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Group Title: How to have an orange grove in Florida : or, Facts and figures about orange culture
Title: How to have an orange grove in Florida, or, Facts and figures about orange culture giving valuable information upon this and other subjects
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055741/00001
 Material Information
Title: How to have an orange grove in Florida, or, Facts and figures about orange culture giving valuable information upon this and other subjects
Alternate Title: Facts and figures about orange culture
Physical Description: 13 p. : ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Porter, Charles N
Publisher: Banner-Lacon Print
Place of Publication: Ocala Fla
Publication Date: 1882
 Subjects
Subject: Oranges -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: edited and compiled by Charles N. Porter.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00055741
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001767674
oclc - 07519056
notis - AJJ0873

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Full Text
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FAGTS


AND


FIG


ABOUT


ORANGE


CULTURE,


Many persons
Florida Orange Gr


viewing them in
of time or suitah
of the State, en
If so, what does
tictt relative to
almost frivolous,
in its infancy, m
are writing for th
the subject, we w
in the briefest n
years since the I
state were consid
but later develop


tih
tle
ce(
a
thi
bo
or
ie


have read of the beauty and productiveness of
ovrs irnd numbers have experienced the pleasu
Seir native soil, but a large n jority, either from a
opportunities, have never been within the boun
they very naturally ask, D)oes Orange-growing i
grove cost ?" To a person conversant with all


LI

b


culture of


t it imuiut
or less, i
enetit of


ill endeavor
manner the I
hopes which
lered visaiona


delicious


bt r6*i
gnor;n
those
to giv
largest
were e
ry and


neinl e
Ice tlu

e such
anmou
nterta
I iulpn


red
Ist
we
theac
nt
iuec
)bal


muonti have proved that it


but a most assured success.


these


direoti


The facts demonstrated
far towards dissipating


clusively that (
which one can
may we expect
conclusion, viz
increased facility
eventually beco


)rango
engage
when
: that
iea fot
mno to


the production of cotton ih


Tis true there


traceable


to local


by the actual expert
the ideas formerly


fruit


such


that this b


our
re of
lack
drites
)av ?
the


a questions see8m0
business being yet


necessarily prey
usumine know
ts and figures as
of iuformnitiou.
I for the orange
ble even by our


!ail.
but 1
will
But
in its
own


As we
little of
convey
a few
native
people


is not only a safe investment
are a few failures to record,
causes and mismanagement.
ience of the past few years go


ent


Culture is the safest and
. Tbhi being the case u
future years roll round.
with increased knowledge
r trnasportation and ini
Florida what the mining


to the


ertai

the
We


1, and
otitabl


present
can dedu


e of the e
migration


1


)uth or the


subjec
the


shows con-
e pursuit in
time, what
Lct but one
:t and with
orange will


,dustries are to the West,
manufacturing interests


are to the East.
From ftr and


Florida and th
only surer tha


Cotton, and m(
in it;" and w
to seven years,
permanently e
would say this
or more certain
mne can engag
The same
orchard in oth
Grove in Flori
.A i 9


widu


Imen


capital


e future posiibilitios o
n ordinary tfarming c
re lpro fita bo than rail
liv? Sihply because a
after which time the
statlished Mt a compa
is a long time to wait,


the


rops, l>u
road stoc
grove w
fortunut
ratively
but we


are turning


their


orange business, for


t is more
Lks, verily. '
ill pay for i
e possessor
tnrlling cos
would ask.


produce
'there'i
itself in
has a
t. Per
what


attention


it is not
tive than
s millions
from five
n inconme
haps you
is a surer
. .


n way to prtoperity? Is there any occupation in whiucr
B which does hot require time and capital to develop?
amount of work which is expended on a pesch or apple
er States, will produce many times its vilue in an Oranrge
da. Instanc~haabe4 pointed out all over the State where
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FACTS ANE


rUBES ABOUT ORANGE CULTURE.


the Louisville Commercial, V
land seems a mighty sma
tains an Orange Grove in ft
thousand acre farm in the Stal


ing upon this subject, says:
ito a Kentuckian, but
tti means more


If we estimate the cost of a single acre ofa
five years.to be $30J and its market value to b I
tliat the business pays; but there is another an
tilis matter-the income from this acre of trees th


ng

C.


$103-which pays twenty per cent, interest on the a
next year the interest should certainly be forty pel
inent, with the property double or treble its previous
the expiration of the eighth year the grove has paid
lays, with interest up to that time, leaving sonime ca
let us see how it stands: A. owns 100 trees, eight year
time a net income of $503) and valued at 65,00), th
ineome e-tabliisaed without being a'ile to retlise
Tnese figures are fully within the bounds of inodera
which I quote the following from the pen of Cole
able editor of the Florida A.irleuturi4, who h:s not
with -the friut industry of Fiorida, but has had the b
experience in the West In lies: "Their have been so
va nations placed upon orange groves, that we have
mate and consider the following a just one. Groves
menacing to bear $2.03J per acre, and after that an a
aunum until it has reached $10,03f, by waich time
giving $1,0)J per acre, per annum interest at tea per
It must also be borne in mind that the yield of
surprbing rapidity as the trees become older. Coloi
owns a grove of 700 old trees, which represent an am
$10,J0 to $25,000. I am informed that he has been


" Ten acres of
when it con-
than the best


e trees at the end
(XJ), it is self-evide
ter way of looking
*fth year should 1


loount invested;
rieent. on the in
ikmarket value.


; tl
vet


fot all previous out-
pita) on. hand. Now
s old, yielding at that
us he hae a very fair
how ik happened.
ition-.as a-p.oof of
mel Codringta, the
only been identified
benefit oft m~~u~yar's
in my contred[tory
made a caredul esti-
in good order prm-
dditional $1,000 per
the grove shaold be
cent"
fruit increases. with
nel Hart., of Palatka,
anal increase of from
offered, arndi ,i ed,


$70,000 for the grove. And why should he sell, when in the epes of a
few short years he will have received $70,000 from the sale of fruit,, .a
still own the grove. Marshall's grove, .situated on the O.klawaha .River,
not many milee from Lake Weir, sold a short time since for $28,003,
three months later the owner was offered and" refused, $50,000 for his
property.
In the vicinity of Lake Weir the rise of the orange business been
no less rapid. Around the shores of this beautiful sheet of water, where
stood a short time aince an almost unbroken forest, may now he aeen


many large and- thrifty orange groves. Thousands. upon thouaawds of
trees have been planted, and large numbers are now yielding retirna to
their happy posasMorsd This changing the surrounding foreota into
blooming Orange Grovew, has had its natural effect, which has created a
rise in the value of real estate, In some instances lands near .the lake
have sold for several hundred dollars per acre.
..Two.of our young men (whom we.might mention by name) have
realized for their labor here m the past eight years $40,000. This was
accompljshed by securing land on Lake Weir and planting orange trees.
Others own property here squally as valuable, but will not sell ,a4 rea-
sonable price. Numerous places cn be shown all over -the county where
i. anr __-_ ___ll Jamf A C- A-. ,i nfl .;


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'.


