• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Biographical
 Index














Group Title: Florida, 1513-1913, past and future : four hundred years of wars and peace and industrial development
Title: Florida, 1513-1913, past and future
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055604/00002
 Material Information
Title: Florida, 1513-1913, past and future four hundred years of wars and peace and industrial development
Physical Description: 2 v. : plates, ports., map. ; 32 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Chapin, George M
Publisher: The S. J. Clarke publishing company
Place of Publication: Chicago Ill
Publication Date: 1914
 Subjects
Subject: History -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Biography -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by George M. Chapin.
General Note: Vol. 2 includes biographical sketches.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055604
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000119230
oclc - 01483350
notis - AAN5110
lccn - 14018672

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Biographical
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
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Full Text















1513-1913


PAST,


PRESENT
AND


FUTURE

FOUR HUNDRED YEARS OF WARS AND
PEACE AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT



By GEORGE M. CHAPIN
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA



THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
1914


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BIOGRAPHICAL


GOVERNOR


ANSON


P. K.


AFFORD.


in San Francisco, with


which


he was connected


I86o until 1862.


He was a natural born


pioneer and,


of Governor


Anson


P. K. Safford


is removing to Nevada,


became


one of the best known


honored not alone in


one locality but in many.


and most influential citizens in Humboldt


and adja-


life work has not ceased its fruition


nor will it do


cent counties.


was called


to public


so as long


as civilization endures in America,


for he


and served


as mining recorder


and also as county re-


set in motion the


wheels


progress


which will roll


corder, while the business of mining


also occupied


on and on through all time.


He


has justly been called


much


of his attention.


He was ready to meet pioneer


the "father of the public school


system of


Arizona,"


conditions


and seemed


equal to any emergency.


When


and other
honor and


sections of the country have reason to


praise


him for the equally valuable work


difficulties occurred with the Indians, whose hostility
was manifest in thieving and murder, he organized and


in their behalf.


His last days were spent


at Tarpon


led armed bodies of


citizens


to pursue and punish


Springs, Florida, where his widow, Mrs. Soledad B.
Parken, still resides, occupying the home erected by
Governor Safford.


them.


Although he endured


great hardships


on some


of these expeditions he never complained, placing duty
before any thought of personal comfort. He contin-


At Hyde Park,


ruary,


Vermont on the 14th of Feb-


Governor


Safford


was born and


ued a resident of Humboldt


when he


went abroad,


county, Nevada, until
spending two years in


therefore, but eight years of
1838 removed to Crete, Illinm


age when the family in
is. His educational op-


Europe, partly for the benefit of his health and partly


increase


his store of information concerning


human


portunities were such as only the common schools


affairs and the world's resources.


that day afforded.


upon the
financial


home fan
conditions


Moreover, his services
m, for the family was


S


were needed
in straitened


and could not employ help,


Following his return


President
States su


to his native


Johnson appointed Mr.


rveyor


general for


Nevada


Sa


land in 1867
afford United


and from


Presi-


that through the
to perform such


mitted.


spring and summer months he had
tasks as his age and strength per-


While his opportunity of attending school


dent Grant came the appointment as governor of Ari-


zona in 1869.


accept


He resigned


the latter,,and


the former


so creditable


position


and satisfactory


was somewhat limited, he


of books, of
an observing


nature
eye an


lure of the gold fields


journey across,
the mountain


was always


s a


and of mankind and
d retentive memory.


was upon


s the long hot
passes to the


in mining for about eight


him and 1


stretches of


close student
I he possessed


In 185o
ie made


sand and over


Pacific coast, where he en-


years,


spending most


was his


official


service in that position


Grant reappointed him in
ernor of the territory for
to seek a third term. Ni


haps was
results.
written:


eight y
3 other


that President


He continued as gov-
ears and then refused


epoch of his life


fraught with so many deeds fruitful of great


In this connection one


of his biographers


of that time in Nevada


county.


However, unlike


"He found the territory almost in a state of anarchy.


many
search


others,


he did not devote his time to


for the precious metal but,


a frenzied


recognizing


Many officers refused to obey the laws.


taxes


was resisted by


some.


payment


Outlaws were coming


duties and obligations of


citizenship,


and helpful part in framing the


the pro
native


)gress


of the


state.


affairs


His fellow


took an active
and promoting


citizens,


appre-


of his ability, elected him to the legislature


in 1856 and again in


After his retirement from


that office he turned his attention to commercial affairs


from Sonora and robbing and murdering settlers along


the border and


Apache


as far north


Indians were atrocious


murders and the military authority


as the Gila


river.


in their thefts and
ies were nearly use-


less. The commanding officer and many subordinates


were not in sympathy with the people.


Such eminent


'5-c,


name


from


E


o





FLORIDA


generals as Sherman and Sheridan regarded the terri-
tory about worthless and only fit for Indians. There
was no public-school system in operation and but one
public school (at Prescott) in the whole territory,
with nearly all the children of Catholic parents under
the power of priests hostile to free public schools.
There was not a railroad on the east nearer than
Kansas and the Overland had just been completed to
California. Arizona was in a most univiting condi-


tion. Governor Safford realized the full
situation-of the work before him. With
bravery and an unflinching purpose to
out of chaos, to give the people protection
a system of public schools, he went to


force of the
intelligence,
bring order
, to establish
work. The


previous legislature was held by many to be unlaw-
fully convened, hence the laws were only partially
obeyed and the very first thing to be done was to
procure an act of congress authorizing the calling of
an election for a legislature and to confer upon the
governor large powers until it could meet and enact
laws; As commander of the military department of
Arizona, General Stoneman was inefficient and un-
friendly to the citizens. Another commander was
necessary. To help obtain the required legislation
and secure a new military commander, the governor,
at his own expense, and on borrowed money, spent the
winter of 1870-71 in Washington. Fortunately Hon.
R. C. McCormick was delegate. Hie stood high with
the administration and with leading members of both
houses of congress and he cordially and efficiently
carried the necessary laws through congress and in
every way helped to strengthen the governor's hands
and together they induced President Grant to super-
sede General Stoneman with General Crook. The
governor returned to the territory in April. 1871, and,
with a zeal rarely equaled, began work on all lines;
and in his eight years as governor rid the territory
of Sonora of outlaws and secured the passage and


thorough


enforcement


of effective


laws--especially


revenue and public-school laws. To work more effec-
tively with the native people he learned to speak Span-
ish. He personally visited from time to time nearly
every family in the territory and made them feel that
his highest ambition was to give them security in
person and property and good schools for their chil-
dren. As a rule each legislature passed the laws he
recommended. When not engaged in executive duties
in his office he was leading prospecting parties into
the mining regions, armed parties after hostile Indians,
traveling from county to county, giving cheerful words
to the struggling pioneers in stock-raising, farming
and mining. In this way he traveled thousands and
thousands of miles at his own expense, often without
protection other than his shotgun. He enjoyed par-
taking of the scanty fare of the settlers in their cabins.


