling nor any soft and individually. In most awaits the actions of the farmerin
President of the County, ,Alliance of soap. We are prepared to welcomethe portions, of Florida breech-loading the election of '92. We have
I.( each county will notify:.'me:'of,their kind encouragement of every gold shotguns ,are merely a, luxury, 'but ,I reached the point in our history as a
place, of meeting.; It: will save me citizen, but we want something more have never yet found a place in all nation at which the Roman republichad
I; much trouble getting to.my appoint- than words.. You all remember the our fair State where breech-covering arrived when bribery and corruption : ,
If ments. Fraternally, old proverb : "Kind words butter no breeches were not a necessity. Now, gained the day and her doom as
I' C. COLLINS: parsnips, but beef-liver pie is fatness my friends, don't.Iet us worry Congress a nation was sealed. And let the
.. StateLect rer. to: the soul. If you don't recollect about shotgun taxes, but we'll keep pestilential corruption now existing
Box 42,Anthony; Fla. the: proverb don't say anything aboutit. the breeches question red hot. and leavening with its diabolical in- f
\ TOM SAWYER. fluence not only our political but
No Pip in the Indian River Afflances. I caught two I. R. trout yesterdayand OUT social life as well; let the infamous
,
r ;-* devoured them. They weighed Alliance Outlook. bribery, ''both of voter and legislator,
" I*find that the farmers of this Indian nearly ten pounds and I am only gaining Editor Alliance Department go on unchecked; let hope of political
River country are alive to their' interest one pound in weight per day. i Will the Alliance aims be attained? preferment and a dip into the public
and are flocking into the Farmers How are we to reconcile this,apparent : Will its agitation be successful, or will purse bias men increasingly in the
Alliance. The Brevard County .Alliance discrepancy? i the whole thing end in smoke? Such future as in the present and past,
has just_ closed its first session That august (or April) body knownas are the ,questions asked 'on every and Ichabod will be written over
and the outlook is very encouraging.The the Florida Legislature will meet hand. Asked by the politicians, the ,the citadel of our departed libertiesand
membership is quite an intelligent next month, and, the indications now middlemen, the gamblers in farm we will die to freedom, ,
body-above, the average, and they point to the l liveliest, ,session since the produce and especially by the monied to liberty, die to all the glorious hopes
have good ,business ideas. They,are l;ast. There is to be a Senator elected class_ _the capitalist.. _It _is beyond? that have gilded our National horizon i
patronizing the Exchange at Jacksonville and a road law repealed. "Me and cavil the question of the hour. The with brilliant coruscations, promisinga
'for such, he vy articles as fertil- Bob" will not be candidates unless Alliance gains in the last election and day of the most splendid and unlimited
izers' stoves, wagons, etc., and, they ---(?), nor have we any desire to especially the solid front shown by the National prosperity. Die as
claim a-great saving ;of money.. work ,on the public roads. I think the farmers, particularly in the West and we deserve, having sealed our own
Of course, they think that the Indian Alliance members of the ,Legislaturewill Northwest, have awakened the monied doom and signed our own death-war \
River section is the best portion of have sufficient patriotism and busi-- classes as never before to the fact that rant.
Florida, ,and every mother's son of ness sense to elect a man who can the key to all needed reforms is held On the other hand, we may by our '
them will swear'that their salt .water and will properly represent the Stateat by the tiller of the soil. The questionis patriotic and united action save the
mullet, and 'pompano are superior to all events the Alliance will be no longer, can the farmer attain his Union, in a nobler, grander sense
oar Ocklawaha bass and bream ; but held responsible for the actions of a ends, but will he? Does the Alliance than ever it has been saved in the
,they are foolish'in that line. People body which they will control. I have fully grasp the situation? Does it past. We may save our national life
become prejudiced favor of the prod. supreme;faith in the solid good sense realize what is needed? Are the farmers and liberties, and leave to our children
ucts of their particular i locality and I of the brethren we have sent to Talla- a unit in the matter and will they a commonwealth strong, because free, ;
have, no doubt that when I go out hassee, and I look for good results be true themselves and, refusing to happy, because prosperous, and safe ';
West,in April I will find brethren from,their deliberations. be turned aside from their purposes, because of God's smile upon the clean '
bragging about, the Chattahoochee TOM SAWYER. strike the iron whilst it is hot and attain record. Let us, as Alliance men, with .
mud cat. Tituivllle March 12 that which professedly they seek unfaltering advance, beat back'the ?
Brevard will have five more sub- i t and which admittedly they may take unrighteous encroachments of capital
Alliances organized in a few weeks, Breeches and Shot-Guns. if they, will? upon labor. Let us join hands with ,'
and.under the able leadership of Capt. Some of our good citizens, who Such I believe, is a fair description all the moral and religious forces in
R. C. May, of Rockledge, the order know more about the game laws of! of the questioning and expectant 'atti- the nation and with them demand
r( is' ,bound to flourish. The. coast at Florida than they do of the Constitu tude of all classes at the present moment that every incubus resting upon the
I: Rockledge and Cocoa is a charming tion of the United States sent up a As an Allianceman I want to nation and hindering or preventing 1., "
r: section} and I have not seen such a: petition to Congress to decrease the ask, what are the lessons taught by the her truest progress in everything that ,i' .-
lot"of the "damyankee" since 'the duty on breech-loading shotguns.The past? Wise men learn by the mistakesof makes a nation truly great and good,
'i..' Philadelphia i Exposition. Old "Rebs" ; duty on those weapons is. 30 percent the past to avoid blunders in the shall be hurled from her path. Let us
and veteran "Yanks" sit around there ad valorem, while the duty on present and future. History teaches demand a sufficient currency, the out-
uader the palms and on the coquina breech-covering breeches, pants, trousers that no one ''thing has wrecked the lawing of all trusts and immoral combinations IIj U
rocks, and talk over the brave old bifurcated garments, or unmen- hopes of ,the farmer and laborer in of capital. Make gamblingin
days:; when it was considered the tionables, is 35 per cent. ad valorem, their conflicts with capital, as has the stocks of whatever .characteran 1
proper thing to shoot at your neighbor besides 40 cents a pound. One good want of unity amongst themselves, offense punishable by fine. and t
and hit him if you could. They shoo' breech-loading shot-gun will last ,a i and without,this success is absolutely imprisonment Let us unswervinglydemand
off their mouths now. man until he is too old to go hunting, i impossible. Unless we clearly recog- that the mail, telegraph "' '
Bre. Rogers met aye: here and 'he but one pair of breechcoveringbreeches nize, what we want .and are preparedto and railroad services of the Nation -
made this people one of his grand pants, trousers, or: bifur- stand as one man for it, we mightas shall be worked solely for the 1
i talks, then he skipped out for:an' Aliiaace cated garments, or unmentionableswill well lay down our arms at once. good of the people and, not least, let us i
.gathering 400miles away. soon wear out, especially when What are the teachings of the last demand a nationally observed weekly; 's':;
The maR who thinks ,that the Alii your anatomy and ,your chair are too election? First, That in every case rest-day and the abrogation of all |:
ance .is drooping, or has got the pip, (friendly. So, it will happen that in where Alliancemen knew what they liquor licenses-the .national probi:1:1
or the die-back, here ,in Florida, is just a little while you will be payingthis wanted and were prepared to sacrifice bition of the traffic which, above every- 1
mistaken. It,may: J be aiittle. ,sleepy!in 35 per cent ad valorem and 40 everything else for it, they were over- thing else, hinders our religious, moral, ::1
\I some places; but you just;stick,a pin, cents a pound avoirdupois to make I I I whelmingly successful; whilst, wher- physical! and financial, growth' :, and i
in it or throw a rock 'at*it, will your ? yourself presentable.. Yet I hear of ever they allowed themselves to be prosperity. F. F. '
..
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.. ABCH 19 1891] ..... ".,:' ... ,THE FLORIDA> DISPATCH,:,FARMER AND FRUIT-GROWER. taJ:

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SPEBOH: OP JOHN, DUNN. On.whom does this duty devolve Most ence on the subject. I shall not attempt RICH FLORIDA LANDS.
: ) :t. .: assuredly on the enterprising citizens, in this short address to give them all,
those who are entrusted with the makingand which would require more time to detail
;. To}the Alliance Meeting, at DeFuuI execution of her laws and in looking than I can give or you would care to
.. .':. ink,March : 14. aftef her welfare both at home and in the hear. I will but briefly mention one or,,

: Ladies and Gentlemen and Fellow-citi National Congress. At this time, _my two of them, however, which I think
farmer friends, more especially does this should be remedied, and 'one of which
z, 'zen+ *of the Farmers'.Ali a -of Florida: duty rest upon you in view of the fact militates directly against the farmer. A

It is a pleasure to be with you to-day that members of the Farmers1 Allianceof national bank is prohibited from loaning
: &B-d.to meet .so. many of the farmers of Florida compose majority- of the its money on real estate, either directlyor
West Florida.. Although almost native: present legislature and must, to a certain indirectly,except to secure an existing
Floridian, and one that has always felt a extent, be responsible for the laws that debt, and in that event the bank is required -
great interest in that portion of our'State shall be the result of.their labors. Some to collect such debt and disposeof
lying west of the Appalachicola river, one at my:elbow asks, are they equal to such security at once. The bank isnot
with RB. magnificent, harbors, in conse- the occasion? I answer unhesitatingly"yes allowed to carry such loan, althougha
quence of a busy life at home it has ," as some of the ablest and most national bank is a private institution
not been'my;, good fortune to.visit your progressive and many of the'.best citizensof with its own capital, it is not allowed to
section but once or 'twice and then our State are members of that organization do what it chooses with that capital.
'and if the is This feature is hardship to the
only to pas through on a hurried trip: organization properly a 'great
therefore when I received ,your cordial managed, I may add, a large influ- farmer, especially in an agriculturalState
. invitation to be present do-day, I acceptedthe ence and co-operation of many more able like ours, where he has no money
! 'same,kith no ordinary pleasure. 1am and progressive citizens whose lives have until the end of the year, when his crops
delighted with your beautiful country been devoted to the development of Flor- are harvested and sold, and no securityexcept Farmers I Stop 'and Think.
varied 'and attractive scenery, and ida, who are in touch and in full sym- ,his land, which is really the basis
Way of
evidences of and improvement pathy with the Farmers' Alliance move- of all securities and the most stable. In Spend the best years your

. so manifest. progress I congratulate you on your ment, may be freely given them.I consequence, the farmer is deprived of life cultivating the soils of the frozen
1 beautiful village, its handsome.buildings, regard the Farmers' Alliance move- the benefit of accommodation when he North and West raising crops on which
picturesque springs. and the fame that it ment as a progressive one. The condition needs it the most. the freight is often not realized, when
has' won as'a great educational''' 'institu of existing evils it seeks to remedy, 'Secondly, the Secretary of the Treasury can buy land from the undersigned,
tion. In the last few.years this has been gave it birth and, as I understand, its under the law has the right under certain you known lands
fertile
accomplished, and;now your great Flor- objects and purposes are to change the conditions to 'designate as national de- rich and as any ,
) ida Chautauqua is visited annually condition of things and make them better positories for the public moneys such and where you can raise a crop that the

the most gifted divines, scholars, orators : it is therefore a progressive organization banks as he may choose, and to keep the United States Government will .pay a
and educators of'the land, and.is'known and should be so regarded. I do government funds therein, which gives BOUNTY of$too on each acre.
throughout the length and breadth of the not see how any patriotic'citizen or"progressive of discrimination, and he
Union, and shows conclusively that the business man can seriously op- may have favorite banks and thus enable HOLD On, this isn't all. You can sell
western portion of our fair State is abreastof pose the principles enunciated by the him to concentrate all his money to one the said crop right there in your home
the, time and is marching,, hand in Farmers' Alliance, and should not !be in common center, which only can make a market for $250 per acre. You ask for
hand to that'lasting;, prosperity: with the hearty accord with the main features of corner: possible. This takes the moneysout the "How" and the "Wherefore."
rapidly developing eastern and southern their platform as has been said, and of circulation and furnishes the essential -
parts and all combining to make Floridaone which, in short, I understand to be the' element for a contraction of the Quite right-facts and figures count best.

of the greatest of the sisterhood of overthrow of sectionalism, a reductionof currency and a consequent money panic. Plant, the Land with Sugar Cane.
State comprising this great Union, taxation to the needs of the govern- These evils should be corrected and
Anyone who is at all observant: of the ment economically administered; State this temptation removed.I TO OLD'Farmers and careful perusers -

times and,the march and progress of civ' and inter-State control of railroads, asoundstable say' that there should be one of two of papers, the fact that there is now
ilization, can"but admit that our countryis ( and flexible currency issued things-let the government do the bank- established near Kissimmee, Fla., the
moving onward, and has, for the past by the government in accordance with ing business of the country and assume St. Cloud Sugar Refinery, is. stale
and demand with increased sub-
hundred ,.been recognized as the supply ,
years all the responsibilities thereof, or let it news.Ve are talking to all our
most enterprising and progressive nation, treasuries or money centres in proportionto
; keep its hands off it and let it alone. That
on the face of.the.. earth. Mr. Andrew the populatien and business of the the government should become a great friends. Sugar cane can be raised as
Carnegie, in his admirable book rium- country an honest dollar receivable for banking institution is hardly in keeping cheaply as corn, ,and.Uncle Sam will
phant Democracy,"'describes 'us. as the all dues and demands whether by gov- with the spirit, of our constitution and payyou a bounty of two cents per poundon
lightning express train moving at the ernment or individuals, a safe system of
: and should not be
possibly The St.
government, the manufactured sugar.
and medium of that
rate of sixty miles: an hour, while' the banking exchange but the be'the
older countries of Europe are travelingwith admits of no favoritism and which will money-making government can and issue a great sufficient Cloud plantation in Osceola Co., Fla.,

the same old accommodation train make a contraction of the currency anda quantity: of power gold, silver and greenbacks averaged 4,500 pounds of sugar to the
fifteen td twenty-miles an hour. This illustration cornering of the money market .for and it will
at all times,equal to the demandsof acre last year, go .5,000
very aptly shows the. rate of speculative purposes impossible. the people, which should be an honest pounds this year.METHODS .
progress being made in the United Statesas These I regard as substantially the dollar and receivable for all demands,
compared with England-the mother great reform which the farmers of the public and private, and let the'banking ? This isn't the only big

country. ) country are pledged and are endeavoringto of the country be done by private' indI- chance of your life, however. The
In this,grand)march forward it is peculiarly procure. They are sound govern- viduals, corporations or banking compa- rice lands about Kissimmee -
of
cultivation \
gratifying' to,.all friends of the : mental principles. I for one am in nies under State laws.If .
South and those who wish her to reap her full accord and sympathy with them; is to become an assured, profitable
the circulation is uniform
share of prosperity, 1to_ see the rapid and will heartily co-operate with the dollar is worth much in Maine and it a fact. There is no richer or better
strides ,she is making and is destined to farmers and industrial classes of the as as truck and market-garden lands in the
is in California I for
see no necessity a
make, and thrills the heart of every true country in securing such a: condition of the rich
uniform system of banking any more world than the land on over-
Floridian to know that our own incom- things.
than a uniform system of selling dry 'flow bottom lands about Kissimmee. -
'Florida ranks with the foremostof or
parable The financial
present or monetary
sys- goods. The uniformity in value all over
her sister southern States and is soon Write for confirmation, to Col.
tem of the country is receiving the special the country of national bank bills, as a ,
to take the lead of them, if all her patri- attention of the Alliance circulating medium,is possibly one of A. K. McClure, editor PhiladelphiaTimes
otic citizens but do their duty. ,
and Industrial Union. From all
appear- the attractive features of the national who has personal knowledge.
As a plain business man, I desire to ances it is regarded by them as the greatest banking system; ,and the inequality of Then in lands for orange groves, or
direct your attention to our State, her re- machine of oppression,the"Pandora's State bills under the State bank system
sources and her needs, and shall do ,so box" from which all their evils flow. of years ago, was the great objection to groves already cultivated or bearing,

in brief and perhaps imperfect manner. The national banking system,althoughit that system. I can satisfy you"that your best interestslie .

i It is said that Florida produces annually has stood the test for nearly half a century With a uniform currency or circulating in seeing me before any one else.