FACTS AND FIGURES ABOUT ORBA&'( 6ULTUBE. 3
have 'been impressed by the general outloC A correspondent in the
Tiwes and News who has been facts from the various
gTrowers in the different par~ti ays : For the last five years
the sales of oranges from' t's g; e at Palatka, have aithouited to-
$15,000 yearly. This 'ro covers 'sofhfe five acres, or four and'three-
quarters. A gentleman' il Columbus, Georgia, bought Marshall's grove
tfor $28,0(0. In lIw~'h'|i three months aftei the purchase the owner
waus offered and ret sr50,0X)0 for it.
'" Mrs. Stowe's a~ e, on a little more than'an acre of ground and cone
listing of one hundrP fand fourteen trees, produced for five years in sue-
cesjion 60.000 oranf yearly. She expected this year to realize $2,000
from the sale of thfi produce .
"A negro living near Jacksonville sold oranges from four trees in
his yard to, the amount of $100.
"A Swede me eight years ago received a present of five acres'of
ground which e pjanted in orange trees. A short time ago he sold the
lhnd and trees ftbr 45,500."
Rev. Mr. Moore estimates the value of a full-bearing orange tree at
$100, and says that the owner may expect from the investment from teln
to one hundred and fifty per cent. Another writer in a different locality
l :lcethe value of an orange tree at $50.
A wild orange grove could, a few months ago, be purchased for
s300o per acre.
"Mr. Harris. sonIe seven or eight veanr ago, invested in a wild
rangee grove near Orange Lake some $1,,000). lie sold his last years'
crolp for $19,(KX) and expected to receive for his crop of tht present yelr
$40,000, but lort a portion of the ,crop during the excessive cold weather.
"Two Baptist preachers received for their orange crop $6(00 and
$800 respectively. The one had twenty and the other thirty trees favor-
ably situated for sending to market.
~ tR .,JaZ La Il, ee trI.a- ,a- A 1..


manual, nuriln~t rn ir
some the moat favorable locli
blank of a large inland lake is a
ravages of frost. Perhaps in no


or healthy spot th
attractedd the atter
ident there we fin


gone
acre,
acre

for $


hup in price.
and nothing
and in a few
" The Dummn
15,000, and ir


"An


IUl llU I IU. llNtI(tllllt", Illt
ties for oraine growing.
favorite locuhty for those
part of the State is there


consi
The
who d
a more


nan Lake Weir-in Marion countyy So strong
ition of orange growers that in a recent letter fih
d these words: Everything here in the orange
Land suitable for a grove sells for from $50 to
done to the hind. Lands have been sold for
days the owner has sold for (100 l.r acre.'
itt Orange Grove vas sold in 1871 for $12,009,


i1881 for


$42,000.


orange tree produces from seven hni


oranges. Trees have been seen with 10,000 orang
such trees are few."
Says a Florida exchange: "Thete are grow
of Green Cove Springs, on the farm of Mr. J. J.
trees that were budded forty years ago, the largest
at the collar six feet two inches in circumference,
and the branches cover a space df thirty-two
linooanna at din nln Attn troo anl. mllnaa In i


southern
read the
pleasant
lyv has it
)m a res-
line has
$300 an
810 an


1878


idred to six thousand
es hanging on them, but

ng within twelve niles


Lee, six s
o.,e of whi
is thirty-fi
feet; the
r, mllv ^^n


weet or.in're
ch mIc.:sIUI -
ve feet hig;;%
sm iler nflr *9a ItZie^


S-A


n





FACTS AND FIGURES ABOUT ORANGE CULTURE.


The seed from w.ich thl
mother is living on tile
one huindireai indi uvun


Loui
He t
" Cr
grov
with
grov
like
and
dark


oran
gig:i


ere grown were planted in 1831.
in conparativoly good health at


** b.Aa 'J'L .aU A C7% Vte* F ..A.
The Nortiiwestera oor8sp t
isville H'rne a,,d Fina, had ocosion
Ihus gives his views in regard to on(
ssing a sav:unah-like portion of C
e an the train cone to a full stop,
the others and get our first sight o
e in vigorous health, fine condition
what we had supposed an orange g
sensation There were the orange


, shiny foliage and compact anl
ges, ripe, numerous und-golden
tic antI towering cabiuge palm


mn gnolieas,
and huangi
froI limb
Sotur
uril featur


some of
most su
County.
the tuwi
opportu
acres of


:h
(t'cc


I


I
(
?


Imay
n, tit
to lir


Ssueh
.,ssrul
tH Of


arnd the like ?
iwn were long d
nb, waving festo
by way of expla
orange product(
cecSse and detail
cultivators. Mr


r


n
LI


Mr. Eichelberger'a lan
i on the south, and here,
nity to go ovet a part of
fifteen years old orange


full tower, feather
orange orchard is
apart for a portion
and it was eviden'
limbs must meet
hardy, regular, ha
able tree thun the
the enconlmniuns
South of Europe :


the.leu
graceft
so bear
dium i
nature
"
trees
of Flor
all the
on the
North
farm o
sible a
ton of
orange
contend
-- -- fl1


ion,
il.
itifu
size
no
So v
ire


theli
Their
1 it is
and
theirr
vound
Loun i


, fruit and


a


'To e\
', peri
ms of
natior
n in
s of ti
Ada
de, h
under
his gl
treed


I


Mr. Loe's
the age of


u a, that excellent journal, the
it Florida on a short trip:
e or tro Marion County groves.
Range ICke we enter an orange-
. We b out upon the platform
f a repress t ive Florida orange
1 and full baring. But how un-
:rove o be, md what a surprise
trees to be .S with their rich,
indsome fo ria : there were tihe


