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 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Preface
 I
 II
 III
 IV
 V
 Notes
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Group Title: Notes from Sunland, on the Manatee River, Gulf coast south Florida : Its climate, soil, and productions ...
Title: Notes from Sunland, on the Manatee River, Gulf coast south Florida
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 Material Information
Title: Notes from Sunland, on the Manatee River, Gulf coast south Florida Its climate, soil, and productions ..
Physical Description: 83 p. : incl. pl. front. (port.) ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Upham, Samuel C ( Samuel Curtis ), 1819-1885
Publisher: The author
Place of Publication: Braidentown Fla. <etc.>
Publication Date: 1881
 Subjects
Subject: Manatee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Samuel C. Upham.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00055736
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000128326
oclc - 01621715
notis - AAP4328
lccn - 01006947

Table of Contents
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Dedication
        Page 5
    Preface
        Page 6
    I
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    II
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    III
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    IV
        Page 46
        Page 47-8
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    V
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Notes
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Advertising
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 95
        Page 96
Full Text










































































.4--- -~ C-.
S.-
'
~w~a~--
-'


~.


0t


^^^*^'* .-


MADAM JULIA ATZEROTH,


The lady who


raised


the first coffee grown in the United


States.


From a photograph by F. PINARD, Manatee and Tampa.







NOTES FROM


ON THE
MANATEE RIVER, GULF COAST
OF


SOUTH


FLORI DA.


CLIMA T7E,


SOIL


AND


PRODUCTIONS


The Land of tlhe Orange Arid Gua~va
The Pine-Apple, Date and Cana.


Br


SL.AMETL03ff


ILILU STRATED.
oanS szrWo*r!


PUBLISHED


THE


AUTHOR.


PHILADELPHIA:


E. CLAXTON


& COMPANY,


930 MARKET STREET.
1881.


1Id


' I I


, .\


* I'\ I I


I


D


N


U


N


L


A


S


-crPbLAhrM











































-Snared according to Act of Congress, in the year s8s,


Dy SAMUEL


UPHAM,


in the Office of the Librarian of Congres, at Washiatoa, D. C.
^W


I t


- 'II


, I 8,


' '" I


1 '/ I '













HAMILTON


DISSTON


I Ktwt.


FLO


RI


LAN


IMPROVEMENT


COMPANY,


Not because he is a millionaire, but for the interest he
has evinced in the welfare and progress of Florida; for
his integrity as a citizen, and his sterling worth as a man,
this Brochre is rpectfully dedicated by
THz AUTHOR.












PREF


ACE


Two


or three


letters


written


myself


friends at the North 'having found their way into


print,
during


I have


been


literally flooded with letters


past six months, from all sections of


the Union and British


Provinces, asking for in-


formation
Florida.


in relation


Hundreds


to the


have


Manatee


been


region


replied


many remain unanswered for want of time.


This


little book has been written with the belief that it
will answer the requirements of my numerous cor-


respondents, and also


prove a welcome


guest to


others who desire reliable information concerning


this portion of the Gulf coast of South


Florida.


With
upon


these


brief


remarks I


little


tide of public opinion, with


that favorable


breezes will waft


waif
hope


it into the hands


of those who will be benefited by its perusal.
SUNNYSIDE COTTAGE,
Braidmtn, Forida, April z881.









CHAPTER


MANATEE BAY-ITS TROPICAL SCENERY-EGMONT KEY-
SNEAD'S ISLAND-DATE, PALM AND OLIVE TLEES-
CLIMATr-INSECTS-BRAIDENTOWN AND ITS SURROUND-
INGS-MANATEE, THE O jST TN o oN THE BAY-ITS
EARLY HISTOY- BRAIDEN CASTLE- FAIR OAK--
ODaGE GROVES-W uLLZMSMENBURG AND FOGARTYVILL.


THE Manatee River,
ing, bay, is one of the
water in Florida. I is
with an average wi th
One of its tributaries-
-extends still further


miles


and another nor


Its course is nearly
where it mingles its
Bay and the Gulf of
twenty-seventh and
north latitude, and


wa


or, more properly speak-
most picturesque sheets of
fourteen miles in length,
of one and a half miles.
the Manatee River proper
r eastward, some twenty
thward, half that distance.
le west to Egmont .Key,
tters with those of Tampa


Mexico. It lies between the
twenty-eighth parallels of
in longitude 5%s west from


Washington. A person passing up the bay on the
mail steamer for the first time, will be charmed
with the tropical and semi-tropical scenery that
meets his view on either side of the bay, from its
mouth to Braidentown, the present terminus of
steamboat navigation. Egmont Kty,1 itse
I i I \ I rt
III I V i 7





Notes from Sun/and.


forest of cabbage palmettos nodding their ever-
green plumes in the morning sun; the stately date-
palms and olive trees on Snead's Island,. on the
north side of the bay, and the pretty villas sur-
rounded by young orange and banana groves on


the south side, between
atee, form a landscape
unexceled in the land
by the fairest scenes in
Until quite recently,
great sanitarium of the
speaking, been a sealed


Palmasola city and Man-
of rare tropical beauty,
of flowers, and unrivaled
Italia's famed land.
this part of Florida, the
world, has, comparatively
book to the invalids and


pleasure-seekers of the North and West, who spend
their winters in Jacksonville, St. Augustine and
the towns on the St. Johns,'Halifax and Indian
Rivers, and console themselves with the idea that
they have seen all parts of Florida worth visiting.
The principal drawback which the Gulf coast has
had to contend with, and which partially exist at
this time, is lack of speedy transportation and
comfortable hotel accommodations. These are
being remedied, and, when the Manatee region
shall have become as thickly populated as the St.
Johns, our facilities for transportation, etc., will
equal those of the Atlantic coast.


The
talists,
Tampa


railroad now being built by Eastern c
between Palatka on the St. Johns
at the head of the bay of that name


api-
and
on


y~,#,qqf cbat, will be completed within two years.




Notes from Suatand. 9

Then the on horse, with bowels of fire, muscles
of st l and breath of steam, with a shriek and a
snort, will rush over the metallic track and anni-
hilate time and space so rapidly, that the Atlantic
and Gulf coasts will be within a few hours of each


other. A narrow-gauge railroad from
the Manatee, and thence to Sarasota
soon follow, giving us direct and rapid
cation with the principal cities of the
West. The round-about route over Ki


Tai
Ba
con
Nor
ig


Transit Railroad to Cedar Key, and there
steamboat to the Manatee, will then be aban
and henceforth remembered only as a neces
by-gone days. The recent completion
Louisville, Nashville and Great Southern


npa to
y, will
amuni-
th and
)avid's
ice by
doned,
sity of
of the
Rail-


road, with a terminus at Pensacola, will soon give
us direct and speedy communication with the
cities of Louisville, Nashville, Cincinnati, Indian-
apolis, Chicago and St. Louis, and open up the
best and most available markets for the fruits and
vegetables of the Gulf coast. General Alexander,
Vice-President of this company, recently expressed
his willingness to assist in the establishment of a
line of steamers between Pensacola and Manate,
touching at other points along the coast.
Our climate is far superior to that of any other
part of Florida; and, I do not think I hazard
much in saying, to that of any part of the habita-


Sble globe.


Having, during a somewhat eventful
I







Notes from S&leab.


life of sixty-two years, visited Europe, Asia, Af-
rica, South and Central America, Mexic and
California, I say, and "I say it boldly," that in
my varied travels, nowhere have I found so health-
fil and desirable a climate as Sunland," on the
Manatee Bay. We are exempt from ice and the
chilling blasts that sweep along the St. Johns and
Halifax, and also from tornadoes and hurricanes,
so destructive on the Atlantic coast.
Insects are neither numerous nor troublesome.
I have been worse annoyed by mosquitoes'in the
City of Philadelphia than in this part of Florida.
The ubiquitous flea is, I admit, rather prevalent
here, but one soon becomes reconciled to his


habits, and honors his drafts
his bill. Snakes are not as
Pennsylvania. There are,
and moccasins in Florida.


whenever he presents


nume
hower
The


Irous
for,
for


never seen, and the latter but seldc
that came under my observation, apple
worse frightened than I was, and ma
exit. Alligators are not numerous in t
and are comparatively harmless. Li
noted statesman, they desire to be let
closely cornered, they will fight; but


here as in
rattlesnakes
ner I have
>m. Those
ared to be
de a hasty
his section,
ike a once
alone. If
they prefer


to run, if a chance is offered for escape.
Braidentown, the embryo town of the Manatee,
is situated on the south side of the bay, about
eight miles above its entrance into Tampa Bay.







Notes from Sundaud. n
Located on a bluff some fifteen feet above tide-
water it commands a fine view of the surrounding
country and of the entire bay. Being constantly
fanned by the breezes from the gulf "with heal-
ing on their wings," it is in point of healthfulness
all thatthe most fastidious pleasure-seeker or in-
valid could wish for. From Jack's Creek, its
eastern boundary, to its western terminus, Ware's
Creek, it contains a frontage on the bay of three-
fourths of a mile, dotted with picturesque villas,
surrounded by tropical fruits and flowers. Al-
though yet in a chrysalis state, being scarcely two
years old, it contains two boatiing-houses, two
stores, a meat-shop, post-office and a warehouse,
with a wharf connecting it with the shore-the
only one on the bay east of Palmasola city. Pas-
sengers for Manatee and other places on the bay
are conveyed on shore in sail or row-boats. Ma-
jor W. I. Turner, the projector of Braidentown,
a Virginian by birth, has been a resident of Florida
for forty-five years. Although on the shady side
of life, he is still hale and hearty. May he live to
see his bantling, now in her leading-strings, the
county-seat of Manatee County. Stranger events
have happened. This is an age of progress; the
world moves, and Florida, after her Rip Van
Winkle sleep of three hundred years, is moving
with it.
Sportsmen visiting this place can be accommo-









No tes from Su sand.


dated with sail boats for fishing, or mule and ox
teams for a hunting trip to the Miakka, the gports-
man's paradise. Captain Charles Miller and Billy


Stowell, aias
and reliable me:
spective crafts, 1
reasonable rates
of John N. Har


The reader
allow me to
how to run a
he will most a
at the same ti


'Buffalo Bill,"


will
state,
hotel
sure
ime s


both


"old salet


can be engaged with their re-
Sancho Pansa aad Onkeei, at
Ox and mule teams can be had
and Dr J. Tyler.
paidon a slight digression, and
that if any person who knows
1, will start one in Braidentown,
dly put money in his purse, and
atisfy a great public want. A


hotel


containing


hundred


rooms,


properly


conducted, would be filled with guests six months
of the year. We have fish, oysters, clams and
game in abundance, on which boarders could fare
sumptuously every day. Shall we have a hotel?
One and a half miles east of BraidentowA, on
the low, sandy beach of the bay, is the irregularly
constructed village of Manatee. A stranger visit-
ing Manatee will invariably ask himself why a


ever bu


solve the problem.
southerly direction
which, in conseque
ings, could not b
The pine land on
healthful location


ilt here? The following will
Adjacent to the village, in a
n, are rich hammock lands,
,nce of their malarial surround-
ie domiciled by their owners.
the bay shore offering a more
for building, the early settlers


town








Notes fom Sun/lan


availed themselves of it and erected their log and
palmetto cabins first, and afterward more pre-


tentious a
war breal
located at
cleus of a
savages.
many yea
tee Bay.
verbial.
for bread


nd
ing


architectural structures. The Indian
out soon after the first settlers had


SManatee, their cabins formed the nu-
Ssettlement as a protection against the
Thus Manatee became a village, and for
rs was the only settlement on the Mana-
The hospitality of her citizens is pro-
The stranger within their gates who asks
is never requested to masticate a stone.