,of ,and is claimed by many of the ablest medium, however, I do not see why we BEAUTIFUL HOMES. The health-
4. and molasses.....$ 100,000 could not to the State bank
return system
Honey;sugar financiers as the best the world ever saw, of Kissimmeehave
Oranges, etc................. ........ 4,000,000 is no "Idol" of mine, and I am doing with absolute safety. The question of' fulness and beauty .
Hogs, beef and sheep............... 520,000 business under its:provisions from neces- finance, however, is a very importantand never been questioned. No
Fish, sponges, etc :.................. 1,100,000 sity-not from choice. It is not without intricate one, and should be handled diphtheria, no consumption, no pneumonia -
sT Rice,.corn and tobacco............ 1,200,000Red many objectionable features, and its with the greatest caution. It should -, in fact, read our medical
cedar.and other woods..... 1,500,000 workings being practically under the have the earnest attention of our best :: Beautiful villas or
Cotton ................;................. 4,000,000and control and direction of one man, couldbe business men and financiers and the aid report. cottages, Writefor
hundreds of thousands of dollars made indeed a "machine of oppres and co-operation of our brightest minds lots suitable for residences.
worth of other things, and I shall add, sion"by manipulating the currency and and ablest statesmen. It should be the terms and particulars.
that I believe that inside of five years,she concentrating it in one or two large banksof duty' of Congress to give heed to this COME SOUTH And get; untold
will export annually,five million dollars New York City, for instancewhereit matter and the appeals of the farmingand climate in
worth of phosphate,besides possibly as can be ,vaulted up and temporarilytaken industrial classes have been too long quantities of the grandest
many more millions may. be realized.annually out of circulation thus contracting unheeded and should claim the Imme- the world free with each acre of ground
from fertilizers manufactured in it, lowering the price of staple crops, diate attention of Congress and should purchased. Come where you can till
our own State; then think for one 'moment creating a money panic, and bringingruin receive their earnest efforts to relieve the soil twelve months in the year. '"
and'realize the boundless reSources and disaster to the business interestsof them by a change,of existing things as for full particulars.
of Florida the country. Such occurrences, in far as the same is possible under the con At least write to me

Do you doubt the possibilities, of whatI my opinion, have been enacted and are stitution., WM. CANNON,
have said? If you do you have,but to liable at any time to be repeated. I In their efforts to obtain relief from,existing Kfssltnmee, Fla.,
look, back for the past two years and think is the possibility of these occur- hardships, the Farmers' Allianceof Agent for the lands of the Diuton Compa ***,
think ,of''the fifteen m' dollars that rences that has given rise to the great the country have petitioned Congress lands for the of Associated Kl*slmmee Railways Land Co.land,aad the...
hare,been ntested,ia: ufS-tate.in phos- opposition of the Farmers' Alliance to by what is known as the subtreasurybill
phate lamia ,alone. Should, we: not be national banks, and should be remedied. ; a bill that has attracted widespread Phosphate, sugar cane,,rice, trucking;
encouraged tortBev? action in, behalf of There are, in my opinion. many objec- comment, pro and con and to'which or II fruit, grazing, timber, general farming
oar State ia pressing her,forward to the tienable features In the national banking; something better, the Farmers'Alliance: I and home lands. Send for map sJrewiag

grand prosperity of which she is capable? system, and I speak with some expen- as an organization, has fully coDllUittealfI lands. ... I
': ,_' ( l,' I
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24 THE FLORIDA. DISPATCH, FARMER, AND FRUIT-GROWER.: [ MABCH 19_, 18iteelf. '1''

.... _....__ ,____",, ,.r _, ....... __ ____xcy-, ,- .".. .=- 'w _"< "" ...,...'__ .
Whatever may be said of this bill ] favor the poor but operate by occult taxed both the note and the mortgagedland. are not safe. While the rate of interest -

a boilg'oontitMkrn.a1ity; ,. feasibiity,:or economic. laws to exempt theich, andit The reason is apparent, If provided is J large for a first class

that practicability the results; there,sought can be to no'question be obtained rallies retainers, some;::nispired by those noteholders should move to security, yet when we have to foreclose,
tough its provisions and operations, the hope of sharing ,in:the plunder of New York there would be nobody as is frequently the case, it is often .;
Tiz.:' a needml.supplj; of money at a low exemption, and others\by the delusive pay the taxes if they had exemptedthe difficult to realize from the proceeds of
rate of interest to;enable the. farmer to promise"of cheaper interest if .the. mortgaged land. Nantucket would the sale the full amount of principal
remove bis crops at a season of the year have For due. At there is
lender shall be exempted. It whee- no revenue. certaintyof present no authority
wtiititti. : is always scarce, should be
Malted oney i if po ible.. This bill:'should dles the poor followerof: Henry George revenue and to prevent fraud in this State for investing public funds
0 weerve the earnest and moat :profound (who, under the puritan'system;'never lent mortgages made: to avoid taxes, upon real estate security, except in regard -
atteBtfofi and eoDaideration'or. every bore a tax) t to )help in exempting cred- our ancestors taxed both the.mortgagenote to the'United States deposit fund.
member of Congress, and if coustitn- that and.the So their Nat. Economist.
ti.nal l'and practicable should. become its, led by the' wild .,hope somehow mortgaged land. -
law. If not so, then some measures a by shifting the taxes from the taxation before that sale and after was v .,.
giving equally as good results 'or'better chattel capitalist the land.'capitalist as follows : All the reasons that make gold and
sfeouW be adopted. As success or disaster his own poverty will become a vanished Before sale. Aftl"rsale. silver''a good standard of value, make :
:to the agricultural interests of'thectryaffects dream. It bides for the nationalist Property Tax Property. Tax. land a poor standard. It varies in, "

people j J and their a interests larger number to a greater:of our to establish municipal works like Proprietors 1.1.000" 00130 000 I $3O A.000 $15,000 value, more even than.staple.manufactures -
extent than all other interests put together the gas works of Philadelphia, which Workmen None; None. 3,000.000 15,000 which are not dependent on the

'j'in fact, as Thomas Jefferson said by ,charging $1.50 for gas'*when $i Note, here was a double valuation, seasons. Any particular land is not
in his first inaugural,address as President would 'be an ample price levies a but. not 'a double tax., Observe 'par- universally: desired. Americans do
of:the:United States "Agriculture is the
:
chief pillar of our wealth and prosperity -' half million of taxes from men not in ticularly that those note-holding proprietors not desire_ French farms, nor Georgians -
."I Therefore I say'relief to our farm proportion to their abilities but in pro- had no hardship from this Vermont town' lots. It is not always !-
ers and industrial classes should bespeedily portion as they use gas. It is every- process which they call double taxa- desired. On the contrary real
given. I bid the farmers Godspeed where alert, while the farmer and' ordinary tion, for while they really ought to pay estate sells more slowly than'any other
,in their efforts and them '
of
'
my.sympathy, aid and, earnest assure,co-opera-, business man have seemed, the, whole tax of the island,the "double commodity. For these reasons. 'land,
tion. It I may' be pardoned ,for a per- everywhere asleep. tax" let them off from half. So them is almost the worst basis of money.In .
sonal allusion to myself, as'one whose Nor will its course be stayed till men n who holds the mortgage note is the absence of gold and silver, )

life' has, been 'inseparably linked with will investigate their wrongs and main- never double taxed ; is never taxed government taxes, pig iron, cotton, t

interests theirs whose and sympathies associations along, affections the -, tain their '\ ghts with the spirit! of the enough, for his tax is reduced by the corn, wheat, beef, bacon would make.

paths of poverty and adversity from rugged puritan colonists, who, by theSight of taxation of mortgaged land. a better basis for currency.-Christian,
rafancy the present day,. side by side pine knots on their hearthstones, after But he cries "double taxation," and Patriot. '-
with,the great struggling, laboring ere; the Bible, studied Blackstone and, the States 'like Connecticut, Oregon and ***
ment, I .!have a ,right ,to know and butspeak. science of Taxation and established the Massachusetts, exempt him, to the At, a meeting of San Luis Obispo
what I,have learned from'sad
: and I say' that no class, in this expedenoo most, perfect system: of taxation the grevious'wrong of the farmers who in County Alliance} held January 13,
country of ours have a better right to beheard world has yet seen. the latter State (if we count the reduction 1891, the following resolution was
and! heeded than the toiling masses, Their: theorem is now generally con. in savings bank taxes made adopted :
by"whose honest hearts, sturdy ,steps, ceded that, with certain minor exemp- necessary by their exemption) are Resolved, That in our opinion two
:muscles with the aid of All
wise brawny,Creator, this, great! country is an what* tions, each man should bear taxes in mulcted about quarter of a million legislative 'bodies sitting at one time

it, is to-day,:the, best government ,in the proportion to his ability, and that this annually by the increase of taxes_ re, are useless and a hindrance to the en-
world, 'the asylum for the oppressed ability should be measured by the market quired to let the lenders off. actment of just and needed laws,
mankind of all nations. value of his possessions. The golden Since this exemption of mortgages therefore we request the present legislature -
)
All henorand praise be given to the canon of taxation is : i in Massachusetts every borrower on of California' to consider the

patriotic they continue American until their yeomanry.efforts shall:May be, "Taxation should rest like an. atmosphere mortgage has paid all the taxes, he did proposition to consolidate the Senate,

crowned with a glorious success, and on all property alike." before and one tax more, namely his and House of Representatives i into
P our government shall be'redeemed and .This cannon forbids the taxation of share'of the tax the lenders got rid of. one, by constitutional amendment.

brought back, to, the 'days of-itst:pristine one man to, build up the business' of HENRY WINN, in Am. Agriculturists *st*'
purity, for the people,and for their.benefit =
,
.
When Phil. Armour
and connivance the Bell
and not the people for the govern- another, at escapeof Liberty : -
: ,
ment."I one to throw his burdens on the Reform Press. went on the board of trade and boughtall
': :might say much 'mom'on this subject rest. Its peculiar virtue is that underit The plan of loaning money on real l the pork in sight and 200,000 bar-
but I have already detained you too there is no indirect taxation by'incidence estate is not a new one as the following rels of "futures" more than was sup-

long you heartily, and would for conclude kind attention., by thanking but the house owner: pays with- shows: In 1837 the federal surplusto posed to be in existence, and then

P .... f your. .'. I' out charging his tax into the rent bill ,the amount of $28,101,645 was deposited raised the price from $10 a barrel to'

,THE ;TAX PROBLEM. and every man bears his tax' as he .among the respective States.It $18.20-clearing $777,000 by :the,
stands in the list. was named the United States deposit deal-that was "business." When

HOW'. Real Estate is Unjustly Burr It is claimed that a credit is not fund, and was loaned on call, so that the Knights of 'Labor decided not to'

-. dened. property and so equity is satisfied the States felt obliged' to invest the eat any of Armour's "future" meat. ,
.No matter of public interest is so when tangible things are taxed and money where they could realize on it that was "conspiracy."
important to the farmer as honest local paper representations exempted. if necessary. New York's quota was Yes, and if the vast centralizingpower

taxation.! ,And in no phase of the administration What is a note? Conceive an island about $4000,000, which was loanedon .in this country is not soon'

of government ,are the. like Nantucket valued at three mil- farms with the following result, according stopped, about fifty-five millions out
abuses so gross, the, oppression so unjust lions with taxes of thirty thousand. to the testimony of the comp-- of the sixty five, millions of the present

;and, .severe. The great wrong Assume' that it is owned by fifty pro- troller under date of January 7 : population of this country will be subject -.
lies in the exemptions escape from prieters who employ five hundred pen-I The money was authorized to be invested to indictment for the same kindof
assessment of notes, dues receivable, liness workmen. Who owe'the taxes ? upon bond and mortgage on conspiracy;-lack of funds will
bonds and stocks,. which are the peculiar -: Plainly the proprietors, for they own improved real estate by county com compel about that number to "re .I

property of the very wealthy usu. the property. Feeling rich enough to missioners, appointed by the governorin solve" not to eat that same "future" +t
ally, called credits. 'Tax dodging has retire, they sell the island to their each county, pursuant to a statute meal of Phil. Armour's-nor any

open defenders, but the-exemption of workmen taking their notes',secured by passed by the legislature. Those securities other. .

I. credits has more,and,the exemption of mortgage. Who now,owe the taxes ? and the manner of the invest- What Ho,Did' With It. .
mortgage. loans is an insidious\ form of Have the former proprietors Impover- ment of the said funds upon real estate, the of the Pioneer tHe
the abuse which has established.'itself ished themselves in the slightest the as provided, have not met with the bought buggy
Co. and then took Maud forfc
in several States. Since it. is the trade? If so, why did they make it ? approval of the financial officers of the Buggy ,
drive. But he the side of
Have the workmen become rich ? Do State for a number of years past. It kept on good
the father him with
presenting
exemption. not the note-holders through interest has been the policy of the comptrollerto of the, Dy Horse Book "a
While .the unwary farmer rests in the enjoy the fruits of the island as they withdraw said funds from the county copy "Complete ,
which send free for in
quiet dreams that by casting his vote did before, leaving the workman with commissioners as fast as possible, and we silver. Pioneer ten cents Co.,
and then forgetting public flairs he not much more than he had before as invest the same, himself in public se stamps or O Buggy' ,

has secured himself from wrong, the product of the same labor he now curities. The amount still outstandingin Columbus ,
wealth finds the ear of government, it applies ? Plainly then, if there is any the hands of the county commissioners -
controls assessors, it fills the rooms of property in that island which ought to and invested upon real estate in HORTICULTURAL{ ,'

r legislative committees with able coun be taxed it is the notes. And so, 'gen- the several counties of the State, is 'SUPPLIES.'jW,: t .

sel, it packs' the lower houses. of legis- erally, ,a credit is the essential fruit about 1500000. The rate of intereston HORTICU .TURAS.'TOOL Mt$ tiT and aaaDki. AM KIT say9W -'
l lation with well-to-do credit holders, bearing title to tangible property of such securities at present, as provided Usx CKe. ,.i tixa.'iL End"
rrSeed era&< > &.d*
and the highest with millionaires ; it which the actual holder.. has only the by statute, is 5 per cent. per i lor" lWJby s.ppl VATALOf1JOHNSON r oar F aE 14 I<<...o.ceemplete
t owns presses, it formulates attractive nominal title. annum. Experience has shown that SOB .ablihe4.

1 schemes. .of.......'..... which" appear, on their., 'face to Our fathers,'in the case: I have cited, the' said investments upon real: estate 21t...SI'M....STOKES.' fttl."I 1:tgrEtiM,)
,. i .I' .
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y tI,-"r) THE,, FLORIDA, DISPATCH, _, FARMER AND FRUIT-GROWER. [.MARCH 19, 1891


Lawn, I THE WALK. NEW KODAKS. as they generally run too deep to be
To make this a'trench one hundred turned up with the plow. The roots
",. X WWi1Nr| > X/i> N*> \<' feet long, four feet wide and six inches should be carefully picked out and

'- A Suburban Home. deep. was dug and faced 'with boardsat piled up to dry, where they will not

: r Tbie elegant residence of Messrs. J., the sides. Four inches of broken take root again from lying on the moist

'Crawsfcaw' & Son,.near Lawtey, ,; i is, agood' ,. bricks, rubble and coarse mortar' was You preSs tfo ground.

illustration of the, .beauty and thrown on the bottom and the upper button, Cojnmelyni nudifora (Common Day

,effort that can be created in Florida two inches finished with a good Flower). Very common in cultivated,
-
'
by a:little, study 'and persevering industry. article of cement. Just in front of we do the rest. land of a rather moist nature. Stems'

!; Although 'possessed of ample : the house it expands into a half oc prostrate, slender, much branched,

runs;. .these. : gentlemen have done tagon. This entire length was madein SenD :Sew Styles sad Sizes two to five feet long, rooting at every
nearly all'the work about the premises ,one stretch, ana the result is the ALX.LOADKD WITH Transparent Films. joint, making it very difficult to pullor
themselves.: 'They laid the brick in swelling and shrinking caused it to For sale.by all Photo.Stock Dealers.THEEASTMANCOMPAN. hoe it up, as the stem breaks at the

their cwtern, plastered it, laid the crack in places. Mr. C. says if he joints in attempting to pull it up.

pipes! ; drains" etc., laid the walk, put' had it to do over he should do it in Send for Catalogue. ROCHESTER,N.Y. Leaves ovate-lanceolate, sheathing,
up''the:.trellises, planted or:.moved allthe sections, which would prevent the one or two inches long; flowers blue,

''trees: shrubs, etc., showing that cracking. from a spathe, half an inch or less in
men with determination ,and a fair; trees; grevilleas, or Australian oaks, diameter; petals three, one smaller .
share of American gumption can do a FLOWERS AND SHRUBBERY. too tender, for this latitude ; bamboos, than the other two. This plant is far' .

thousand and one things which, mostpeople''of The most conspicuous ornamental both giant and dwarf; the Canton more troublesome in flower gardens

wealth' 'usUAlly think, they objects in the yard are the,different hybrid and other rare citrus trees ; than in fields or truck gardens, whereit

Jl ut have done for them by workmen. varieties of the arbor vitae and the kakis, pears, figs, etc. On each side can be largely destroyed with. theplow.

-ffem,large city. .. roses. The golden-tipped arbor vitae of the avenue, in.front of the house, .
.. (Biota durea) is'a beautiful little there are fifty Texas umbrella trees .
tr'i 'THE CISTERN. shrub ; nothing could be handsomerin recently planted.We Viola hasteta.
'
la accordance with the usual practice i :its way. There are two or, three have mentioned only the. plants There are several species amongour

)in! Lawtey: the ,house, is raised on I other varieties" not well identified, all that did well.-ED. American violets which are rarelyseen j'-

posts'about'six. feet above: the ground, of them, doing well. At first most of ... in gardens, although they possess

giving. a broad, cool, airy "celjar" them dwindled, but after a couple of Jamaica Sorrel. much charm and beauty as garden-
underneath,, an admirable'place 'for a drains were laid through the yard Editor Farmer and Frult-Orower: plants. Our common Northern Viola ,

work-shop and a store-house for 'fruit (made of .boards four inches square, Several persons have recently applied cucullata, Viola pcdata, the Birds-foot
arid sunken three feet below the to me for seeds or roots of the
aid vegetables. Directly 'under the violet, the charming little yellow-
kitchen, is the cistern, eight _feet, in surface) those near it began to flour Jamaica Sorrel, or information about flowered Viola ubes.ens, and the white-
who sells
them.A .
diameter and ten feet deep., The soil ish. Others, 'strange. to say, seemedto any person flowered Viola Canadensis, one of the
n 1 being flatwoods, a stratum ;bf clay is take on anew Vigor simply from party formerly advertised foots of best plants which can be grown in a
the
Sorrel
i'reached at a depth of about' thirty being moved from one. place to an- Jamaica at twenty-five cents rock garden sheltered by overhanging
in the Florida in
apiece, Agriculturist
inches, and in this one soon comes to other. \ trees, are all excellent subjects to naturalize -
The house, is bordered three 1889, as well as I can recollect, but
'
on in the at-
water, no matter what time of year, garden. Equally
files
which interferes with ,the work of sides with a trellis on which the follow having LO of the paper of that tractive, although much less well

putting: in a cistern. zzA.''pump Has to roses are making a handsome period, can give no satisfactory reply. known, is the .Halbert-leaf violet

be kept in operation 'while the digging growth James Sprunt, Marechal : Those having seeds or roots to spare (V. hastata)), which grows very locallyin
would do well advertise in the
goes'on, and when the cistern reaches Niel, Celine Forrestier,' Reine Marie I to Northern Ohio, and is found in the