--


among the foliuge, But what of the
live and watur oaks, sweet gums,
rery limb and eac trunk, clinging
eu, or when the win had swung it
Spanish' moss.
i and definition on some of the nut-
Florida, and we are ready to hear of
ie crop from one of the earliest and
m Eichelberger, of Ocala, Marion
house and plantation lie close up to
'r his guiancec, we had the pleoaunt


r
a


leaf.


set out in trees standing
of.it, and a considerably 1*
t that if the same vigorous
in a few years and require
ndsonae, fruitful, ever-beari
Florida orange is nowhere
of a writer deseriiing the o
' All the trees comirising t


I n '


ime and others, have an aspect
persistent foliage, of a bright,
vainly sought for elsewhere, ai
very fragrant, and their fruits
known are comparable to.'
ur, then, where the best and
I to be so admirably suited


ounds and to see in detail
nd his twnrity ners of ba
. Eichelberye.r's forty-five


I




t


roen tifteex
ss distance
growth con
thinning.
ig, captival
o be found


range
hie gen


mor
deep
nd tl
are

most
to


I
h


his forty
nanus iol
acres of


I to twenty feet
for another port,
tinued the outer
A more robust,
ting and profit;a-
, fully justifying


as it appears in
ud CI-mu, the oma
or lesa agreeable
and shinimug greel
eir flowers are of
of a form, color


the
nge,
and
II, in
me-
undi


Beautiful of all fruit
the soil and climate


ida, that orange growing some time since became all the rage ani
fashion, nor that while those who live there have orange culture
brain to the last man and woman. The disease is fast spreading
wird imnd attacking all classes and conditions. I was shown one
f forty acres, not long since, purchased by so conservative and sen-
gentleman as Governor C~aamb*rlin, of kMaine, and General Filer-
the :;ime State has a still larger interest. Indeed, half the young
growes of the State are thought to be owned by non-residents, wl o
plate, when theee plantations have acquired age and attractiveness
*n Ljak 4 l..-. .J A Pfl ..,k,4n, ,.aaBAnr nna w*l ra.. Ljr.0 .


I


]





F.ACt AND FIGURES A3oUr ORANtGE CULTURET .


cleared the land and
quently budd4,cf then
hundred trees on the
gathered thirty-five
seventy-tive to the b
1878-79 lie gathered
From the crop of 1.i
oIld them For $1,7th9.
acres, thirteen hulidi
ve tir old and he has
purchase money,,abi
per cent. would be
promising one andw
year. Last winter
Sterling, Kenttqky,
Mr. H. W rac
newspaper ewtresnpo
venrs ago I wrote soi
coonsidered wild, I n
Wil:tt I then wrote.
five years have brouw
ideal raised tris yve ir c
asked Dr. H1Irris, thL
vears from now an(


planted it in sour trees in IMarch


1875


and subse-


a with \vweet buds in. July, 875, putting out eleven
twenty acrre. e.' Fv eee, in the winter 1877-78, he
boxes:"w veeiWve -e-netar one hundred and
'oxr, ata d them for $135. In the winter of
fouzr hunhrd and sixty boxes and sold them for $490.
-'t4U4 e gathered six hundred and forty boxes and
Tds winter, 1889-81, the product from the twenty
red boxes, sold for $3,380. His grove is now six
realized 86,335 from it. The grove cost, including
t 84,0.J). Interest on that suo: or six years at ten
,400, making the grove cost $6,4~), The grove is a
till perhaps yield twenty-tfive hundred boxes another
Mr. Dunn was offered by a gentleman of Mount
$25,000 for his twenty acre grove, which he refused."
Iy, of Atlanta, Georgia, the well known writer and
dent, says in writing from Sanford : "About six
mTe ltters on Florida and O)range Culture that were
ow stand in the heart of the orange belt to review


r

e
1


I
I
v
'p


250,00,)000.' And f
tion,' he said, laughing
adequate idea of the i
growing was a fancy \
trtees was then a large
near here, Sanford,)


next best
worth $40
sand. Th
The Hart
Markham


find that facts
It more than I
t ^ L~k J f 1


er o),u
Speak'


1i
iv


ie an
*e yei


Jly. I
nunen!
pursuit
one.,
which


is the Hart grove *
,(XX) and yields 356(
ie crop tlis year
grove is worth $6(
, of Atlanta, has


trees, 'n grove of
son, Marcellus, h
Hayden a grovel
Sunford a grove
GeorgiaH a grove
<,f others, it will


) young t


6(X
'as
of
of
of
be


2,00()
about
8,000
3,000
seen


tre
2,0
Vo


have ou
dared to


trun
oxpe
Ali


my
ot.
*


rophecy, and the
The State of Flor-


VU,Xtj) orange., ana tiis was a so ort
er of the House, what the grop would(
swered, At least five times that n
ars later?' 'Ah, figures Iuil for that (
I have seen nothing in print which M
sity of the culture. In the old day
. indulged inhere and there; a grov
The finest grove in Florida is the 8pe
covers only six acres and has 580 trei
at Palatka, which has 700 trees. Th
0,000 orange, worth on the trees $15
Sa short year) sold for *4,Ok), on tl
3,000 and yields about $6,000 a ye
near the Speer grove, with its six i
rees just "coming in" as they call
ei of which only 600 are hearing, an
00 trees just bearing their first fruit.
unf trees. Mr. W. I. Traywick, of


tttrew.
A A


tl


Business "on aH large scale ir
If the present prices
they will he. there is nothi
race of rich men. who will


gouth, the Carp
in six year Col
V40,(IX from a
thirty acr, anc
owner un incou
Inonths travellir
hnm H.l an


F


at oranl
instead o
of oran1
ng to p
rank u


Barons of Germat
onel Mark ham wii
place of 1tK) acres
i so on. A place


ie
Ig


of *4i5tA; thisM
and harve more
ia a wrtain nm


orop. I
I be five
uetsI. or
:oivesla-
;ives an


e


orange
of 500
r grove
. The
first is


a thou-
he trees.
ar. Mr.
Hundred
it. His
d Judge
General
Macon,


rom these fig-uree, samples of hundreds
ge planting for. the past few years is a
'f a fancy as formerly.
ges are menintiind, as I believe they
event the etablihament in Florida of a
vith the plantation princes of the old
iv: To fall bock to familiar examples,
1 have a et Meady income of 3)0,000 to
i; Judge Hayden $16,000 from about
of ten acres with 600 trees will give its
will allow him to spend .his summer
than he needs for:comfortable living at
* kim trpfw twill ntliun him and hin