They never suggested any act for their benefit that he
did not promptly do or try to do. While a strong
partisan in national affairs, he was not in his admin-
istration of territorial laws. He appointed men for
their fitness, with little regard to their political stand-
ing. Narrow-minded and selfish men did not always
approve of his actions. His convictions of right and
wrong, especially in all matters affecting the public,
were so strong that more than one unfaithful officer
felt his righteous wrath and power. He always tried
to conciliate so long as the public interests did not
thereby suffer; but honesty and efficiency he would
never sacrifice to conciliate anybody. His crowning
achievement as governor of Arizona was the system
of public schools he established, and perhaps there is
not a case on record where a single officer led in every
step from no schools at all to a thoroughly efficient
system by which every neighborhood, even with few
children, was provided with a school supported by
public funds. He met and overcame obstacles that
seemed insurmountable to even zealous friends of
public education. This part of his work in Arizona
should of itself entitle him to the everlasting gratitude
of the people. His personal work and sacrifices of
time and means to accomplish this crowning work of
his is not fully known to anybody, for they were done
at all times, day and night, and under almost all cir-
cumstances. It is true he had the support of the legis-
latures, but a less determined officer in this regard
would not have secured it. He believed in education
in the public schools as the best foundation for hon-
orable success in life. Governor Safford had a broad
and comprehensive mind. In proportion as the people
were prosperous and happy he was buoyant and con-
tent. Perhaps no man ever lived who more enjoyed
promoting the public welfare and the welfare of worthy
individuals than he. When there were fresh de-
velopments of minerals reported he lost no time in
personally going upon the ground to verify fields; he
encountered hostile Indians and several times helped
carry wounded companions for many miles over rough
and dangerous roads and always cheered them up
under the saddest conditions. He was a pioneer by
nature. His personal requirements were few and sim-
ple and his life abstemious. Life to him was useful
activity. He was among the first to introduce fine
sheep and other animals and, though he lost money
in this way, he never regretted it because it set an
example which was followed. So unselfish and liberal
was he as governor that at the end of his term of
eight years he had little more than a pair of mules
and a buckboard in the way of wealth. He was not
very rugged and he saw that provision must be made
for sickness and age and that he must concentrate his


efforts to


make some money.


Without going


into de-







FLORIDA


tails he w
tal in the


as instrumental in introducing the
noted Tombstone mines, and after


first capi-
a year or


two of work in this connection, realized a competency,
though not wealth as that word is now understood.
He helped establish a bank at Tucson, built business
blocks in Tombstone and did many other acts that
proved his faith in and attachment to the territory,
which were strong to the day of his death."
After leaving Arizona, Mr. Safford was for two
years a resident of Philadelphia and New York, dur-


ing which time he became
the purchase of a large tra
removed to that state. He
active in the upbuilding o
was again work of purel
found there practically a fc
lishment and development ol
ally of his time and strength
health became undermined
death. He erected the secoi


pon Springs in 1885.
built in the bungalow s
ments have since been
attractive residences o
Governor Safford
vived by a daughter
who is a graduate of
teacher of Boston. I


Safford married Miss
Mexico and of Spanis
celebrated in Arizona.


It waa
tyle, a
made,


interested with


others


ct of land in Florida and
was thereafter especially
f Tarpon Springs, which
y pioneer character. He
wrest and began the estab-
F the town, giving so liber-
h to the enterprise that his
, probably hastening his
nd dwelling house at Tar-
s a typical southern home,
nd additions and improve-
constituting it one of the


this section of Florida.
as twice married and is sur-
f his first union, Marguerita,
Smith College and is now a
or his second wife Governor
Soledad Bonillas, a native of
h descent, the wedding being
After four -and a half years


of widowhood Mrs. Safford married W. W. Parken,
a native of England, who was a musician by profes-
sion and passed away in July, 1903. Mrs. Parken has
been a most active and valued member of the com-
munity which constitutes the town of Tarpon Springs,
whither she came with her first husband in 1883.
Here she has resided continuously since. She took an
active part in building the first schoolhouse in 1885-
86 and has been largely and helpfully interested int
educational affairs for a number of years. For ten
years she was president of the Women's Town Im-
provement Association, the main efforts of which
were directed along the line of improving sanitary
conditions and beautifying parks and. lighting the
streets with oil lamps until the first street lamps were
replaced by electric lights. The association raised the
money to secure the electric lights and maintain them
for a number of years. Tn more recent years Mrs.
Parken has devoted her efforts to the building of the
Catholic chapel at Tarpon Springs.
It was in December, i891, that Governor Safford
passed away. Those who knew him intimately bear
testimony to his liberality, unostentatious charity and
practical kin dn ess s'n.4nn ,i h h


-..-%J, Cay ng1


t at e aimed to aid so as


to put the beneficiaries in ways to self-support or in
more advantageous situations for independence.l His
religion was summed up in doing right and in being
useful and helpful among his fellowmen. In his fu-
neral oration the Rev. H. D. L. Webster, of the Uni-
versalist church of Tarpon Springs, said:
"The governor was pure and correct in his morals,
his integrity was beyond question and his benevolence
and charity matters of public notice and admiration.
Those who have known the man best looked upon him
as a large-brained, public-spirited and most valuable
citizen, a natural leader of men, wise in counsel and
true and steadfast in his friendship. We look upon
him as a master of destiny, as a conqueror of great
difficulties, as a man born to succeed. His loss, as to
the affairs of our town and the entire gulf coast, is
almost irreparable."
The Pioneer Society of Arizona in a memorial to
Governor Safford said:
"It is hard to realize that our brother pioneer is
dead. Seldom has a death occurred that so shocked
our people or caused a sympathetic tear to start from
so many eyes.
"Our archives contain a record of his advent into
the territory in I869. He reached Tucson on the
2oth of July and at once entered upon his duties as
governor. He found public affairs in a chaotic con-
dition and practically without laws. There was a
territorial debt of twenty-six thousand dollars and no
funds in the treasury; the Apache Indians were depre-
dating and outlaws were murdering and pillaging along
the boundary line of Mexico. Prompt and decisive
action was demanded and Governor Safford was equal
to the emergency. He went to Washington and se-
cured congressional action legalizing the acts of the
previous legislature and also giving him the authority
to convene the legislature in extra session and con-
ferring extraordinary powers upon him for a limited
time. This arbitrary power was exercised so mildly
and judiciously that but few people in the territory
knew of its existence. Gradually but surely the con-
ditions were changed and complete order and harmony
were restored; the treasury was provided with funds
for all necessary expenses; the public debt was ex-
tinguished and a handsome surplus was on hand when
he retired from office.
"The crowning glory of his services to the people
of Arizona was, however, his successful efforts in the
establishment of the public-school system of which
Arizona is justly proud, and never was his character-
istic energy better manifested than in this self-imposed
task. He found the territory absolutely devoid of
public schools, yet by the most determined personal
efforts he soon established schools in every town and
settlement having sufficient pupils, under a wise and





FLORIDA


provided law he caused


pride of


to be enacted.


his life and he is justly entitled


of the father of t
tory of Arizona,


accord him."
It was only
ernor Safford


the public-school


It was
to the n


system in the terri-


and such honor will history surely


a few days


before


that his sister, Dr.


passed away. She had b
Medical College at Bost
Governor and Mrs. Sa
Tampa Tribune wrote:
"Both were eouallv


views


the death
Mary J.


leen at the head of the


;on,
iffor


of Gov-
Safford,
Women's


but came south to live with


rd.


In this


connection


Georgia, graduating from that institution
1911. On February Ist, of the following!


came to Bascom


and in


one year has gained recog-


nition as an able and successful


labors,


his high professional


sterling characteristics


confidence


in which he


physician,
attainment


has justified the


is held by


nity and the local public.