; tHe desired depth a little well has to H nriette, Richardson, Solfaterre,La- FRUIT"cheap GROWER.columns" of.the FARMER AND forests of the Alleghany Mountainsfrom

be'dug''in the center and kept pumpedout marque. On the west side of the Pennsylvania to the northern
the readers of
until all the rest of the 'work is house there are three Marechal Niels Among your paper borders of Florida. It is a yellow-
be several I
which 'do,, not flourish; the proprietor there must persons who flowered slender glabrous
completed, when it is drained dry and_ have had in the nearly
quickly filled with groat and. cement believes this is due' to the heat of the Jamaica Sorrel experience and who could growing tell all species, distinguished by its halberd
,
before-the water can 'rise., afternoon sun with the reflection from' shaped stem-leaves, which in one remarkable -
the' house adding to its fervor. Thoseon about its culture, capabilities, and Southern form are three-
Above the clay the wall.is laid .with where it Can be procured.
the other sides are making a luxuriant lobed, or even trifoliate (var. tripartita).
whole.brick the cistern being carried
Except at the home of Gov. A. P. '
and thrivein
hasa will doubtless
growth, a neighbor This plant
pretty
u3 about.three feet above groundi but K. Safford Fla. I
| ; Marechal Niel on the west side of Tarpon Springs, cultivation under the conditions
done in the clay the wall is composed. have not seen the plant in cultivation.If .
his house which has flourished
ex- which are favorable to the growtn of
of brickbats; : (which are much. desired information
; cheaper he would kindly give the -
ceedingly for four though it Viola which botanically
an'd years, pubescent, to ,
equally as good), with it would be
gr.oat highly appreciated -
rests against a veranda and has it is very closely related.-Garden and
between them and the
clay. readers.
by many .
*V/I! abundant ventilation without. exces- Forest.
'
? The wall is strengthened by three sive heat. MRS. JENNIE S. PERKINS. '4

buttresses outside, each two bricks Mr. Crawshaw thinks the reason 811, Mulberry. St, Macon.Ga.. .- March 7,1891. Consumption Cure d. ,
square: and two flues. One, of these why so fail to succeed 9 :: An old physician retired from practice,bad ;
r many persons Some Troublesome Florida Weeds. placed In his hands by an >ast India ml -
%esserves for a filter; it is eighteen with this magnificent ,rose, the Mare slonory the formula of a simple' vegetable
i inches extends to the' bottom No. 13.fj. remedy for the speedy and permanent cure of
square, is
chal Niel, that they neglect it and Consumption Bronchitis. Catarrh. Asthma
oft the. cistern, and from it a pipe allow sprouts from the hardy stock to H. SIMPSON, MANATEE.] ", and all throat and lung affections. ,also apo l-
tlv and radical care Gar nervous debility and
passes,up into the pump in the kitchen spring ,up, and rob the growth above. Urtica. Urens (Small Stinging Nettle all nervous complaints. Having. tested Its

overhead.? Passing through this brick His is budded on the Cherokee, and Dwarf Nettle). This is an annual, cases wonderful, and desiring curative to powers relieve in human thousands. suffering of-,
wall the water is 'very pure and limpiii he is only now venturing, not withoutmisgivings eight to twelve inches or more high, .I will 'find free of charge to all who wishIt.
} and Mr. Crawshaw said,that,even it found in cultivated and this recipe in German Drench or English
; ; even after has got a waste grounds.The with full directions for preparing and using.
hjs\ .Newfoundland dog-a thorough growth of two years, to allow a single stem is beset with venomous stings; tent by mall, by address lng with' Powersi!stamp f'
naming this W.A.NOTES,82)
geatleman, by the way-would not shoot to come up from the root, to be leaves ovate or broadly elliptical, pe- Block Rochester paper.,N.Y.Tutt'sPiIIs.
drink' well water if he could help it, budded for a friend who has always tioled, three-veined, opposite. It is .
brit would go thirsty long time wait-: failed with this prince of roses. naturalized from Europe. This shouldbe

' wgjfor; cistern water.. ; The Celine Forresticr, a noisette completely destroyed before;> goingto '

The.'.other: ,flue serves:: a waste rose, is perhaps the most thrifty seed and getting a foothold.
pipe. The four-inch tin conductorf grower"'oi all ; a vt ry beautiful yellowrose Canna flaccida (Indian Shot, Head-

f .about two feet above the cistern, ; fulljand of fine form, one of the ache Plant, Wild Canna)% This plantis

and'in the fork there is a valve. This best of the yellow roses, in bud, in found in swamps and in Ipw culti-

may be turned. throw the water down flower and in habit of growth. vated hammock soil. The stem is stimulates ens digestive.*he torpid organs liver regulates strea *ta*_. ,

i into the cistern, or it may be thrown The Richardson proved refractoryand from two to four feet high; leaves trowels,and are unequaled aa an "

.... into the,other branch of the fork and he failed to get one started untila smooth, two to four indies wide and ANTI-BILIOUS MEDICINE

.. carried across into the waste pipe. friend, who had a stout, old clump, from nine to' eighteen inches long; ..
The.,waste flue reaches .to the bottom allowed it to.be split "down throughthe flowers large, yellow, irregular; cap In wldelyrecogntned.astheypossesspeedr'malarial districts their virtaes are ...

ofjhe cistern ; so when a rain precipitates middle with a saw, giving a sule often 'an inch long, covered witha nllarproperties in freeing thesysterafrom

.a quantity of fresh water into the thrifty section, well rooted, which, dense, bristly coat. It is an ever- that. Dose poison.small. Elegantly Price,2 ete.sugarcoated. % J 1

cistern the overflow is from ;the ,oldwater when set out began to grow at once. green perennial, spreading by hori- Sold Everywhere. j

at the bottom, rising through Besides there is a Japanese maple, avery zontal rootstocks deep in the ground,
the lillie,at the ,outside. ,.* pretty shrub; "soine camphor which must be dug out with the spade, I Office,'39&41 Park Place,N.Yn. !,
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MABCH 19,1891] G THE FLORIDA DdS ATCfi, #A MER AND FRUIT-GROWER. 231


The Wane of the Petticoat. ses. As 1 airi one of those who think worked years on this grove and this -.f
Our Rural flpme, The petticoat must go. boys should ,be trained to "be, good year it promises to repay him for"all

...,. ....... ....... ......... --- ...,..,..,..... ...... The,fiat has gone forth, from dress husbands no less than girls to be good his trouble. He has been fortunate -j
"Lifted Over." reformers first of all and lastly from fash wives, I insist that my two boys shall enough to be in the State and to see ,1
A* leader mners guiding baby steps, ion. The divided skirt, which is do certain dailychoresabout the house: his grove in full bloom, and his own
,
When places)i ome at which the tenderfeet warmer than two common petticoatsand without any prompting. Each of two were the first orange trees he ever .1
o Would trip: ,lift\ up the little one In arms? permits the wearer to get over the has charge of a stove, and must keepone did sec in bloom.-Starke Telegraph. :}
Of love;aad eel them beTond the! harms
So did our Father watch the precious ,boy ground in a gusty day without stoppingat supplied with coal and the other
Lied."e.i the stones by me,who stumbled oft every corner to unwind, gains in with wood without any prompting.The .
}.1YI&IHt l led my darling on popularity with all classes. It costs penalty of neglect is that the
4'.saw the sweet limbs' faltering, and saw ready made from$1.50 to$20; according clothes of the culprit shall be put The Superior
bough ways before us,where my arms.would '
fall, to whether itjs of worsted pongee away in his drawers without ironing; ;
untrimmed of India silk accordion- and of the is fond of
So reached from heaven, and lifting the dear or as one boys remedy .
child, plaited and briar stitched, and can be shiny collars and bosoms, the omissionof
Who smiled In leaving me, lIe put him down made at home of any material one two weeks' '''ironing taught him the for all diseasesoriginating ;
t
Beyond all hurt, beyond my sight! ,and bad pleases.But propriety of taking up his duty and in .
Him wait for me 1 Shall I not then be glad/: ,
for street wear many women are bearing it, right along. This penalty impure blood '
;
And. thanking Ged,press on to overtake '
I Helen ,Hunt Jackson giving up petticoats altogether, wearing failing in the case of the other boy, the
---- '. .- instead black worsted tights (ladies' whenever his' chores were undone he ,
p.r! Hints About Boys. bicycle trousers), jersey-fitting, reach- tooK/ is next meal in the kitchen; andas
,'t Each 'boy should sleep alone, rather ing from the waist to the ankles. Theseare this was very trying he has decidedto MEDICINE' I j

than two together, where this is possible i- worn over the combination under- take up his duty and do it. '#
.; should sleep'on a hard mattress garment, with the stockings between Five or ten minutes at the most suffices which ,
of husks''and straw, never ,on featherbed them, and the boots buttoned up over to do the work required, which may always *" .
; should have''as few covers aS'will them, giving warmth, but nothing to might easily be done by hired help; but be relied :
ei make comfortable, and never be over- draggle about one's ankle, or to step in that case the boys would get entirelyout upon >
t\ warm. (Beds are often cold becausethe on' going up stairs or to trip going of the'way of feeling any domestic: to give the best. 1
'cold comes' J up through the mat- down stairs. The properly made dress responsibility. When boys and girls'can satisfaction,
tress; when this is the casey a blanket skirt hangs as well over tights as over depended on to do certain nec-
is
y on,the mattress'under the sleeper.) a petticoat and gives 'an amount' of essary disagreeable duties without
Hearty boys should not sleep i in warm blessed freedom to women who, born being "punched up," I think they AYER'SSarsaparilla
rooms, but there is no' objection_ to with two legs, see"/nothing reprehensible begin to be men and women' Until I '
sleeping in rooms, from which the chill in clothing each leg under the compelled my boys to take care of
has been, taken, as in a room opening drapery of the dress which is retainedfor their own rooms they were disorderly
into a warm hall. The rooms shouldbe its grace, when fittingly made. in their rooms;.l leaving garments lying .
thoroughly ventilated, windows Jersey tights do away with cotton around instead of hanging them up, Cures others,will cure you
open wide as they will go ; opening a drawers and save, in labor expendedupon whittling on 'the 'carpet and taking no
window 'an inch or two gives no ventilation sewing and washing, many times pains to keep their rooms tidy. Now
at all. their cost. This averages about$3.50per everything is in place, neat and THE1L0RYOFMANSTRENGTH.VITALITY
Boys under fourteen years of age pair. Shaken well and aired daily,' orderly. Finding out,how much workit
need,not less' than nine hours' sleep the bicycle trousers require to be takes to sweep and tidy a room !
,each night; to grow up into 'vigorousmen washed not oftener than once in three makes them careful; and when they go How Lost
this is most important. On farms weeks, since they take the' place of to college the habit of keeping their How Regained,
boys are often called so early that petticoats, not touching the skin at rooms in order will be well fixed. fG".
they do not get much more than half any point. 41 .
enough sleep; result, they make men For summer wear the jersey trousersare Death to Roaches.I .
'of'weak minds and' weak 'bodies. In too warm and their devotees ex- tried every remedy I could hear /(07: EJ

towns boys often lose 'sleep over their change them for a divided skirt,whichis of, and I was always inquiring.' They

school: books or in roaming the,streets. worn over a lisle, balbriggan or a seemed to fatten on my poisons; at KNOTO5ETHE
No boy urder'fourteen' ; should be out cotton combination suit (reaching to least their numbers did not suffer di-
after dark, and no boy under fourteen the knees), and no cotton drawers are minution. One day I took up an old SCIENCE OF LIFE ..,
,
should be'required ,to study at home ; required.An ,almanac and idly turned its tattered on A Scientific the Error and ol Standard YoathPrematare Popular DeclIne Medical Nerroa Treatise*, >
the school day' is long enough for that. added advantage of the tights is yellow'pages, and on the last fragmentof and Physical Debility,Impurities of the Blood.

No,objection, however, to his reading that the stockings are held up betweenthe a leaf came upon this: "Equal por- EXHAUSTEDVITAIITYUNTOLD
in the evening. When he goes to bed, outer and inner garments without tions of corn meal and red lead mixed

it should be to sleep, not to worry suspenders of any sort. with molasses, and spread on plates, MISERIESResulting
over lessons. Fashion has set her stamp upon will destroy roaches." And it did. I I I

,The boy under fourteen; or sixteen house gowns made with plaitings of put it in several dishes and set themon from FoUy,Vice,I orance.Beeuet or
either, should' not be allowed 'to be silk or lace inside the dress skirt, so the floor, and at nine o'clock stole for Overtaxation Work,Baslneas, Enerratinz, the bfarrledorsoclal and unfitting the Relation victim
called in the morning with an alarm arranged as to provide the witchery of softly out to see if ,they ate it. The Aroid unskillful pretender Possess this great
clock, that he.may rise early'to study.. dainty trappings about my lady's slip dishes were so covered with roaches work.binding,It embossed contain,800 fall pages gilt!: ,royal Price Sro.only Beautiful 1.00 by
The l boy? should go to bed with warm pered feet, and yet put the weight of that: the mixture was scarcely visible. mail,postpaid Prospectus,concealed Free,if in plain wrapper. JllatrstiTe The*. 4:
feet -rlie cannot sleep. The feet arebest the flouncings upon the skirt which, in The next night there were fewer at the distinguished author,Wm IL you Parker: ,pow.M. D.' re- a
f'wirmed: in cold the of feast. And in. week not roach eeired the GOLD AND JEWELLED MEDAL
.'bathing water princess"style gown, depends a a. from the National Medical AeaociaUoa for
and then'rubbing with a ,coarse' towel from the shoulders and not from the was seen. I lived seven' years there- this PRIZE ESSAY on NERVOUS and
2 until dry. He should not go to bed hips.The after in the same house and never saw of PHYSICAL Assistant Physicians DEBILITY may.Dr.PaJcerand b. consulted aeorpe confi
.j hungry, but a: glass, of milk or a bodily emancipation of women one.-Good Housekeeping. dentially THE PEABODY by mall or MEDICAL in person at INSTITUTE the office of,
piece of bread and butter is all he dawns.-Ladies' Home Companion. If No.4BallinchSt.Bo.tonMaas.towhomall
ordera.for books or letters for adylco should be
. needs on retiring. He should sleep Orange trees this season are bloom. directed AI abort*
with face.;away from 'window, for the TrainingBoys to be Husbands. ing nicely, in 'factevery little tree b
early light and the moonlight shining The old miners of California, when that is large enough to hold up an
into the.eyes is injurious to then delicate they did not become wrecks from their orange is fragrant' with bloom. But For a DISORDERED LIVER
bad habits made the best husbands in of alltrees that have
>rgans. If the rising hour is six, come to our
th'e'room should\ be' darkened else in the world, because they had been notice the Sundell orange grove 'on Try BEECHAM'S'1LLS.
the summer season he will be awakened through the mysteries and the miseriesof Kingsley lake is certainly the fullest 25cis. Box.
:at break of day, two hours be- bachelor housekeeping and knew of bloom and the most fragrant of I3RVG.c a .. '
fore the,rising h r.Vhen requiredto how to appreciate a good wife Very any. This grove consists of 12 acres 'OFAXtXa : rxH 'a.SQRGHTThI
lose :sleep, he,should be given time few men are really able to do this. A of budded? orange, trees. They are .. --
to ;m ke'.it up. When sick, sleep ,isoften correspondent in an. exchange corroborates well grown and handsome, but the e
of more value than medicine these views: prettiest'part is that they were'at the
give him all the sleep he asks for.--H.. I have observed that the most intelligently time of our visit perfectly white with A Lima, book that every farmer ought to haTe }
w Hand Book" which be-
Is the "Sorghum mar
.z.V' ,. _T.L. I helpful husbands and fathers bloom. not only on the outside, but had free.addressing The Blymjer Iron WorksCo.
& . I are those who have been accustomedin in parting the leaves the inside of the able..of crop Cincinnati syrup-making,'a Sorghum feed and I* &VeI'TTaJ-u.fodder',and:
HORSFORD'S_ ACID PHOSPHATE: their boyhood to help their mothers tree was discovered to be as whiteas this pamphlet gives full information about tale ,
,Ui hi'aXf ? of dyspepsia. *, %I and sisters about, the! house and premi the. outside.I Mr. Sundell" has fend different and species get it and,beat read. modes it. of C lt4ftlto ,etc. ,
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k ; !fbeJ Farmers Alliance "