::


d


I i




FACTS AND FIGURES ABOUT ORANGE CULTTRE.


glorious climate, an income of $'
maddening chances oaUte, suj
summer, Marcellus Mait~bhl


twenty a
He wisel
it will eaw
hold tfhe]
Frox
ing: "A
thousali
Brown,


cre place, with only (
y said, It gives Die n
sily be $3,000. This will
re constantly. Why 81h
xn a pamphlet entitled "
nuIlhler of older trees ii
1 oranges each. The on
at \\ebster, (about' tw


dollars jortlh of fruit annually a


Hamilton,
of Corley's
too measul


$840
Josepi
a old,
ling o
inches
v sold


7,500 per annum, no feverish anxiety, no
perb filhing and hunting, and a loitering
refused $40,000 the other day for a
I trees in beaiinn and 1,400 young ones.
i i000 this year. Next year
in areuat5,000 in five years, and will
would 1 sell them tr even .50,000 ? "
Our Anericalhtaly we clip the follow-
LI the tate yieHl nnuually eight or nine
Sl hrge tree growiBg: in the yard of Mr.
'enty-six year olc :h yielded eighty-
t ditierent tines. VL tree owned bv Mrs.


of Sumterville, netted its owner i
Island, hts a budded lemnm tree
res over twenty-five feet in diaime
to $50 annually, bIesiJe what i;
i R. Fort, ot Scott's Mills, has tw
that netted him last year $51.
ii the place of Mrs. Lanier's, wcs
in circ.iaucrence, anti yieldl. toiur
at Lecsiuurg list year lor 4 60.


n 1878,
eight y<
ter, and
s used 1
o or.tngt
A tree' 1


\7. Mr. Woodward,
t old whose thrifty
ields fruit that sells
nit it in his famil;.
re w.itihl buds ten
'euntyaix years old,


t of Leosaur', nml ciures fifty-
thlotis.nd oUrInges ipr annual.


"Mr. John Condrv and Mrs. $8wickard, at Adamsvile, and
Tillman, h;avO trees of a similar age, wilich yieli from 3,<1K


the hlte
to.4,U00


per year. An au e c*ntlainin
average o 43X n) flnn u.ily.
or:. ges from an #cre of lal
has sonie tret~ at Orange
for several years, and are n
mightt be cite

quote as follows:
pursuit, where th
returns, with les
such stiteniente
County ha kept,
the expenditures
number of the ti
$7,590, as against


ults


e tillir


fluctu
with
from
.and
ew w
aI cxt


and interest oh tike utol
tures $5,640. This is
because it is only on: ii
trates that (Omnge Cul


trees,


k tiLty. uci
Mr. L. 1.


nd of voungerlv


W(Hltl


sold h
trees.


Bend tl.t. nave netl
iot over half grown.
niuphlot entitled
ce shown that t


ig of the sil is invo
nation. It as always p
facts. An extensive
the itwgining of his g
receipte .to the close
ere 3 pulditure, omitting et
Iy, of .$1,9-rW. This
only one instance, -bi
In a ve.y large numlw
ture is not t all tranut


Lived
iousi


tst


yield


owner


year $1,1UO worth


(Cionel T. C. Lanier
I twenty dollars per treat
Numnerous other cases
,,- Truopi d Florida we
re is not at present any
, that will yield larger
tit to-b' abh. toconfinili


orange
rove, 01
of the
142 G.X)
)ost la
jives r


ut itt
it ry.
it*?ry.


II
i'


grower in Putunalll
accurate account of
liirteeo years. The
ortiugis, selling fi>r
d, tirst (o t of trees,
c*iptA over eppendi-


I eutcOd ars
coic:lusivcly


many,
dtimon-


WHAT DOES A GROVE.:COST'?
There is a great diversity of opinion au mng our leading fruit-growers
asto tth cost of plaitinlg andt bringiug:u grove into bearing at thuttage oP
.five vear--wiich. fact hmny Seemn stanmge Ito tIose unacquainted with tlh,
detrels, but which: cmn readily beexplained by one titnilmar with the.busi-
nesa.- The priw s of Ilor ld- tr(e vay greatlyy h ditferent. wctiouns or
the 'tate,. lut th reattMa Variatinn. is'likey to occur in the different
valuwitiols. played tipo) laidi, Ludi which in noe suvtioms can bL'
bought I ttwstyjr dollar per atre, would in others readily sell .for h150.
Therefore: prtie living at the t.l paints.would e .likely to place very
-- r it. F1J l- -


1


{




FACTS AND FIGURES ABOUT ORANGE CULTURE,


than in others, f6r the reason that altitude
nearness to -tranportation, etc., have iiuekh
real value of the property; but more parties
stance, a grove is. uated te mrils. rom a
nicrtion;. it wofld' then aiwtO wo.
1,000 to place the fruit w). i would be
necessitating extra handling,. consequently
loss from decay, r .
The estimate in inakiha a grove will us


from $400 to $#(j6Oper acre is wui
through the first five years as it
.some consider a high price mny
upon which his grove is placed
the best attention for the reason
rated to devote all his attention


, froeedpn from cold winds,
tos.do with determining the
larly the latter case. For in-
cy railroad or water commnu-
dollars to four dollars per
ready for shipment, besides
rougher treatment and more


nallv


sally considered 1
dholuI be done.
rest ausured of ti
is valuable, and t
that the nmnauge
and energy to I


he found


to v


Sbe suflisti nt t
person who p
o things: that
at the grove wi
is sufficiently


seei


ng thi


properly done, whereas one who agrees to plant and cart
something like half price, either intends to slight the wo:
little idea of the nature of the undertaking. Again, r
differ as to the amount of wyrk required, some claiming
having sufficient work and fertilizing to prevent the leaves
Enough has been done; while others believe in keeping
stantly stirred and fertilizing the trees amply so that the'
the food they require, and thus not only make more rap
be always vigorous and healthy. The result of the two


tion will soon
the proper am
treble in value


measure


illus


be visible, for at


mount of


care wi


the one wl
rates the


the end of a give
yiehl much larg<


been


saying-


so sadly


" \What


n ti


m


rury, but
o carry it
ays what
the land
11 receive
reom une-


at the work is
Sfor a grove at
rk or lihu very
nen's opinions
that the trees
turning velli w
the soil con-
y may have all
,id growth. but


[Il


e the


returns
neglected


costs


afls of opera-
one receiving
and perhaps
, which :in i


nothing


worth


nothing."
A correspo
says: lWhat
ceeding to one
moment and ti
short it really i
younger and w
that they '.ust
question fairly.
years will have
likely at the en
investment the;
mate for bring
ing the value o
and will .proba
must be hired.'


ndent of the H(
generally set ins 1
about to legin
iat is, waiting.
s we who are cre
ho fret with tlhe
wait sometwhcr
Time will go
gone by whethi
of ten ears a
y could have ma
ng a grove into
f hind at from $


nme andtl


the I
a g
Ten
ttini
imp
e, it


Fm-m, in speaki


nost


rove -in
year s
: old w(
mtiencec
might


on wlhatev(
.er they hav
grove will


IIh,. In m;
1 roflthblc I
' t", $100).