Dr. Bell married,


Elvira


October


Covington, and they


born August


public-spirited, broad in their


of life and philanthropic


in their


natures.


Dr. Mary J. Safford was one of the best known woman


physicians


in the


county.


a keen knowledge of her
to attract or repel at will,


win all hearts on the


as a sister.


The death


Of high


mental


capacity,


fellow creatures enabled her
and she apparently chose to


west coast,


where she is mourned


of ex-Governor


Safford


Methodist


ch


5,1
urch


to the democratic
with the Masonic


foremost
county.


ranks


[9I.


24,


g year, he
ned recog-


who by his
;s and his


respect


the medical frater-

1909, Miss Hattie


have one son, Elzie


Dr. Bell is


and his political


party.
order.


of the me


He enjoys a large


a member of the
allegiance is given


Fraternally he is connected


His ability places him in
medical profession in Jack


practice,


;son


a progres-


sive citizen and one whose position in the community


is enviable
regarding 1


because


the expression of


him is altogether


opinion


favorable.


lowing so close upon that


of his sister,


was not unex-


pected,


but is none the


less truly


mourned.


Saffbrd has used his best energies to advance


interests


in every practicable way since


ter here and his services


enthusiasm and
recent years hi.


S


Governor
Florida's


his first win-


were characterized by that


zeal that marks the grand citizen.


s leisure,


chiefly devoted to
-Tarpon Springs
lost. in the death


two friends upon whose


monument


during


talents and money have


advancing the west coast generally


in particular-and


this county has


of this talented brother and sister,


graves will


built of their neighbors'


rest the noble


love and


trust


their lives.


HON.


A DISTINGUISHED


While
greatness
it is the


modesty
achieved
modest n


human instincts;


emotions.


W. A. BLOUNT.


CITIZEN


AND LAWYER


OF FLORIDA.


was not essential to the so-called
by Napoleon and Alexander, yet


ian


who most


one might


appeals


to the finer


say, the sacred human


It is this quality, as much as any other,


that appeals to the
deeds by egotists n


work of him


unostentatiously,
respect.


admirers of Robert


E. Lee.


fire the imagination, but


who does great things and


compels


the deepest


Heroic
the life


endures much,


admiration


William


A. Blount


was born in Clarke


county,


WILLIAM


Dr. William


E. Bell


E. BELL, M. D.


, a prominent


physician and surgeon


young physician
in Dale county,
a son of William


natives of
chant dur
parents of
still living,


Alabama,


of that state,


during


Clement


and successful


of Bascom,


December 2,


was born


He is


S. and Maria (O
the former a


his entire


of seventeen
ig, namely:


active


seven


Joseph,


Dale county, Alabama;


of Malone,


of whom


is engaged
Mary, who


Jale county;
Florida; Dr


in farm-
married


Dr. James


on October 25, 1851. His t
It Blount and Julia Elizabeth


both born in Newbern, North Carolina.


a young


man,


saw a chance


and moved t
a plantation.


several


years,


, and a practicing la
for the accumulation


to Alabama to


engage


but finally removed


parents,


Alexander


Washington, were
The father,


lawyer,
on of


in the


thought
property,


operation


to Pensacola,


ida, in 1858, where the father reengaged in thd
tice of law-Pensacola, even at that time,


promise
out of


of becoming
the Civil war


Alabama, where they


ed for
Flor-
prac-
giving


a great city. On the breaking
, the family again removed to
lived for several years, during


review;


Loney,


William; Leona,
Dale county; ani
Dr. William E


, who is associated
who married B.


d Bascom, of the
. Bell acquired hi


same section.
is preliminary edu-


acquired habits of
which have regulated


introspection a
and sustained


Lnd self-reliance
him throughout


cation


Newton


in his native state, and afterwa
College of Eclectic Medical


Surgery


the Georgia
at Atlanta,


were endowed


s



































































































































































7 a





FLORIDA


than ordinary mentality, and both had exalted


of the duties of life. It als
of the fact that Mr. Blount
his profession, that both the


ideas


o should be told, in view


has succeeded


Washingtons


were professional people for generations.


ers on the


father's


mother's side, were lawyers.


so well in


and Blounts
Three broth-


and two brothers on the
One of them, William H.


In 1890,


Mr. Blount was tendered by H. L. Mit-


chell, the governor of the


on the state


supreme


that his practice was
to accept, he declined.
the governor of the


state of Florida,


a position


bench, but because of the


so great as not


In 1889 he w
state, one of a


three lawyers to revise the statutes of


to permit him


as appointed by
commission of
Florida, and he


Washington,


served


as a member


age of twenty-six.


of Congress


at the


was chairman of the


commission.


His part of the


work embraced the second, third and fourth


divisions,


The life


stories


of men


have performed deeds worthy
fellow citizens of the south,


of Mr. Blount's


of consideration by their
are for the most part


cover
work,


the administration of the civil law.


with very few changes,


state, being embodied in the


is still the law of the


same divisions


of the


similar.


of the south


competency,


were plunged,


erty, and their youth


or better, the


young


by the Civil war, into pov-


and early manhood passed


general


statutes


of Florida, adopted in


He was a member of the senate of the


Florida


for four years,


including the


state of


sessions of


heroic struggles for subsistence
a result of this condition, Mr. I


and education.


3lount's early educa-


and 1905. He was president of the Chamber of Com-


merce of


the city


of Pensacola for


four years.


tion was frequently interrupted, but he was determined


was a


member


of the capitol commission


of the


to acquire knowledge, and by


able, in


intense


application


1870, to enter the University of Georgia.


this institution he graduated


in 1872,


first in his


of Florida, appointed by the
the Capitol building. He w;


governor,
as, in 191I,


the committee appointed by the


to reconstruct


a member


circuit court of


with an


A. B. degree,


law class of the


diplon
began
Senate


as LL. B.


and immediately entered the


same university, and received


coming back to


Pensacola,


the practice of law in the office of United


C. W. Jones,


kindly heart, whose keen


States


a man of great intellect and


insight must


have recognized


peals of the fifth judicial circuit of the United


to suggest


to the supreme court of the United


changes in the
cases in equity.
attorney for the


rules


prescribed


For many years


States,
States


by that court for


Mr. Blount


was city


city of Pensacola, and during his term


of office he prepared the


first city code.


This code, in


and appreciated the talents of his


his chose
industry


I


profession,


young


Mr. Blount, by his


and high character, rose


rapidly


friend.


intelligence,


a high


the manner of stating the law, and the arrangement of


subjects, was
been taken as


so concise, clear and practical that it


a


model for


subsequent ones.


position.
In 1885 he had already
the leading minds of the


terms


become recognized as
state, and was selected


one of
ed as a


member of the constitutional convention, which met in
Tallahassee during that year and adopted the state


constitution, which is still in


convention


A. E. Maxwell, f
from Florida, and


force.


from Escambia


His associates in


county, were Judge


ormer Confederate States senator
afterwards successively judge of


E. Yonge, subsequently


provisions


attorney


shown


e state,
general

by the


of this constitution


avoiding


In 1887 Mr. Blount formed a copartnership with


his brother,


Carter,


form


ice. became


composed
Yonge.
sively to c
consists 1
panics, an


A. C. Blount, and in
er circuit judge and s
a member of the firm.


of these thr
Mr. Blount 4
officee practice,


ee gentlemen,


devotes


Igo6 Judge F. B.


supreme


court


The firm
and J. E.


himself almost


and as the business


largely in representing public


id other


corporations,


his time


is a member


is now
Davis
exclu-


of the firm


utinty com-
is more than


supreme


States, anm
- court has


reaching
Blount iF


many


American


court-


cases before


Bar Association,


member


interests


article


writer


to meet


convention.
the highest
interests of


his great


served witl
exception,
is devotion


character,


capacity for v
kindliness and


modesty.