Unfortunately, the citizens of Manatee are not as
progressive as hospitable. A plank wharf or foot-
way, connecting the steamboat warehouse with the
shore, is badly needed, and should be constructed
at once. There is a great deal of vitality lying
dormant in the old town, which, if thoroughly
aroused and properly applied, would place an en-
tirely different aspect on the face of affairs. The
village contains a Methodist church, five stores,
three boarding-houses, a drug store, an academy, a
meat-shop and a post-office. Dr. George Casper,
an enterprising Manateean, wishing to extend his
usefulness, and being impressed with the belief
that it would be a good thing to mix literature
with physic, has issued the prospectus of a weekly
newspaper, to be called the Manatee County News.
It will be the pioneer paper of the county, and its
editor will have plenty of elbow-room-m-Manatee








14 Nt,,s from Sd
County being as large as the States of Connecticut
and Rhode Island.
One mile east of Manatee, on a poinf of land
formed by the junction of Braiden Creek with the
bay, stands a historic structure, known as Braiden
Castle. It is composed of a concrete of lime and
oyster-shells, two stories high, surmounted by a
cupola or observatory, constructed of wood, from
which a-charming view of the surrounding country
can be had. South-east, Braiden Creek, winding
like a silver thread among innumerable evergreen
islands, presents a view worthy of a poet's dream.
Westward, as far as the eye can scan, can be traced
the blue waters of the bay glinting in the sun or
dancing in the moonbeams on their way to the
gulf. Northward, across the bay, the eye meets
hammock, pine land and prairie stretching far


away toward Tampa Bay.
by Indian bullets, stands a
days. Who shall write its
At Fair Oaks, about one
of the castle, on a portion c
station, is the largest and mc
grove on the gulf coast of S
prises nearly four thousand


This old relic, scarred
sad memento of better
history?
and a half miles south
pf the old Braiden plan-
nut thrifty young orange
south Florida. It com-
trees; belongs to the


Hon. Charles H. Foster, ex-State Treasurer, and is
a living, growing,,earing monument to Yankee
pluck, enterprise and industry. Mr. Foster is now
erecting at Fair Oaks the handsomest private resif





Nts from Saniand. IS

dence in South Florida. The most direct route
to Fair Oaks is by the way of Manatee, and the
scenery en rota is unsurpassed in the land of the
myrtle and ivy. Leaving Rocky Ford, you pass
Glen Falls, whose pellucid waters sparkle and
dance over rock and through chasm, on their
course to the Manatee. Graceful palms, with
their evergreen foliage; stately live oaks, draped
with pendant moss, swaying to and fro in the
breeze; girdled oaks, gayly festooned from base
to apex with ivy, yellow jesamine and Virginia
creeper, gladden the eye on either side of the road,
and orange-blossoms perfume the air with their
delightful fragrance, rendering the scene enchant-
ing as fairy land.
In the village of Manatee and adjacent ham-
mock may be seen the orange groves of Mrs. Gates,
Revs. Edmund Lee, A. A. Robinson and E. Gla-
zier, Messrs. Pelote, Curry, Harllee, Mitchell,
Vanderipe, Lloyd, Clark, Warner, McNeill, Cas-
per, Gates, Wyatt, Adams, Broberg, Reed and
Wilson. Mrs. Gates,. Parson Lee and Major
Adams also have banana groves in bearing. The
latter gentleman is engaged in erecting a large
concrete mansion, with carriage-house and ser-
vants' quarters of the same material. Situated in
an eligible position on the bank of the bay, ur-
rounded by tropical fruits, powers and vines, whose
evergreen foliage constantly wavng in the breee,
renders the location highly picturesque.








aNtes from: S unld.


Some four or five. miles south of Manatee, en
route to Sarasota Bay, are thrifty young orange
groves, belonging to the Messrs. Helm, father and
sons, Dryman, Marshall, Younglove, Dunham,
Saunders, Azlin, Howell, Thompson, Williams


and Whitted
Braidentown,


and on
may be


Judge E. M. Gra
Helm are pronoun
them to be the me
State. They are
to the blush many
are monuments of


lam.
iced b


Black-Jack Ridge, near
seen the thrifty grove of
The groves of the Messrs.
y every one who have seen


)st promising of their age in the


only four years old,
groves twice their
clean and persisten


but will put
age. They
t culture.


On the west side of Ware's Creek, skirting the
bay, is Willemsenburg, consisting of three houses
and the frame of a mammoth hotel. This grim
skeleton, gray with age, has a history. Erected
originally by Dr. Hunter, at one time a noted
physician of New York, and Charles W. Skinner,
a Boston capitalist, on Sanibel, or "Sanitarium"
Island, near Punta Rassa, it was soon blown or
washed down. A portion of the wreck, with ad-


ditional lumber from Cedar Key, was soon after-
ward erected at Sarasota Bay, where another part-
ner, Dr. Dunham, of St. Louis, joined in the
enterprise. A misunderstanding between the trio
resulted in the withdrawal of the two medical men
before the structure was completed. Mr. Skinner
subsequently razed the building tothe ground,







Notes/ from Sunand.


rafted it through Palmasola Bay into I
and erected it on its present site, where
in an unfinished condition during
years. The deceace of Mr. Skinner:
erection, caused its progress to stop
as did my grandfather's clock" at


the
e it
the
8oo
ase
th<


Manatee,
has stood
past five
n after its
suddenly
e death of


its owner.
Westward, separated by an imaginary line, is
Fogartyville, a community composed principally
of boat-builders and seafaring men, with. their
families. It contains a store, boat-builder's shed,
half a dozen dwelling-houses, a floating dry-dock
with two sections in working order, and two addi-
tional sections nearly completed. The Messrs.
Fogarty and Captain Bhart are the owners of the
dry-dock.
In this cozy little settlement, close down by the
waters of the bay, lives Madam Julia Atzeroth,
and in the garden attached to her house was cul-
tivated with her own hands the first coffee grown
in tAh United States. Madam Atzeroth, or Madam
"Joe," as she is called by her friends, is a char-
acter, and deserves an extended notice.











CHAPTER II.

MADAM ATZEROTH-BIRTH, PARENTAGE AND MARRIAGE
-ARRIVAL IN NEW YORK-VISIT TO PHILADELPHIA,
EASTON AND NEW ORLEANS-ARRIVAL IN FLORIDA-
LOCATES ON TERRACEIA ISLAND-VIcIssITUDES OF PIO-
NEER LIFE-A FRIEND IN NEED, A FRIEND INDEED-
ARRIVAL OF HER SISTER AND FAMILY-TRIP TO NEW-
NANSVILLE-CORN-DODGERS AND SAWDUST-DEATH OF
MRS. NICHOLS-REMOVAL TO'FORT BROOKE, TAMPA-
COL. W. W. BELKNAP AND FAMILY-RETURN TO TER-
RACEA-HoMESTEAD PAPERS ILLEGALLY EXECUTED-
RETURN AGAIN TO TAMPA-GALE OF I846-REMOVE TO
PALMETTO--INDIAN WAR-SCENES DURING THE WAIL OF
THE REBELLION-SELL OUT AT PALMETTO AND SETTLE
IN FOGARTYVILLE-FIRST COFFEE GROWN IN THE
UNITED STATES-ITS HISTORY. /

MADAM JULIA ATZEROTH, whose maiden name
was Hunt, was born in the City of Bradford, near
the River Rhine, in Bavaria, on the 25th day of
December, 18o7. Of a family of four children-
two males and two females-she is the only survi-
vor. The death of her mother occurring when
she was eleven years of age, she was adopted by
an uncle on the maternal side, with whom she
resided until she attained her majority. At the
age of twenty-four years she married Joseph At-
18






No/es from Sn!xd.


zeroth,


a native


Bavaria.


young


couple soon after the birth of their first child, a
daughter, left the Fatherland and immigrated to
America. They arrived in New York in the
month of August, 1841, where they remained only
a few months. In consequence of the failing
health of Madam Atzeroth, they visited Philadel-
phia and Easton, Pa.; but deriving no benefit from
change of location at the North, her physician ad-
vised her to go South. They accordingly went to
New Orleans, where they remained about one year.
Madam Atzeroth's health not improving, her at-
tending physician, a German, proposed a trip to
Florida. Laying in a supply of provisions and
medicines, and accompanied by the physician,
they engaged passage on board the schooner Essex,
a tender for the United States troops stationed at


Fort Brooke, Tampa,
spring of 1843.
Soon after'landing at
menced prospecting for


where they arrived in


Tampa, Mr. Atzeroth com-
a desirable place to locate.


After looking about for two or three weeks, he
concluded to homestead one hundred and sixty
acres of land on Terraceia Island, and on the x 2th
day of April, 1843, accompanied by his wife, little
daughter, the German physician and his dog
Bonaparte, landed on the east side of the island
about midway of Terraceia Bay. The hammock
was so dense that the.men. .were compell4 t. to
C






o Notes from Sunlan d..

their axes to clear a space on which to pitch their
tent. The underbrush and vines were so thick,
and the progress made by the men so 'slow, that
Madam Joe seized an axe and assisted them. This


was her first attempt at
Florida. Since that t
pert at the business.
and dinner prepared,
relish. From that tim
new life and strength.
perform its normal fur
discharged the physician
cines. The doctor we:


chopping and grubbing in
ime she has become an ex-
When the tent was erected
it was eaten with a keen
e forward Madam Joe felt


Her torpid liver
actions, and she
n and destroyed
nt to Key West,


begaq to
forthwith
his medi-
where he


died soon afterward.
Having become weary of tent-life, Madam Joe


proposed
to hut.
husband,
ered the
mounted


to her husband the erection of a palmet-
Mr. Joe, as the madam always called her
drove the takes for the frame and gath-
palmetto fans or branches. The madam
the roof and thatched it; but her work


was perform
rain deluged
refuge under
re-thatched,
trees, which
down. Soon
provisions r
canoe for Ta
turn, adverse


ed so


badly that the first shower of


the interior, and its inmates sought


the table. The hut was
and three of its corners
prevented the wind fro
after the completion of
m short, and Mr. Joe
impa to replenish them.
winds blew his frail


subsequently
made fast to
m blowing it
the hut, their
started in a
On his re-
caft around





NWUs fVom Sunhland


Shaw's Point into Palmasola Bay, and becoming
bewildered, he landed at Sarasota instead of Ter-
raceia. After being buffeted abbut by the wind


and waves for
home. Durii
child had no
The panthers
hideous with
One night a
chickens roos


more than a week, he finally reached
ng his absence, Madam Joe and her
companion save the dog Bonaparte.
,wild hogs and owls made the nights
their screams, growls and hootings.
raid was made by an owl on the
ting on the trees overhanging the


hut. Madam Joe seized an old musket c
Methodist persuasion, which usually went
half-cock, with the intention of frightening
the "wild varmints," but it was unloaded.
having loaded a musket, she was in a qua
whether to put in first the powder or the
Luckily, she put in the powder before the


and stepping to the door of the hut,
musket into the tops of the trees.


discharge
She put


>f


off at
away
Never
ndary
shot.
shot,
d the
in too


much powder, and like another gun we read about,
it
Bore wide the mark end kicked ts owner over."
The owl escaped that time in consequence of be-
ing at the wrong end of the musket. It was sub-
sequently killed by Mr. Joe, and peace reigned
once more among the chickens. Madam Joe sub-
sequently became.an expert with both the shot-gun
and rifle, and if reports are reliable, her unerring
aim has caused more than one red-skin to make a






2 Nale$:tficm frSwdhL.

hasty exit to the happy hunting-grounds." She
can also ride a horse astride or otherwise-seldom
otherwise-like a Camanche.
Becoming disgusted with their frail palmetto
hut, Madam and Mr. Joe felled the trees and com-
menced the erection of a log-pep house, consisting
of two rooms, with a wide passage running between
them. As there were no saw-mills in the country,
boards could not be had at any price. The roof
of the house was covered with split cedar planks,
and the interstices between the logs filled with
moss and clay. A chimney was improvised of
sticks plastered with mud. Subsequently, glazed
sash for the windows were imported from New
Orleans. Meanwhile the axe had not been idle.
The stately live oaks and graceful palms around
the house had been felled and burned, the land
grubbed, and a good-sized vegetable garden was
in successful cultivation. Fort Brooke, some thirty
miles distant, offering a good market for their
surplus produce, they hired a man with a boat to
transport and sell their vegetables. Although
bountiful crops rewarded their labor, they were
not entirely happy. Madam Joe was anxious that
her only sister, residing in New York, should
emigrate with her family to Florida. But how
was the matter to be accomplished without money?
Where there is a will, there is always a way to
accomplish thing which at first eight seem to be






Notesfrom Surland.


impossibilities. The matter was laid before Col.
W W. Belknap, the commander of Fort.Brooke,
who cheerfully advanced the required funds, and
Mr. Joe left immediately in a schooner for New
York, ia Key West. The voyage was long and
tedious, but it was accomplished, and in due
course of time, Mr. Joe returned safely with his
brother-in-law, wife and child.


Another trouble


iodw presented itself


Armed Occupation Act having expired previous to
locating their land on Terraceia, they were com-
pelled to go to the United States Land Office, at
Newnansville, one hundred and sixty milesdistant,
to file the requisite papers. The country being
wild and sparsely settled, Mr. Joe and Mr. Nichols,
his brother-in-law, were compelled to pack their
provisions on their backs, which rendered their
journey wearisome and slow. On the third day
they reached a cabin, where they remained over
night While at breakfast on the following morn-
ing, most of their provisions were stolen by some
thieving negroes. The theft not being discovered
until they stopped at mid-day to lunch, they were


in a
ble,
hab


sad plight. They pushed on as fast aspossi-
and latt in the evening came to a cabin in-
ited by very poor people. A scanty supper
set before them, which they ate and retired for
night. The breakfast-table on the following


morning wasbountifully supplied with hog, hominy


If.


-I


V







Notes from Suntand.
a#


and corn-dodgers. Mr. Nichols having never be-
fore seen a corn-dodger, took a large mouthful of
one, and then walking deliberately to the door,
spat it out. On resuming his seat at the table,
he requested Mr. Joe, in German, not to eat those
saw-dust cakes. Mr. Joe, knowing the difference
between saw-dust and corn-meal, continued to put
away the dodgers, to the great disgust of his bro-
ther-in-law, who finished his breakfast on hog and
hominy. They finally reached Newnansville,
transacted their business and returned safely home,
after an absence of about two weeks.
Soon after the return of her husband from New-
nansville, Mrs. Nichols gave birth to a child. It
lived only two hours, and in less than one week
from its birth its mother followed the little angel
to
SThe undiscovered country, from whose bourne
No traveler returns."
The surviving child, a little girl two years old, was
adopted by Madam Joe, who reared and educated
her. She is at this time the wife of Mr. William
O'Neil, who resides at Palmetto, on the north side
of the Manatee Bay.
The money borrowed from Colonel Belknap still
remained unpaid, which was a source of great trou-
ble to Madam Joe. ShI had the inclination, but
not the means to cancel the debt. The colonel
proposed to send for his family at the North, and





Notes from Sunland.


install Madam Joe as housekeeper.