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VOL. y. 'Agriculture is the Basis .of' Wealth" No. 12.
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'rOfjSAWYERf.- l' i ,.> r.-4.'- -* Contributor.'. -- r The way to make the Farmers Alliance no petitions going up about those manipulated for party purposes and
Notice. grow is to fight it. Get an old farmer breech.covering breeches, etc., etc. were persuaded to give their own aims
\ H t,$ stirred up on any question, from relig We can stand the tax on shot-guns, only a secondary place, they accom-
-Secretaries. County and Sub-Alliances ion and he is and if could have Winchesters This is but
to politics, ready to fighta we a tax on plished next to nothing.
: wishing receipt-books 1 ;- 'can get buzz saw.'Vhenever. and pistols that would amountto history repeating itself. It has ever
the':'same by applying. .the under the opposition begins to prohibition we could stand that too; been so and it ever will.
signed.' A.'P. 'BASKJNY i, pat us on the back and call us.good but'when our:breech covering breechesare What an opportunity is ours! A
.. fellows, we at once begin to relax our taxed, from the bottom hem all crisis in our National history has been
Sec. Fla. State Alliance.
'" .It vigilance and waver i in our purpose. along up both legs across the seat reached and I unhesitatingly affirm
: r f; We want fair treatment and proper and through the pockets to the that the weal or woe of the country,
,
"; : Alliance Notice. respect from all the world, but ,we do waistband, it hurts our feelings collectively that the National prosperity or disaster -
I'shall be pleased if the Secretary or not want. any coddling nor any soft and individually. In most awaits the actions of the farmer
President of the County .Alliance: of soap. We are prepared to welcomethe portions, of Florida breech-loading .in the election of '92. We have
each county will notify rme"'of,their kind encouragement of every godd shot-guns are merely luxury, but ,I I reached the point in,our history as a
place, of meeting.; It will save me citizen, but we want something more have never yet found a place in all nation at which the Roman republichad
much trouble. in getting to.my. appoint- than words. You all remember the our fair State where breechcoveringbreeches arrived when bribery and corruption fc"
ments. Fraternally, old proverb: "Kind words butter no were not a necessity. Now, gained the day and her doom as
C. B.'COLLINS, parsnips, but beef liver pie is,..fatness my friends, don't let us worry Congress a nation was sealed. And let the
State.Lect.. rer. to the soul. If you don't recollectthe about shotgun taxes, but we'll keep pestilential corruption now existing
c. Box 42,:Anthony; Fla.. proverb don't say anything aboutit. the breeches question red hot. and leavening with its diabolical in- f
SAWYER. fluence but
\ TOM not only our political
No Pip in the Indian River Aliif I caught two I. R. trout yesterday our social life as well; let the infamous
*4' .
'(.** .s '-' ances.. ..' > I and devoured them. They weighed Alliance Outlook. bribery, '''both of voter and legislator,
*T find that the farmers of this Indian nearly ten pounds and I am only gain Editor Alliance Department: go on unchecked; let hope of political
River\ country are alive to their' i interest ing one pound in weight per day. Will the Alliance aims be attained? preferment and a dip into the public
'and are flocking into the Farmers How are we to reconcile this apparent Will l its'agitation be successful, or will purse bias men increasingly in the
Alliance. The Brevard County ,Alliance discrepancy? the whole thin end in smoke? Suchare future as in the present and past,
has just closed its first ession That august (or April) body' knownas the questions asked on every : and Ichabod will be written over
and the outlook is very encouraging. the Florida Legislature will meet hand. Asked by the politicians, the ,the citadel of our departed liberties
OJ'he; membership is quite an intelligent next month, and the indications now middlemen, the gamblers in farm and we will die to freedom,
body-above the average, and they point to the liveliest session since the produce and especially by the monied to liberty, die to all the glorious hopes
have good ,business ideas. Theyare, l last. There is to be a Senator elected class, the capitalist It is beyond that have gilded our National horizon
patronizing the Exchange at Jackson- and a road law repealed. '"Me and cavil the question of the hour. The with brilliant? coruscations, promising _
ville for such. heavy articles as fertil- Bob" will not be candidates unless Alliance gains in the last election and a day of the most splendid and unlimited -
izers, stoves, wagons, 'etc., and> they ---(?), nor have we any desire to especially the solid front shown by the National prosperity. Die as
claim a great saving 'of money.. work .on the public roads. I think the farmers, particularly in the West and we deserve, having sealed our own
Of course, they think that the Indian Alliance members of the Legislaturewill Northwest, have awakened the monied doom and signed our own deathwarrant \
River section is the best portion; of have sufficient patriotism and business I classes as never before to the fact that
Florida, ,and every mother's son of sense to elect a man who can I the key to all needed reforms is held On the other hand, we may by our
them will swear'that their salt .water and will properly represent the Stateat by the tiller of the soil. The questionis patriotic and united action save the
mullet, and 'pompano are superior to all events the Alliance will be no longer, can the farmer attain his Union, in a nobler, grander sense
ear Ocklawaha: bass and bream ; but held responsible for the actions of a ends, but will he? Does the Alliance than ever it has been saved in the
"j ,they are foolish in that line. People body,which they will control. I have fully grasp the situation? Does it past. We may save our national life
become prejudiced favor of the prod supreme;faith in the solid good sense realize what is needed ? Are the farm and liberties, and leave to our childrena
ucts of their particular i locality and I of the brethren we have sent to Talla- ers a unit in the matter and will theybe commonwealth strong, because free,
have no doubt that when I go out hassee, and I look for good results true to-themselves and, refusing to i happy, because prosperous, and safe
West in April I will find brethren from their deliberations. be turned aside from their purposes, because of God's,smile upon the clean
;- bragging about the Chattahoochee TOM SAWYER. strike the iron whilst it is hot and attain record. Let us, as Alliance men, with
mud cat. TitQBville,March 12 that which professedly they seek unfaltering advance, beat backthe;
Brevard will have five more sub- > and which admittedly they may take unrighteous encroachments of capital
Alliances organized in a few weeks, Breeches and Shot-Guns. if they, will? upon labor. Let, us join hands with
' and under the able leadership of Capt Some of our good citizens who Such I believe, is a fair descriptionof all the moral and religious forces in
R. C. .May,, of Rockledge, the order know more about the game laws of the questioning and expectant 'atti the nation and with them demand
is' -bound to flourish. The coast at Florida than they do of the Constitution tude of all classes at the present moment that every incubus resting upon the
Rockledge and Cocoa is a charming of the United States sent up a As an Allianceman I want to nation and hindering or preventing 1-
,
section, and I have not seen such a: petition to Congress to decrease the ask, what are the lessons taught by the her truest progress, in everything that 4
lot l ."o.f the "damyankee" since 'the duty on breech-loading shotguns.The past? Wise men learn by the mistakesof makes a nation truly great and good,
Philadelphia Exposition. Old "Rebs" ; duty on those weapons is, 30 percent the past to avoid blunders in the shall be hurled from her path. Let us
and veteran "Yanks" sit around there ad valorem while the duty on present and future. History teaches demand a sufficient currency, the out- *
ua4er the palms and on the coquina breech-covering breeches, pants trou that no one thing has wrecked the lawing of all trusts and immoral combinations
reeks, and talk over the brave old sers, bifurcated garments, or unmen- hopes of the farmer and laborer in of capital. Make gamblingin
days: when it was considered the tionables, is,35 per cent ad valorem, their conflicts with capital, as has the stocks of whatever characteran
proper thing to shoot at your neighbor besides 40 cents a pound. One good want of unity amongst themselves; offense punishable by fine and
.aad hit him if you could. They shoot breech-loading shot-gun will last ,a and without,this success is absolutely imprisonment. Let us unswervingly
off their" mouths now. man until he is too old to go hunting, impossible. Unless we clearly) recog- demand that the mail, telegraphand
Bfo. Rogers met me here and he but one pair of breech covering nize,what we want .and are preparedto railroad services of the Nation
made this people one of his grand breeches, pants, trousers, or bifur- stand as one man for it, we mightas shall be worked solely for the
talks, then he skipped out for.an' Alliance cated garments, or unmentionableswill well lay down our arms at once. good of the people and, not least,'let us
.gathering'400 miles away.. soon wear out, especially when What are the teachings of the last demand a nationally observed weekly
The man who thinks that the ,Alliance your anatomy and ,your chair are too election? First, That in every case rest-day and the abrogation of all
I is drooping, or has got the pip, (friendly. So, it will happen that in where Alliancemen knew what they liquor licenses-the national, prohi
or the die-back, here ,in Florida, is just a little while you :will be payingthis wanted and were prepared to sacrifice bition of the traffic which, above everything -
mistaken. rlt,may J be a.little.sleepy in 35 per cent. ad valorem and 40 everything else for it, they were over- else, hinders ourreligious, moral,
I some places; but you just;stick,a pin, cents a: pound avoirdupois to make I whelmingly successful; whilst, wher- II physical and financial. growth. and
in it or throw a ,rock at*it, .will you? yourself presentable.. Yet I hear of ever they allowed themselves to be prosperity. c F. F.
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; T A BCK 19,' 1801_ ] -' :.<0 _".".""-': THE FLORIDA :DISPATCH,: FARMER .AND FRUIT-GROWER. :isPFathOF
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: :! JOHN F.'DUhtI. I On'whom does this duty devolve P Most ence on the subject. I shall not attempt RICH FLORIDA LANDS.
f, ) -, assuredly on the enterprising} citizens, in this short address to give them all,
'' those who are entrusted with the makingand which would require more time to detail
1, To t the Alliance Meeting, at DeFun- execution of her laws and in looking than I can give or you would care to

t iak,March 14. aftef her welfare both at home and in the hear. I will but briefly mention one or,

: Ladies' and Gentlemen and Fellow-citi- National Congress. At this time, .my two of them, however, which I think
farmer friends, more especially does this should be remedied, and one of which'
I WH,of the Farmers' Attianc of Florida.: duty rest upon you in view of the fact militates directly against the farmer. A

It IB a pleasure to be with you to-day that members of the Farmers1 Alliance national bank is prohibited from loaningits

, aad,,to meet ,so, many of the farmers of of Florida compose , West Florida., Although'almost native present legislature and must,to a certain indirectly,except to secure an existing
Floridian, and one that has always felt a extent, be responsible for the laws that debt, and in that event the bank is required -
great interest in that portion of our'State shall be the result of,their labors. Some to collect iuch debt and disposeof -
lying west of the Appalachicola, river, one at my elbow asks, are they equal to such security at once. The bank is
with 1 fts. magnificent harbors, in conse- the occasion? I answer unhesitatingly not'allowed to carry such loan, althougha
quence of'a busy. life at home it has "yes" as some of the ablest and most national bank is a private institution
not been'my goodfortune to 'visit your progressive and many of the',best citizens with its own capital, it is not allowed to
action but once' or twice and then of'our State are members of that organization do what it chooses with that capital.
only to pas through on a ,hurried'trip: and if the organization is prop This feature is a great hardship! to the :
thereforewfien I received your cordial erly managed,I may add, a large influ- farmer, especially in an agricultural
invitation to be present do-day, I accepted ence and co-operation of many more able State like ours, where he has no money ti.er..M _1. :.
I the'same,with no ordinary pleasure. I and progressive citizens whose lives have until the end of the year, when his crops
am delighted with your beautiful country been devoted to the development of Flor- are harvested and sold, and no security Farmers !' Stop and Think.
varied and attractive scenery, and ida, who are in touch and in full sym- except his land, which is really the basis
evidences of progress and improvement pathy with the Farmers' Alliance move- of all securities and the most stable. In WHY Spend the best years of your

so manifest. I congratulate you on your ment, may be freely given them.I consequence, the farmer is deprived .of life cultivating the soils of the frozen
' beautiful village, its handsome buildings, regard the Farmers' Alliance move- the benefit of accommodation when he North and West raising crops on which

picturesque springs. and the fame that it ment as a progressive one. The condition needs it the most. the freight is often not realized, when
; has'won as1 a great educational'' ::institu- of existing evils it seeks to remedy, Secondly, the Secretary of the Treasury can buy land from the undersigned,
tion. In the last few,years,this hat'been gave it birth and, as I understand, its under the law has the right under certain you
accomplished, and;now your great Flor- objects and purposes are to change the conditions to 'designate as national depositories rich and fertile as any known lands,
/ ida Chautauqua is visited annuallyby condition of things and make them bet- for, the public moneys such and where you can raise a crop that the

the most gifted divines, scholars', orators ter; it is therefore a progressive organization banks as he may choose, and to keep: the United States Government will .pay a
and educators of the land, and is known and should be so regarded. I do government funds therein, which gives BOUNTY of$too on each acre.
; throughout the length and breadth of the not see how any patriotic citizen or progressive him the power of discrimination, and he
Union and shows conclusively that the, business man can seriously oppose may have favorite banks and thus enable HOLD On, this isn't all. You can sell

western portion of our fair State is abreastof } the principles enunciated by the him to concentrate all his money to one the said crop right there in your home
the, times ,and is marching hand in Farmers'Alliance and should not be in common center, which only can make a market for $250 per acre. You ask for
hand to that lasting,, prosperity with the hearty accord with the main features of corner possible. This takes the moneys the "How" and the "Wherefore."
rapidly developing eastern and southern their platform as has been said, and out of circulation and furnishes the essential -
parts and all combining to make Floridaone which, in short, I understand to be the' element for a contraction of the Quite right-facts and figures count best.

of the greatest of the sisterhood of overthrow of sectionalism, a reductionof currency and a'consequent money panic. Plant the Land with Sugar Cane.
State comprising this great Union. taxation to the needs of the govern- These evils should be corrected and
Anyone who is at all observant: of'the ment economically administered State this temptation removed.I TO OLD'Farmers and careful perus-

times and the march and progress'of civilization and inter-State control of railroads, a say' that there should be one of two ers of papers, the fact that there now

,. can but admit that our,country soundl( table and flexible currency issued things-let the government do the bank- established near Kissimmee, Fla., the
is moving onward,'and has, for the past by the government in accordance with
ing business of the and is I stale
country assume St. Cloud Sugar Refinery,
supply and demand, with increased sub-
hundred been recognized as the
years ;
all the let
responsibilities thereof it
E or
all
news.Ve talking to our
treasuries centres in are
most enterprising and progressive nation, or money proportionto
keep its hands off it and let it alone. That
on the face of,the earth. Mr. Andrew the populatien and business of the the should become friends. Sugar cane can be raised as
Carnegie in his admirable book "Trium- country, an honest dollar receivable for banking government institution is hardly in a great cheaply as corn, and Uncle Sam will
keeping ?
: all dues and demands whether
phant cracy'describes 'us as the by gov- with the spirit of our constitution and pay,you a bounty of two cents per pound
ernment individuals safe of
train at the or a system
lightning express moving
government, and possibly should not be, manufactured The St.
banking and medium of exchange that on the sugar.
rate of sixty miles: an hour, while the
but the be' the
older countries of Europe are travelingwith admits of no favoritism and which will money-making> government can and issue great suffi- Cloud plantation in Osceola Co., Fla., '
a
the same old accommodation train make a contraction of the currency anda cient quantity ot power gold, silver and averaged 4,500 pounds of sugar to the
green-
fifteen to twenty miles an hour. This illustration cornering of the money market ,for it will
backs at all times,equal to the demandsof acre last ,year, and go 5,000
very aptly shows the: rate of speculative purposes impossible. the people, which should be an honest this .
progress being made in the United Statesas These I regard as substantially the dollar and receivable for all demands, pounds year.METHODS .
compared with England-the mother great reform which the farmers of the public and private, and let the'banking ? This isn't the only big

country. country are pledged and are endeavoringto of the country be ,done by private' indI- chance of life, however. The
In this,grand!march forward it is peculiarly procure. They are sound govern- viduals banking your
or
corporations Kissimmee
compa-
cultivation of rice lands about ;
gratifying to all friends of the mental principles. I for 'one am in nies under State laws.If .
South and those.who wish her to reap her full accord and sympathy with them; is to become an'assured, profitable
share of prosperity, Ito, see the rapid and will heartily co-operate with the the circulation is uniform and a I fact. There is no richer or better i
strides ,she ,' and is destined to and industrial classes dollar is worth as much in Maine as it
I making farmers of the market garden lands in the
is in California I truck and I
see no necessity for a
make, and thrills the heart of every true country in securing such a condition of '
Floridian to know that our own incom- things. uniform system of banking any more ,world than the land on the rich over-
parable'Florida ranks with the foremostof than a uniform system of selling dry flow, or bottom lands about Kissimmee. -
: The financial
her sister southern States and is soon I present monetary system goods. The uniformity in value all over Write for confirmation to Col.
of the country is the ;
special national
receiving the of bank bills
to take the lead of them, if all her patriotic I country as a :
attention of the Allianceand circulating medium,'is possibly one of A. K. McClure, editor Philadelphia
do their
but duty.
citizens
Industrial Union. From all appear- the attractive features of the national Times, who has personal knowledge.. :;
As a plain business man, I desire to ances it is regarded by them as the greatest banking and the of
system inequality
for i
; Then in lands orange groves, or '1
direct your attention to our State her resources machine of oppressionthe"Pandora'sbox" State ,bills under the State bank
:4
,. and her needs, and shall do so from which all their evils flow. years ago, was the great objection systemof to groves already cultivated or bearing, J

in bri-efand perhaps imperfect manner. The national banking system, althoughit that system. I can satisfy you that your best interestslie

,; It is said that Florida produces an- has stood the test for nearly half a cen- .With'a uniform currency or circulating in seeing me before any one else. ;

r nually,off tury,and is claimed by many of the ablest medium, however, I do not see why we BEAUTIFUL HOMES. The healthfulness 1
Honey, sugar and molasses.100,0o0. financiers as the best the world ever saw, could not return to the State bank system
'Oranges, etc................. ........ 4,000,000 is no "Idol" of mine, and I am doing with absolute safety. The question of and beauty of Kissimmeehave i
Hogs, beef and sheep............... 520,000 business under its :provisions from neces- finance, however, is a very importantand never been questioned. No <
Fish, sponges, etc :.......__.......... 1,100,000 sity-not from choice. It is not without intricate one, and should be handled diphtheria, no consumption, no pneumonia j
Rice,.corn and tobacco............ 1,200,000Red many objectionable features, and its with thu greatest caution. It should -in fact, read our medical ,,!
cedar.and other woods...... 1,500,000 workings being practically under the have the earnest attention of our best villas
Cotton ........................ ............ 4,000,000 control and direction of one man, couldbe business men and financiers. and the aid report.:: Beautiful cottages, or 1
and hundreds of thousands of dollars made indeed a "machine of oppres and co-operation of our brightest minds lots suitable for residences. Write
worth of other things, and [ shall add, sion"by manipulating the currency and and ablest statesmen. It should be the for terms and particulars. 4

that I believe that inside of five years,she concentrating it in one or two large banksof duty of Congress to give heed to this COME SOUTH And ; untold '
get
will export annually,five million dollars New York City, for instancewhereit matter and the appeals of the farmingand in .
worth of phosphate.besides possibly as can be ,vaulted up and temporarily industrial classes have been too long quantities of the grandest climate
many more millions may. be realized.annually I taken out of circulation thus contracting unheeded and should claim the imme- the world free with each acre of ground "j

from fertilizers manufactured in i It, lowering the price of staple crops, diate attention of Congress and should purchased., Come where you can till
our own State; then think for one 'moment creating a money panic, and bringingruin receive their earnest efforts to relieve the soil twelve months in the year. .
and realize the boundless reSourcesof and disaster to the business interestsof them by a change,of existing things as 'I
Florida., the country. Such occurrences, in far as the same is possible under the con- At least write to me for full particulars.