Legislation,"


a member


University of I
invitation of
Georgia, and in


of the


and is also


la State Bar Association,
organization during the
:n the degree of LL. D. b:
He has made an address


mater,


the University


1911 he spoke before the Georgia State


Bar Association, upon the


subject


"Passing


Ig


la


or





FLORIDA


the Stetson University law class, on "Ethical Duties of
Lawyers." In 1911, upon invitation, he delivered an
address before the Alabama State Bar Association,
upon the subject of: "The Past, Present and Future
Status of Employers and Employees." In 1912, upon
invitation, he delivered an address before the State
Bar Association of Illinois, at Chicago, upon the sub-
ject of: "Procedural Reform," and in April of the


present
ciation o
to them
Courts."


year he was
if Louisiana


pon the
He is to


invited by
to address


subject
I deliver


the State Bar Asso-
that body, and spoke
"The People and the
re the American Bar


Association at its meeting in Montreal, in Sep
of this year, an address on "The Struggle for Si
cation 'of Procedure,-The Goal and Its Attain
He has been for years, and is, a member
Florida of the conference of commissioners oi
form State Laws, a body earnestly and ably st
ing uniform laws upon important subject
administration by the several states.
Mr. Blount married Miss Cora Moreno, of
cola, in 1878, and has a family consisting ol
sons and two daughters. The oldest son,
Blount, Jr., is also a lawyer, and is at present
attorney for the first judicial circuit of Floric
In his home and social life, Mr. Blount is a
man,-affectionate, considerate, attentive, u
and devoted. He is charitable to a fault, nev


tember
implifi-
Iment."
from
n Uni-
uggest-
ts for

Pensa-
f three
W. A.
state's
da.
n ideal
nselfish
er fail-


ing to heed an appeal for aid, though in many
instances he must know that his assistance is unappre-
ciated and misplaced. As a citizen, he has always
been among the foremost in contributing to the en-
terprises and public institutions of his adopted city.
Mr. Blount is of middle height, strongly and com-
pactly built, and has a most attractive and engaging
personality.


JOSEPH


Well
father


may Joseph
of Miami, for


ALBERT McDONALD.


Albert
he was


McDonal
not only


called
of the


business men of the city but his activities have, since
the foundation of the community, touched and affected
practically every important phase of municipal expan-
sion. His precedents and his standards have marked
Miami's history; his ideals and enthusiasm influenced
the direction of development and his initiative spirit
and organizing power founded and built up -its great
institutions, and today his enterprise, energy and pro-
gressiveness are guiding elements in its security and


greatness. He
work by which
formed from a


assisted Henry M. Flagler in the magic
the Florida east coast has been trans-
wilderness, with only here and there a


sparse settlement of fishermen or Seminole Indians,
into a modern, populous country, where there are
prosperous towns and cities with the most magnificent
hotels the world affords. He has been one of the most
able of Mr. Flagler's lieutenants and his brains, his
energy and his dynamic personality are responsible
for the successful accomplishment of a great deal of
the work which is now history in the state. It is im-
possible to estimate the vast amount of good he has
done in Miami alone and he is still carrying the work
forward as president of the Board of Trade and of the
J. A. McDonald Lumber Company as well as an able
official on the boards of many of the city's most im-
portant corporate concerns.
Mr. McDonald is a native of Prince Edward Island,
Canada, born in that province in the '5os, and is a
son of James and Ann (McKinnon) McDonald, both
of Scotch ancestry. He acquired his education in the
public schools of his native community and after lay-
ing aside his books at an early age, learned ship car-
pentering, spending seven years thereafter engaged
in that line of work in Canada, and afterward pur-
suing the business for five years in the United States.
He lived in various parts of this country until 1881
when he came to Florida, which state has since been
his home. In the year of his arrival he formed a part-
nership with Mr. McGuire under the firm name of
McGuire & McDonald, in the general contracting busi-
ness. It was in this connection that Mr. McDonald
did his first important development work on the east
coast, for his firm, becoming one of the strongest of
its kind in the state, was retained for service on the
construction of the magnificent hotels, then in course
of erection by the late Henry M. Flagler, multi-mil-
lionaire and public-spirited citizen of Florida. Mc-
Guire & McDonald were engaged to build the famous
Ponce de Leon and Alcazar hotels at St. Augustine
and later were in charge of construction of the hotels
at Ormond, in 1891. Two years later the firm built the
Royal Poinciana in Palm Beach and in 1895 The
Breakers in the same city. This beautiful hostelry
was destroyed by fire in 1905 and in the same year
rebuilt by McGuire & McDonald. The firm erected
the Royal Palm in Miami in 1896 and the Colonial at
Nassau, Bahama islands, in 1899-all of these being
known as the famous chain of east coast hotels, owned
by Mr. Flagler, but operated under the name of the
Florida East Coast Hotel Company.
It may readily be seen that Mr. McDonald's activ-
ities at this period of his career were important and
their effects far-reaching. In addition they afforded
him a rare opportunity of studying business and other
conditions in various parts of Florida and of compar-
ing relative merits. The results of his study became
apparent in 1896, when, at the very foundation of the






FLORIDA


city of Miami he built for himself the large Biscayne
Hotel, an enterprise of great magnitude for so small
a city and a striking'evidence of Mr. McDonald's
faith in the future development of the community.
That he possessed great and unusual business fore-
sight and keen discrimination is amply evidenced to-
day, as the Biscayne Hotel, a solid three-story brick
structure, is still one of the most popular hostelries in
southern Florida.
Mr. McDonald gave a great deal of his time to the
affairs of his hotel, but being a man of varied inter-
ests and comprehensive business ability he also ex-
tended his activities to other fields, becoming
connected with practically all important business inter-
ests of the city and figuring as the founder and pro-
moter of many of the most substantial enterprises.
In 1902 he organized the J. A. McDonald Lumber
Company, and he has since been president of this con-
cern which under his progressive management has had
a successful career, expanding rapidly until it is today
one of the largest industrial enterprises of Miami.
Mr. McDonald was at one time president of Halcyon
Hall Hotel Company, is at present vice president of
the Miami Transfer Company, president of the Ocean
Beach Realty Company and chairman of the board of
directors of the Bay of Biscayne Bank. As president
of the Board of Trade he is doing discriminating, far-
reaching and constructive work in the general inter-
ests of the city, making his initiative spirit, his well
timed aggressiveness and his versatile business ability
factors in advancement and growth. Specific instances
may be mentioned of his timely aid to the city in hours
of need and of his untiring labor in the support of


existing


institutions


as well


as his efficient


In 1870 Mr. McDonald was united in marriage to
Miss Elizabeth Wallace, of Derby, Connecticut, and
they became the parents of three children, of whom
only one is now living, Mrs. John B. Reilly, who re-
sides with her family in Miami.
Mr. McDonald is a member of the Roman Catholic
church and molds his life according to its principles,
taking an active part in the promotion of its doctrmes
in this section of the state. He is identified with the
Knights of Columbus at St. Augustine and belongs to
the Jacksonville lodge of Elks. He took an active part
in the organization and incorporation of the new city
of Miami and for the first three years of the existence
of the community was a member of the city council,
an office which he is again holding at the present'time.
He has indeed had exceptional opportunities for ad-
vancement, but never one advantage which his energy
did not earn and his ability command. A man of wide
sympathies and broad charity he has yet never sought
self-exploitation and when he aids the poor or unfor-
tunate, as he is constantly doing, his left hand never
knows what his right hand does. Only those who come
within the close circle of his friendship know the
full scope of his powers or the extent of his interests
and yet to the people of Miami he stands as the splen-
did representative of the prominent capitalist to whom
business is but one phase of life and does not exclude
his active participation in all the other vital elements
which go to make up the sum of human existence.