>ly cost more, lpecially if


of this


ipel ess rieiture of the w]
in fact the thing of
Ietm a long time to wai
dl know an(d if those
o youth, would but
* help them to dead
er they do. After aiw
e a grove or not, and i
lIe worth more than II
llV instvncCs a very
Katring is $P.i) an actc
It can hardly be d il l labor and superin


h


subject,
ole pro-
-


t.
-wh
coni
with
while
t is
nv <
fair
;, iii(
e foi


llest
How
o arce
sider
the
ten
very
thl.r
eIsti-
clu'i-
r lts


tenden.ev


Non-rcesidents
of curring for giovet
think.tl ere, aust b
and ihare onl,lw."
set forth i new pa
wr, crte; triw ift
hundred oranges
problem; the.cwt


are apt to h:a
I. hby often
e fscmet;h i,1
Many perm
pere, are ipt
y Cents" afle


l,.A 1..,


ve( erroneous notions in regard to the cc(:t
n r intly u:ndret'tinmte the exptirn. v.rd
w (:npg licn tj)eir aB1 nt ca1ll tor 'n, ol.( v
ons, niejld ty delusive caHtlati( ns tofi, n
.to oisidedr solely the itenms, ')dlad $50
ce;.eighty to' the, acre fifth year four
oqms two .ccnts each. It a 'plain
t90-it five' tLrea the return is S64o: A
^.\ ^*^/1 A4^^ ^lll^^ *ftfit ^ft*t1A/.-_- ^__ ,


7


ho


lwi


I


I -


u-


Il '


Pr





FACTS AND FIGURES ABOUT ORANGE CULTURE.


at the time of planting, and
and one year from the bud.
four times a year, at a cost c
trees should be fertilized twi


frequently.
killed by soi


They must be


ama


from any other c
orange tree must
vented. Fertili~i
The cost of a tei:
than $1.25. F<
specially liable t
dental expenses (


plant eighty trees four yA
The grove should then
f two dollars an acre fbo
ce a y.Nr atW mn acre.
trimmed and Thei esnro


nders, or scale insect, or wv
cause, must be replaced by
be guarded against and tri
ing and hoeing increase in
n is at the lowest $2 a day
ences must be repaired o
o be burned from the fires
iefv all exact estimates. Ye


,od sata
others.


ane old from the seed


be plowed thr
Sach plowing.
"They must be
Its removed.
i, or those tha
The enemies


apped or ot
expense a6
, and nlo ta
r renewed;
in the wood
oU may enle


what it will cost to bring a grove into bearing, and
will cost more; or by extermination, energy, hard


you may bring the cost
perhaps, I cannot come
consent of most success:
pamphlet, issued in the
C. C. Beasly, of Maitland
ture and suplsines the
an average acre of your L


then
work


generally under ordinary es
nearer giving an estimate th
ful orange growers than by
interest of Winter Park."
: Tiis estimate calls for th
owner shall hire all the w
and and the cost of starting w


herwis


cil


ee or
The
hoed
Trees
it die
of the
rcumrn-


the trees grow.
tn works for less
rail fences are
s. Indeed, inci-
ulate to a nicety
be pretty sure it
and self-denial.


;tinmates. I think,
at would gain the
copying from the
the words of Mr.
e very highest cul-
o(rk done. Take
ill bC-


Cutting down and removing trees......... ...... .... ............. ...... ... $15 00
Taking out .tumps..... ................................................ 15 (10
Grubbinn. ................................... ........ ..... ....... ................... .... 15 00
P ow ing ......................... .. .... .... ...... ..... ......................... ......... .... 00
Fencing (not o\er)..................................................................... 8 oI
One hundred trees .......... ....................... ................... .................. 76
Setting stakes and planting......... .. ..... ... ... .......................... 7 50
Fertilizing when planted ...................... .......... ............. ............... ... 2 50
Total................................................. -.................... .................... 158 00
Your total outlay for the first five years, including start and land,
will not exceed $500." The total expense, including fertilizers, to take
this one hundred trees through five years he estimates as follows-


Cost First year ............. .......
8eroand year..................
TIird yuear...................
Fourtil year......................
Fifth vear.....................
Total....................... .................


.. .'..*g e ".. ... "..e ...e....a..e..... ........e..

* .*. ." .*. .'. ....... ..' *.. ."".. *** .** ..


$2800
3400J
46 00
51 00
57 00
I
$215 00


Cost of star'ing................. ...................... .................. .. ........... $158 00
CoN, t of land.... ........... ......... .............. .. ........................................ 100 00
Total ........ ..,........ ......... .................................... ..o.,. ......... $473 00
This with land pt a high figure leaves a margin on .500 for unfore-
seen egpeni But as I said, it woul4 be hard to make or find' n esti-
mate th-t would exactly iult, in evurv' item, the experdc<, of all groWers.
In the a the numbt often to the acr wod generally thoQghttoo
maiy, e tima foir' setting 'p ak r,' plainng an fertihziP t"og low,
while te ct8tf pf inmg aeDendj mltogetret bo the krid .f !I ce.,'


C





FACTL'AND FIGURE ABOUT ORANGE CULTURE.


years old $5(M
age *2,000. I
H


) and according to our beet suhhoi
But it will eventually prove a bdnat
ow SHALL-A jIBTAIN A


cities it is worth at that
zaL to its possessor.


GROVE?