P1


ion was cheerfully acquiesced in; and early
,ear 1845, Madam Joe, accompanied by h<
band, daughter and niece, went to Tampa a
iided in the house of Colonel Belknap, a
Brooke. The Terraceia homestead was
chargee of Mr. Nichols and a hired man.
:olonel's family at that time consisted of hi


roposl-
in the
er hus.
md re-
,t Fort
left in
The
s wife,


:wo daughters and a son. ,That, son, General W.
W. Belknap, at present, I believe, a resident of New
York, made an honorable and enviable record
luring the war of the Rebellion, and was afterward
Secretary of War during a part of President Grant's
administration.
During the eight months Madam Joe resided
ith the family of Colonel Belknap, she frequently
w the wily chief, Billy Bowlegs, and other noted
eminoles, for whom, to use her own words, she


'cooked many
causedd a recurren
plaint-and she
louse of Colonel
rerraceia, where


a meal." Close confinement
ce of her old disease-liver con-
reluctantly left the hospitable
Belknap for her homestead on
by constant out-door exercise,


he soon regained her usual health. Even at the
>resent day, Madam Joe's universal panacea is
' the grubbing-hoe and elbow-grease." She prac-
ices what she preaches, and unlike the, e Sal
rofession, takes her own medicine. Soon after
he return of Madam Joe and family to Terraici4


I (( 'I







26 N'es from Sunland.

Mr. Nichols concluded to go to New Orleans.
During that year-1846--the yellow fever nearly
depopulated the city, and Mr. Nichols was proba-
bly one of its victims, as he has never been heard
from by his friends since' he left Terraceia.
In the fall of 1846, one of the severest gales that
ever visited this section of the country passed over
Tampa, Terraceia, Palmetto and Manatee. Ma-
dam Joe's house was blown down and. all her fur-
niture destroyed. The hen-house was the only
structure that survived the storm. The fowls were
dispossessed of their domicile, and the family oc-
cupied it until another house was built.
In 1848, a government official visited this part
of Florida to examine proofs of claimants to land
under the Armed Occupation and Homestead
Acts. On examining Madam Joe's papers, it was
discovered that two permits had been issued for
the same number. This error could only be'rec-
tified at the General Land Office in Washington.
It was deemed advisable by Madam Joe and her
husband to return to Tampa and remain there until
the mistake in relation to their homestead could be
rectified. Mr. Joe hired a man to msist him in
building a house at Tampa, and they went up the
Hillsborough River to cut logs and make shingles
I f, tf w~lSewe. Ih the month of September the
,16 ''ffk ^ 9lq yere formed into a raft and the
Snmges placed on it. Everything being in readi-






Notes frcm Sun.nd.


ness


a start, a furious gale


set in, which


stroyed the raft and scattered the logs and shingles


for miles along the
gathered the logs
rafted them down
family at Terraceia,
the late storm his w:
refuge in the house
the island. He retu


nks of


ba
ani
to
wh


rne


the river.


d shingles toge
?ampa, Mr. Joe
ere he learned tt
child and niece
friend on anoth
i to TamDa. and


S


Having


other and
visited his
iat during
had taken
er part of
his family


followed soon after.
she did not admire the
selected for the house.
and erected on a lot or
and was soon occupied


When Madam Joe arrived,
location her husband had
The frame was taken down


Sthe town-side
by the family.


of the river,
The prop-


erty is still owned by Madam Joe.
Misfortunes, it is said, never come single-handed.
In the early part of 1849,,Mr. Joe injured one of


his feet, and
and fever, w
tinued nine
finances wer
equal to the
thing to do


penny.
beer and
ized by 1


She
cab
the


cial circums
time kept a


soon after was attacked with chills
which, despite medical treatment, conf-
months. At this time Madam Joe's
e at a fearfully low ebb; but being
emergency, she cast about for some-
whereby she could earn an honest
Accordingly started a home-made
:e shop, which being liberally patron-
oldiers, soon placed her in easy finan-
tances. Her husband *at the same
sutler's store at Fort Chiconicla..


About this time a partly-finished house, built by.


I d


m


w


<(








Notes from- Sun/awd.


a friend-Mr. Reece-in Palmetto, was sold by the


sheriff,


with


Madam


the hope that


became


Mr. Reece would


purchaser,
be able to


redeem the property.


Failing to do so, Madam


Joe and family left Tampa and located in Palmetto


year


z851


Here they


opened


a small


store


, in which they did a thriving business.


They


also cultivated their farm on Terraceia Island


bf degrees,


as their means permitted, stocked it


with cattle, horses and hogs.


Additions were also


made


to their stock of


goods,


and finally they


purchased a colored man, who was an


excellent


farm


hand


, and


proved


great


service


to his


owners.


In I855 another Indianwar broke out.


Volun-


teer companies, home-guards and boat companies
were organized 'for protection against Indian in-


cursions.


Many plantations were abandoned and


homes broken up.


belonged


to ote of


boat companies, and a ten days'


scout being


prolonged to twenty days, it was reported'that the
entire party had been massacred by the Indians.
During the scout they visited the Indian camps in


Everglades,


from


whence


brought


away as trophies a silver cup and a spoon belong-


ing to Billy Bowlegs.


The cup was subsequently


to Colonel


Jewett,


The country


was in a state of commotion and fever of excite-


ment until the close of the war, in 1858.


During






Notes from Sunland.


these eventful years, Madam Joe stood guard with
her musket or rifle whenever her services were re-


quired.


She never showed the white feather.


Peace had


scarcely


been


restored,


when


civil war of 186I broke out
in a state of anarchy. I


, and Florida was again
fr. Joe enlisted in the


Confederate service, and served in


Kentucky.


Tennessee and


At the close of the war, Madam Joe


sold her place at Palmetto,


with


the intention


returning to Europe, but her physician


informed


her that she could not survive a change of climate,
which induced her to abandon the idea of visiting


the Fatherland.


The family again took up their


residence on Terraceia, where Mr. Joe died on the


29th of October,


1871.


Madam Joe sold part of


her Terraceia plantation and moved


to Fogarty-


ville, her present location, in the year 1873. Her
garden at this place comprises only four acres, but


nowhere else in Florida can


found so many


different


varieties


trees,


plants,


vegetables,


vines, shrubs and flowers.


Mrs.


William Fogarty,


the daughter of Madam Joe, with her husband and


reside with the madam.


Here, in


the year


1876,


was planted a few grains of Mexican coffee,


received


from a neighbor,


Mrs.


On the 2oth of February, x88o, Madam
to the Commissioner of Agriculture, at


Warner.
Joe sent
Washing-


ton, the first found of coffee grown in the Uni!ed


States, for which she received ten dollars.


This









Notes from Sn!as'd.


spring she has sent to the Agricultural Department,
at Washington, four pounds of coffee, the product
of two trees. Next year she will have eight coffee
trees in bearing, and at least one hundred young


trees


nursery.


quite


a diversity


opinion exists in relation to the origin of the seed
from which the first coffee was grown in the United


States,


append


from Mrs.


the following communications
Warner, of Manatee, Fla., and


Dr. A. A. Russell


of Cordova


, Mexico, published


in the Tampa Tribune, of September 26th, i88o:

MANATEE, FLA., Augst 3oth, r880.


S"DR. WALL


: Dear Sir-I inclose a letter from Dr. A.


A. Russell, of Cordova, Mexico, the gentleman from whose
plantation the coffee-seed was procured that has been suc-


cessfully reproduced by Madam Atzeroth here.


As the sub-


ject of coffee-raising in this State is causing considerable
inquiry, and as this letter contains much valuable informa-
tion on the subject, I submit it to you for publicationasking
the favor of having a copy forwarded to the doctor from


your office as soon as issued.


Very respectfully,


"E. S. WARNER."

"CoiDovA, Mxxico, May 9 gt, 188o.


"Mis. E.


S. WARNER


: Madam-It was quite a plea-


sure to receive your very kind letter of April Ist.


I con-


gratulate you most heartily, and am proud to learn that from
the seed I sent s produced the first coffee iM tke States. I


think I wrote you that the plant requires shade.
climate we prefer to plant in fresh, timbered land


In this
cutting


out at first only the undergrowth, and taking out a few trees








Nofte from Snla.nd.


every year after for two or three years, thus graduating the
shade and ventilating as appears to be required. The pala-
tine (or plantain, or banana, as you probably call it) makes
a good shade, and may be cut out, or under leaves trimmed off
as may seem to be necessary. Coffee requires a rich,
vegetable soil, or manure. The berry is fully ripe when
dark red, but the grain is matured if the berry is picked
when it has become yellow or only turning red; however,
the coffee is of better quality if the berry is fully ripe, that is,
of a deep or dark red. Whengathered, it should be spread
out at once to dry In the sun. It may be dried on mats,
scaffolds or platforms of planks or boards. In good or
favorable weather it requires about three weeks to dry.
Here it is often dried on the ground. It may be spread
from two to four inches tick, and should be stirred twice or
three times a day; and if it should get wet a few times on
the dryer, before half dry, no harm will be done and the
coffee not injured in the least, if frequently stirred to prevent
fermentation. When half dry it should be protected from
rain and dew. If it has been wet a few times it will be
more easily cleaned, but if frequently wet it will be of a
darker color; also much darker, and even black and spoiled,
if allowed to heat and ferment. It may be pulped by some
of the pulping machines now in use, the day it is gathered,
then washed and dried. The pulped coffee will dry in a few
days, occupies less space in drying, and is of a lighter color,
which, with you, I presume, are considerations of little im-
portance at present.
"You will know the coffee is sufficiently dry when the
hull crushes readily under the foot. The most simple, and,
by the way, not a very bad process for cleaning the coffee,
is the primitive mode of cleaning rice; that is, to beat it out
in a deep mortar with a heavy pestle, and as the chaff accu-
mulates dip out the coffee with a cup in the left hand, pour-








32 Notes from Sun 'ad.
ing back into the mortar from the same height, at the same
time blowing off the chaff with a fan in the right hand, re-
peating the process until clean.
"There are a variety of machines for hulling and clean-
ing coffee, which will be a matter of consideration when the
production requires it. Now that you have succeeded in
producing the grain, you will have less difficulty in propa-
gating from the acclimated seed, which should be thoroughly
ripe, squeezed out of the pulp and dried in the shade. Hope
you will continue successfully, and establish plantations of
importance. Your obedient servant,
"A. A. RUSSELL"

The portrait of Madam Joe, forming the fronti-
fiece of this book, is a truthful likeness. Above
themediumheight of her sex, with features bronzed
by a tropical sun and the exposure and hardships
of a pioneer life, she is nevertheless a well-pre-
served matron of seventy-four years, with as noble
and generous a heart as ever pulsated within the
breast of a human being. She is passionately fend
of music and waltzing, and can
"Trip the light fantastic toe"
as gracefully as a miss of sixteen. May her days
in the land be prolonged beyond fourscore years
and ten.











CHAPTER III.

THE WARNERS, MOTHER AND SONS-PALMASOLA CITY-


STEAM


SAW-MILL AND OTHER


IMPROVEMENTS SAM


NICHOLS AND HIS SHELL-MOUND--PALMASOLA BAY-
SARASOTA BAY AND ITS SURROUNDINGS-SNEAD'S ISLAND


- SHELL-MOUND DATE-PALM


AND OLIVE


TREES -


UNCLE


JOE AND HIS DOGS WITH GLASS EYES-SAPP'S


POINT-PALMETTO-THE PATTEN AND TURNER PLAN-


TATIONS--JUDAH


P. BENJAMIN-OAK


HILL-TERRA-


CEIA ISLAND-LANDING OF DE SOTO IN I539.


WESTWARD of Fogartyville, on


south side


of the bay, among the most prominent residences,


are those


Warners,


mother


sons.


Thence westward, across a bayou, on a sand-spit
projecting into the bay, stands the steam saw and


planing-ftill ol
just completed.


Messrs.


Warner


This mill, wharf and warehouse


are the nuclei of Palmasola City, which is soon to


skirt the adjacent sand hills, and


rounding


"wilderness to blossom


cause the sur-
as the rose."


Warner is a Bay State Yankee of indomitable


pluck, and his partner, Mr.


sides at Terre Haute, In<
bags of a national bank.