Do you doubt-the possibilities, of whatI ny'opinion, have been enacted and are stitution., WM. CANNON,
have said? If you do you have.but to liable at any time to be repeated. I In their efforts obtain relief from.existing Kissimmee, Fla., -;
look, back for the, past two years and thinkit is the possibility of these occur- hardships, the Farmers1 Allianceof A Rent think ,of'tbe fifteen million'dollars that rences that has given rise to the great the country have petitioned Congress forth* Associated Railways laade,aad the :;
have p en.nvested| in our'State in phosphate opposition of the Farmers' Alliance to by' what is known as the subtreasurybill lands of KUalmmee Land Co. :
: g:1
\ lands ,alone. .Should we; not be national banks, and should be remedied. ; a bill that has attracted widespread Phosphate, sugar cane,,rice, trucJd ..
encouraged to reew action' in, behalf of There are, in my opinion. many objec- comment, pro and con and to which or ; fruit, grazing, timber. general farming,
oar Stole is pressing' her, forward to' the tienable features in the national banking something better, the Farmers' Alliance, and home lands. Send for map showing ;

grand prosperity of which she is capable? system, and I speak with some experi as an organization, has fully committed lands. "', ,
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394 THE FLORIDA, DISPATCH, FARMER. AND FRUIT-GROWER. [MABCH I!c 19,189J,

.... ,- '. ,- ..., .
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itself.. 'Whatever. 'may be said of this billas"bo favor the poor but operate by occulteconomic taxed both the note and the mortgagedland. are not fvhil the rate or'interest i -
ife'.QOQgtitBiio&aUty,. feasibi ity,:orpte4ioability laws to exempt the rich, and :The reason is apparent, If provided is l large for a first class
; there cane be 'question' it rallies retainers, some inspired by those noteholders should move to security, yet when we have to foreclose,
that the to be obtain'edtHough
its results.sought provisions' and operations, the hope of sharing ,in the plunder of New York there would be nobody to as is frequently the case, it is often ''
.,iz.:' a needfuLsupply; of money at a low exemption, and"others by the delusive pay the taxes if they had exemptedthe difficult to realize from the proceeds of
rate of interest to;.enable) the farmer to promise,_ of cheapfer interest if the, mortgaged land. Nantucket would the sale the full amount of principal
remove bis crops at a season of the year lender shall be exempted. It wheedles have no revenue. For certaintyof due. At present there is no authorityin
wlBn;money is always scarce should be and fraud this State for funds
to investing public
the followerof Henry George revenue prevent
'
poor
ofctoiaed i if po eible.r This,bill: should
o neeeive the earnest, and most :profound (who, under the puritan system,!never lent mortgages made to avoid taxes, upon real estate security, except in regard -
atteetiofi aDd consideration' of, every bore a tax) to'help! in exempting cred- our ancestors taxed both the mortgagenote to the'United States deposit fund.Nat. ., 1
member of Congress, and if;constitutkwiftl its, led by the )wild .hope that, somehow and.the mortgaged land. So their Economist. "
:
and practicable should become a by shifting the taxes from. the taxation before that sale and after was *** i
then
law If not so, some measures
giving 'equally as good results,'or' better chattel capitalist to the land, capitalist as follows : All the reasons that make gold and l
sfeouki be adopted. As success or disaster his own poverty will become ''a vanished Before sale. Aftt"r ale. silver'a good standard of value, make ';
,to the agricultural interests: of'the dream. It bides for the nation Property Tax Tax. land a poor standard. It varies in, t'

eettB&y and affects their a interests larger number to a greater:of'ourpeople alist to establish'municipal works, like Proprietors 3.000.:00 !30,000 I '3.0XX)1),( ) 515,000 value, more even than,staple.manufactures '!
15,000
esteat 'than all other interests put topether the 'gas works of Philadelphia, which Workmen None. None. which are not dependent on the
; in fact, as Thomas Jefferson saidin by ,charging $1.50 for gas when $i Note, here was a double valuation, seasons. Any particular land is not
his first inaugural address as Presidentof would ''be an ample price l levies ,a but not 'a double tax., Observe 'par- universally: desired. Americans do
!United States_:, "Agriculture is the' half million of taxes from men not in ticularly that those note-holding proprietors not desire, French farms, nor Georgians
chief of wealth and
pillar our
-4 ity."' Therefore I:say relief to our prosper-farmers proportion to their abilities but in pro had no hardship from this Vermont town. lots. It is not always
and industrial classes should be portion as they use gas. It is every- process which they call double taxa- desired. On the contrary real
speedily given. I bid the farmers Godspeed where alert, while the farmer and' ordinary tion,,. for while they really ought to pay estate sells more slowly than any other
,in their efforts, and assure them of business man have seemed. the whole tax of the island,the "double .commodity. For these reasons, ''land.
my,sympathy, aid.and earnest.co-opera-: is almost the worst basis of .
tion. If I may be pardoned for a per- everywhere asleep. tax" let them off from half. So them money.In
sonal allusion to myself a.8'one whose Nor will its course be stayed till men n who ,holds the mortgage note is the absence of gold and silver,
life' has been 'mseparably linked with will investigate their wrongs and maintain never double taxed ; is never taxed government taxes, pig iron, cotton, t
theirs; :whose associations, affections,: their rights with'the spit of the enough, for his tax is reduced'by the corn, wheat, beef,'bacon would makea -
interests and sympathies along the rug- colonists who the tight of of land. better basis for currency.-Clzrislian/
gedpaths'of poverty and adversity from puritan by taxation mortgaged '-
fawnsy"to the present day,. side by side pine knots on their hearthstones, after But he cries 'double taxation," and Patriot.
with,the great struggling, laboring element the Bible, studied Blackstone and the States 'like Connecticut, Oregon and ***
I ..1 have a ,right ,to know and but science of Taxation and established the Mussachusetts, exempt him, to the At,, a meeting of San Luis Obispo

speak.what, and I,havo I say;learned' that no from.sad class in this experience most perfect system: of taxation the grevious wrong of the farmers who in County Alliance, held "January 13, .
country of ours have a better right to beheard world has yet seen. the latter State (if we count the reduction 1891, the following resolution was
and! heeded than the toiling masses, Their: theorem is now generally con in savings bank taxes made adopted :
by whose honest hearts, sturdy steps, 'ceded that, with certain minor exemptions necessary''' by their exemption) are Resolved, That in our opinion two
brawny:muscles! with,the aid of.an All* each man should bear' taxes 'in mulcted about quarter of a million legislative 'bodies sitting at one time
wise Creator, this great country is what
it is to-day, ,:the. best government ,in the I proportion to'his ability, and that' this annually by the increase of taxes required are useless and a hindrance to the en-
world, 'the 'asylum for the oppressed. I ability should be measured by the market to let the lenders off. actment of just and needed laws,
mankind of all nations. :value of his possessions. The,gol Since this exemption of mortgagesin therefore we request the present legislature -
,All honor and praise be given to the den canon of taxation is : ) Massachusetts every borrower on of California to consider the

patriotic they continue American until their yeomanry.efforts shall May be "Taxation should rest like an. at- mortgage has paid all the taxes, he did proposition to consolidate the Senate
crowned with a glorious success, and mosphere on all property alike." before and one' tax more, namely his and House of Representatives i into
our: government shall be'redeemed and l brought back to the ,days of'its:pristine* one man to build up the business' of HENRY WINN, in Am. .Agriculturists ***'
purity, for\the,people.and for their benefit _
another, and connivance at the escapeof > .H Liberty Bell: ,When Phil. Armour
ment.,;and not the p.eople.for.. .the govern. i one to throw' his burdens on the Reform Press. went on the board of trade and boughtall )

,:,jImJ.ght.sa.y 'much 'more'on this subject rest. Its peculiar virtue is that underit I The plan of loaning money on real l.. the pork in sight and 200,000 bar-
1. but I have already detained you too there is no indirect taxation by'incidence estate is not a new one as the follow- rels of "futures" more than was supposed
long, and would, conclude, by thanking be in existence and then
to
but.the house owner: pays with- ing shows: In 1837 the federal surplusto ,
for kind attention. '
you O. i heartily' your. ." I out charging his tax into the rent bill ,the amount of $28,101,645 was de- raised the price from $10 a barrel to

,THE TAX PROBLEM. and every 'man bears his tax as he posited ,among the respective States.It $18.20-clearing $777,000 by ,the,
stands in the list was named the United States deposit deal-that was "business." When

How Rent Estate Is Unjustly Bur- It is, claimed that a credit is not, fund, and was loaned on call, so that the Knights of Labor decided not to
..t, r dened. property and so equity is satisfied the States felt obliged to invest the eat any of Armour's "future" meat- ,
...No.matter of public ,interest is so when tangible things are taxed and money where they could realize on it that was "conspiracy."
important to the farmer honest, local paper representations exempted. if necessary. New York's quota was Yes, and if the vast centralizingpower
taxation.! ,And in no phase of the administration What is a note? Conceive an island about $4000,000, which was loanedon ,in this country is not soon' ,
of government, are the like Nantucket valued at three millions farms, with the following result, according stopped, about fifty-five millions out
abuses so gross, the: oppression so unjust 'with taxes of thirty thousand. to the testimony of the comptroller of the sixty five, millions of the present
and, severe. The great wrong Assume'that' it is owned by fifty pro. under date of January 7 : population of this country will be subject ,
lies' in the exemptions escape from prieters who employ five hundred pen- The money was authorized be invested to indictment for the same kindof
' assessment of notes, dues receivable, liness workmen. Who owe the taxes ? upon bond and mortgage on conspiracy;; lack of funds will
bonds and stocks, which are the peculiar Plainly: the proprietors, for they own improved real estate by county com- compel about that number to "re,1
1 property of the very wealthy usually the property. Feeling rich enough to missioners, appointed by the governorin solve" not to eat that same "future"meal
) called credits. Tax; dodging has retire, they sell the'' island to their each county, pursuant to a statute of Phil. Armour's-nor any

open defenders, but exemption of workmen taking their notes,secured by passed by the, legislature. Those securities other. .

credits has more,and,the exemption of,. mortgage. Who now:owe the taxes? and the manner of the invest- What Ho Did With It. .r ,
mortgage loans i is an insidious form of Have the former proprietors impoverished ment of the said funds upon real estate, He bought the buggy of the Pioneer
the r abuse which has established,itself themselves in the slightest the as provided, have not met with the Buggy Co. and then took Maud for& ,
in several States, Since it is the trade? If so, why did they make it? approval of the financial officers of the drive. But,he kept on the good side of 7.
openly aggressive phase,of credit ex- Have the workmen become rich,? Do State for a number of years past. It the father '' presenting him with a '
careful note-holders interest has been the of the Dy
deserves
emption, it attention. not the through policy comptrollerto of the "Complete Horse Book "
While the unwary farmer rests in'the enjoy the fruits of the island as they withdraw said fund' from the county copy which we send free 'for ten cents, ,in
quiet dreams that by casting his vote did before, leaving the workman with commissioners as fast as possible, and or silver. Pioneer Buggy Co.
and then forgetting public affairs he not much more than 'he had before as invest the same, himself in public securities stamps Columbus O ,

has secured himself from :wrong, the product of the same labor he now .- The amount still outstandingin _no ,
wealth finds the ear of government, it applies ? Plainly then, if there is any the hands of the county commissioners I
controls assessors, it fills the rooms of property in that island which ought to and invested upon real estate in HOBTlOyLTURJULSUPPLIES.' _
legislative committees with able coup be taxed it is the notes. And so, 'generally the several counties of the State, is j".r

sel,' it packs' the lower houses of, legis- a credit is the essential fruit about 1500000. The rate of interest RTICUL.TURAL TOOLS KCWttT and,..o.lAya AM HIT WJH'
lation with well-to-do credit holders, bearing title to tangible property of on such securities at present, as pro II rrSesd 01% &!..Io Ii OV .. l'oJIar 7AC.:
and the highest with millionaires ; it which the actual holder has only the vided by statute, is 5 per cent. per: Pwl y lJtIypl,..... FREt"WI IllHe.
owns presses, it formulates 'attractive nominal title. annum. Experience has shown that complete SKBB VATALOOU&JOHNSON 7abU he4
4, STOKES
,
schemes, .... ... which appear. 'on their. face to Our fathers, in the case I have cited, the said investments upon :real estate:, SlT.WSlf.......' ear.i.UP,,r.
.
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.l i> ..- 9.t891: ] __. ..,._...,.., THE FLORIDA D ISPATG'H-FARMER; AND FRUITGRO'VER.'d. ---. k .235.

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'1'1.1 f ; "to: 'tKemori8.1 \ '\ ..
of, Respect Lochloosa BARTER COLUMN. Sweet CaflUVB se J stalks for tale. (7 per .
Alliance. 1,000 feet on board the ears. CUAS. F. MAT, '.
Eustis, Fife.: S-5-44 "

1; WHEREAS, It 'h2.. ..pleased our All- Definite f exchange offers Inserted tree State what Cassava seed,two dollars A barrel; Spanish dr 11:

wise ;Heavenly :,Father to visit our you hare and what yon want. Peanuts two dollars a bushel. D. C.
ANDItESd, Maccieiiny.McCartney 2-26-tt
Alliance' and take to Himself our Open to nbAer1benonl7.
roses make beautiful evergreen,
beloved President, Rev. W. F. Carl- stock-proof hedges Plants and catlings: for'

ton, and, Wanted-Live *toe k-work animals or sale. ONKILL, Fairbank, Fla. 1313I6t
Jerse. cowg--for rood orange lands in Lake The Florida Real Estate JournaL Arcadia ;'
WHEREAS, We submif:uncomplaining county. J. M. PITZER Pitttnan
Fla Florida-with State Map-can be bad for only-
to the will of Him who doeth all A rare offer-Two building lots each 25x100 ten cents. South Florida lands cnap. 2 19-12 p.t.

things well,. still, recognizing our ir- feet in LeRoy, to exchange for fifty budded Only few of those one year pecan trees left ....
orange trees of good varieties; or, will exchange Order now. Alo choice roses large size '. .
repairable loss, we the same for unbudded our orange or Camelias, all colors. Figs, Persimmons,
Resolve, zst, That in the loss of Florida wild lemon nursery stock. LeRoy 1* Scuppernong, etc. Prices low DL. PIER-
town about miles
a new ten west of Ocala SON Monticello, /la. -$- *
Bro. Carlton this Alliance has suffered on railroad to Dunnellon. Address, JAS. A.

the irretrievable loss of an indefatigable GROVES,Sebastian, Fla."CENTAWORD". I I LeConte Parties pear wanting trees, three purple-seeded and four pomegranates ,year-old: Florida Central and Peninsular i r

worker and staunch figs,quinces,Marianna plum stocks, or .
: supporterand nmbreila China trees, would save money bv RAILROAD,
leader. buying from first hands. Address. J. U.GIRAR3KAU .
Ruolved,2d That COLUMN.To ,Xoutlceilo, Fla 2-19-3 THE FLORIDA TJIUNK LIKEFormerly
our community
has lost in the Orlando Nursery SCO TardiiT 400 Mediterranean : (( the P R, i N. Co.) offers increased
death of our Brother sweet 200 XtivenWe :Navel. 200Oummit i facilities this reason for travel to Florida,
one of its best citizens, one who was insure Insertion in this column adrertls- ,'400( ) Homoss*saa. 400 Maltese Blood, I having in: addition to its old and popular
ments must be accompanied by the money.Advertisements 1.000 Sweet Grape Fruit, Villa Franca connection, the LOUISVILLE &: NASH-
always first in every goo'd 'word and must not exceed fifty _.erd.. Lemons, Reeves' Mammoth and other peachon VILI.E R..R at the River Junction, and the
work active to interest alike Postage Stamps received in MarIanna plum. These are not cheap GEORGIA SOUTHERN A FLORIDA {the
every payment. trees, are as fine as possible to grow them Suwannce River route to Florida' \ arrangedfor
both,civil,and religious. Count every word.Including name and address. JAMES MOTT. 2-19-Ct a new route from the West and 2Torti.-
we t via Montgomery,Bainbrldge and,Alonli-
.. Resolved, jd, That we inscribe a Bay a home cheap! A pleasant home can cello carrying through sleepers: from CINCINNATI -
of minute book Conch peas for sale. Pare, clean and fresh. be secured on the installment plan. Nice TO TAMPA.The .
A our suitably to
page house and l lots i In of the !
two most
one pleasant
1325 per bushel, f. o. b. $! per peck by ex- road has now no less than <
his'memory.' press. W. F. HUOHKT High Springs, Fla.319.2t locations in the city. Address, CIIAS. W.
DACOSTA, Jacksonville, Fla. Sereu Points of Connection With
Resolved, jih, That we tender our e
sincere to his bereaved wife For Rale-Apricot Man o trees, one ,year, For sale.-Good one and two-year old the North, ...:....
sympathy
pot Hrrmasllla Pomegranate lemon buds on.sour stock, 25c f. o.b. W B.
grown; twoyearold
and children in this their sad afflic- date plants; teoMnte. seed large; or WALKER, Manager Lake Mattie Nursery, namely Live Oak, Fernandina, Lake City,,C"nahanIJaCk8onvllte,
Auburndale, Jt la. 2-12-41
small Guinea .
quantity seed
; grass or plants.W. Junction making comfortable connectionswith
tion.Resolved B. CAMPBELL, Winter Haven, Fla. 3.19-3 Send us your orders for. note paper pens Chicago, Kansas City and all northern
,.5th, That these resolutionsbe For sale-Bronze turkey eggs, It per dozen inks and all supplied Wo will treat Son dues, for which this road la specially In.

published in the FARMER AND Sired byline imported Tom Orders with right. DaCo&ta Printing. and Publishing augurated.
with cash booked. V. C. Smith House,Jacksonville, Fia.Send
Chetwynd, The Florida Central
FRUIT GROWER, and, 'a copy be fur- Lake Co., Fla. it for my circulars on curing salt rick
nished the bereaved family of the cattle or loss of appetite. Guaranteed. Price and Peninsular Railroadis
,, For prices on car lots Western tobacco of medicine, thirty-five cents by mail If my
deceased. stems, write L. WALLACE JENKINS. Lake conditions: are complied with, I Will cure or the greatest artery of travel through the
Helen, Fla. S-12-31 pay for them. It has cured tome bad cases of finest parts of Florida, traversing twenty-
I L' f E. A. HOLT, .antedWild persimmon seed. Address hog cholera. W. TILQHMAW, Pa.atka, four counties-Gadsden, Jetteismi, Unvai.
:Committee : \ J. R. TOMPKINS, B. B. B., Eureka, Fla. It Fla. 2-5-1H Alachna, Lake, Leon. JSuwaanee. *N&s>aa,
Send us your orders for notepaper, pens, Levy, Orange, liillsborougti. \Varfuila,
( D. W. CARN. Great bargains in very desirable real estate. inks and all supplies. We will treat you Columbia, flay! Marion, folk, .Manatee,
Adopted March th '1891.It Send for description and price. J. L. UEBIEUX right.] DaCosta Printing and Publishing Madison, Baker. Bradford, humter, iter-
; Lakeland. Polk Co., Fla. 3.12.5trrr. House,Jacksonville, .Kla. nando and lJe-jto--ln: their ilchtsi portion.Itfuns .
through ih .' MIDDLE FLORIDA REGION :-
I .J. S. R Thomson, Spartanburg. B. C. Do you need printing of anv kInd? Send to or lULL COUNTRY where are the tint:old
!ft tweet to lire, but oht"bow! bitter-to be lady manager to World's Fair wants to correspond = DaCosta Printing and Publishing House,
troubled' with a cough, day 'and night. Dr.Ball's .! with parties in Florida with view' to Jacksonville, Fla. Farming Lands and the New To.
Cough Syrup, however, Is Ire sure having collected native and other and
1! plants All kinds of books bound and made as Rood
remedy. 26 cent I bulbs. ',U as new. Send to Da Uosta Printing and Publishing bacco Farms *
."I cannot ting to throat !.' House,Jacksonville Fla. *
,
ore." "Of course( you haven't tried Salvation Repair your old family Bibles. Make themtishing Breached by no other line) some of them
Ollt" "No" "Then get It and you will1 new. DaCosta Printing and, Pub Several grade Jersey cows fresh with: cal f by : conducted on a large cale He e are Quincy,
lug like the birds" 1 House, Jacksonville, Fla. .* registered Jersey male and a few Poland T l.ahassee ;:the capital), MouticeJo, Madl
Cblna pigs. Wx. U. BCHBAUEIV Waverly son aod other town,from whose comfortable,
I Nothing excels the umbrella China as a t Mock Farm, Tallahassee, Fla. First prize ample dwelling, reposing in a fertile
'' glowing and ornamental shade tree.itjper Oca!a. 3-5-21 country coming-s. renewed energy: ,to em-
Growing 'Pears. $ 100. J. H. GIBABDBAU, Monticello, Do you need printing*.iy kind? Send to ploy me resources! : lavlspedabout .(hem.htretching .