This is a question adriftting several answers of which any c
seem conclusive in itself,. but we shall prreent a few of them a
our readers to judge which is the most practical and applicebl
own particular case.
Plan first, is to visit the State and after finding a grove that
make a purchase of the same, provided the property is for sale
amination will reveal the fact that there are very few bearing
flr sale in the State, though where a person is so fortunate as to
a one lie may expect to pay fi'om $1,X000 to $3,000 per acie for
erty. This of course applies only to young groves ; the older I
are yielding large returns will cost at the rate of 88,000 ta
per acre. :'
Plan Mecond would be to visit the State andtake narranem
some reliable party to 1ilnnt and care for a grove for a certain n
years, for a given sum of money. In this way one can select
land and trees.
Plan third, is to come and live in the State and make your o
This, no doubt, is the cheapest way provided one intends
thts their homIe, and of course a party can do everything pie<
own way.
But a large number own groves in the Stute who do
here and many others would own them if they knew just how t4
it. ro all such we submit-
Plan four. We all know that acmnbinotion gives power,
nearly all kinds of work can be accomplished quicker, en
cheaper by united effort than it can in a single and individ
lay of stkngth, and by applying this well-known iden to tit
business. it will he seven thatbv o-oneracuon we matv confidently e:


lIeet results.
cultivating 1
country, an
tage to the
reaping the
dance of hav


Stock cmpIlanies in
large groves are now be
d deservedly so, inneR
non-re ident in enjoy
pecuniary benefits tl
ing to make one hinu


aUgu
consil
i uch
ing tN
lerefr


elf,


'ne i
mnd
e to


rould
leave
their


will suit,
. An ex-
groves for
find such
the prop-
ones that
)o (15,000

ents with
umber of
his own

wn grove.
to make
wisely his

not live
o manage

and that
isier and
iual out-
c orange
xnect the


rated for the purpose of plainting and
ng quite popular in our section of the
as they offer every possible advan-
he pleasure of having a grove and
omn without the trouble and aniiov-


. bumuinej of which he m


wholly or entirely ignorant. Property thus ncquirrd will in 1
valuable and a source of constant and largely increasing ii
instance, a company of one hundred umen subscribe $500 eac
aggregates $50,0Q0. They then appoint thie proper officers
and with the efficient aid of one experienced and intelligent 2
whole business of planting and caring for a large grove c
mienced and carried through to a eucc.xful termination;
treees can )ave the best of treatment until such time as
to yield fair returns. The entire one hundred men mui
practical knowledge of the business, though the Manager has,
forms.his work well, for which he is duly compensated. T
will operate somewhat as follows; "A we will amume, is i
$1,200 per year; he subscribes (1,OO& He is eseted th
fWA *ln t 4L.- -- Laa Lap) Lt-- S lM WU1\\


- a


be almost
re hbe very
>me. For
this sum
directors,
rgfer, the
be corm-
at is, the
ey begin
have no
Ld he per-
business
receipt of
firet year
I 1I.


*J




FA('TS AND FIGURES ABOUT ORANGE CULTURE.
d *


i" perhaps three year more he has received back his $1,000, an(
income established ..iht ,yemluy grows .lager from capital
in reality ,not inreated. Ani ,all this. Is acompished while conti
draw his original slndry of $1,200. 3oll "A" wish to sell his
at the end ot the lcflfy ver, it. will tli fullY, twice what it cost,
tiink, most people will consider a very fr investment L As
dwelt at sufi eieat length on this subject to give our readers
of the practical working of thii system,, we will pass on t4
sideration of the next question, leaving them to decide for them
advantages to be reuliied from making an investment in
and manner d(tteribed above..


d has an
that is
nuing to
business
which, I
we have
an idea
3 a con-
elves the
the way


SUI


We answer most


favor of this d
700,000,000 ol
fourl:eenth of'
tfroni other co
we ~numt raise
been unaldte t
alples, or the


of co
the a
that
go\'el
$pejY


more proInsing.,


Iteision.
Soranges
which is
untries.
enough
II :Vcon
\\'cet he


h
I


PLY LIKELY
. ] DEMAND
emphatically no! il
In the tir*at plaie
e(onuiIed I annually
Supplied by Florida
"l' S i


TC
?
nd
it i
in


tience Ieore we may
for home consumption
plish. Does the North
r vast fields of grain, or 1


tton, for feur of ovdratocking the mar
answer will till he the samine. He wh
,overn tihe srurtcet of supply and dei
rn tlalel:selvts. Ail overproduction I
II in turn creates new ditmnand.
ing of ()range Culture says : The


Floridla


ora nii t


others. In point of numbers e
they are few, vet iv their great
foremost place in tlu market.
Florida, together with suflticien
the juices without dh4tro.ving t
part this quality--ia vrhie to 1
'live field they arr yet t occtup
t<. pol ess our ouwn ilarket, the
of! yveart, and after air.eat iwari
under cultivation. We cannot
phcce of the tinreign product, bi
Our inability to supplv the der
be the ultimate remllt is clear'fi
so, of merit. The lialtiliy of li
taintie o.f a d i voyage ifrmnn a
foreign fruit trade, servihn to 1
setance against 'whieh detldra d4
Florida orange.< Wo hatvd t i


ar (


(n)lpar T'd
e'l iuerit,
The gen
tly warm
ie lively


'ket ?


)


EXCEED


THE


there are many reasons in
s estimated' that there are
the United States, only one
the balance beihg imp orted
look for an oVer product
, which thus far weo have
stop raising ler peaches and
the South her inanene crolp


No. and


1o has closely
ninuiid, know ful
lirs a tendency
Our former (
future of the
'mnclted to Ibe


to
tht
ial

ar


rlhere else


beIt in t
on of orni
predict


it it is ii


tl
'I
I


til


e grpat qual
have cone


clinirte li
lin to nmntu
mniatic tiniv<
attainalble
idly illimita
world 'T]


nl1
re
er
to

\ w


for ye;
studtie
1l well
to red

busin


ris to conme
d the lhws
that they
U(ee prict ,
issioner in
ess is still
rior to all


ntitics con
to occu
peculii r
:.nd coli
of the tir


an


'Tiey
11 be t


r oringe lands have been
when the doln<(stic will
iovitattle in t:Ie course


nand is the main ,
toni another elIuse


bi
n

it
L:
4


sand d
im.por
iake it.
not h:a


d'e.