Beach, who re-


., controls the money


If capital


cap build a city, the success of Palmasola may be
33


pluck








Notks from Sun/and.


set down as assured. Along the bay, west of the
Warners, are the ranches of Messrs. Sweetzer,
Burgess, Sykes and Bishop. A few miles further
west is Shaw's Point, at the mouth of the bay.
Here, on an immense shell-mound, surrounded by
hammock and pine land, Mr. Sam Nichols, a native
of Alabama, has entered a homestead of x6o acres
of land. Although severely wounded during our
late "unpleasantness," Mr. Nichols has beaten
his musket into a plowshare, his sword into a
pruning-hook, and, like a good citizen, is earning
his bread by the sweat of his brow.
Along the Gulf coast, southward, skirting Pal-


masola and Sarasota Bays, may be found t
pitable homes of Messrs. Farrar, Adams,
Buckner, Harp, Stephonse, Tyler, Spang,
ley, Dorch, Callan, Riggin, Dunham,
Helveston, Whitaker, Willard, Bidwel
mondson, C. E. and M. R. Abbe, Liddell,
Yonge, Boardman, Young, Lancaster, 1
Woodworth, Jones, Anderson, Crocker, I


Bronson Bros., Clower,
Bacon, Knight, Guptrel
On the north side of
trance into Tampa Bay,
rated from the mainland
"cut-off" leading into


he hos-
Moore,
Crow-
Smith,
i, Ed-
Greet,
Conliff,
lansen,


Lowe, Webb, Griffith,
and Roberts.
Manatee Bay, at its en-
is Snead's Island, sepa-
by a narrow and shallow
Terraceia Bay, and also


by a wider and deeper channel opening into
Tampa Bay, and separating it from Terraceia Is-






Votes from Sunland.


points of the crescent on the bank of the


I


five hundred feet. On the highest point
mound, and nearly in the centre, stands a
dwelling, somewhat dilapidated, erected
former owner of the place. On the eastern
are two date-palm and two olive trees.
former are fifteen inches in diameter and
feet in height. The latter are eighteen inc
diameter two feet above the around, and fifth


in height. Both the ol
fruit; the former in la
mound in the centre of t
house, are two olibanum
diameter and fifty feet in
an Indian burial place,


ive
Lrg(
he


)ay, is
of the
frame
by a
angle
The
forty
hes in
y feet


the early Spanish invaders as a defense against the


Natchez, a warlike
dians, who, at the
inhabited this part
The only human
time are uncle Joe


couple.
shell flooz
eyed dogi


and semi-civi
time of the E
of Florida?
occupants of
Franklin and


lized tribe of In-
;panish conquest,
Quien sake
the island at this
his wife, an aged


land. Midway of the
tee Bay, is a curiosity
mound or earth-work, c
forty feet in height.


island, fronting on Mana-
in the shape of a shell-
:rescent-shaped, and some
The distance between the


Sand date-palms bear
e quantities. On the
crescent, and near the


trees, eighteen inches in
height. Was this mound
or was it thrown up by


Uncle Joe lives in a palmetto
, and with the old 'oman and
s as companions,
SHis hours in cheerful labor fly."


hut with a
i two glass-








56 Notes from Sunland.
Uncle Joe is a character, and all visitors to the
Manatee should call on him, examine his mam-
moth wild fig tree and hedge of century plants.
Mem. Ask him to chain his dogs before you go
ashore, otherwise the seat of your inexpressibles
will require repairs. I have been there.
Eastward, above the Terraceia cut-off, is Sapp's
Point. Further along, and directly opposite
Braidentown, is Palmetto, a young town contain-
ing two stores and a post-office. The reader will
perceive that Uncle Sam distributes post-offices
in Florida with a lavish hand. We have three of
these convenient institutions within a radius of
one and a half miles-Braidentown, Manatee,
Palmetto-and Palmasola City, only three miles
distant, will have one as soon as Postmaster War-
ner shall build an office to protect the mail matter
of that growing city.
Immediately in the rear of Palmetto is a prairie
of several miles in extent. North-east of the
town, about one mile distant in the hammock',
Mr. Hendricks, of Palmetto, has a promising six-
years-old orange grove, grown from seeds planted
with his own hands. Mr. Hendricks cultivates
vegetables between the rows of his orange trees,
and last'year he realized several hundred dollars
by shipping his early tomatoes, cucumbers and
snap-beans to New York and other Northern
markets. To Mr. Hendricks belongs the credit







Notes frm Sunand. 37

of starting the early vegetable boom in the Mana-
tee region.
Mr. David Zehner, from Louisiana, has recently
purchased a strip of scrub hammock, east of the
town, where he intends to make the cultivation
of grapes and strawberries a specialty. He has
already received several thousand cuttings and
plants of the choicest varieties. A few miles
further eastward, you reach the plantation of
Major W. I. Turner, the god-father o" Braiden-
town, who has forty acres in tomatoes, cucumbers,
squashes and beans. He has already commenced
shipping his vegetables to the Northern markets.
Half a mile east of Major Turner's is the ex-
tensive plantation of Major George Patten. Gen-
eral Hiram W. Leffingwell, ex-United States Mar-
shal for the Eastern District of Missouri, has
recently purchased 2oo acres of this land, and is
negotiating for more. Two of the general's
sons, with their families and an unmarried nephew,
are now encamped on the land, and are busily
engaged in erecting dwelling-houses and the ne-
cessary out-buildings. The general and his wife
will arrive later in the season. In addition to the
cultivation of the various fruits of the citrus
family, the general will devote his attention to
general farm crops and the growing of early vege-
tables for the Northern and Western markets.
Another St. Louis gentleman, Mr, C. G. B.


a








Notes from Surnadse


Drummond, Assistant


District


Attorney,


has purchased 20oacresof land on tf
mock near Oak Hill, on which he
orange grove this summer.
Mr. H, 0. Cannon, a California
late resident of New Albany, Ind
spent several winters prospecting
like a sensible man, concluded to
on the Patten Dlantation. With tf


e. Rogers' ham-
will set out an


Argonaut, and
., after having
Florida,- has,
pitch his tent
is view, he has


purchased twenty acres of land, which he has
commenced grubbing and fencing, preparatory to
planting an orange and lemon grove. Mr. C. H.
Walworth, of Milwaukee, has purchased twenty
acres of land adjoining Mr. Cannon, which he
will have cleared, grubbed and planted in orange
and lemon trees this year.
In ante bellum times, the present Patten planta-
tion was know first as the Gamble, and afterward
as the Cofield and Davis plantation, and was the
largest and most thoroughly equipped sugar plan-
tation in the State of Florida. The owners worked
200 hands, and had ,4oo00 acres of sugar-cane in
one field. Their sugar-mill and refinery contained
all the modern appliances, and, at the commence-
ment of the war, was worth half a million dol-
lars. Soon after the breaking out of hostilities,
most of the slaves were sent to Louisiana, and work
on the plantation was abandoned. During the last
year of the war, a Federal gunboat entered the


r








Notes from Snla/ld.


Manatee Bay, and a boat's crew, commanded by
an officer, blew up the sugar-house and set fire to the
refinery. The destruction was complete; and to-
day may be seen the ponderous fly-wheel of the en-
gine, broken shafts and crumbling walls-said me-
mentos of the event. The family mansion, a large
twrntnrv brick structure. with galleries around


three sid
destroy
time, it
with slij
another
sion is a
Within
Southern
was fast


Les
Tr.
is
ghl


-, -rr -rrr- - -- .....


of both stories, escaped the hand of the
Although bearing the finger-marks of
at this day, a substantial structure, and,
t repairs, would weather the storms of


century. Connected
history, now for the
n these walls during
t Confederacy, when t
crumbling to pieces,


with this old man-
first time published.
the last days of the
hat fabric (on paper)
Judah P. Benjamin,


a fugitive from justice, and flying for his life under
the assumed name of Charles Howard, was the
guest for nearly two months of Captain Archibald


McNeill, its then occuI
orable Sunday, in the
and his cabinet hastily
jamin and Breckinridg
Florida, which seeme<
Arrived at Gainsville,
on the Atlantic coast,
guidance of Captain L
Gulf coast, v:a Tampa
mansion of Captain M


pant. When on that mem-
spring of i865, Jeff. Davis
fled from Richmond, Ben-
c struck out for the wilds of
i to offer a secure retreat.
Breckinridge sought refuge
, and Benjamin, under the
. G. Leslie, started for the
, and arrived safely at the
icNeill. After remaining


*








Notes from Sualand.


nearly two months at Captain McNeill's, Benja-


min was conveyed in a boat tc
thence to Sarasoto Bay in a hc
Glazier, of Manatee; from the
in a small sail-boat, command
Tresca, also a resident of
Florida a larger boat was p
several hair-breadth escapes
boats and the perils of the s
landed his charge safely on one
Bahama group, and returned
richer than when he left home.
England safely, where he has
fortune. Should this page b
eye, he will no doubt be pl
Captain McNeill, past threes<
tired from active life and setti
rounded by a large family.
Captain "Fred.," as he is ca


lives wit
plantatic
his years
well-prei
still a r
he had
century.


h his wife and two
,n near Braidentown.
away up among the
served "old salt."
resident of Manatee,
renewed his lease of
Judas betrayed his


I

ai


Manatee, and from
rse-cart, by Rev. E.
rnce to Cape Florida
ed by Captain Fred.
danatee. At Cape
rocured, and after
from Federal gun-
ea, Captain Tresca
of the islands of the
to Manatee $x,5oo
Benjamin reached
acquired fame and
iy chance meet his
eased to learn that
ore and ten, has re-
ed in Manatee, sur-
Captain Tresca, or
lied by his friends,
children on a small
Although he counts
nineties, he is still a
Rev. E. Glazier is
nd looks as though


life for another half
Master for the paltry


sum of thirty pieces of silver. Twenty-five thou-
sand dollars was the price offered by the United
States Government for the corps of the fugitive.







rr from


-- A


JvOJ


The example of Judas was
who assisted Benjamin to
There are more than a th
hammock land belonging
sale at from $15 to $25
location. When the fact
$75 per acre to clear this ]
sideration, it will be seen


it is now offe
the reach of
will be sold i
Adjoining
the residence
orange grove
of hammock
further on, i
Hill, the fon
At this place


auntana. 41

not followed by those
escape.
lousand acres of the rich


to thil
per acr
That il
land, is
that th


s plantation for
e, according to
t cost originally
taken into con-
e price at which


red is very low, and places it within
persons of small means. The land
n lots to suit purchasers.
the grounds of the Patten mansion is
Sof Hamet J. Craig, who has a young
of three hundred trees and ten acres
1Jnd under cultivation. Five miles
n a north-easterly direction, is Oak
ner residence of Major W. I. Turner.
the major has bearing orange grove


of several hundred trees, and also one of the most
promising six-years-old groves of six hundred
trees to be found in the Manatee region. Adjoin-
ing Major Turner is the grove of Walter Tresca,
just coming into bearing, and near by is the young
grove of Mr. William Gillett.
Terraceia Island, separated from Snead's Island
by a narrow channel, is bounded on the west by
Tampa Bay, on the north by Frog Creek, and on
the east by Terraceia Bay. This island contains
several tracts of excellent hammock land, most of









Not s from Sunk/and.


which is under improvement.


On this island are


located the bearing orange groves of Messrs. Hal.
lock, Lennard and Williams; Mpssrs. Kennedy,


Howard, Gifford, Watki
Wyatt are also located
Cessna, of Gainesville, h
plantation on the island
there. Other persons.on
Railroad having become
ice, are seeking homes
On the mainland, on the
way of Terraceia Bay, i
John Craig. Mr. Craig
has the reputation of m


ns,
on
as
,


Hobart, Patten and
this island. Judge
recently purchased a
and will soon locate
ie line of the Transit
gusted with frost and
the Manatee region.
st side, and about mid-
he plantation of Mr.
ses the finest cane and


making the


Manatee County.
A short distance north of Terraceia Island, on


the main
conquest
Francisc<


part of
Sunday,
in five 1
tines.
Florida
and his
to those
been de
soldiers
of valor


4
]

I
1


land, Hernando De Soto, fresh from the
of Peru, where he was associated with
3 Pizarro, landed his troops in the latter
May, 1539. He sailed from Havana on
May i8th, 1539, with his troops embarked
irge ships, two caravels and two brigan-
'he disastrous fate of his predecessors in
cast no gloom on the mind of De Soto,


assurances of success imparted confdence
who accompanied him. He had never
heated in battle, and was believed by his
to be invincible. His officers were men
and ripe experience, and his troops wee


best sugar in


___


L






Noks fiw S lamd.


well disciplined, a majority of them having served
in many campaigns, and all were well acquainted


with Indian
His wife,
thusiasm, an
the dangers
ter; but De
and encour
reunion was
Florida app
from which
sions of wea


warfare.
Dona Isabella, did not share his en-
d desired to accompany him and share
she believed he was about to encoun-
Soto strenuously opposed her wishes,
iged her to believe that the time of
not far distant. The conquest of
eared to De Soto to be an easy task,


he
lth


could soon return with large acces-
Sand glory.


Contrary and baffling winds kept the squadron


tossir
days.
view
the 2
same
from


ig about in the Gulf of Mexico for several
De Soto and his troops obtained their first
of the Land of Flowers on the morning of
5th day of May, and in the afternoon of the
day they came to anchor about two leagues
the shore. The shoals which extended along


the coast prevented the ships from coming nearer.
They had, in the meantime, been discovered by


the natives, who
the beach, now


had kindled beacon-fires along
known as Pinellas, as signals to


collect their forces and be in readiness
their enemies. De Soto's vessels were
off the mouth of Tampa Bay, called by t
iards the Bay of Espiritu Santo.
The Natchez, who inhabited the nei


to repel
anchored
the Span-


ghboring


country, were governed by a chief named Ucita,






~Noterm .
Notes from & n/ant.


whose hatred of I
When Pamphilo 4
1528, he was kin
tertained by the
peace between tl
slight pretense, 1
philo caused the
his aged mother


the Spaniards is easily explained.
de Narvaez visited this region in


dly rece
I Chief
iem was
the wily
chief's
to be t


ived and hospitably en-
Ucita, and a treaty of
formed; yet, on a very
and bloodthirsty Pam-
nose to be cut off, and


to pieces


by dogs I


Hence, the reason why Ucita displayed implaca-
ble resentment in his behavior to De Soto and his
companions in arms.
Thus, it will be seen that from the earliest his-
tory of our country, the aborigines have been
treated with the most impolitic and unchristian-
like barbarity; and it is highly probable that
much of that ferocity which characterizes the In-
dians of the far West at this time, may be ascribed
to the harsh and merciless treatment which. their
ancestors received from the early Spanish ex-
plorers, who acted on the principle that the In-
dians had no rights that a white man was bound to
respect.
Wishing to avoid a collision with the Indians
at that time, De Soto weighed anchor, and pro-


ceeded with his fleet ti
bay, where he disembark
place where he- landed
of IIillsborough Bay,
Little Manatee River,


ro leagues further up the
ed his troops in boats. The
was on the eastern shore
above the mouth of the
and near the line which


separates Hillsborough and Manatee Counties.