1 I have for many years grown pears Fla. 3-6-2t DaCosta Printing.. and Publishing, House, down through
headed low toward the ground. I' Repair your eld family Bibles. Wake them Jacksonville. ..la. The Peach louutrjr ,
good as new. Da''osta Printing and Pub- Wanted, the'' content of 1Q.WO smokers, to
Aiachua :
prefer them branched out at three lishing House,Jacksonville, Fla. send' each, a sample lot of 150 "N lCKEL"" of Baker. ,'Bradford, and Levy counties -
Cigars and a 20 year gold filled Watch, by Express !, through the ymsperourStrawberry
'
feet from the soil (i) ,They come to Wanted-A live newspaper! man to canvass C O. D. 15.25 and allow examination. Farms .
dwarfs thus the State for two leading publications. Apply HAVANA CIGAR Co., Winston, N. C. l-29-8t
bearing as soon as saving
,
to C. W. DACOSTA, DaCosta! Printingoust of LawteySUrkdud Watdvparuhpi superior
three to five before getting a ,JacksonvilleRepair Do you need printing of any kind? Bend toDaCos in profit to the orango jrovt -it goes through '
years 'a Printing and Publishing House, the heart of the fata penetrating sumo of ;
crop. ((2)) For picking there is a great your old/amily. Bibles. Make them Jacksonville. Fla.Strawberrles the.fluent glOves, ones having -:.
good as new. DaCo ta
Printing and lnb- Bessie Alabama Stevens.
advantage. You fruit for 7O.OOO Orange
Full-beftfing
can gather *
fishing House Jacksonville, Fla. the kinds to plant for profit in the South ,

several >years with a step-ladder. ((3)) 60.000 tobacco plants for sale; choice Havana Send for prices. JULIUS SOHNADLSBACII, Trees,

All fallen fruit lies comparatively un- peed, Vuelta AbaJo, Aroma de Cuba Ten Grand Bay,Ala. -.ot passing for nearly iv mile! between themin -
dollars a thousand. E. A. LINDSLKY. Vorth Do you need stationery of any kind-paper, akin< its way southward to the Onif.aud to
:injured. ((4). .In ,case of drought ,the Jacksonville. 3-5-ot pens and ink Send to DaCosta 1'rintingand the more tropical portions of '(bo Stag In .

limbs shade the soil and equalize the Wanted-Villa Franca Lemon trees and Publishing House,Jacksonville, Fla. kit portions or Ute Hiato it reacne-: points. of -

It must be borne in White Niagara Vines. Must be best stock Do you need stationery of any 1dad-paper I Scenic interest. :
temperature, and cheap. Address, NICOL, care FARMER pens and ink Send to DacostaPrintingand Wakulla Springs in tleVeltt, the Snwannee
:mind that more,damage to fruit occurs AND FBUIT-GBOWEK 2-28- Publishing House, Jacksonville, Fla. River an beautiful and romantic as U Is :

:'from severe changes of temperature Jaiuous,Oliver tiprlnes, i 1 the lake" region, rand
the lakes themeeiv with! their ur- ,
than from extreme cold. ((5)) You are roundlngs rolling land interspersed with .

:able to trim the trees shouldbe pleasant homes in green graven niopib down ;
as they; .
Accompanying !is a portrait of the late r' Qf. Eti to the clear lake tranta By means of"ini*
without :much trouble. Pear trees (' M. rood you can mc.t,readily reach L&oHunting'
l a ward: E. Phelps, D., LL D.of DcTitreeutli
should for,the..first(fire ,or six.years be and Fishing Grounds.
College. He was a strong,able man who stood
[gone .over twice a In.midsum- The ettler will fled on the line of this road
year. ,. 1 high in the literary and scientific worlds. It is not a greater opportunity varied selectton of
,
from lightest soils to tbo e underlaid with.
and in November head back
\[suckers, that Prof.: Phelps was the discoverer of what is clay and luarl), 'and of r'cfc+t hammock \

the _new growth one.thlrd.-E. P. known to the Medical profession and Chcnmts whether for regular mixed farming;:, stocK or
dairy farm ng, peach or strawberry culture.. ,
Powell. '". universally as Paine's, Celery ,Compound, unquestionably orange gr.,v,and vegetable gaft.cx> -
E s+. II "'r The toarut will to gr.J.frcl >sin Its 1.
of the most valuable discoveries
The"almost.universal verdict of Ger- one scenery. The health'seener on its ample
I ; 3:5-: of jhis century This remarkable compound is route can find some spot adapted to nif -
man)scientists is.against.smoking. andmifftaking : wants. On the hard clay rood of Middle
1 = ; not a nervine, an essence, a sarsaparilla, or any Florida the horseman wilt l ride with'8Pf"cd ;r

as extremely injurious. devised article, but a discovery, and it marks a and satisfaction, and the Florida C utral. .,
the famous Vienna' and Penlntular is theSportsman's
Bilroth, surgeon,, distinct step in medical practice and the treatment
"That the posterity of the nico- iloute.None. ,
says: of nervous complicatic) sand the greatest
..-Pas. from Northern connections -
enger
tinized and alcoholized higher societyis '4 of all modem 'diseases:-Paresis. It has been
1 _ ; hkvln ticket 6rer the Fiorlaa t.:itral
becoming,steadily. weaker and more freely admitted by the best medical talent in the and Peninsular tu pant ; in Oath Florida
baTe the privlisjeof, beIng- la ec JotoJack.
nervous is by no means surprising.The land,and,also by the leading chemists and scien- ftonvitl over tbs Company's Hue ant allowed! ,
colossal increase of nerve and . ., tists that (nervous troubles, nervoof exhaust- astop-oyt-r within the going limit*' of: 'the
The Late PR' P H ticket with return to their route for d .t ll3-
1 'mind diseases in our day is undoubtedly ,GL.H&.fontinsonmia, debility; senility, and even the tlon fret, of tra' chars Send.for.mupcf.

the result, to a great extent, of dreaded and terrible Paresis, nothing has ever been discovered which"reaches tit: disorder Florida, matted,free. *t- oJ-

the,tobacco and alcohol, habit and of and restores health equal to this discovery of Prof. Phelps. A. o.- MACDONELL' ,;Jacksonville,o. p. A*, Fla.:3k -1.;

'the straining of the nervous system ( ter DSfissorwf >. N.'S.PENaIItITOTTral4lo'7fenager;'" ,,', J
ON'T > "' 2 ,
.caused by these poisons. EAf00LEDc jWmd/or FAMI AND FAHCY YEr; D. E.MAXWELL,General Maaager.. ...


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236 FLORIDA :DISPATCH,. FARMER AND ,FRUIT-,GROWER. .. [ acn.19, 1&91IiSPATC

--


!.o I A 1.GROWQ GEO. S. HACKER & SONMANUFACTURERS POULTRY FOOD!


OI OFw -
ttRH" R r srlfss ttupct
[lffJ 11.1.t.N@4M.Wn1
:
.w. c.CRAB. &s
.r:: :::

.x m =

W. DACOSTA, Publisher. 00 Trade Mark.
..
HOLLIB' CANNED MEAT FOR POULTRYWill

.' d tug a= Make Hens Lay I .. '.-

.. Terms of Subscription: 0o Will Make Chickens Growl!

For one year........................'.....$2'00 C AND GOOD 'FOB MouLTisa FoWLS.

For six months.........................__ 1 00 .... -- This food is strictly fresh meat carefully
oo cooked, ground fine,seasoned and hermetically -
.Subscriptions in all cases cash in ad- -
sealed in 8-1bcau8. :Being ground fine,it

Taaee. Q .aw u- -- UQ can be readily mixed with soft food,and fed

Kat. of Advertising on application. .. so as to give each fowl an equal share Prio

REMITTANCE should be made by Check) ,: 80 cta per can; S3 per doz. Address HOLLI8

Postal Note,Money Order,or Registered Let And Building Material. DRESSED MEAT A WOOL CO:, 20 }North

ter,too-rderof Boston,Mass. f Mention paper.I

FLORIDA DISPATCH AND FARMER AMSDEN \ CHARLESTON, S. C. ,
.
AND FRUIT GROWER, '


Jacksonville, Fla. EAST; COAST POULTRY YARDS PECANS.Large t W.E SICKLY


JACKSON, Miss. Fourteen varieties of land and water fowls. nuts for seed. Also pecan trees
S.H. Garrett, Mansfield, Ohio. Dear Fir! :- ready for the grove LOOKING CHILDMIlubjeet

I am perfectly satisfied with your machine in Indian Games: Imperial Pekin

every particular. .1 have already put up fifty: Large Faper-shell Pecans tny to SPASMS are most likely troubled 'with'
Ducks, Bronze Turkeys. R M Q The beet remedy for this l_the celebrated
rods of fence, using cane for pickets., The Specialty.Pecan nUnmO.B.A.FAHNESTOCK'SVERMIFUQE* a
cane 'cost* me nothing except my labor in Poultry supplies of all kinds. Send a postal Been OTeantnu eandneerfaUa.ObseI'Tep&ritC1* j"
]nuts, $1 per pound; one.yearoldtrees i larly that th-initials are B.A.thus aroidlnc 1m1tat1aDl"OSGOOD"
card for new illustrated catalogue and
cutting The cane has never been used in my ,$l each.
this locality for this purpose, but it makes a price lUts. W. R. STUARt
12- 5-2t Ocean Springs, Mils.o. 01nstrated5
strong as well as an ornamental fence. Eggs to Hatch. asrooo

Respectfully, THOS. SWINBANK f. ..
E. W. AMSDEN, Ormond, Fla. PERRIE HAVENS
0. TJ.B.Standard

[NEW SUBSCRIBERS ONLY.] d SCALESBentontrlaL
Notice of (Incorporation. Leading PhotographerOf
Freight paid.
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned t TON 35
:
BIGPremiumOffer persons have formed a corporation under.the the State. .Estimates on ,t -low. arrant

general Florida. incorporation laws cf the State of QS600D&TSOHPSONBlDghainlODNY.OUTFITS! .

Tba name of this corporation shall be VIEWS
Purity 011 Company,"and Its principal place
of business in Florida snail be In Jacksonville Up to 18x22 given on application. 12-Mm
Duval county. Florida. It shall also 1NG
have a place of business in New York City, lherpaLa
New York. The New Tomato UDr rLafCL7101 a1nT
.
IvUl
sae llqnld katOBAtksalt; 6d
The general nature of the business to be .pr y too treet per boor.ft m
transacted shall be the production milling, place sD tha marktt thi* MmMn three!
refining, deodorizing, dsflavorlzlng, manufacturing From Canada OUGHT to be extra early, andas new ftnd improTe4 macbl.o,1..I.d1De ft n.*Xkoapuek

'. THX: i ... buying and selling of vegetable, such Is sent out. The reports of the experimental AIM an lm road Hor Sprayer*poir.r for 4m>Vineyards trtat at l Uw and pray MmrMrl Clrcn
mineral and animal oils.' stations speak highly of It, and lrtrBKE.FIRLnrnKCRII1 P Co.L .kpert.N.Y
.' The amount of the capital stock authorized
FLORIDADispitoh is One Hundred and Fifty Thousand Dollars numbers testify to its earllness productive-

I150.0CO( ),divided into Fifteen Hundred(1,600)) ness. large size, roundness, rich color and
Farmer and Fruit-Grower Shares of One Hundred Dollars (U10U)each, to freedom from rot. Per package, 15 ds; five :
be paid in money at such times and in such
amounts as the board of directors may from for eo eta. Yon will find it only In my seed RUITEVAPORATORTHE

For one year and a copy ofbituer's time to time determine npcn, catalogue,which will be sent FREE to any-
This corporation shall commence at the Tbe Standard >>..a.tae.
time of filing a copy of these articles with the body. Different sizes and prices. Illustrated Catalogue free
in Florida Secretary Stat of Florida, and the Clerk of J. J; .H. GREGORY&; SON, TlL&BLYM Y K IKON WOKKft CO tlactaaatl,0.
Gardening the Circuit Court of Duval County, Florida, Marblehead, MassT.
4 and hall terminate in ninety nine years

ALL FOR $ .OO! therefrom.The business of tIle company is to be' con- V. MUNSON, J),,OJ;
I ducted by a president, a board' of three
; Send for Circular
directors,of whom the president shall be one, NURSERYl\JAN9: telling
.
a secretary, and by such; other officers as the }: When to Spray,
Whitner's Gardening in Florida is a board of directors shall from time to time appoint
and
The Introducer of the great good How to Spray
or ,authorize: the time at which the ,
handsomely printed and bound book of directors are to be elected shall be at the an- Brilliantampbell Parker mile Strawberry, and what Pumps to use.
nual meeting of the company which shall be I Agents Wanted.
held the third Wednesday of March in C GRAPES.I
being a comprehensive treatise on '
250 pages, each year, and the president and secretary Herman Jaegerllommel y 'ij THE GOULDS MFC.CO.

on the vegetable and tropical products of shall be elected at a meeting of,the board of Will mall his valuable catalogue of tried 7 -. Seneca,Falls, N. Y. .
directors to be held immediately( after said
fruits free. Address,
Florida, by Prof. J. N. Whitner, A. M. annual meeting. The other officers shall be Southern
appointed for inch times as tbe board ofdlreotors T. V. MU 80N. Denlson,Texas.
This book is much sought after for its may designate or authorize Please mention this paper. 1141-4 FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS FREEI
The highest amount of Indebtedness or
if. which the at I \ will send you the"South Florida I Home"
. information. Liability to corporation can any
practical time subject welt shall b*' one hundred and six weeks on trial for 10 cents and Insert your
'g name In our"Mailing List"free of charge which
$2.00 buys the book and our fifty The thousand undersigned dollars compose($150,000)the)' first board of will bring you hundreds of sample copies of Flor-
ida ,maps circulars,etc.,and if
directors:; J. H. PAHROTT fa .q newspapers you
for z
" I paper one year. T. M.. DAY.JR.. want to visit or locate in Florida,you can very
3-lVMt H. M. JENISON. o oy oH easily decide where to go and how to get there,
; This is certainly a grand offer. Send 7 M W oZu and you will be p'easeu; with the small investment ..
of 10 eta." Stamps taken Address SOUTH
In orders at once. .... JrLOEIDA: HOME, St. Petersburg,Fla..

C. W._ ;DACOSTA. HA'W'XEYE.GRUB


Jacksonville, Fla. MACHINE.; i W aww i:7O ." ._
A V\J" *y Q_._ ,
y :<> 2 .a ggfc
ORANGE GROVE ETC.
Works os & -? -
itherStANDING'TIMBER OA
Your choice 5 to W acres young bearing. I The JEWETT & DWIGHT, Co...
3' Also,raw )land. south side large deep lauu.Becar 'STUMPS.WlllpulUnor. MANUFACTURERS: >
: protection Two new railroads H to
iVf miles. Pure, soft water. Large variety t dlnary Grub SHippiNp/9 PERFORATED, TABS.
I summer fruits. Valuable invention',thtiti Ift1 "INUTES C 0 w pt\U40 RI"TED CINCINNATI.PATPMTQTHOMA8PBIMP8ON, .
" United states No.436t118\ o =
have secured patent MAKES A .
" Canadian No. 84,665. For full particular
. ,call. Bode bottom prices. Honorable hand CLEANSWEEP .
;, : .Wa hFA -
wanted. Small family A.no CALLAHAN objection. .ftw.Acres atrt.lttla:.AosboyaM.dort.aaeper.t. = x40I I II I O ia t gton. D O. No atty's fe
it. 1(01lNYJ' Chain* "**.t. hand].. The crop oa a fey until Patent obtained Write'for Inventor's
t 3 19-1'M Melrose Clay Co.,l"Ja." Mr*.\i.am rear +UI W for ">. )cMofc I&will only cost Guide
Ttm a postal fr* to seal for M Iltattrtie?CataJopf t

_ .. .., FAVORITE SINGER. nriM AMES term MILNE an$ U'tliaocJalt.& SON Adar-SCOTS the!!Amret.ren QKOVE, IOWA.. I CURE FITS '
4III iiiiIt-. ... NEW HIGH ARM. STAUNTON MILITARY ACADEMY for
, Style as shown in cut,with full When I say cure I do not mean merely to stop them young men and boys. For HIM catalogue,
t .. "setattaehmentaself-setting nee IMPROVED for a time and then hare them return again. I mean a address. Staunton Military Academy Staun-.
die and self-threading) shuttle ItINCUBATOR radical cure. I haTe made the disease of FITS.EPILEPSY ton, V'EARS.
. J You .ngetlBW'u.achlneaonY EXCE LS1 or FALLING SICKNESS' a lifelong etody. I .. .
of manufacturers. Fave CanT3.Mrs' .&- : lQiplr. Perfect nd !"Ielr-ltelOllat. warrant my remedy to core the worrteaaes. Because FOR PROFIT IN THE StHITH.
\ COmmissions of$35. Benton n others
trial.. Warranted! 5 years. >Rarantcrd to hatch luver percmtacc Sandstones for a treatise and a Free Bottled ILLUSTRATED LI-T I REE.j'l dj}

\ Oe-iUTIYE SEWltt MAOHftE CO., of hMeb.r.fertiQ6f ggs$eB at S ltas l Or.cost for IHoa.than Catalogue any other my care.infallible remedy. Gin Express and Poet Office.R. '.5.nnln'IIII', :itinrsery! (!*>.. Them. an-,

. 4V Wo pay J'retc1:1tFhDade1ph1a.: ,Par (3roaluefras. CEOH.STAHLQUINCYILU I G. BOOT, M. O., 183 Pearl SU, N. YUfcii ." 5 5 -tlle,.Georgia.., ., "''
., .' X .y 'd .... ',"'" .

t.

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,. .. 6.. :.... .,, ...... ,- L'j.J : .
.ara a. @'Wr sews.6 r4i .. fiiE' ; ';:,,;' ::.."- <", :Jg' -tL. >>.A( ';" )M..i J" :J. WJ1i ) !OI :"" _:, .. ', '
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19,1891] r FLORIDA DISPATCHJ, FARMER.. ANDFRUIT-GROWER.: ; '237;. :'



, $60. $60. PILES FOREVER CURED.

g$ I. I If you suffer:with any (form of this terrible

THE BEST, IRRESPECTIVE OF PRICE. loathsome disease and desire to eet cured

promptly, permanently and cheaply, use
rcAVat TMKV AMC Turkish Electric Ointment. Immediate re-

THE BEST. lief. Action,coo).and soothing. It is the only .