ARTHUR E.


DONEGAN.


work


* the organization of new enterprises. In 1907 when the
Fort Dallas National Bank failed and it was feared
that the Bank of Bay Biscayne would be subjected to
a run which might end in disaster, Mr. McDonald,
with other leading business men of Miami, promptly
rallied to the support of the threatened bank and
Mr. McDonald, by accepting the presidency, did much
to restore confidence and to insure its stability. He
also aided the Florida East Coast Ice Company at a


time of similar


when


its affairs


were entangled


with those of the Fort Dallas National Bank, accept-
ing the office of president and effectually relieving it
from all financial embarrassment. Each year of the
seventeen during which he has lived in Miami has
chronicled something to his credit along lines of busi-
ness development and has added something to the
respect and esteem in which he is uniformly held,
finally taking him out of the ranks of the merely indi-
vidually successful to stand among the chosen few,
whose lives and prosperity have been of direct benefit
to their fellowmen.


Kissimmee is fortunate in numbering Arthur E.
Donegan among her citizens, for he has made his
constructive intelligence, his progressive spirit, his
initiative and aggressiveness the foundation of a great
and lasting success, which, touching and influencing
many phases of the political, social and financial devel-
opment, has for the past fifteen years been one of the
powerful factors in the growth of the comnununity.
Mr. Donegan stands as a central figure in financial
circles of this part of Florida for he is president of
three of. the strongest and most conservative banks in
the section, and he is, moreover, connected through
investment or official service with a great many of the
business institutions upon which rest the present se-
curity and future growth of the city in which he re-
sides. As a politician, his record has been varied in
service and faultless in honoi, and his career has been
not only prosperous but useful and beneficial in its
various relations.
Mr. Donegan was born in County Queens, Ireland,
August 4, 1876, and is a son of Peter and Susan (Cox)





FLORIDA


Donegan, natives of the Emerald isle. In that coun-
try the father was a farmer owning his property and
acting also as manager of some English estates. He
came to America in 1886, and settled in Florida, where
he continued his connection with agricultural pursuits.
His son Arthur was ten years of age when the family
removed to the United States, and he completed an
education begun in Ireland in the Kissimmee highly
school. After laying aside his books he became con-


nected with a
intendent and
three years.
himself with
member of a i
nection when
tion. That he
his business ca
tions plainly in


railroad


he did able w
At the end of
mercantile inte
veil known firm
he was elected
has since that


ireer,
idicate


his varie(
and he is


as chief clerk and


super-


ork in this capacity for
that time he identified
rests of the city, as a
I here, severing this con-
supervisor of registra-
time been prosperous in
d and important connec-
well known in financial,


and is connected with a variety of important business
concerns in the city where he makes his home. He
is vice president of The Everglades Land Company,
secretary of the United Land & Investment Company,
president of the South Florida Lumber Company,
president of The Donegan Cattle Company, president
of The Arthur E. Donegan Hardware Company and is
largely interested in the development and exploitation
of Florida lands. He was the first president of the
Kissimmee Board of Trade and has been active in
the affairs of the body since its organization, serving
at present as chairman of the finance committee. All
of his business interests are carefully and conserva-
tively managed for Mr. Donegan is a far-sighted, able
and resourceful man, capable of initiating important
projects and possessed of the intellectual power and
the breadth of view necessary to carry them forward


to successful


completion.


industrial


and commercial


circles


of the city,


and for


many years has been one of the most powerful indi-
vidual forces in the general business development. On
the 2d of April, 1910o, he aided in the organization of
the Citizens' Bank of Kissimmee, which in that year
was capitalized with a stock of thirty-five thousand
dollars and with the following officers: Arthur E.
Donegan, president; H. M. Pfann, vice president;
C. W. Dann, second vice president; and Paul K.
Weaver, cashier. Since that time the bank has en-
joyed a steady and rapid growth, much of the credit
for its expansion being due to the energy and initia-
tive spirit of its president. At the present time the
deposits amount to two hundred and fifty thousand
dollars, the surplus is five thousand and the value of
the bank building and fixtures over twenty thousand.
Four per cent interest is paid on all savings accounts
and safety deposit boxes are rented to patrons. The
bank building is a modern two-story brick structure,
fifty by seventy-five feet in dimensions, and attract-
ively and modernly furnished in every particular. The
present officers are: Arthur E. Donegan, president;
H. M. Pfann, vice president; and Paul K. Weaver,
cashier. The board of directors is as follows: Arthur
E. Donegan, H. M. Pfann, C. W. Dann, F. W. Hill,
and L. H. Cohoon. The bank is the depository for
the funds of the state of Florida, Osceola county and
Kissimmee, and is undoubtedly one of the best man-
aged and most prosperous financial institutions in
this part of the state. Mr. Donegan is also president
of the First National Bank of St. Cloud and of the
State Bank of Haines City, connections which indicate
something of his power and high standing in banking
circles. He is in addition president of The W. B.
Makinson Company of Kissimmee, president of The
Model Hardware Company of Lakeland, treasurer
of The Florida Plantation Company of New York


It is not alone along business lines however, that
Mr. Donegan has done splendid work for Kissimmee.
for in the political field he has been prominent and
active for many years, and has made his name a syno-
nym for progress and advancement. After serving
ably and efficiently as supervisor of registration he was
appointed deputy collector of Osceola county and in
this office discharged his duties in a conscientious and
capable manner. In I907 he was elected to the state
legislature and after serving for two years was ap-
pointed deputy clerk of the circuit court. After a
time he was elected to the office of clerk of the cir-
cuit court and acted in this capacity until 1912 when
he was sent to the Florida senate representing the
nineteenth senatorial district comprising Osceola and
Orange counties. Since assuming his duties he has
been identified with much progressive and reforma-
tory legislation and his influence and vote are always
given to projects of improvement and advancement.
A man of modern views, advanced ideas, high stand-
ards and disinterested public spirit, he has made all
the activities of his life conform to one ideal-that
of making his individual success an element in public
development.


HON.


EMMETT


WILSON.


Hon. Emmett Wilson, who at an early age has won
distinction as a representative of the legal fraternity,
now practicing in Pensacola, is also well known in the
city as United States congressman from the Third Flor-
ida district. He was born in Belize, Central America,
September 17, i882, and is a son of F. C. and Eliza-
beth Virginia (Maxwell) Wilson. The paternal
branch of the family came originally from Virginia,





FLORIDA


where the grandfather, C. L.


planter.
Wilson's
mett and


He was a veteran


of the


maternal grandparents


Sarah


mer a native
of Virginia.