Notes from Sunand.


The Indians being anxious to get rid of De Soto
and his followers, informed them that El Dorado,


for which they were
ward. De Soto sent
and commenced his
which ended with h
Mississippi River, on


seeking, was further north-
his ships back to Havana,
toilsome march overland,
is death and burial in the
the 5th day of June, 1542,


three years and one month after the date of his
arrival in Tampa Bay.




II
aI


CHAPTER


"SU NNYSIDE"-ORANGE AND BANANA GaROVS--LMows
AND LIMES-COFFEE TREES AND PINE-APPLES-CALI-
FORNIA GRAPES-QUALITY OF THE LAND-MODE OF
CULTIVATION-FLORIDA, PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE-
INCREASED PRODUcrTION-BETTER AND CHEAPER TRANS-
PORTATION-I NTERROGATORIES AND ANSWERS.


HAVING given the reader
Manatee region, I will add
personal experience at S
past eighteen months. On
town, in the fall of 1879, m
wilderness." At this time
grove of six hundred tree
lime, ten guava, half a doz<


a hasty outline of the
a brief resume of my
unnyside during the
my arrival in Braiden-
y land was a "howling
I have a young orange
s, sixty lemon, fifteen
en olive, two soft-shell


almond, twenty coffee, four each Japan plum and
persimmon, two pomegranate, two cocoa-nut and
four Le Conte pear trees, all of which are growing
luxuriantly. I also have one acre in bananas and
sixty pine-apple plants, both of which will bear
fruit next year. Around the fence inclosing my
house lot, I have sixty California grape-vines of
the choicest varieties, viz.: Flaming Tokay,
White Muscat of. Alexandria, Mission and Rose


of Peru. The vines are
bear fruit next year.


looking well, and










ri 1J







I- I
I _.-. .. -- .-.- ,- : -


SUNNYSIDE COTTAGE,
The Residence d Samgm. C. UraAm, Braidentown Florida.
From a Photograph by F. PINARD, Manatee and Tampa.


c, -- --- ----







&fsfrnesslaaS -. *
The lad on whikk I am located is spruce.pine,
interspersed with waer-osk and scrub palmetto,:
which wold)&e pron.HON bt the average Flo-i
ridian worthhla I had. ht the commencement,
and still have, biding faith in the white sand of.
Florida with :a mulatto subeoiL. 'No matter how.
white the s auste, if underlaid by a mulatto or.
yellow sub-soil, the citns family will thrive. The
foliage of my young trees is:dae gflu, and their'
vigorous growth astonishes Mi: ca u," who vi
predicted .failure. Owing to the mndnam of,
the climate-my location being:ezxmap ftx f&rot
-my trees grew all last winter. My Oa teeU
are set in parallel rows, thirty .it ptr!.each:
way; the.Ukau and lime treea teYmfve- feet
apart; the: ba .twelve feet, id te pine-.
apples two feet Mpart. I hoe my grof every two
months, and plow it four times a ye. Thus, by
keeping the soil onastatly ticklel with the hoe,
my trees laugh with a bountifi fibge What Ir
have done, can be pe-fonned b ote60 There.
is no secret ambott the matter W welcome im-
migrants from the frigid North, hom the prairies:
of the West, and frogo the lands beyond the sea.
To all we ay, 4me and tarry with us.
Florida, the tet Statebelonging to the Union,
discovered and sted by:Europeans hs, during:
the pat 350oye beem jnbtled about from pillar:
to pot like a ujigvak. The repeat Indin
S








Notes from Slantad.


wars from 1816 to t858, rendered life so insecure,


that the
in their
that Flo
Adams,
truthful!
that she
edition,


r


early settlers literally carried their lives
hands. Is it then a matter of surprise
ida is so sparsely populated ? Mr. J. S.
farmer Commissioner of Immigration,


y remarks: T
has not attained
but that she exis


boundless forests, her
tiful lakes are not fast
of a moveless desolati
rested like an incubus


love
loci
on.
of


ie wonder truly is, not
a more flourishing con-
ts at all, and that her
ly rivers and her beau-
ced in the silent embrace
" Since slavery, which
original sin on the soil


of Florida, has been removed, immigration has
been pouring in from the North and the West,
and from the isles of the ocean. Germany, Italy,
France and England have each furnished their
quota, and the forests along the line of the rail-
roads, as well as those accessible by steamboats,
are beginning to show the effects of an advanced
civilization. The gigantic undertaking of drain-
ing Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades, to-
gether with the construction of a ship canal, con-
necting the Atlantic Ocean with the Gulf of
Mexico, by Mr. Hamilton Disston, of Philadel-
phia, and his coadjutors, is proof positive that anew
era is beginning to dawn on the Land of Flowers,
and, ere many years, the southern portion of the
State will be one vast orange grove, interspersed
with the guava, lemon, lime, pine-apple and ba-


-








Notes from Sun/and.


nana.


I hear the skeptic say:


"You will over-


stock the market, and your-fruit will not pay the
cost of transportation." The orange par excel-
lence can be grown only in the soil of Florida,
therefore competition with foreign countries need
not be feared. Florida will soon be able to sup-
ply the cities of the Mediterranean with a superior
fruit to that grown on their own shores, and more
cheaply. Increased production and transporta-
tion will cause a corresponding reduction in
freight, and also insure greater and better facili-
ties in the modes of transportation. There will


also be a large reduction
which will enable the r
other words, the poor
millionaire in the daily
of the Hes erides-th
above may be deemed
cal, but time, the great
the problem.
By every mail I am i


n in price to the consumer,
nan of limited means-in
man-to indulge with the
luxury of the golden apple
e Florida orange. The
by some persons chimeri-
arbiter of events, will solve


n receipt of letters asking


all manner of questions in relation to the climate,
soil, productions, etc., of this part of Florida.
At first I cheerfully complied with the requests of
my numerous correspondents, but the novelty has
worn off, and the task has become slightly mo-
notonous. Recently, I received a four-page cap-
sheet letter from a gentleman in Utah Territory,
to which was appended seventeen interrogatories








Notesfrom Sunland.


to the Gulf Coast of South Florida.


That straw broke the camel's
to the following question:
census that Manatee County
over 4,ooo, and not a death
Do people ever die there?" I
"Hardly ever. When we w;
yard, we kill a man." I a
with the belief that my Mor
with a "family of ten person


grate to the Land of Flo
twenty-five questions in


I1


back, and, in reply
" I see by the last
has a population of
recorded for z88o.
wrote immediately,
n t to start a grave-


,m
moi
nIs,'


wers. Be
relation


firmly impressed
n correspondent,
'will not immi-
low will be found
to Florida, from


correspondents the "wide world over," with
swers appended:
ist. "At any time of the year do you h
severe storms of thunder and lightning ?"
During the rainy season, thunder showers,
companies by lightning, frequently occur,
they are not more severe than in the Northern
Western States.
2d. "Are venomous reptiles numerous ?"


an-

iave

ac-
but
and


During
have nev
moccasin
The two
by the n


Smy residence and travels
er seen a rattlesnake; I .ha
, garter, coachwhip and
latter are harmless, and are
atives. Alligators are not


in Florida, I
ve seen a few
blacksnakes.
seldom killed
numerous in


this vicinity, and are comparatively harmless.
Scorpions and centipedes are seldom met with.
Their sting is no more severe than that of a bee.


in relation


*
t
&







Notes from Sunand.


3d. "Is the land about Braidentown sandy or
clayey ?"
The land on the margin of the bay is sandy;
further back in the hammock, the soil is dark gray
and chocolate color, underlied with clay and lime-
stone.


"Are the people mostly Northern?"


Like


an Englishman's


favorite beverage, they


are 'alf-and-'alf.


5th. What is the name of your nearest town
of any importance ?"


Have no towns of


" importance


in this section


of the country;


they are in the womb of time-


not hatched yet.
6th. What is the character of


your society?"


Mixed.


"DO


you consider


Florida as healthy as


California ?"
I consider this Manatee region the sanitarium


of the world.


A more healthful spot cannot


found on God's footstool.


8th. "Do malarial fevers prevail in your section
any time during the year ?"
In the rich, low hammock lands, where vegeta-
tion is rank, malarial fevers exist in the fall of the


year.


Chills and fever here yield more readily to


proper medical treatment than in the West.
land is exempt from malaria.


Pine


"Does


summer heat


prove


enervat-


ing ?"









Notes fiom Snsland.


That depends on a man's constitution. If born
tired, yes.
zoth. "Is it true that the summer weather with
you is more pleasant-less oppressive-than at the
North ?"
Yes; the thermometer rarely registers more than
960. It reached that point only twice last summer.


Sixth
Gene
I th,
day in
Ye ,
day toe
in Flor
z3th.


. "Are the nights
rally; sometimes
. "Can you work
summer time ?"
when it does not
hot to work out 4
ida.
IIn


tle ~rtL a


in summer always cool ?'
cooler than in the winter.
out of doors during the


rain. I have not seen a
of doors since my arrival


of vegetables and grass


burn under the summer sun ?"
We don't raise vegetables in
vegetables are grown in the
when the land at the North is
embrace of frost and ice. Th
nutritious, and large herds of
This section of country supply<
i4th. "Are insects-fleas


the summer. Our
winter and spring,
locked fast in the
e grass here is very
cattle fatten on it.
es Cuba with beef.
and mosquitoes--


more troublesome than at the North?"
Fleas sometimes make it lively With us; but
there are fewer mosquitoes in this locality than in
a majority of the Northern States.
x5th. "Do you consider Manatee County one
of the best to settle in?"


1








Notes from Sunland.


It suits me better than any other part of Florida.
You might go further and fare worse.
x6th. "Do you think the Gulf Coast equal to
the Atlantic Coast for climate, health, etc. "
Yes; far superior.
17th. "What is the price of land in your sec-
tion ?"
That depends upon quality and location. Here,
in the settlement of Braidentown. land is selling


at from $
back of t
from $1.5
g$o per
Manatee,
mock lan
chased at
location.
phosed in
tomatoes,
Northern
x8th. '


25 to x$oo per acre. A short distance
he town, pine land can be purchased at
o to $5 per acre; and hammock land at
acre. Across the bay, nearly opposite
on the Patten plantation, good ham-
d, once under cultivation, can be pur-
from $15 to $25 per acre, according to
This land is beinm rapidly metamor-


r S


to vegetable gardens, whose products-
cucumbers, beans, peas, etc.-reach the
markets during the month of March.
'What are the business prospects for a


new-comer r
That will depend a great
comer." Come, investigate
self.
x9. "Can sugar-cane be g
your neighborhood? and wl
can be made to the acre?"
The Manatee region is the


deal on the "new-
and judge for your-


rown to advantage in
hat amount of sugar

natural home of the


I








Notes from Snlard


sugar-cane. Here it tassels,
fully matures. Florida is the
Union in which the cane tasse
field tnd Davis, now Patten
full operation, the average pro
heads of sugar to the acre.
toons from six to eight years.
soth. "What is the cost of
That depends on the quality
average pine land can be clear
from $ro to o20 per acre. H
cost double that price.
sist. Can lumber be had o
if so, at what price ?"


and
onl]
Is.
plan
duct
The

clear
of t


consequently
y State of the
When the Co-
tation, was in
was two hogs-
cane here ra-


ing land ?"
he land. '


ed and grubbed at
[ammock land will

n the Manatee, and


*Heart-pine lumber, suitable for fencing or
building purposes, can be had here at.$ 5 per M.
Light wood posts can be purchased at -io per
hundred.
sad. "What is the price of labor in your vicin-
ity?"
Colored laborers can be hired at from $rS to
$o2 per month, with board or rations. The price
is $g per day when the laborer boards himself.
s3d: "Are fish, oysters and game plentiful?"
Our rivers and bayous are literally alive with
mullet-the mackerel of the South. Sea-trout
(black bass), jack-fish, sheephead, red-sh, angels
fish, drum and pompino can also be had in abund-
ance in the water around Palm Key, at the mouth


t
[






Notes from Sun/an.- 57

of the bay. Oysters and clams of a superior
quality can be had in Terraceia and Sarasoto Bays.
Deer, squirrels, quail and wild turkeys abound in
the adjoining hammocks.
24th. "Can you refer me to any person in your
vicinity whose health has been benefited by the
climate ?"
Yes; several. Rev. Edmund Lee, of Manatee,
arrived here forty-five years ago, a confirmed in-
valid; in fact, nearly gonetwith pulmonary con-
sumption. On his first arrival he was so weak
that it required considerable effort to pull a mullet
off a grid-iron. The healthfulness of the climate,
together with out-door exercise and a clear con-
science, have enabled him to fight the flesh and
the devil successfully to the present time. He is
at this time a well-preserved patriarch of seventy-
two years; has outlived two wives, and bids fair
to remain many years longer on this side of Jor-
dan.
Mr. John M. Helm, residing some three miles
south-east of Braidentown, arrived from Windsor,
Ind., about four years since. He also was nearly
gone with consumption. One lung was hepatized,
and on the other a tubercle formed, and dis-
charged after his arrival here. Physicians at the
West pronounced his case hopeless-beyond the
reach of medicine-and recommended the cli-
mate of-Florida as a last resort. He is now a well








58 Notes from Sunletd.
man, and can hoe more orange trees in a day, and
hoe them better, than any man I know in Florida.
Two years ago I arrived here, clad in porous-
plasters, suffering with chronic rheumatism. Two
months later I was as frisky as a lamb in spring
time. Lam convinced that my old complaint has
left me never to return, so long as I remain here.
I could record other cases, but the above must
suffice for the present.
s5 th. State the most direct route to Braiden-
town."
By rail to Cedar Key, the terminus of railroad
communication, thence by the boats of the Tampa
Steamship Company to this place. A boat leaves
Cedar Key on Monday and Friday afternoon of
each week, and arrives at Braidentown early on
the following morning.. Fare, $8. The above is
the advertised programme, but it is sometimes
changed to suit wind and weather. Captains
Jackson and Doane are thorough seamen, and do
everything in their power to render passengers
comfortable. Whatever may be the opinion of
travelers in regard to the speed and accommoda-
tions of the boats, they will unanimously amree


that the fare--8 for a d
miles-is first-c/as. A
modern-built and comfr


boats, between Cedar ]
would be liberally patron


boats?


instance of less than Ioo
line of light draught,
ortably fitted-up steam-
Key and Braidentown,
sized. Shall we have the


Echo repeats the question.