4' D.M. Fzur&Co. remedy in the world,and cures the worst cases

f ffittitrated,Descriptive and Priced ., __-n.. in existence. Sent ,by mail on receipt of one ..

SEED ANNUAL] dollar-no free samples., We mean business.

Don't hesitate, but remit at once,and address \
For 1891 will be mailed FREE ] plainly, TURKISH PHARMACY ",,o., Albion,
i [to all applicants, and to lastseason'tt] Mlcb.
' customers., It is better than ever. ,
Every person using; Card,
Piawtr or Fitld SttJs, y '
{ should send for it. Address 65,000 Very choIce Niagara grape roots. .uuw.wua ,

i D. M. FERRY &:CO. DIRECT SALES.

I I.argetSeedemen DETROIT MICH.in the world j ji rl j.uuuuu( FIye-bud cutting of Niagara Ariz rrt0N, Fair alto VEOCTABLB GBOWKKS
grape for sale cheap.
'."w, The No.3 Cutaway.4-feet wide,itt$13.50:cash with
Both from old bearing vines,well matured order. Full stock In warehouse. Send for circulars.E. .
wood and warranted true to name. ., 8. BUBB R)), State Agent,-, .'
Federal .
: Point.1&
STRAWBERRIES.We I can locate a few very desirable homesteads -
in South Florida.
200000NIAGARA3BUD.

make the original Virginia C. I. PAGE, .
.
..
I-Z.&
Aubnrndale. Polk Co., Fla. CUTTINGS
Ventilated Fruit Carriers for J. J. CALHOUN & CO.,

Strawberries and Tomatoes.. If PLANT BED CLOTH. FOR SALE.
xxcurerot DRUJOLS These cuttings are all from bearing vines.,

you want fancy prices for your Cheap Substitute for glass on hot beds, All orders must be In by December 1, l&O. ti

i Tomatoes, ship them in a No. NATIONAL TYPEWRITERAND cold frames, etc. Threel] grades, Light, Medium 82.5O per 1,000. Orders of 10,0 iO and up .
; Heavy. wards.2..)per cent. discount. "
41 or a,No. 42 Ventilated.Carrier. State agents for the sale of NIAGARA
i 6UPPI.UIS.8. ; For Florists Gardeners>> To- and GRKKN MOUNTAIN grape vines.
: Early Strawberries in a No. 34 ;
HAYNES, YOUNG & BAILEY,
r or 36 Crate. Catalogues, prices 52K West Bay Street, bacco Growers, etc. Pioneers of Grape Culture in South Florida,

j and samples free on application. ZACXSONVILL1 llLOBrna.olrm.sk .. Protects from frost, promote hardy vigor- .ox W! Orlando. Fla.
ous growth. Will not shrink or mildew

Southside Mfg. Co.,' t L: i Day Line--St. Johns, River.
..
Petersburg,.Va. I '\, c CS..I!;o..(Z.... ..gg .
ii Except Sunday.STE.
l-l-W -=!t
..
} -Mpa -:-:.:.. ELIZA HANCOCK leaves Jack,onville,
t
oe.5_0_=tpC 1c foot Main St.,at 2 p.m.for Hibernia I ,Magnolia,i
Important to Melon Growers ,;r z oi; Green Cove Spring, Picolata, Federal Point,
'&:: = For ale by leading dry goods houses, seeds-
:." t::;! 1t men, florists, eta For circulars and samples Orange Mills and Palatka. Leaves Palatka
eo)8-A< PLANT ONLY PURE SEED. E4
.I t........y nMVrgaaLx7. NATIONAL WATERPROOF FIBRE CO., Melrose and Santa re. Arrives Jack sonvllle

I can supply' Melon Growers with --.: "C Ctnocd. : South St.,New York, N. Y. 12:30,p. m.,assuring early connections for the
pure stock Watermelon Seed cf all =.e 5: :z; Agents wanted. North and West. E.V. H. POST, Gen AgU,

standard varieties, my own growth, at f. 5r.'o.c CD..5-' -o Also waterproof covers from 2]%cents per E. W. EBBETTS, On Board
j."tS'. square foot. 100 W Bay St.
lowest market prices. .q H :

i To those purchasing seed of me, I, t,!Q-ASo..a.= "' ..
...."..0=_.0.00.. :
:
:
will furnish full
particulars as to plant- \ :0..&g .8' .j ,
..
1 it gfertilizingf cultivation, etc. : am
elk QQlJ...S.. t 4 '
Address, ,_ _..a"f:
W. M. GIRARDEAU fr :w0m BICYCLES*

1.1-lt VIomtl llo, Fla Jj:1. :=e..e'ifra
, a t awd: -!AOea : .
..{'f. II> ".'-.....tt"d: g...:.:.tlCD."'"
AHIYOU i ,11I\ .J. .stl\ .IC _", "..f-o S
BEE MAN 1 1.A C fa.c': .. : : 1Ii "" ..d cSL t.Rfla'TiOn
.
CD ;..;. : :!ap t 1I!..9.., roVeodr ? ., .
.
,. .
-a .0 ..'" >4 .d iI! :::
Postal Will Get You .. c g!:l :e .;:&a. a .
l .. m ; =sg : J. E. POORMAN Agent
... .
.
... = ,
U C)
Bee in Dixie. .
Keeping .. a !IS 'Q cr CII
0 t)ro -"lIS --.Q..z .. i
I 60,.. Pages of Picture and Printing and Prices "" cn E4 ::I ;": t 3".'-.:oQ.:.s oed: : Cincinnati ohi
cCO !"'",. .... ::. ...,... -"" p ', .
JENKINS & PARKED, Wetumpka; >> Ala. ...... ,.t) ,," Ztr.do'g.. .8 cr :l 1
:
.
t5 ..
I.
.>.. R : Yi
I 3.5- _, .'.".. Q!j CI;;\...,..yaee. !_I"' _.Q.. :.>....wig cI: 't"".u.. ? Catalogue Free. Agents Wanted.
E !:! S 3-5-3m

t.DEAF'NESS .._..... ..J....-_.o0no.......-:: ,t':.....:.......-........:cs":'.:.:I._.w.,oo..

E1 It m C......aessCCI.:It : ...>.a. e.. DIAMOND "D"
__ 11M '"" "' ,...a o A 0 w C"e-' :
do i
g.==" 1!s
"IJ z e"d
i ITS CAUSES AND CURE_ -C 0 QMq;; .cr.hm.,=Q i .+ 8i.as'iw. = .=.

.: .
Ashes
o : 13 Hardwood
..
= t.'C.g.ss.s. fi.9OJ'S.
___ > :
world- ..... I Q i"" 0 A'a.
o-t > "..: "'I R
entirely cured,of from 20 to 3*,years'stand, a. 'tIo.e: =c-'cc' ""d ai Rank at the head of the list for quality ,
C. ::<:.. .: o0eN t;toQE
all other treatments have
after failed. How -... "
the difficulty is reached and the. cause removed ,- i i.ui&sj't: Eir es..e"' e""o-I'' I. And Take the Lead Everywhere.They .

.t fully explained in circulars, with affidavits .= t S
and testimonials of cures from prominent -- are obtained from mills manufacturing car and wagon timber, and where no,other

people, mailed free, fuel Is used than the best of hard woods. No other brand Is obtained from sources that insure -

., Dr. A.FONTAINE East 14th St., N..'V CONSUMPTION. >> uniform a quality. A. Dollar invested in Diamond "D" Hardwood Ashes will buy

more actual plant food than in any other fertilizer 01. the market.

I bare a padtint remedy for; the above disease;by its :
Six days earlier thin too' thousands of efohl of the ant kind and of lone ACTUAL RESULTS .
Dyvartttrt*,ted lUbe atuding aAT9b*. cnrbJ InC ed so strong is ID7 faith --j I
Agrleu'tl Ex. Grounds :
at Of npTa,N. Y. Color in its efficacy, that I will send TWO BOTTLES TErz.with That are the outgrowth experience nre more convincing than mere theory. bated upon
k greenish *bite pulp VALUABLE TREATISE on this disease to&D7.dlferw chemical analysis or a printed'formula, hence the grower who has proven to his own sails
ender, sweet and delirious. will send their Express and P.O.address. ;
who me
unleached hardwood ashes will make a thrifty and productive grove 0
The only (faction that.pure.
imp 181 Pearl SU, N. T.
M. C. ,
Slocum ,
A. ,
that ranks flrat both In IT. orchard on the lightest soil,and that,too, for less money than by any other mtans,'will testify ",
E earllnets qnalit e
i.ach Tine andt sealed with to the merits of this brand, for he will< at mica recognize in them the "strongest" ashes

our' rrriiteied trade- he ever used. For prices, terms and other particulars,address,
mark label. Send forctrcuur
.*".t., iun. r information. Agent wanted C. E. DEPUY,
Address SIEPHiN HOWS bONS New Canaan Cfc r
RttW"k"1i". Michigan


The Garrett Pieket &Wire Fence Machine SPRAY YOUR FRUIT TREES AND 'VINES.
I' ,
VtavM to the posts.A unl- Wormy Fruit and Leaf Blight of Apples, pea.. Cherries, Plum Curculla -
venal in use.ffcvorite...U'ut.et4..FreI Thousands b ,IUQGIES' NESS at PRICE.3iay prevented by spraying with the EXCELSIOR SPRAYPTJMP. :
IllIllIlul paid. Agents are reporting GRAPE and POTATO ROT prevented by using EXCELSIOR .
.: Direct troes FACTQRT sod UTe MIDDLEMEN'Srolt.
bc! sales. Machines APSACK SPRAYER I also injurious Insect which infct \
\Vire. etc., at wholesale '? A ."0.03 LEA TIiE1f.\(TOP BUGGY,Steel Curranta .ebtrriea-sta.--berries and Btrawberrien. PERFECT
direct from factory to .1x1 Jt Tine.Cick.ry WltH1.,Wftmuit a,$4 t.50. AT GO D PRICES
1111111 Farmer .; Pass. Tt J9U, $30.SO J Has. Opta Buggy $>..i 0. F U T ALW Ya E ,
where I cave no mailed
Catalogue alflnJuHons Insects to fruits free. Large
HUhlI ar nu C4Ul.tr.free.Ad- :1 Uaa C-.rl..$S.S>e. A pod$10 Baggy Earatsi, fi.fft. showing
dress the o stock of Fruit Trees, Vines and Berry Plants at Bottom Price. .*
manufacturer, U.S. BUGGY AND 0 AKT Cu., ;
Address, ...STAELL.Qmiaey,JJllaei
$. H..GARRETT. MANSFIELD. OHIO. Cincinnati, Ohio. JI I Ia

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,.
"' ; : {} ) 1 < ...... .. '
aka.. q.h-...;;.. "'.... ',-n_ FLORIDA;: 'DISPATCH;FARMER AND FRUIT-GROWER. >- -' [hfLEclr 19--1891":='

1 .
THE LEADING FURNITURE HOUSE OF THE STATED



Q .A.. 1 LARGEST STOCK SOUTH OF BALTIMORE. ':
{ .
: & j Latest Designs in Parlor and Bedroom Suites in Antique:: ,Oak

cO rrOSrondeb' a J2-: ', ,.. Mahogany, Cherry, Walnut and Imitation..II: ll.sta.ndsl

e .SOIIcltd \.J 8 Bed'Lounges, Willow, Reed and Rattan
.
,
Goods, Desks of all KindsandW
40" .
B '
'. fc Styls.
.
*
b42 .
WE'SELL .
.
SA :,;
BEST Y
YOU THE 0 Sr.Y

GOODS FOR THE 'LEAST MONEY.'t JAOKS: ',' .

HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS OF ALL KINDS. ONVJ.LE( : ''F" ;; I ,

:>'_ r '. LA.K .
./Carpets, Mattings, Curtains, Window Shades, Hanging Lamps, China and . .
Crockery Sets, Tin Toilet Sets, Mirrors, Curtain Poles and Brackets. ; \ '

Hotels Boarding Houses, Shins, Steamers, Offices and Private Residences Furnished from Top to Bottom. ',

J: ...When writing,please mention this paper.


p LITTLE f BROTHERS FEJacksonville TILIZER AND PHOSPHATE CO,,,'" ', ;


Florida. ,'.;.- j i;:

Dealers in I and Manufacturers of High I Grade Fe rti Ii zerse


Orange Tree and Truck Fertilizers.} Cotton and Corn Fertilizers.

-1 All Grades or Fertilizer Materials; on Hand at Lowest! Market: Prices. .. '
.;
,,'i ,. .
'
We Cl: manufacture all our own eoods at South Jacksonville. Our fertilizers .are made from the' best materials.,
., ,
', We.r '"'- live' -;" recently J purchased the factory and good will of the South Florida Fertilizer Co., at Orlando.;''Fla.. .
'
J. ALEX. LITTLE, Secretary and Treasurer, ". :
JACKSONVILLE, FLA."
I,

VEGETABLES. ORANGES. CUT WORMS! GRASSHOPPERS! CATERPILLARS'":


; Jradlej's Vegetable Fertilizer Bradley's Orange Tree Fertilizer, THE SEMINOLE INSECTICIDE AND CUT WORM

Bone and Potash. DESTROYER will kill the cut worm, destroy the grasshopper
. "Fish and Potash exterminate, the caterpillar and all other: :,insects/ that
"Pure Fine Ground Bone feed on and destroy the young vegetables and. plants. Vege-
Dry Ground Bone table and truck growers should investigate the merits) of this
'
Sulphate of Potash wonderful preparation.
,
; For general information,prices, circulars,etc., address.
Tobacco Fertilizer, Sea Fowl Guano, Patent Supernhosphate of: THE SEMINOLE INSECTICIDE CO... .
Box 216. ;Jacksonville,Fla.f .
.
Lime, Muriate of Potash, Nitrate of Soda, Kainit, &c.l .f Mention: this paper.| .

-

BRADLEY FERTILIZER GO., JOHN CLARK, SON & CO.. .. J


: IBOSTO3NT, :L.A..SS.." r, GROCER S 11 COMMISSION MERCHANTS .

Branch: Office, .- ,AUGUSTA, GA:; -DEALERS IN- "

*'W.;J. POLLARD, Gen'l Manager. OSCAR E HOLAN,,Fla: Salesman.CS l .

ti s Correspondence Solicited. ; Coal, Hay, Grain, Wines, Liquors, Cigars, Tobacco o" Etc'-I ta r; \

TREES TREES TREES JACKSONVILLE,FLA. .,.."" ,'!

GLEN ST. MARY NURSERIES PRICE LIST OF WHISKEY. :. :
Parker,..___......_. ...tl.75 J. Martin ttje:, _......__._...-:. '3.00
...,..___..... ____._
G. L. TABER, Proprietor, Glen St. Mary, Fla. ,Mprinp Orange! YIeyM Valley...._: __....'...../. tf.50 2.00 uldRonrbon.Virginia til titles...._....._._....._..,,A.OO 4.00
...__ sour na.k__.. ft.OO :
250,000 Trees, 200:Varieties. All home grown. It will pay you to Clifton!North Caro.loa Club_.._CorD_....__.M.._2._50_ Old Kentucky Baker.___ __ ,,;,,_...M...5OO; t
._.__.___ .
,write to us before purchasing elsewhere. Send for catalogue and price list. fllontreie Velv.e. $0.60. '
Special prices on large lots. Jigs extra: 1 gallon 25c.. 2 gallon 5Oc., 3 gallon 75c. Remit &office
money order, check or registered letter. We cannot ship C. O.D.to dry towns
F Established 1856. 200 Acres in Fruit Nursery. A complete price list of Groceries, and Wine list,"eenMree on application.
John Olnr"Ur: Ron & Co.SALZER1 .
ONE ACRE UNDER GLASS.

NURSERIES NORTHERN'!
=t. FRUITLAND ,, S CROWN
( ARE THE BEST
Angusta: Georgia. FOR ALL SOILS EEDS
AND CLIMES.
Bonanza Ont toot the.+.eriea.err.L
*We offer for Fall and winter delivery' an Immense. stock of Fruit and Ornamental tree, White u. the be nest yielding Oats in Am iea..| ... ,
- Rose,Palma,atc. suited te Florida. All the new Peaches lately originated. In Florida. ; .Prue.per acre JxttrFrrialit. *to all pointt '.l, .
+ ''
Alo a superb stock or Evergreens,Camellias,Greenhouse plants,etc. : IlEl.M TATOKM CHEAP. I \ a\?, .
,,.._.,Our have been tested in Florida for thirty-three years past. Catalogues free. Oar Cftialcgne. the finest ever jmblisbed.! Send 4 eta! ,, '; ..
products fan t
tor same or 8 eta.for my Grain Sampler or 6 eta. .,. 1<; \,. \ ,', .
i iDTrial }
Address, my new 17-dxj Acme Ramah and receive dialogue free. $ 4:'" ;
No :
K'eu'ts. "
etable&edeDostpd.la'i. : .ie.:; :
pk&-Ea.rltef.\V ;
< -
'.- P.J. BRRGKMAMS, U pkgs.Klegant Flower deeds poBtpeid 6t'c. \'.. E"the new 17difBadl5b.
Augusta, Ga. JOHN A. SALZER. LA CROSSE. WISCONSIN.


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.._.'' .... -,.. ... .. -,.," -.y!it .. )!{f.: :%:;. 'h....... '" ..... ''' .fi4;. -. ..__ ,..... J<-'_., .i. .,..



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r; MARCH 19, 18 11 THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, FARMER AND FRUIT-GROWER.. 239 _



The 1 r AV N .A H LINE.

Clyde

to 55 hours between Savannah, New York and Phila
'. .,.

New York, Charleston and between Boston and Savannah 65 to 70 hours. :.'"