, ind


damage retll
tant factor
extrenmlv i
ve 4o con Lei
eM(iInr to a


in America; and wheit Uie (tit ,s transport$ 5di 1
are afft,rted by lfootlf'nd' boimodioui steat;ls
"Or:rnge chitre, therefol miny to on
without fear oft .reoiin *t goer':orlf prmniuce.
occupied thls* of luiWnpethnd'_erakhVei wi


That


sunIed.
py. the
soil of
entnrite
lit, uinl-
extent.


are yet
he lab r
brought
tuke the
of time.
this will


dependent, or nearly
ng* from the uncer-
the conduct of the
:ardous-a- circuni-
in thd shipment of
the great markets


by water, :l
hiirw.
inlhtiri til

II 1>0 oI) ti


1 l'th a iltitis


y in Florida
JWn market is
to ps.'The



TH


P


such


1




FACTS AND FIGURES ABOUT ORANGE CUIURtE.


efforts in orange culture
effort in orange culture Ctn
and independent desire, is
reached."
.g To persons of foresight i
/rather Jan the praent :fkF
her orange pursuit the Tt
But aside from the qwc tior
other practical advantoges.
under conditions of' consta
regular profits; in point o
tion; in point of a very gene
of success and freedom from


verse influences in
practical workings
groves in Fl.4da
mnents. A bearing
one would rMjuqire


11


continue to be put forth until this unlimited
nmet--- goal w perhaps can never be

and CPlpi ~tbwho are looking to the future
i eNera wve returns, Florida presents in
extended as well as the most inviting field.
iof profit the culture of oranges presents
As a producer the orange-grower is working


other pursuits,
, the most ploais
are entirely wel
g grove is worth
a large cash out

MARIOI


increasing advantage.
industrious, frugal, cl
esire to become indeper
ry; and in pouit of rep
they have found orange
iug of occupations. Pc


1
L

s'


satisfied, as a
grnat deal of
ay.


In p
hecrful
xlernt; i
refssionl
u cultur
rursons w


rule, with their
money, and to p


point


n point
and ;(I-
e, in its
ho own
invi st-
urcii SC


COUNTY.


Before closing
tion of tihe SLtte.


tageeto
such a
portaUti
o0 our
without
opportu
garden
ablt al
are all


WO
Per)


the average set
diversity of so
)n facilities. Sh
ablest writer a
good reason,


nitv fi,r the rs


I


*1


ant
d t
bei


vecetah I
5 withlini
tLs, aii .
thlt 't
BUt t;


1 urchatrd.
lien cottoI
ng rtaied
es, wvhichi
tl' pI)st It
is destine
hiarettoiire.
erythinig 4


vish to
iaps no
ttler as
il adli
le has
a the
as he


add a word in regard to this particular s6C-
county in the State oflers so many adv.a,-
Marion County, oniLniiug, ias sith dots,


ed to good location
been very appropriaut
'"agricultural heart ot
*r bhiga, rolling, rich


and sup
ly design
Floritia.
t i


erior traiiis-
.ated by olu'
" Aind not
fol'rd every"


ucccssful cultivation oft all the produckLs I thie faria,
Grape culture alone can be maiade very proti:-
i, cane, rice, tobacco, prodiuts of minr iin wrtaic
witli a large degrc of succcts. The cultivation
formerly ret.ved but a anllU aluount of atttnItion,
ew years sprung up into a business oi large projuo-
tl at solie future day to awssuac importance ul-
. .


st sinks into iiwigguificance when comnpaled


the future jOuiIiliict' of orange culture.
outgrowth iot the past few year, is ra
were tirst to engage in tiis pursuit.
A practical Ocali orangt-grower says a


to yicld two bo)
which at prescut
We auru if
the county. has
nursery stock. 4
Ocala has s0on1e
over til county.
rifle, in the (etu
ulation. lias two


II


ies, or tin'
prices woi
orimed thl
30,(AO) oral
()Orange SpI
very filn
Oc(tila, si
ity sent.
ntilrond,.


Oe hundred d
uld be about


It
ige


I1


T
pidl
t1N
bud

$10


)rnage Lake


ring enh
ones ;
ruated c
It is a
the TmN


naiid u number of boa rdidg houses.
is the gqlitre of 'an hhrg ind d!pd
liUtblincd. at tLis pjhi,, is ably
of interesting rendinipila'tter aholut
..1 t.1 -A


Ihis Iusin.ess, wllicia is
ly iucreessxing, anil tin
raping a tinancimal
detL tr< ftiv!i years ol,
,sd toA the trou tile fit
jpr tvoe, or 31,UU(0 )pe


in the


northern


I ludnted i groves and 30,
iauxst of a nuinlxer of tine
oeeides this smnitll ones
)ne hundred miles south
Ytery flourisiing town, of
mit and Florinal Southern,
It ciln boast of sone tFine


with


lut the
$e who
6UCCL't .
id ought
th year.
a: cre.


portion ot
(AX) trecs in
Srov e, and
around nild
ft Jjacksoli-
1,'2t) p0>l0-
,two hiotels
stores, and


ly growi trade. Thle Ban'ner-L#A.,
*qndncted and giv&e a large amount
ri-du. The county hua 13,OU pol-


trew


1


I


l






FACT AND FIGURE ABOUT ORANGE CULTURE.


situated in the southern~iI
four i'y six miles in exten
building sites, comm:ndin


sides. A good chds of energetic, eifwt
nearly every State in the uhion, live here.
the prevnilingr oc,'etltitoh, as the lands ar4


is is or
Great (
cl.jin
gec a
v five
itmore


rre no

partial
This it
tins ki
(l1 :t II1
Ef one
hbusine


' of the hc:~Ithiest


popularity.
a populati
nd lemon
years old I
lemons. O


Ten
on of
trees
fronm t
)range


t reducingg nnythir
store, a saw-mill,
list of improvement
s one of the finest 4
nd. Two joint stock
ore extended psaile, II
of these groves have
is is well conducted


cuger. Luke Weir
Budded trees


timate shW
tor starting
ling trees
from $12
to $10 p
thouimnd
per d:v;
88 to $10
cents per
iIead'; Fl1
from 810C
where an
either brh
?.ulta thai
d ilttire a;
do rcmarl
lroperly t
We ii
otser objii
obtained
h .1 IgC!n


would pr<
g groves
will con
to $15
3r acre.
; lumbe
corn, (
per barr
bushel ;
rida cat
Sto $30(


Slocalities ir
years 'hgo
Ave hundr
have been


i th
thi
ed.