CHAPTER V.

FLORIDA LETTER PUBLISHED IN A CALIFORNIA PAPER-
EDITORIAL REMARKS-THE "FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH "-
THE MANATEE RIVER AND ITS SURROUNDINGS-TROPI-
CAL FRUITS-GAME AND FISH-THE SPORTSMAN'S PAR-
ADISE-LETTER TO THE EDITRESS OF THE "PHILADEL-
PHIA SUNDAY TIMES" THE LAND OF PROMISE-
SUNSTROKE AND HYDROPHOIA UNKNOWN COOL
NIGHTS DURING THE "DOO DAYS"-PREPARING THE
LAND AND PLANTING AN ORANGE GROVE-THz FLO-
RIDA ORANGE-ROUTE TO THE MANATEE-CLIMATE OF
THE GULF COAST OF SOUTH FLORIDA-REcORD OF
THERMOMETER AND RAINFALL FOR THE YEAR I88o-
No FROST-REPORT IN RELATION TO THE EFFECTS OF
THE FREEZE ON THE ATLANTIC COAST IN DECEMBER
LAST.

As THz following letters and communications
have a direct bearing on the Manatee region, the
reader will pardon their republication. Among
the chaff perchance may be found a few grains of
information that will pay for the perusal. The
first letter was written to a personal friend in the
city of New York, who forwarded it to the San
Francisco Examiner. It was first published in that
paper with the following editorial remarks:
"Old Californians are not unfamiliar with the name of Mr.
Samuel C. Upham, an editor upon this coast in the early
59








Notes from Sun/lad.


days, and, of late, the author of a work entitled Voyage to
California via Cape Horn, and Scenes in El Dorado in 1849
and I85o. We are permitted to copy a letter from that gen-
tleman, written in his humorous style, and addressed to an
old Californian friend, which may prove of interest to others."


FRIEND


C-


PHILADELPHIA, une Ir6tk, 1879.
I owe you a letter, and the following is


what I have to say: You are aware that I went South lasi
winter for the benefit of my health, and that I returned in the
spring as frisky as a lamb. The late hot weather has pulled
me down considerably, and I sigh for the Land of Flowers,
where Ponce de Leon searched for the fountain of youth, and
Upham found it. I was so charmed with the climate of the
Gulf Goast of South Florida, that, while there last winter, I
purchased 225 acres of land on the Manatee River, fifty
miles south of Tampa, and Mrs. U. and myself are going
down to that land of promise the coming fall, to plant an
orange grove, and sit under our own vine, orange and euca-
lvytus trees. It is a delightful country, away down below


" frost line," where the pine-apple, ba


nana, guava, sapadillo,


pomegranate, date, cocoa-nut, orange, lime and lemon grow
almost spontaneously. The rivers are overflowing with fish,
and the forests are overrun with game. Roasted wild turkeys
run about with carving-knives and forks sticking in their
backs, and ask to be eaten. The country now is a trifle wild,
but will soon become tamed and civilized. The people are
hospitable, and welcome all classes of strangers, with the ex-


ception of cas
found wanting.
I shall locate
can be dignified
County, Florida.
but is bound to


p


et-baggers."


They have


been tried and


in the village-if two stores and four houses
Sby that name-of Braidetown, Manatee
The place is scarcely twelve months old,
be heard fom-ter I locate thr Th








Notes from Sunlnd.


climate is delightful-sort of an earthly Paradise. The ther-
mometer during the winter months ranges from 70 to 75,
and in summer rarely exceeds go0, with a sea-breeze blowing
constantly either from the Atlantic or the Gulf. The nights
in summer are invariably cool, and one can lie comfortably
under blankets during dog days.'
I do not expect to make money in Florida, but I do ex-
pect to enjoy better health than in this city; hence the reason
of my exodus. I shall, first off, plant an orange grove of 500
trees, which, in eight years, barring accidents, ought to yield me
a handsome revenue. Should I "shuffle off this mortal coil"
before these orange trees commence bearing, I shall feel dis-
appointed-that's all. I think the change will give me a


renewed lease of life; and, as I intend I
trees, I think the chances are rather in


Book says: What does it pro
world and lose his own life ?"
in my checks" just yet; hence
been watching and praying the
" good time coming" to put in
arrived, and will not, I fear, d
of tears. I have a mortal dread


fit a me


to plant three-years-old
,Jny favor. The Good
an if he gain the whole


I am not prepared to "hand
my change of base. I have
past four or five years for the
an appearance, but it has not
during my sojourn in this vale
of the poor-house. In Florida


that institution is unknown. My eldest son will take charge
of my store and laboratory in this city, so the business will
go on without interruption. As I have spun out this letter to
a great length, I will 'say domino.


Truly yours,
S.


C. UPHAM.


The following letter was published originally
in Taggait's Phladelfph a Sunday Times, under
the following caption.: Life in Florida. Inter-
esting letter from Samuel C. Upham, formerly of









6s Notes from Sun/and.

Philadelphia, but now located in Florida, ad-
dressed to our lady editress. Hints to those who
may wish to visit the Flowery Land."

SUNNYSIDE COTTAGE,
BRAIDENTOWN, FLA., yneC 8f1, 1880.
MY DEAR MRS. BLADEN: In the Sunday Times of the
30th ult., you say:
Mr. Samuel C. Upham, whose popular songs and won-
derful California experiences render him a Philadelphia celeb-
rity, has a large plantation near Jacksonville."
It is pleasing to know, when one is far away, that he is not
entirely forgotten by his friends; but ybu are slightly mistaken
when you say I own a large,orange plantation near Jack-
sonville. I am located on the Manatee River; some eight
miles above its entrance into Tampa Bay, on the Gulf coast
of South Florida, in latitude 27i and below frost line."
I visited Jacksonville and all the towns and landings on the
St. Johns, Halifax and Matanzas Rivers, and also did" the
Suwanee pretty thoroughly before locating in Braidentown.
I prefer this part of Florida to the Atlantic coast for the fol-
lowing reasons: Heathfulness of climate, purity of water
and immunity from frost and insects. My health has im-


proved wonderfully
and I am pretty tho


since my arrival in the Land of Flowers,
)roughly convinced that I have obtained a


new lease of life. The sea breezes that fan my brow at
morning, noon and night, act as a tonic on my enfeebled con-
stitution, and I am daily gaining strength and muscle. I have
to-day worked six hours in my banana grove, with the ther-
mometer at 9go0 in the shade, without experiencing any in-
convenience from the heat.' The heat is so modified by the
constant sea breeze that one can work in the sun at all hours
of the day and at all seasons of the year. Sunstroke and









Notes from Sunland.


hydrophobia are unknown here. This statement can be taken
ithout salt. In midsummer the nights are invariably cool.
Blankets at night are the rule, not the exception. This much
about location and climate;- now, a few words about that
orange grove.
My ranch is new, and consequently rather crude. When I
located here in November last, a large portion of it was a
" howling wilderness." Since that time, I have felled the
trees, piled the logs, burned the brush, grubbed and fenced
fifteen acres, on ten acres of which I am now setting out 5oo
two-years-old sweet seedling orange trees, which I hope to
live long enough to see bear fruit. Some two months since,
I set out 2oo banana plants, and they are doing remarkably
well; many of the stalks are six feet in height. They will bear
fruit in about eighteen months. I also have a patch of sixty
pine-apple plants which will bear fruit next year. I have a


few coffee and tea pl
granate, almond and
I brought with me
nuts, which I planted


ants, Japan plum and persimmon, pome-
olive trees that are growing luxuriantly.
iom Philadelphia, half a dozen cocoa-
Son the Ist of November last, and had


given up all hope of ever seeing them sprout, when, to my
great surprise, some two weeks since, two of them threw up
sprouts. They are now one foot high, and are growing vig-
orously. The guava thrives admirably here. I have several
trees, and expect soon to luxuriate on guava jelly of my own
manufacture. I will send you a few sample boxes.
Have you ever eaten a Florida orange, fresh plucked, that


ripened on the tree? If not
greatest luxury of your life. I
fit food for the gods. I have,
eventful life, eaten oranges in
nean, South America, Mexico
can compare with the orange j


visit Florida, and enjoy the
[t is the fruit ar excellnee-
in the course of my somewhat
the groves of the Mediterra-
and the West Indies, but none
brown in this State. Our soil


is peculiarly adapted to the growth and maturity of the per









64 Notes from Sunand.

feet orange. No other soil can produce it. The West Indii
and Louisiana seedling orange tree is wonderfully improved
'by being transplanted in Florida soil. South Florida will,
ere long, be one vast orange grove, and will supply the world
with her incomparable fruit. She will supply the Mediterra
nean ports with better oranges than can possibly be raised in
that country. Won't that be "carrying coals to Newcastle ?"
I may not live to see the above prediction verified, but there
are persons living at this time who will.
If any of your numerous friends think it would be a good
thing to have an orange grove, advise them to visit the Gulf
coast of South Florida before locating elsewhere. Also tell
them to drop in at Braidentown. They may go further and
fare worse. The most direct route to this place is by rail to
Cedar Key, the present terminus of railroad communication,
thence by steamer down the coast. The mail steamers leave
Cedar Key twice a week for this place and Tampa. Leave
Cedar Key at 4 o'clock P. M. on Monday and Friday of each
week, and arrive at Braidentown at 7 o'clock the following
morning. Au revoir. S. C. UPHAM.
The following communication was published in
the Florida Agriculturist in January last, under
the caption of the Climate of the Guf# Coast'of
South lorida."
Having kept a record of the state of the thermometer at
6 o'clock A. M., s2 o'clock M. and 6 o'clock P. M. at Brai-
dentown, Manatee County, Florida, from the Ist day of Jan-
uary to the 31st day of December, 188o, inclusive, I herewith
inclose you a synopsis of the same for publication in the
Agriculturit, with the hope that it may interest your numer-
ous readers, especially those in the Northern and Western
States who are seeking homes in
The land of the orane and gava,
The pine-appe, date and cavaa.










Notes from Sunktd.

I also send a ttement of the rainfall for the ear 188o,


Avage temperature a
Average temperature a
Average temperature a
Highest temperature
August s6th, .
Lowest temperature at


TzuPILATUO .
t 6 o'clock A. M.,
t 12 O'clock M., .
t 6 o'clock P. M.,
at 12 o'clock M.,


* 7x1
S83%
78s
July ist and


o'clock A. M, Dec. 31st,


RAINFALL.


January,
February,
March,


une, .
uly, .
August


October, .
November,
December,

Total,..


*S S .
S S S S S
* S S S S .
* S S S S S S .1
* S S S S S S S S S
* S S S S
* S S S S S
* S S S S S *


* S *


* S


* S S S a a a a *
* S S S S S S S S

* S S a S S S S S *


S
3


12

is
13


18
3

6

104


19
24
24
29
4
8
6
8
.15
19 -
IS

'5
'7


Rainfall during year,


. . . 69jN inches.