*

The ,magnificent; Steamships of this 'Line
Steamship Company.
to sail as follows : _
(STANDARD. TItfK.)
,, From Fro
New
York (Central or 90 Meridian Time)
s (Pler2 ,E.:lL) STEAMER,

f Monday Feb. Z3d, at 3 r. x. .."CHEROKEE".. Sunday, Mar. Passage Rates. : ')
i! Wednesday; Feb.'25th, at3p.x..YEMASSEE..Tue day. Mar. *
If Friday Feb. V7tb, at 3 P.M. .."SEMINOLE"... Thursday Mar.
and New York 1st class, 125.60 Intermediate,119.00 Excursion,H&5Q
It Monday. Mar. 2d, at 8 P.H. .. IROQUOI8" Sunday. Mar. : ; ; .
't' Wednesday Mar. 4th, at 3 p.x. ..."ALGONQUIN" Tuesday, Mar. Steerage,liSO.
Friday, Mar. fit h, at S p.M. ::"CHEROKEE.".. Thursday Mar. Boston: Cabin$27.00: Intermediate,$21.00; Excurslon.S-f7.9f; Steerage, liaS.
t Monday, Mar. Wi, at 3 P.M.'.."YEMA88EE".. Monday Mar. Steamships of this Company are appointed to sail..follows:
I Wednesday Marllth, at 3 P. M. .."SEMINOLE"... Tuesday, Mar. .
Friday. Mar. 13th, at 3 p.K. ."IROQUOIS" Thursday Mar. nOM SAVANNAH TO NEW YORK.
Monday, Mar.16th, at 3 p.x. .ALGONQUIN" Sunday. Mar.
Wednesday, Man 18th, at 3 p.lc. .."CHEROKEE".. Tuesday, Mar. [Central or 90o Meridian Time.]
I Friday Mar. 20tb, at 3 p. M. .."YEMA88EE". Thursday Mar. Capt. Daggett-..,.................:......Wednesday. Apr. 1- LOCO am
Monday, Mar. 23d, at 3 p. x. ..8EMINOLE". Sunday, Mar. Capt. Smith ........._ ...... ........................Friday, .. 3100 D m
Wednesday, Mar. :26th, at 3 P. x. ..IROQUOIS" .. Tuesday, Mar. ,Capt.Burg_.......... ........... .. ,Saturday 4- 2.00pm
I FrIday Mar. 271.h, at 3 p. x. .."ALGONQUIN'- Thursday Apr. ....aJt.Catharine.: ......... :.................Monday. 6- 4.00pxx>
Monday Mar.3tb.at3P.x..ClEROKEE.Sunday, Apr. I Capt. .Fisher. ;.._..._..._ _.... ...Wednesday, 8- 5.30pm
Capt. Kem ton............. ....._ ............ Friday, 10- 6.30 a m
EE.Cap Daggett........ ................. ..Saturday, II 11- 7.00pm
Capt.Smith...... ........................... ...... Monday, 13- P.OO a m
I St. Johns River Line.For AINOHAM,Capt.Burst...... ......:..............Wednesday, .16- 11.00am
.. .. & Capt.Catherine.............._... ...........Friday.. It 17- LCOpm
,: T : .Capt.. Fisher....... .............................Saturday 13- 200pm .
!; and Intermediate Capt. Kempton ........ ............ ... .. Monday ft 2)- aSjpm
Sanford, Enterprise ,Capt. Daggett..... ..........__ .....Wednesday: ;2J- 430-p'm
'" : Johns River. Capt Hmitn .. .._..._. .-......._.?... ..Friday. 24- 5.30am
.' : L' OBAM, Capt. Burg....... ..... .....Saturday.. 25600pm
' \t ., Capt Catharine .................. ..........Monday, W- 7.00pm
:: ''I The Elegant'Iron Side-Wheel SteamersTACSSISOIl Capt. Fisher..... ........,.:.... ..........Wednesday 29- 9..qo am

"o.': :.TOP T : : ) FOB BOSTON. -

t J'. 'j i{ ; ,Capt. W. A- SHAW;, ; : Capt. Lewis...._.. ,.. ....._........,.......:Thursday,Apr. 2- 1130am
J
11 ; ..Doane................... .....................Thursday.. 9- 600pm
f PR ED'X: : EBARY': Capt.I.awls................ ....................Thursday, II 16- 12wm
) Doane.. ...... ........_......... ...._....Thursday; 23- 54Xpm
; :.., .: -Oapt..T.. W. LUND, Jr. Capt. Lewll _.. ......... ............ ...Thursday, to- lOWam
f ;. Are appointed to sail from Jacksonville,dally except Saturday at .
FHXLADELF HIA,
Sanford,dally except Sunday,at 9 a. m. FOB "
(This Ship does NOT: Carry:.Passengers.) :

i SOUTHBOUND. SCHEDULE. Askins........._?............ ....................Sunday, 20)pm ..
1 Read Down. .Askins .6............._....................,..Wednesday, Apr.S- 100) "' ,.
s'f Leave 3:0P. ..................... ........Jacksonville .................... .Asking....- ......___... ......... .........Saturday, 255.00- am m
r .* 8.(O P. x.-................;.;...........Pal tka .......\..... .......'... p.
t# u 1:30A. M........... ....;..............Afctor......................'... :THESE PALACE STEAMERS .,.
.* .2i5A.H............................St. Francis ...... ............... : ,
; .4 5:00 A.M..............................Beresford ................-...... the Savannah. Florida and Western Railway (Waycross Short Line)offer
: .. 6tOA.M.........:................. Blue Springs .. ................. Traveling Public and Shippers advantages equalled by no other line.
: Arrive 8:00: A.M........................... #..Sanford... '.. ............".... ; and Bills of Lading issued to Inclpal points North,East and Northwestvia ,
l 9:15: A.M. ...........................Enterprise.......... ........... Savannah. For information and rooms apply to .\
Also Steamer EVKROLADE:'(freight only) from Jacksonville Astor TH;General Agent, H. R. CHRISTIAN Soliciting 1
i" days and Fridays at 6 P.x. Returning, leave Astor Tuesdays t Bay Street,Jacksonville. 71 West Bay Street Jacksonville. '
.I at 10 A.x. ,Agent, C. G. ..\NDERsO& Agent a
85 North River New York. City Exchange: Building, Savannah.,Q.. 1
l General Passenger and Ticket,, Office 88 West : RICHARDSO4& BARNARD. Agents,Lewla' WhArf, Boston. }
Agent 13 8.Third Street: Philadelphia.-
F. OT. IRONMONGER Jr.,Fla.Pass.Agent,88.West Bay BU, Eastern Agent. 8ev.. Fin.*Western Ey. Ca,28l Broadway N. Y. j,
W..F. OO KN FAY,Traveling Passenger Agent,88 West Bay St. ,Gen. Manager. W.E ARNOLD,Gen.Trav. Agt,Jacisoavme.. Fl> "
\ :to S F.& W. Railway office. '
J. O. PELOT, Frt. Agt.,on wharf, foot Hogan St.,Jacksonville,.1'S ,,. ::.., ,
JOHIt .I*. HOWARD, Fla. Frt. Agent, foot uraRt.Jack .
J. A. LESLIE. SupU., foot Laura 8t.,Ja.ck80nT1l1e,Fla.iriARSIIAL ESTABLISHED 1875

; n. CLYDE, Assu Traffic Manager,5 Bowling

: THEO. O. EGE!f.,:Traffic: Manager 5.Bowling: Green,:X. Y.
'XLLIAM. : : .A.. :E3CC1 I.S.
i WM. P. CLYDE & CO., Gen'l

.
r IS South Wharves, Flilladclpbla. .6, WHOLESALE



Williams & Clark Garden Seeds and Fertilizers: t



j NEW YORK.: NEST BAY STREET JACKSONVILLE FLAc ]

r f

Branch Office, No. 729 ,Reynolds St., : THE BEST AHO MOST RELIABLE SEEDS. A COMPLETE STOCK O1 1. .. .


...- C. 'D. DUNCAN, Florida Oats Floor BranWheat Grits 1
.' Meal!

SEED MEAL Both Bright and Dark. 1-
Americus. Orange Tree' Fertilizer, : : .J

'.: s ,Americus ,Orange Tree,No.; 2, r AGENT'

; ." Americus Ammoniated Bone FOR 1 PURE'GROUND BONF, 11
: ,
lone gert & Co.'s Jh "
-
'A'mericussPure Bone: Meal l Americus'
v j M NITRATE SODA, 'l

., /* -, U Ol Americus Strawberry Fertilizer :; Fertilizers
I MURIATE OF POTA8H
4.' B ANALYSIS. P ,
\ '. t .:Americus' Sulphate of Potash,
.. '
>.' ". Florida Vegetable ; SULPHATE POTASE
'
and Vegetable L :
'..'"'RJcJ'EBEZfO' :- '0.F. Winton. Mandarin- Fla-t Dr. H.Knight, ; j \ KAINIT, ETC. ;5., I
Wjieon Clermont. Fla.; M. GodtreT Minneola'I'la. : have no superior In'the: market and a trial will oonrlnce. .. ., t.
&dSreu all correspondence to;W Ik.LI i8.&,.CLARK >>' :
... : .

LEMONS.. r 1-
VALRICn NURSERIES .. 1B..NANAB.
NUB-SERIES: ES. PINEAPPLES,

'Tropical find Subtropical.LarreStk AVOCADO PEARS .1

', ....... -i1F.TH1MilwaukeeFlorida _" GUAVAS,
'
Choice Tiri ti esl I TruaNjaiagl! ANONAS, J
i
: ;, 'Orange : Liberal :Dealing! ROSES/NERIUS,.
I ,CAL DIUM.2,
; J
i-iiH; -< s&s aa."i ; is' ,
pHOIOBBT".Btratefl of.DItlnctlve Virletfee of Citrus Fault.Trees.a W: G. TOUSEY,. 'Prop'r, CACTI, VINES, ,. 'I
Ji.l..v
BAll 8003
ETC. !
) V> Jvee and'Ooj. lets. Prompt ittentionto correspondence. .For YALRICO,BILL8BOROUGH CO.FLA.' .". 10

t address,'" j'"* :A. L. DUNCAN, Man '. : .: Send Catalogue., ,. : PALMS.

; '
: : ....'... ';'. :J --c.
;
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C' < -- k- "","'."'", _"'F("' .r, '"'!Y.' ,".. .-, "...... ..'c--., ''F't... );, ... .. '; ." .., .. .
., "t -
.L' : '.:; .. .. :.' .'! t' .' ;,.""".',-11-,; : l'
JO .. *" >


.
2ro THE FLORIDA DISPATCH, FARMER AND FRUIT-GROWER. [MARCH 19, 1891E

.
----- ------ --- -
: .. ':


E :T FERTILIZERS. FERTILIZERS. 4


.

Blood and Bone, Dark and Bright Cotton Seed Meal,

I '. ,Pure. Fine. Ground Bone, Linseed !Meal! .. ,.

F I Animal Bone and Potash, ... Tobacco Stems, .

I;, **, ., Blood, Bone and Potash, Canada lEEardwpo'd Ashes,

;, t Chioao-o Bone Meal, &_ Sulphate of Potash, &0.t' ,


''L t' .: '. C>range: : Tree' F-oo, :E3ear1n.g: Trees. : : .... _I

f tip Orange: Tree Food, TroTua.ce: Trees' .' '. ,

f"V- ge-ta' J.e and-: :potato Grro"VVer.J ,.

L GKEO. E. WILSON,..G( 'l A.0"fc.. 22 "W\ Bay St., Jacksonville Fla. I

:: -

j DARLING'S COMPLETE FERTILIZERS,
I ORANGE;
'
t S
'
.
G Made Expressly for the FRUIT AND TRUCK GROWERS OF FLORIDA.
.
; : ,3: Oi Manufactured by the-

\ .. B. Darlfog Fertilizer Company, Pawtucket, R I. t

i O Southern Offices and Warehouses, JACKSONVILLE, FLA. j
,i W. H. MACOMBtiK General Sales Agent Bostwick Building. 1-
V A Oar Fertilizers have given Universal Satisfaction the past season. Send tor Catalogue,
H Special, Complete Manure. trine prices,and testimonials from some of the leading growers. .,

I

i For.Orange Trees, Young ,and Old, Fruit Trees, and Small Fruits AGRICULTURAL TOWN OF Florida.

McINTOSH Marion .
'", Producing: Healthy: Vigcrous Growth and Bright, Firm,Fruit County, ,

:,' That Holds on Until it is Picked. Located on Orange Lake, the home of the native orange. Rich high hammock lands |
rising seventy-five feet above the lake level. Flourishing orange groves. Prominent veg- j
"FEED THE PLANT, AND etable shipping point. Well watered. Natural drainage. Railroad, telegraph, post office ..
OUR MAXIM. THE PLANT WILL FE ED YOU and school facilities. Universally pronounced one of the very best locations In the State. ;
1' An inspection will satisfy.the most critical. Inquiries may be addressed to ;

r. Scientific research,verified by practical experiment, have enabled ns to determine the S. H. GA1TSKILL."VEGETATOR". l'l'S
most suitable form of plant fcod.to 'rodnc.e.not only weet fruit (the most salatle)', but also

We claim that. our ORANGE,GROWER returns to the soil In suitable form and In proper .A. -V- E1s?"" 01R :MONEY: J JBy
time those constituents which fruits abstract,al1d will give larger yield;stimulating
a vigorous condition of the entire plant.. Our ORANGE GHOWxR supplies the required
elements of plant food and In suitable forms. "CULTURATOR" .
Experience has proven that Potash Is beat adapted to the orange tree,and cur ORANGE bnm! Millor LiDDincott & CO'S 0 }
GROwl R contantalns the largest amount,principally In the form of sulphate. The Bone 1;
used Is more quickly available than the raw bon., being carefully dissolved, hence more 1:
readily taken by the rcots of the tree. Many failures are recorded with the bone,and we are Complete Fertilizers for Vegetables and Fruit Trees. Analysis. and prices application. .
led believe that the soil of FJorida has upon
to : not the power to dissolve bone and make plant BAKER BROS, State
Agents.
food of It,which a heavier soil possesses. We have aimed to put It In' the right form to yield GEO. W. BAKER'S ROTTED BONE MANURE, Decomposed with Potash. 125 per .
up its plant food gradually through the season.It ton delivered. Guaranteed Analysis. Catalogue and :
w an unquestionable fact,admitted by all that the growth of an orange tee I.the BAKER BROS.,Special Agents,Palm Springs, Fla.
labor of many years and we can not afford to wait a whole season for the bone to be rendered
lolub!e. On the other sand the trees should not be forced by stimulants like fUn,guano LOW PRICES ON TOBACCO STEMS IN CAB TATSJOIN J
.cottonseed meal which,being rich In ammonia,are consequently too forcing. Experience
has further demonstrated the wledcm of frequent applications of fertilizers,especially on ,THE. '.
lighter lands,*ay two or three times a fear In January,February or March and In June and :r
July. It should be scattered broadcast around the trees,a little way from the trunk,and as HOMF I1 rN-V-ElSrr1\llEI: :: .
far out as the tranches extend and should be worked lightly!In the BOIL About one-half -1..
pound should be applied: to young trees when first set out,worklug thoroughly Into the soil,
that It may not come In contact with the tender roots. Another half-pound should be scat
tered around the tree after It Is set out,on the surface and raked in. Building and Loan Association
Older tres should! l be treated as follows: Two pounds for second year,three pounds for .,,1
third year,increasing the quantity pound a year entll the tree Is ten years pld. A full
t beating grove should have from 1,200 to 2 000 pounds per acre. .
Send for pamphlet and price,and all other Information to And Own a Home. i

A. M. BOND, General Agent, .

.' BOWKER FERTILIZER CO. Jacksonville Fla. The terms of this Association: have never been equalled In Florida. It offers terms that J
; should enable every man to,instead of paying rent'to a landlord have same sum pay for
same property In a few yean It o "e11l11e8t terms to :
iE: NURSERIES OF THE ;
/, STOP A MORTGAGE.Write Y

,for particulars,to the above named Association 1
Milwaukee-Florida Orange Op.:
5 Everett Block, Jacksonville. Fla. .J
Selected strains of Choicest Varieties of Citrus Fruit Trees a Specialty. -


Our stock Is large and complete., PROMPT ATTENTION Budding-Wood TO CORRESPONDENCE.for sale at all r times.For KIA IE 44 uRn S! l

Catalogue and Price-List,address, I 1

A. L. DUNCAN Manager Dunedin Fla. :
; t .
.. '
Placed In Southern....BOOM siae iA7oTv.ntya run? '
PIANOS. tucceaBfalbqrinein .ilagoTCTHlxMilllon Dollar* --.1'
ready inoreMinc. Why r BMMM the Country toflooded .i's

i FLORIDA FARMERS !! UNEQUALLED IN TO with SELL-NOT Cheap Inferior Instrument TO USEand bust .:!"' 1...1'

and .Gardeners. Tone,Touch,Workmanship 5 Durability WE DON'T the public SELL hu found THAT oat that KIND '

For the past twcnty-two years we-have improved\the,"Pride of America" Baltimore" 22 an than factories. Term. Easiest Method. Fain, ;
Corn. It is the most prolific, prettiest and best corn in the world. It is very: Jew Washington York, 14&, 817 Fifth Market Ave.Space. Write Inducement for Tree*, neatest Catalogue, ndICisoalM expUmmff frelcht* i'

early and pure white. Makes a third more per acre on same land than if F t foil/-all la plain print. East to boy from a*.

planted in any other seed. We have often shelled a pound of corn from a THE SEWSTOREto I] SUDDEN&BATEO :1:1I

single ear, and,have many times made sixty to eighty bushels per acre on land I L, Southern Music House, O :
w that will produce three fourths of a bale of cotton, and over one hundred every min,70Tmmlddle-fi t!, SAVANNAH, OA.I ;'
bushels} where land is rich. The Department of Agriculture declares:this to EN onUC and old Iarubus; oataw n..Dofioa,1l.z.Mo paid. Address I .

be the best corn in the United! States and, having no equaL Why plant poor J
seed, work hard land make about half what you should? Don't miss this chanceof

getting,the best corn grown. .Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded: A SCHOOLIiuing ; ,. ,. Hi

PRICE: Sample packet, 150.; tf lb., 300..: i" lb., Soc.; 4 Ibs., ,$1.50, ,
post paid. )#peck, $1.75 ; i PCck$2.2f; # bushel,.$4; i bushel, $6; over young men for the active datltsof life. :; S4
of and ooQ
Chartered the legislature Virginia
ope.bushel, $S per bushel. ''Don't 'send stamps. Address at once, endorsed by by the Chamber of Commerce Council, _....... :. _7Bft. =
PRIDE OF AMERICA. SEED CORN CO., Fruitland, Fla. and ForcaUlogne.drcolanand prominent "C the testimonials tity where,located.address kIWI h.-10 M..iMwa....... ReH:

S-5-4t .. J J.C'DUNSKOU,President,Staoutcn,Va. :taw'Y:


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