ty of the county. It is a clear luke smeo
h quiet, picturesque surroundings. Fin.
mtfluent views of the lake. abound on alL


g ,people,
re and le!
Sbestadatpted t(
ie State, WhiVh i
e Inke had no
Between 50.(C


planted. in


he bud may be seen b
trees of the same size
ag, for the reason thai
a stem yacht and t
ts. The great need of
openings in the State
coQmpanies for the purp
re in successftil operate


probably
under


depot is three at
will commence
,duce one dollar
will cost from
imence bearing
p*lr acre to cle
Rails are wo
r, $10 per th(
11 per bushel;
el; sugar, ten to
horses and m


itl
)


e, $10 to
per acre,


Sone selects the
nch of industry
the figures ,iv
Id many of our
ablv well when


related.
intended to give more
cts, but lack of space
will lbe freely given to
written in unnwer tW q


* never been in
the guidance


nd one-half I1
Ibe;ring the t
r per tree the


$25 to $
when ei
nr nine
rth $1 p
musand i


syrup I
twelve c
nles nrc
ct head.
cane cul
er locati
undouht


filees
third
fifth


who represent
ion culture is
o this puriowe.
s one reason of
settlers; now
K) :anfd 0).0)0


grove form. Trcf
hearing one thousand
may be found thn.t
t they ire seedlings.


wo p the lake
for an e.
ose of rubi
on here.
the State,
of a oom!
from the


offices is a
is a hotel.
terprise of
Te oranges
nIowners
thou h the
etntn man-
lake.


year and at a low es-


vear.
a,


100 per hundred
glit or ten vear
land. Fencing
er hundred ; s
ret; labor, fro
fifty cents per
ents per pound
worth from $1
The vegetable
ture about the
In and makes


edlyv


obtain


en above. The same
semi-tipical fruits.
planted upon the ri


n


will a
Grapes
ght kin


Trees


(1 trees
s old.


s1


I


Costs frh
hinrles 4
m $1 te
gallon ;
; potato
00 to $1
business
same, alt


a s
uch
pply
Id o


iitahle
Seed-
t conts
om 85
$4 per
i $1.25
flour
s, fifty
50 per
s pays
.hough


pccialty of
better re-
to grape
ciallv will
f soil and


detailed information respecting these and1
p-events. However: such fircts ss can be
thone making inquiriep. All of the above
ueetions previously asked.


In conclusion we
convinced that the
c;innot make a great
had without hibor.
or physical, to niccomn
MucOcesful bearing,. r
by well directed int<
that will more .lunr


would, pay we wish our readers to feel thoroughly
orange buyinefe pays; but at the sampn time one
ier. mistake than to suppose that a grove can be
It requires a certain amount of labor, either mental
iplish anything, aul to plant and bring a grove into
b.i4es a large exderhditure of muscle, supplemented
eli" ce. Still tfere' are com ratively lew things
uelv reward t' the nersistent laborer for his efforts



t !


I


*


nnd
prowll
wil


U






cir own.
iclr own


FACTS AND FIGURES ABOUT ORANGE


more


powerful and


ht year o tedy,
eas as to the future


nd confirms


and noW


receive a praclicai 1
" No; it the he$l
Florida had been ki


i \ A


eloquent


rySI


rth


. whici


tBn our most sanguine


on


LURE.


te pen

has led


mthan


us to forni


I time only strengtheSls
hopes are beginning t.


"b On, opr fi th is vtropiger than ever.
Juinet, ptodu tiveaess ad generlon c


ipa


ilities


n in the past few years, orange groves would be f.r
Af -.* 1 a


shore plentiful, and Ynany a forty acres of henithy


uant that now


-]ongs


to the


the silent reign


government


the tall


would


have


grenadiers of


& thing that was, and iu their places would
iiicoiipauranble orange tree.
4


an indiv


the fore~'t
have stood


1 proprietor,
would have
the beautiful


iti'
bet i1
iuuil


In


Cittr:


'.: 4


J Ur 7r s ", "r
-&T, -j.. h
ia


^ R Y
:i?,i;* Station
* ,of ni~.
*?', t ories)


#


-"Is~








E. McCALL.


4t


J. M. BOYNTO


wh.ole*sa1e a.X& ft


RNI


OrF A.


T


=nv5 P sY


Coffins,


Caskets,


Metalic


Cases,: and.


Undertakers' Goods.


OCAL ,


FLO R


no


Of Sout.th


lrake


Weir,


KEEPS A FULL AND COMPLETE STOCK OF


WATCHES.


CLOCKS,


JEWELRY


SHEARS,


SCIZZORU


RAZORS, POCKET-CUTLERY, ETC.
Repairing Done Neatly and with Dispatch.


QUICK TRAIN WATG
All Goods WARRANTED amid i


E$S A SPECIALTY.
jdnt NEW YORK PRIL$S.


S. M. G. GARY.


GARY


OCALA, -


JOHN F. DUNN.
bUNN.


- FLORIDA. t


Will practice in the
Solicited.


Courts of the State and

FOSTER & B


United States.


LOTIIER,


POST OFFICE STORE


SOUTH LAKE WEIR.


flW


GENERAL MERCHANDISE, COTTON & ORANGES,


Dry Coods,


Umbrellas, Hats, Boots and Shoes, Tin ware,


, U


Parr


. B.




I l *
to on .


'" '' *' '* '-


* at


LAN


"I


MAS CURTIS,


Manager.


jRoon 3, Agnew & Gary's Block, Public Square, Ocala, Florida.


AMES A. SCO TT,


JOHN G. RE


DON..


REARDO N


FQ EY JND CQUN$EhIIb@S AlP
OC ALA, rFLOO .I
S' OFFFCIOD LV BANNER-LAOON B ILDING.


Ani
herI
her


IF YOU WISH TO KNOW
ling about Florida, her Fine Climate,


SLands,


Information


the Orange
pertaining


Business,


the


any


State, in-


closq Iie ont8s >tpay expense on return


A1


OFFICE,


/'*?


, '


0,




t-:
I. I


A'v"-
&i-,-. io
-f A"'





~Estate


ro ki ^ r
U*
* *


~roker
s -


OCALA, FLA4



Valuable Hammock and Pine Lands, adapted to orange


Vegetable culture, Stock raising, etc.


APPLY


FOR


IN FORMATION.


REFERENCES--Rov. Ben. Helm, Caorrollton, Ky.; H. P.. noi


& Bro.


;ta, Fla.


Rev. James B. Dunn, Phiiladelphia, Pa.


Wou


you like to have an Orange ro


one


the


tive sections>f


most

the


health v


State ?


and


We


attraot


wilt fu


nrsh


material and plant and oare


* glove for any number of years for


all


money,


Sto


be paid


dous


a.


Address


4'.


PORTER,


Rea/


ii


I




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