At least one-half the days classed as "cloudy and partly
cloudy" were clear one-half of the day, and a majority of
the "rainy days" were clear three-fourths of the day. Dur-


ii







1

27

22
25
23
IS
12
IS
14

177


6 30
.38








66 NMtsfretm S& al d.

ing the gale on the 29h and: th of last August, which ws
so destructive on the Atlantic coast of the State, rain fell
here almost uninterruptedly for nearly forty-eight hours, but
the wind did little or no damage. The rainfall during the
two days was six and one-half inches, the heaviest of the
season. I have resided here during the past fourteen months,
and, up to:this time (January th, x88I), there has been
frost, and my tropical fruits and plants have grown luxu-
riantly every month of the year. The year just dosed, in ts
dying throes, kicked the mercury in the thermometer down
to 38, and a slight frost occurred on the opposite side of the
Manatee River, and also in the hammock four- or five miles
south-east of Braidentown. The water protection-being
surrounded on three sides by the aqueous fluid-has rendered
Braidentown exmpt frn fro.t.
Although the rainfall of 880 ohas been some nine inches
in excess of the average rainfall in this State, I have passed
one of the most agreeable summers of my life.' While the
denizns of the St. Johns and Atlantic coast are shivering in
the chilling blasts of winter, we on the Gulf coast of South
Floida are basking in the sun, with a temperature of 65 at.
6 o'clock A.M., 75 at s2 o'clock M. and 7o at 6 o'clock
P. M. If any locality north of latitude 27 can pamnt a
more favorable record, Braidentown will yield the palm.

S. C. UmAN.
Sunys Dt CoTTrAG,
BXAIDmwrOWN, FLA., Jan. 7th, l88l.

The following report, now for the first time
printed, explains itself:









Noter frew Sun&and. 67

SUNNYSIDE COTTAGr,
BRAIDI nowN, FLA., Fedb. tA, /881.
D..H. ELLIOTT, ESQ.,
Sec. Florid Fruit Grower Associatio,"
JACKSONVILLI, FLA.,
DnAu SIB: In the Report of the Proceedings of the
Eighth Annual Meeting of the Florida Fruit Growers' As-
mocation," held in Jacksonville on the 27 ult, and published
in the Daily UMie of that city on the following morning,
the annexed resolution was published, with'the name of your
humble servant appended as one of the committee:
"Resolved, That a committee be appointed to investigate
the effects of the late freeze on the orange and other fruits
and vegetables; said committee to report to the secretary at
Jacksonville at the earliest practicable moment."
Having received no official notice of my appointment to
serve on the aforesaid committee, I have resolved myself into
a committee of one, and have the honor to respectfully report
as follows:
The old and trite aphorism--" If the mountain will not
come to Mahomet, Mahomet must go to the mountain "-
seems peculiarly applicable to the above resolution. Ergo,
if the orange and other fruits of the citrus family will not
thrive 'mid frost and ice, cultivate them in a more genial
climate. With the experience of last fall and the present
winter before me, together with a careful investigation of the
climatology of Florida during the past fifty years, I have
come to the conclusion that the fruits comprising the citrus
family cannot be successful cultivated in this State north of
the S8th parallel of latitude, and the sooner and more widely
this fact is promulgated, the better it will be for all persons
interested or about to become interested in this laudable and
growing industry. The fact that the late freeze killed the









68 Notes fiom Sanand.

scale insects on the orange trees in middle and north Florida,
is cold comfort for those engaged in orange culture. There
are fruits better adapted to the climate of Florida north of
latitude 28 than the orange, lemon, lime, guava, banana and
pine-apple. Why, then, persist in endeavoring to cultivate
those fruits with so dim a prospect of success ? It is kicking
against the pricks, hoping against hope. In conclusion, plant
your orange, lemon, lime and banana groves below the 28th
parallel of latitude, tickle the soil constantly with the hoe,
and success will crown your efforts. So mote it be.

S. C. UPHAx.













Noes from Snlankd.


METEOROLOGICAL.

Record of the 7Tkerrwmo er and Rainfall at Braid4frwn,


the month


january, r88o, wmil Remarks


in relation to Wind and Weather.


Date.


Sums, z,788


E.
E.
E.
E.
S.E.
E.
N. W.
W.
W.
E.
E.
E.
N. E.
E.
S.
E.
W.
N.W.
E.
E.w


S. W.
S.
S.
W.
N.W.
E.
S.W.
W.
N.W.


E.
S. E.
W.


Remarks.


Cloudy A. M., dear P.M.
Clear.
A. M. clear, P. M. cloudy.
Clear with strong E. wid.
Clear A. M., cloudy P. M.
Clear.

Cloudy.
Clear.




'a










Cloudy.
Cl.at
Mr
Cluy
4,
Clar
'a


Lowest temperature at 6 o'clock A. M., g9th inst ....


M., x6th and joth inats..............8


......*.........*.........


Floria,


mHh,.t
















the Thermnomter


the month


and Ra8inall at Braenown
February, 188o, with Remarks


in relation


Wind and Weather.


Sums,
Apg


N.W.
S.
N.W.
S.E.
E.
E.
E.
W.
E.
W.
E.
W.
S.
S.
IN.E.


Remarks.


Cloudy. [all day.
Rain at night. Strong wind
Wind has blown aale all day
Clear A. M., cloudy P. M.
Rain during night, dear all
Cloudy. [day.
Clear.


Qear. Wind blow
Rain dur ight,
Clear.
o


Lowet apematr at 6 o'clock A. M., 4th


ln t......nf..a...... ...........4P


M., yth ilast... ..*.......................


Notes from Sunland;


METEOROLOGICAL.


Record


Florida,


s*


HIght










Noats from Suna&nd.


MBTZOROLOGICAL.

Retor ef tie Thermometer and Raifall at Braide nim,
hrida,for the month of March, z88o, wwr Remarks in
relation to sind and Weather.


Sums,
Av'p


S. W.


S.W.

S.
S. W.
So We



E.

E.
E.
we


S. W.
W.
W.
So E.
E
soR


Re0ark.


Clear.


*4
6t
a

a4
'4

Cloudy.
"


Clear.

Rain during night, cloud a

Ra uringnight, cloud a
Cloudy. [lay.
Clear.


Rain A. M., cloudy P. M.
Clear.
as


Lowest emperature at 6 o'clock A. M., apt


Highst


M., zath, x3th and z4th lnst......86


I~LY~-












7a Notes from Ssnlanad.


METEOROLOGICAL.

Record of tAe Thermometer and Rainfall at Bra&mentawj


Florida,


the mouth


April, i880, with Remark is


relation to Wind and Weather.


Date.



I

3
4
i
I
9
10
21
12
13
'4
:a

19

go

t3
s4


Sums,
Av'ge


E.
N.W
N. W.
W.
S.W.
W.
W.
W.
S.W.
S.W.
S. W.
S. W.
S.W.
S.W.
S.W.
S W.
SS. W.


Remarks.


bloody,
4'


with rain


in tle
evefa


Lowet tempetu at 6 o'clock A. M.,3h int......


.......... ..... n. 5.


MIbWt


K., X4thath ad & ba a.........











Notes from Sunand. -



METEOROLOGICAL.


Record


Florida,
relation


the 71rmwkter and


the month


Ma


Rainfall
y, X88o,


Wind and Weather.


Date.


z in.

i in.
*** **
lI4D.O


izj1in


Remarks


Clear.
Cloudy, with
with


rain P.
Scotch


mist.


Clear.
Cloudy, with Scotch mist.
Cloudy.
Rain Lring P. M. and night.
it 6AA 6 as
loudy, with Scotch mist.
Rain in the afternoon.

Cloudy.
Cloudy; windblowinga ga

Cloudy.
ift
Rain during P. M. and night.
o6 6 f


the day.


Cloudy, with Scotch
Partly cloudy.
Ad of


mist.


Rain during night, day clear
Clear.
44


Lownt mpratr at 6 o'clock A. LM., d, d, 3th and i6th InteM...7


M., 3th


at Braid&nown,
with Remarks in


inK....U......U.YI.. .~U.oP


1Hi gh











74 Notes from SmlSand


METEOROLOGICAL.

Record of tAhe 7hnrmo e and Ramifa at Braidenstwn,
Flrida, fr the mouth of wJun, 880o, with Remarks i.
relation to Wiud and Weather.


Date.


Sums,
ATgs'


94'


I





S. E.
S. .
W.
S. E.
S.E.
S.E.
L W.
S. W.
S.W.
S. W.
S. W.
S.W.

'V.
s.w.
W.
w.
w. w
S.W.
S. W.
S. WW,
E.
S.W.
S.E.
S. i
S.


In.
ID.
in.
......
K ID.


Kin.
KI..

i in..
5....
****e*


C-**
BtIn.
in,
'in,
ftla.
...n.
A 1..


8% l.
..... *


Rcmar.b


Rain ila the aftraon.
Cloudy, with Scotch mit.
Rain in the atermoon.


duar

Rain i


evemn.i


" afterono.
f "


*<


Rain A. M., cr P. M.
eur.
Rain A. M., dcar P. M.
CGoudy,

Rain P. and at night
Rain during i dght

Ra~ifnDn~t;rfl duri ~~ng aftro
SShmar diafnoo
| t shower an amrmoo.
E EU EU


EU EU
dl 4
II 6*d


Lowea t Mpsu a 6 o'clock A. M.,


Highet


Me,-a


i t...........................4o


Cody.











Nots fIm S&IafI


METEOROLOGICAL.


Record of the 7krmometer and Rainfal at Braidesown,


the mtos of 7uly, aSio, with Remarks is


relation to Wid and Weather.


Date.


Sumn,
Avse


S..


p6'
9a
9'
93
90
9'
9'


93
9
79


!j


*.fl*9
; In.
......


--


x in.
Kim
.S.S..

*.... .

bla.


17% in.


Remarks.


Rain duanE the aAernoon.
Qa~a'
Cloudy.
Cler.
Scotch mist in the afternoon.
Rail during P. M.


Cloudy, with Scotch mist.
Ooudt


RCain n th aern n.
Cloudy.

ti





Scotch mist in the afternoon.
Rain in the evening.
S e afternoon.


Clody and misty.
ClRain a r.n
Rain atnoon.


M., ht Int.............i..........


Lowat tspeatur at 6 o'clock A.M.,Adah, 7th, a8th and 3t intaL..8


Fbrida,


Hieft-










Notes from SAnliad.

METEOROLOGICAL.


Record


the Thermometer and Rainfall at Braidentlwn,


Florida, for


the month


August,


with Remarks it


relation to Wind and Weather.


Date.


Sumsl *,4,o
Av'r*i 84


S. W.
S.E.
S.E.
S. W.
S.E.
S. W.
S. .

S.E.L
S.W.
s.E.
S.E..
S.E.
S. .
S.E.
S. E.
S.W.
S.W.
S.w.
S.E.
S. E.
S. E.

S.E.
S. W.-



S.

S. E


******
'i in.
,V in.
i In.
"in.
In.
i in.

% in.
......

alia.
s in.


A In.
In.



In.
s in.

ig in.



sy n.


Rcmarik.


eu-ar.
Rain during night.
: : day and night.
" forenoon.
" mafteroon.


ClRain oudy.
Rain in the aftroon.


Cloudy.
Rain in the afternoon.
Cloudy.
Rain in the afternoon.
Cloudy.
Cloudy, rain in the P. M.
Clear.

Cloudy,with rain intheP.M.
4 ft 6* 11


[and ni t.
Ran, wind blowig ple day
Rain during the frenoon.


Iamte a


ight


pFraw


at 6 o'dock A. M., 4th, h, 6th, zgth and pth lr.


*" rI


M., *3d sad s6th Imt ...........


i88o,









Noes from Sunland.


METEOROLOGICAL.
Record of the A ermomeer and Rainfall at Braide twn,


Florida,


the month


September, 18ot with Remarks


in relations


Wind and Weather


Date.


Sums,
Av'ge


SoW,e
s.
S.E.
S. E.
S. E
S.W.


S.E.
S.
S.E.
S. E.
S.E.
S. B.
S.E.
so Es
S.E.
S.E.
S. &
S. E
S.
sw.W
8. W.
N. W.
S.Et
S.E.


Remarks.


Cloudy, with rain in P. M.
"o "


Clear.
Clear A. M., cloudy
Clear.


a
Rain in the afternoon.
Cloudy.
Rain in the afternoon.


Clear da
Clear.
Clear da
Cloudy,
Clar.
Cloudy,
Clear A.
Rain in


if

P.M.


y, rain during night.
y, rain during night.
with Scotch mist.
with strong wind.
M., rain P. M.
the afternoon.


to
Clar.


Rain duringearly prt
Clear.
"[$t


Lowest temperature at 6 o'clock A. M., 3oh


IBH-t


M., loth, asth, 93d and 3th Insts...94


.....,. ,PO .










78 Notes from Sunlnd.


METEOROLOGICAL.

Record of gtde Termovadr and Rainfall at BrSidstown,
Florida for the moat of October, 880o, wA Remarks in
relation to Wind and Weater.


Date.


Sums, 3,345
Av'ge p"4


3.502~


S.E,
S.E.
S.E.
t.L i


In,
0- 00
**0**
Sen***
Sin.


Sin.
3'In.


|*****
*e***
C.....


lf in.


*6

Coody, with rain
Cloudy, whh heavy rain.
Clear A. M, nin P. M.
Cloudy.






Rain In the aftroon
Clear.
i


Rain n the morning.
" during the niDlt.
" n the morning.
aear.


'a


Iaowt umpgratur at 6 o'clock A. M., sSh


Iapt..n ..n.. ..n..k


U-~r


RAemUb.


M., z4th tt...............-......93r










Notes from Suhakd. 79


METEOROLOGICAL.
Reerdoef t4e Twomemue awd RimfIA at Braidme ns,
Fridnafr te md tk of Novemer, z88o, wui Remarks
i relation to Wind and Wealthr.


Avpge


RKmalt,.