Wilson,


was a large


Mexican.war.


were Augustus Em-


(Brockenborough) Maxwell, the


of Georgia, born
The grandfather


and Alabama and followed the


a lawyer of great ability and power.


in 1818,


and the latter


was reared in Georgia
legal profession, being


He supported


Benevolent


Protective


father and grandfather,
the democratic party and


Order


of Elks. Like his


he gives a stanch support to
is eminently progressive and


public-spirited in matters of citizenship.


He keeps


well informed upon the questions and issues of


day and in
progressive


matters
stand,


relating
manifest


to public


affairs


in his cooperation


many movements for the public


the Confederacy during the Civil


war and


was at


time representative from Florida to the
senate and before the war was a member


Confederate
from Florida


of the


United States


thirty-fourth sessions.
known in public life,


Florida


legislature, as


congress


in the thirty-third and


PARKER ADAIR HENDERSON.


He was for many years well


servmg
attorney


as a member of the


general


and judge of


Parker
manager


Adair


Henderson,


president


and general


of the McCrimmon Lumber Company and by


the circuit and .supreme


courts.


He was a stanch


democrat in his political beliefs and in his


religious


virtue of this
personality a


position


and the


powerful element in the


force of his ability and
general business


views a devout adherent of the


and his


wife were the


parents


Episcopal church.


of three children.


F. C. Wilson, father of the subject


was born in Alabama, May


moved to


Florida,


locating


in


30, 1544
I Chipley,


of this review,
L. and in 1882


where he


now


life of Miami, was born in Hampton, Henry county,
Georgia, January 7, 1875. He is a son of Arthur J.
Henderson, a prominent manufacturer of cotton goods,


who still


maidenhood


resides


in Hampton.


Miss Irene


His wife


was in her


Adair.


resides.


He studied


active practice of


medicine


his profession


and has been in the
n for many years in


Parker Adair Henderson was reared in Hampton,


Georgia,


and acquired his education in the public


Chipley, where he is today


regarded as one of


schools of that community.


Laying


aside his books


leading representatives
is also a veteran of the
the beginning to the ei
in the Confederate ar


democratic party,


of the medical


fr:


* Civil war, having
nd of that conflict


ny.


and his


aternity.
served


as a private


Politically he supports the
religious views are in accord


at the age


of .sixteen,


he began working


a sawmill


and from that time until the present has been continu-
ously identified with the lumber business, which he


thoroughly


understands


in principle and detail.


is not only an excellent business manager and


execu-


with the doctrines of the Episcopal
he married Miss Elizabeth Virginia


church.


In 1865


Maxwell, who was


tive but also


forming


every


a practical workman, capable of per-
r process of the work by which the


born in Florida and who died in Chipley, June 2r,


rough timber is transformed into finished building


Ten children were born to


sons and two daughters,


ranging


their union, eight
in age from forty-


lumber.


For fifteen years he gave his. attention to


lumber interests in Georgia,


first as an employee and


five to twenty-seven years.
Emmett Wilson was reared in Florida,


later as an independent employer and dealer, and in


acquiring


Igo6 came to Miami,


where


he has


since resided.


his prel
Chipley.
Florida


iminary education


in the public schools of


He supplemented this by a


course


in the


State College at Tallahassee and was later a


here organized


becoming


the McCrimmon Lumber Company,


secretary


treasurer,


C. T. McCrimmon, holding the


his brother-in-law,
office of president.


student


in Stetson University at De


institution he received


his degree


Land, from which


in law.


was


Their association continued u
Mr. Henderson purchased his


ntil April,


1912,


when


brother-in-law's inter-


admitted


to the bar and has since practiced


in Pensa-


est and he now practically owns the entire business,


cola, winning


for himself an enviable reputation in


although


in order


to keep the concern incorporated


his chosen profession.


In recognition


of his known


few shares of stock still remain


in the names


of other


ability, his fellow citizens have honored him with


members of


his family.


The name, the McCrimmon


various


important official positions, including those


assistant


United


States


torney and states attorney.


attorney,


attorney
He


United


States at-


is now congressman


Lumber
stands


Company, has


been retained and


in Miami it


for upright and honorable commercial methods


and for the high standards of business


integrity


which


from his district, his
tions being a pleasant
the public service.
Mr. Wilsnn fnlltw


past activity


in responsible


post-


indication of his future work ini


have made Mr. Henderson an honored and respected


business


From


one of
wealth,
mnating


is connected


man.


a financial


point of


the most successful me
won by straightforward,
work during the years,


earnest


and discrim-


one


4





FLO


RIDA


invested, principally in Miami real estate. He has
firm faith in the future of this city and has given
practical and beneficial evidence of it by putting his
money into local enterprises. In 1913 he constructed
on the west side of Avenue D what is doubtless the
most modern wholesale house in Miami. Built of
reinforced concrete, it is one hundred by one hundred
and eighty feet in dimensions and two stories in
height and is to be used by two large wholesale groc-
ery firms.
In 1898 Mr. Henderson was united in marriage to
Miss Julia McCrimmon, of Rochelle, Georgia. and they
have two sons: Parker, Jr., aged ten and Arthur J.,
aged three. Mr. Henderson is a member of the Meth-
odist Episcopal church and fraternally is connected
with the Masonic order, in which he belongs to the
commander and the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine.
He is a member also of the Benevolent Protective Or-
der of Elks and the Hoo Hoos. He is a wide-awake
and energetic business man, modern in his methods
and progressive in his ideas, and his success has been
used to further not only his individual prosperity but
also the best interests of the community. In Miami
his name is a synonym for ability, enterprise and that
public spirit which is evidenced in practical work for
the general welfare and, in consequence, he has won
honor and widespread esteem and the confidence and
respect of a wide circle of friends.


ROBERT NAUDAIN


ELLIS.


Jacksonville is largely indebted to Robert Naudain
Ellis, civil and mechanical engineer, who is the builder
of the waterworks system of the city. High profes-
sional skill, combined with deep interest in his work
and unfaltering devotion to the public good, gave to
Jacksonville a system entirely adequate to the needs of
the city and unsurpassed in excellence and service by
that of any city of equal size.
Mr. Ellis has resided almost continuously in Jackson-
ville since 1872 and for many years has occupied the
position of engineer of the board of bond trustees.
His life record had its beginning in Fredericksburg,
Virginia. on the 6th of January, 1843, his parents being
James E. and Elizabeth (Naudain) Ellis. He comes of
English and Huguenot ancestry. The Ellis family was
founded in America by William and James Ellis,
natives of England, who crossed the Atlantic in the
latter part of the seventeenth century and settled in
North Carolina. The family of William Ellis afterward
removed to Virginia, where his descendants have lived
many generations. In that state Dr. James E. Ellis,


father


of R. N. Ellis, was for many years a prominent


physician and
Fredericksburg.


ranked with
He married


the leading citizens of
Elizabeth Naudain, con-


nected with a well known French Huguenot family
that was established in Delaware in the early days.
Robert N. Ellis' grandfather, Arnold Naudain, was at
one time a member of the United States senate.
During the early boyhood of their son Robert, Dr.
and Mrs. Ellis removed with their family to New York
and he acquired his education in the public schools of
that state and in the academy of Fergusonville.
Attracted to the profession of civil engineer, he began
studying under private instruction, completing his
course in 1858. He made his initial step in the business
world as a draughtsman for the Baldwin Locomotive
Works, of Philadelphia, in 1859, and after serving in
that capacity for about two years secured an appoint-
ment, in 1860, as a member of the engineering corps of
the United States navy. He saw service during the
Civil war under Admirals Farragut and Porter, and was
in most of the important navy battles both on the
Atlantic and Gulf coasts. In January, 1863, he was
captured at Galveston, but was held prisoner for only
a few months before-he was exchanged. He remained
in the naval service until 1867, when he resigned and
became a resident of Florida, turning his attention to
the cultivation of oranges at Orange Mills in November
of that year.
Five years later Mr. Ellis resumed the practice of his
profession in Jacksonville and his work as civil and
mechanical engineer has made him widely known
throughout the state and gained him prominence in his
profession. In 1873 he formed a partnership with
A. E. McClure, which was continued until 1888. Their
attention was devoted to architectural and engineering
projects, their services being in demand on important
contracts in adjacent states as well as Florida. In 1878
Mr. Ellis was engaged by the bond trustees of Jack-
sonville to draw the plans for the waterworks and
sewerage systems and became superintendent of con-
struction on both of those important public improve-
ments, which he successfully and satisfactorily installed.
His previous experience in professional lines and his
comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles
underlying his work enabled him to establish a water-
works system which in every way was adequate to the
needs of the city of Jacksonville at that period and for
a number of years thereafter. He continued as super-
intendent of the works until 189,; and in the meantime
was called to other positions, having in 1886 been made
city engineer-the first salaried official in that position.
On his retirement from public service in 1891 he turned
his attention to the phosphate industry near Bartow,
designing, building and operating the National Peace
River Phosphate plant. He continued in that business


until 1895, in which year he returned


to Jacksonville;




























































1






FLORIDA


lis services being again called into requisition by the
ity, which had known such phenomenal growth as to


require a new and greatly
works. He drew the plans
struction of the plant and
attention to every detail of
that no city in the south has
equal it. Since his return
engineer for the board of 1
extended the sewerage sy
plant for the city and in so
exigencies of the moment
The importance of his woi
for upon the water and


extended system of water-
and superintended the con-
system, giving his personal
construction, with the result
a better system and few can
to Jacksonville he has been
bond trustees. He has also
stem and the electric light
doing has looked beyond the
to the needs of the future.
rk cannot be overestimated,
sewerage systems does the


health of the city in large part depend. He has planned,
built and inaugurated a system thoroughly adequate to
the needs of Jacksonville, not only at the present but
also for some years to come, even though the city should
continue the rapid growth which it has now enjoyed for
some time.
In connection with his profession Mr. Ellis has
studied broadly and deeply and is interested in every
problem bearing upon civil and mechanical engineering.
He is studying, too, the needs of the state, its possibili-
ties and its opportunities and is an earnest advocate of
the improvement of the inland waterways and of the
building of good public roads. The Jacksonville Board
of Trade numbers him among its leading and influential
members, and his efforts in behalf of the public wel-
fare, both within and without that organization, have
been far-reaching and beneficial.
In 1873 occurred the marriage of Mr. Ellis and Miss
Frances McClure, a daughter of the Rev. Edward and
Sarah McClure. Their children were seven in number,
six now living: Robert N., Clarence H., James E.,
Frank H., A. Wright, and Florence M.
The family attend St. John's Protestant Episcopal
church, of which Mr. Ellis is a communicant. He also
holds membership with the Church Club and is a mem-
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His
political support is given the democracy, but the honors
and emoluments of public office have little attraction
for him, as he prefers to concentrate his energies upon
his business affairs, which, capably directed, are bring-
ing to him notable success and well deserved
prominence.


EDWIN


S. HUBBARD.


Edwin S. Hubbard, who has been intimately
connected with the agricultural and horticultural de-
velopment of Putnam county and who has achieved a
national reputation on the subject of citrus fruit, owns


a valuable farm and
Florida, where he is


orange grove at Federal
extensively engaged in


Point,
potato


culture. A native of Middletown, Connecticut, he
was born May 18, 1860, a son of Samuel J. and Frances
D. (Smith) Hubbard, and is a descendant of an old
English family which came from the mother country
to America, settling in Middletown, Connecticut,
about 1636. The parents were also natives of Con-
necticut and the maternal grandmother was a Sears,
that family being prominent and well known in New
England and Long Island, New York, and a branch
of the same trace their ancestry back to Stephen Hop-
kins of Mayflower fame. Samuel J. Hubbard followed
agricultural pursuits all his life and was also engaged
in the lumber business, being prominent in the sec-
tion in which he lived. His brother-in-law, an uncle
of our subject, was one of the early pioneers of Cali-
fornia, to which state he moved in 1849 at the time
of the gold excitement, making his way to the west
via Panama with Chief Justice Field, a man of state-


importance,


was his lifelong


friend.


and Mrs. Samuel J. Hubbard were the parents of four
children: Edwin S., of this review; Clement S., of
Higganum, Connecticut, treasurer of the Cutaway
Harrow Company; Elmer S., also of that city and
president of the same company; and Fannie D.,
the wife of George G. Whitmore, of Middletown,
Connecticut.
Edwin S. Hubbard was reared under the parental
roof and in the acquirement of his education attended
the schools of the neighborhood and high school in
Middletown, Connecticut. Early in life he became
acquainted with the details of agriculture under the
able guidance of his father, remaining on the home
place and assisting in the management of the farm.
He there made his home until he was about twenty
years of age, when he decided upon removal to Flor-
ida, recognizing the opportunities which awaited an
energetic and ambitious young man in that country.
He came to Federal Point in I88o and acquired some
land which he devoted to orange culture. He also
was engaged for some time in merchandising and fol-
lowed general farming. He has now thirty acres
devoted to the cultivation of Irish potatoes and ten
acres planted to oranges, deriving a gratifying income
from these sources of agriculture. As the years have
passed he has greatly improved his land and has insti-
tuted such equipment. and conveniences as are con-
sidered essential to up-to-date farming. He has made
careful study of the raising of citrus fruits and in the
course of years has gained valuable experience along
this line.
On October TI, 1882, Mr. Hubbard married Miss
Louisa A. Hart, a native of Poughkeepsie, New York,
and a daughter of Benjamin H. Hart, one of the





FLORIDA


pioneer settlers of


settled


Federal


in 1867, there making


int, Florida, where
his winter home.


Florida, he was born in Volusia county, January 27,
1857, a son of Samuel and Mary E. (Hunter) Knight,


was a prosperous


agriculturist


horticultural lines in New


York.


an expert


Mr. and


Mrs. Hub-


natives of
reared an


Wayne


d married


county,


Georgia.


in Georgia


but in


parents


were


removed


bard are the
is a vocalist
York part of


parents of two


children:


Edith


of reputation, making her home in New


the time; and


E. Stuart, who is engaged


in business with his uncle, William H. Hart, at Pough-


keepsie, Ne
members of


New York.


Mr. and Mrs.


Episcopal


church,


Hubbard are


taking


an active


to Florida, the father


from what he
as a volunteer


having


had seen of the


in the Indian


pressed with conditions
i855 brought his plans


when our subject was bo


decided upon this


country


when


serving


step,
:ning


war, being favorably im-
as they then existed, and in


to realization.
rn he lived in


At the time
a log fort, to


and helpful interest in that institution and its allied


which


he had retreated


during the last Indian


upris-


organizations.
treasurer of the


Mr. Hubbard at present serves as


town of Federal


Point.