Cloudy A h, ar P. M.
Ckar A. ., Cbmudy P. M.
Clear.
Rain during the night.
Clar.
11


Claody.
Car.
Clear
aa


ar day, rain at night.
Char.
&


a.


Rain in the foreoon.
Clear A. M., Cloudy P. M.
do 46 64


Cloudy.
64


and foggy


Imowt purmat 6 o'cock A. M., xz6b inst.......................
Ht u M., Mo Lg...&.._......,o


DaEl.









8o Nots from Sunand.


METEOROLOGICAL.

Record of the Thermometer and Rainfall at Braiden oew,


pHrida,for the month


December,


M88o, w*t Remarks


in relation to Wind and Weather


Date.



- I


Sums,
Av'ge


I
0


84
82
82

Zs
72
73

75

71







51
83
6,





65
71
51
30


so
84
83
8so
78
73
64
72
68
09
72
75
70
73
75



6s
75








6S
74

S3


45
S3


S.
W.
S.W.
S.
S.

N.E.
E.
N. E.
N.E.
N. E.
N. E.
N.W.
S.E.
S.
S.
S.

S.
N.W.
N.W.
N.E.
S.E.
S.W.
S.
N.E.
N.W.
S.E.
S. E.
N.W.
N. E.


Remarks.


ear.

Cloudy, with rain.
Clear.


'd

to
Io
6

ie
ft.
Rain morning and afternoon.
Rain the afternoon.
Cloudy.

clear.
It
Rain in the afternoon.

Clear.
Rain in the afternoon.
Cloud [of te year.
Dri ng rain. Coldest day


Lowat temperature at 6 o'clock A. M., 3xst


igheat


U.t,.~......... I, 940


M., ad


inrt.....~~...............~~P


" 12


Cloudy.
GI











Notes from Su.k IS


METBORLOAICAL.


Record of the Therometesr and ainfoff ot Br-identom,
Fnorida,,r the moutk of 7amery, 881, with Remarks
in reAifo to Vi and aWdiatr.


Sums.
Av'ge


S.E
S.E.
S.
N.W.
! E.
E.



S.E.

S.
S. .
N.E.
N.W.
N.E.
N.E.
N.E.
E.
N.W.
N.W.


z3 in.'



it'n.
3'ln.


s-in.


Remarks.


Rain during the aftmoon.
Clear.
'f
Rain nearly all day.
Rain in tde afteroon.
Rain morani and afteraoo.
Rain il the a nfteron.

Ra n" th a en o.






Coudy ., d P.M.

RaPn i. th aernodah.
Char.
Cr.
Cloudy, ith Sctchalst.




'r

Clr.,
f
w


Lowet temperature at o'clock A. M., .6th tl.t......... ... .......4


M., z'h and lth Iam,...............o


Hifbet









esu from .Sumsadt


MKMTOROLOICAL.


Record of tkl hermmtr and Rainf/ll at Braidstbw,
loridr, for the mows of Fdhwary, 88t, wmA Remarks
im relatio to Wmd and Wether.


D1t"


Avo'


I:










i
7'
7;
75

'9
Ss
a'





S
n
2
84
35
3m


So
Sc
U.
C


S.W.
8. E.
N. e
N.E.
N E.
E.
8.R
S. I
8. W.
W.
W.
N. W.
N.t.
L& L
S.E.
8.W.
N.W.
8. W.
N. RE.
E.
S.E.


- .n




Sins.
96 -*.
......


s .in.
...fl.


Clear.
Rlan In atem mo





U'
er
Ctrs, wiod uowic a gale.

Rain la th e arsoo
rs r. '


O.
Rain in aftme

Car.
**

Ct


co


"a
Rain. witb wind

<


Loawt lempurs at S odock A. M., x4th ,


_ ;4P


E~i~r


M.o imv t....










Notes from Saa d. 83



METEOROLOGICAL.

Raeord of te hermometer and RainfaRl a Braidt wn,
AFrid for ai month of March, B Mi with Remarks is
reaMs to rwd and Weather.


Date.


Sums,
Av'ge


N.W.
N.W.
S.W.
N.W.
N.W.
N.W.
L


N E.
S.W.
NeW,



s5Wo
Sw.
N.W.

N,ew
N.&
8w.
S. W.
S.W.

N.W.

S.W.
s.W.


N.W.
N.W.


* 1. 1
-
*--*
.. In.
*- .
11**--
*****

)-*)*


s% in.


Remarks.


Cear.

M.

of
ef

Rais P. M. and night.
Car.

Cokdy, with Scotch mist.

Cloudy.
ar.
a'


Co rdy, nin P.M. and ight.

Cloudy, with rain at night.
Mar, wind Mowing a ple.


a's
Chudy.
Clr.
.4
Clear wind bowing a ale
a f9


Lowat lm
H-t


v at 6 o'clock, A. I., sxth, a3d ad th iut f.po
1s M., t iat.....................







ELLENTON


PLANTATION LANDS

The undepigned offers for sale the unsold portion of the
"Ellenton" (formerly "Gamble") Plantation Lands.
These lands lie on the north side of the Manatee River,
opposite the village of Manatee. About one-half (say
twelve hundred acres) were cleared and cultivated in cane
before the war, and have lain waste since. The other por-
tion is uncleared.
It is all First Qualty Dry Hammock,
and is the largest body of fine land on the Gulf Coast;
admirably suited by climate, soil and accemsbility for the
successful cultivation of all the semi-tropical fruits, garden
vegetables, etc., etc., which can be grown in hnorid. These
lands are now selling rapidly in parcels of ten, twenty and
forty acres to settlers from all the States, and from the more
northern parts of the Peninsula, who are making it, what it
is destined to be,
"THE GARDEN OF FLORIDA."
For health and pleasantness it is unexcelled. Society is
good and constantly improving by the immigration of moral,
intelligent, cultivated and thrifty settlers.
Semi-weely communication by Mail Steamers with
Cedar Keys, thence by Rail with all sections.
Persons desiring to secure homes on these lands must
apply soon.

GEORGB PATTEN,








EDGCB IGBA alM
ATTORNEY AT LAW,

Solicitor in hace a Real Estate gent,

Maaud t a Badeaown, Florida,
Will Practice in all the Counties of the Sixth Judi-
cial Circuit.of Florida.

Having been Probate Judge for seven years, is especially
qualified to attend to all matters connected with the estates
of deceased persons.
Is thoroughly acquainted with the situation and
quality of all classes of lands subject to entry and purchase
in Manatee County. Has been engaged for the last thirteen
years in the selection and location of Homesteads, having
had official and professional connection with nine-tenths
of the Honetedi located in the county.
Maps and abract of titles furnished at reasonable prices.
Hometed blanks of all descriptions constantly a hand
Corrpondence solicited and information furnished.
Tracts of t ab best l and wgepr lands in thd'county,
from ten to forty acres, for sale, within a mile of Sunnyside
Cottage. Thee lands are situated on the mostelevated and
beautiful ridge in Man*aee County, with splendid building
sites and delightful springs of water, and being situated only
a little more than a mile .from the Steamboat wharf and
Post Office at Braidentown, and entirely cut off from the
high winds aseims prevailing on the coast.
Refers, by pemisson,to all the matters stated a the above
card, tb r. Samuel C. Upham and to profession standing
to the "*' adret Compayl and H. K. & F. B. Thurba,
New .Yotk.
C S ^ SJ nfa ra* ~--








SALE


BEAUTIFUL
LOCATED


AND


WELL


PLACE


Adjoinig the town of Palmeto, rg8 acrs-16 prairie,
six timber, si in cultivation; hoe f five room; erin
trees, six orange, four lemon, two citron, five g as, one
grape; fruit trees in rve, 00 orange, eleven Jpan plum,
ten sand pear, four Japan pedmmos; a lot of lemon,
guavas, limes, alberrm cheslat and ioa Concord grape
vines, strawberries. Pond water on prairie. Will make good
stock farm. Thirty acres fine orange land. Fine boat landing
near house; fine sulphur spring near home, will become
noted some day. Finest garden'of fowes, shru etc., in
the county. For further description of my place, ee page
35 of this book. Price, $z8oo Cash.


Call on or address,


ZEHNER,


Palmetto,


anatee,


Florida.


DAVID


SCATTERGOOD,
*r~r NP


Agr

nurm'tr mn


ood,


8. E. 8eGt Fifth ad Ca* wSt r,
(Tchr doe a bo the Potoame,)
PHILADELPHIA.


Wood Engraving of all descriptions done with dispatch.
Buildings, Store Fronts, Machines, Labels, Show -Crds
mu ted Price Lts, Book Coves, Newspper Hads,
Trade Marts, Advertising Deigns, Etc., Drawn and En-
graved n the bet style, and at low Pies








HOMES


IN


FLORIDA.


A most admirable way for those contemplating a settle-
ment in the genial climate of Florida to procure correct and
valuable information concerning it, is to subscribe for a frt-
c Ass nm apr devoted to the development of every section
of the State.


The


Florida


Uqion


is such a paper. Its Daily Edition, the only Daily in the
State, contains full Associated Press Dispatches and gives
the freshest news to the people of the State. Each number
of The Weekly Union contains facts about the State valuable
to the intended settler, and its Agriadtural Deartoment,
edited by an experienced agriculturist, is invaluable to the
farmer fruit grower and horticulturist.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.


Daily.
Weky
Weekly,
-


Tear, a
Three eonts,.
One Month.
Tear,
six Months,
Three mostt.


10.00
3.50
1.00
1.00
.50


cCALLUM & LAWTON, Jacksonville, Florida.


k4* rP


PHOTOGRAPHER
Oelaay at Manatee next to Haro's 8tome.
In Tampa, neta to Jackson' Stre.


Ywq 9ofR RWIN


WP gnd PuMk Bildip a Specialt.








T


AMP


A


AM T13


you


want


reliable


information


from


South Florida, subscribe for the


................. ......l .. ............ln.. ... ..... .. ... .
I- r ,


unhand


PUBLISHED


AT TAMPA, FLORIDA,


Soo per


Tat,


Dr. J. P. WALL, Editor.
T. K. SPENCER, Publisher.

This Paper has done more to develop the resources of this
section than any other paper, and has reliable correspon-
dents in every County. Gives facts with no rose cooring.


AMPLE COPY,


TEN CENTS.


-t


nibune,


& & -


Whillegalause


'1~nn~7~n7


ST


i


,-~n~r J g r | lmnim


|








M.


HE 44


& SON,


ran t.


oltaint4


. Havi mae onage citnure a special study fr the pat w yaem
during which time we hae tried various eperiument, both in the
manner of planting ad mode ofculnvatin the orange rm, we fel saM
In saying to the public that we are now prepared to p ee ora
culture in a manner guarantein the beat reaolt.


aOulityr Amn o


---- ---- U 9 U
Pesons daring anything in or line will reci prompt attention by
calling on or addrrain


HELM


80N,


1, FiWi.


PINE APPLE
AMD


BANANA


LAND.


A few acres of
cultivation of the
on the east bank
of Braidentown,


chalse.


land admirably adapted. to the
Pine Apple and Banana, situated
of Ware's Creek, in the village
will be sold in lots to suit pur-


ADDRESS:


SAMUEL C.


UPHAM,


BraidntwsSouFth Floria.


ilthr Tir










DE.


Psnps ladTwo
Bflut aflg inl M


Y~btt,


and In PlU aUMIA in la.
wanted by ti Moo of


A K AON OF WA .
THE DEVICES OF THE QUEENS OF SOCIETY.
ET N aZ tm AP t a fwae Atti o vd t
ITe ho BS TF BeffunWfM thMy Wtody of Art
In the BB8T Beauticag Comentic in the World.


PIJ crOLYr


Lea .1


Wn-A iM agil e 6i whte Ako tAme Iut kma ."s
This Delhtftl Preparation, by t aourlnr ion on the
ktn. sfl d -sme tly IMPART8 NLATUES BlOBATB
S7 TO IPL ION. LA its mari be-
come known throughout the ahionshUb world, it is nily
driving out and m-npaeding all other conetlc claimthg to
beautify and apotab sia and orn pt lo q
In Pelo OVER Fl V I UDED of the b
Dr and Dela In Fin e Tolet Goods have adopted it a
T Bna Oomn ...


masTn OOVwRT TOILET POWD
Sablen Mss and anLemds every drawbak to beauty;
aMd it pmam m sas mauTocT A a m so
mLIa W sa THA TMU Cn .,LaWr mr nI Tbm


uc mor to Bu & Co.
aIned IOuiar cnWrsl.


AnlU sn- has aLeane
Igunate of D. P. MASON on
rim of box4-d, of w h ron
willm en a mpdnt 9ma -


m.OD YfIBRWHaUl.
A&ld am eama1 -mfltndlM tb


a & 6NWM


mFTA


COUAT


IT


TO


PD







FLORIDA.

For RELIABLE INFORMATION regarding Florida,
its Climate, Production and Resources, subscribe for the


FLORIDA GRICULTURIST,
A Large 8-Page Weekly. $2.00 per Annum.


CODRINGTON


CO.,


DeLand,


Florida.


All interested in Florida, especially the
Gulf Coast, subscribe for the


MANATEE


COUNTY


NEWS.


l.00 PER ANNUM.
"DUMB:*


P. 0. Box 1


anate.


G. CASPER, Editor.


THE


SPRING


IARMACY.

Always in Stock.


MANATEE,


FLORIDA.


Pure


Drugs Chemicals




































































































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I
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