He has re-


ings in 1857 and there was blockaded for fifty-two
days at that time. They underwent many hardships


sided on his farm


for over thirty years


and is widely


and favorably known in Putnam county, where he is


numbered


among


tors in the development


the pioneers who were the


first fac-


and upbuilding of the sec-


All measures and projects undertaken in the


interest of tl
and while he


region


find in him a warm supporter


has attained to individual


has been a serviceable factor in the


prosperity, he


general advance-


and privations


at the


siege,


as they


only eighteen days and had to live


time on water and parched


the party
The father


coming
r passed


Matanzas river in


early days
ful and a


corn,


rations


for the rest of the


four or five


to their death through starvation.


away on the east


St. John


county,


he came here


an existence was easily


game


t coast,
in 1875.


near the
In the


was still plenti-


to be procured.


He has become widely recognized as an author-
citrus fruit, not only in this section, but all over


the state and even in national societies


founded


He is


the Florida


in furtherance


which are


of knowledge on that sub-


a member of the executive committee of


State Horticultural Society,


having be-


come connected with that organization one year after


its establishment.


He has contributed many valuable


papers on the subject of citrus culture


adjudged


to speak authoritatively


and that he is


is evidenced


fact that he was elected as one of the judges i
horticultural department at the Chicago World's


He has se
American


served on several important committees of the


Pomological


connection has
on such fruit


Society and his work in that


been of value in divulging knowledge


as is grown in this


district.


also served on most of the committees of the


Horticultural Society.


Edwin


S. Hubbard


He has
State


Such work as has been done by
is of inestimable value in bringing


to the attention of many the favorable conditions and


opportunities that
in this district an<


await all who


and while


he has


go out to seek them


never desired


recognition along public or political


work of


d agricultural
order.


official


he has along


lines done constructive


followed farming and


his life.
husband's
children:
Samuel; ;


The mother died


death. Ii
Martha ;
and D. W


D. W. Knight


stock-raising


during most


about two years


In their family


., of
came


after her


were the following


;a; Kate; Sarah,
this review.


with his


parents


county when about five or six years
boyhood on the parental farm, rec


tion in the schools


deceased;


to St. John


old and


receiving his


of the neighborhood.


leisure hours he assisted in the minor


the home place and
tails and methods'
local conditions, und


became acquainted
of agriculture most


under the able


He subsequently followed
his own account and early


his farm to orange culture.


five years of


grew


educa-
In his


duties about
with the de-
suitable for


guidance of his


agricultural


father.


pursuits


in life devoted
For the last


his life he engaged in mixed
he cultivated wv


and the thirty acres which


cipally


devoted


to potato


made a number of
farm and acquired


as are


considered


growmg


and corn.


f important improvements


much of
t twenty-
I farming
rere prin-
He had
upon his


I such equipment and machinery
indispensable by the modern and


up-to-date agriculturist.


Mr. Knight


who was


was married


born here


to Miss Dora Pellicer,


were the parents of


widow


of Bert Gelvington, who


passed


and Gertrude;


away,
ira. the


Among the successful
district was the late D. I


agriculturists


r Beck,
married


of the Hastings


acres near Hastings,


Clarence,


residents


Grady


who passed


s of St. John county;
Stevens. also residents


away


state of cultivation.


A native


in 1857,


_


o





FLORIDA


in Hastings,


where


he had


a large circle of


friends


and acquaintances. His religious affiliation was with
the Methodist Episcopal church, in which his widow


still holds membership. I
ods and industriously and


self to his
found his


tasks,
reward


-^ .


.4,


ollowmg progressive
energetically applyin


Mr. Knight attained


in well


meth-
g him-


success


earned prosperity,


he also was a constructive factor


development of this


6, I913,


section.


in the agricultural


He passed away on


deeply mourned by his immediate


tin case and inserted in one of the pillars at Astor


Park, and when the United


in New York


States


postoffice


and these pillars


was built


were removed,


the picture came to light again and the authorities
advertised for one of the family to take possession


thereof.
claimed ai
historical


An uncle of our subject,


nd


secured


Alfred Dunham,


it and it is now preserved


museum in New


grandfather also equipped the


during the War of


in the


Haven, Connecticut.


brig General Armstrong


1812 and sent her out as a privateer


family and a wide
memory as that ol


was always consider
his life qualities th
emulation.


circle


of friends,


who cherish his


a true Christian gentleman, who
rate of others and exemplified in


at


are admirable and


inspire


with letters of mark and reprisal to hamper British


shipping and fight the enemy's war vessels.


This boat


was finally destroyed in the port of Natal, South


Africa.


David


the position


Ross Dunham, the father, in 1824 held


of inspector


general of the state


of New


York at the time when General


Lafayette


visited


the city of


New York,


and took prominent part in the


DAVID L. DUNHAM.


ceremonies of welcoming the hero of the war of
independence.


About


the father came


to Florida among


There


probably


is nobody who stands


higher


in the


esteem and respect of his fellow citizens than David L.
Dunham, who for seventy-three years has been a resi-


dent of St. Augustine,


native town, being
of David Ross and


Florida, which


born here Januar
Mary Magdalene


he calls his


y 18, 184o, a son
(Facio) Dunham.


early settlers from the United States and, locating at
New Smyrna, built what was said to be the most hand-


some home south of the
In 1835 this mansion was
Wildcat Indians, and the


Potomac river at that time.
destroyed in an attack by the
father then came to St. Au-


gustine, where he made his continuous residence


The father, one of the pioneers of the state,
in 183o, only eleven years after the territory


came here
was ceded


he passed away


in 1869 at the age


The mother also died


here when


of seventy-five years.


seventy-eight


years


by the Crown of Spain to the United


States.


In their family were the following


children:


mother


was born near Hibernia,


John river,


and was


Florida, on the St.


a daughter of Francis


Facio, whose father's name was also Francis Philip,


Mary Louisa, deceased; Facio,


served
to the 1


who died in 1874


through the Civil war from its beginning up
battle of Chickamauga, in Company B, Third


the latter


Switzerland.


a native of the canton of Berne in


Francis Philip


the grandfather


Florida
mention


Regiment, being taken prisoner in the


engagement


and confined


afore-


a period of


our subject,


was born in London, England,


people emigrated to


the United


whence


States.


twenty-two months;
B. Taylor, residing


Matilda


W., the widow of James


at St. Augustine; Leonora,


David Ross Dunham, the father,


was born


in New


passed away


in infancy;


David L., of this


review;


York and his father, David Dunham, was a native of


fred, who passed away at the age of three years;


New Je
Fulton,


*rsey.


He built the


and named the


famous


steamship,


Robert


vessel in honor of the man


who first put a steamship on the


water.


first steam vessel that ever sailed out


It was the
any port in


of St. Augustine, who served


Civil war,
Fredericka
Coxetter.


enlisting at
, deceased,


for over a year in the


the age of fourteen; and Eliza
who was the wife of James G.


the world, and in


knocked


1821, upon the


Hudson river, he was


overboard by one of the booms and


in that body of


drowned


water before the boat was entirely


David L.
his home.


Dunham has always made St.


At the


of fourteen


yea


earn his own support and became early


Augustine


rs he began to
connected with


finished.


He was the Vanderbilt of his


an extensive owner


of vessels.


time, being


His son, David


the pioneer railroad work done in the state. He
the first spade of earth thrown up in building the


Dunham, the father of our subject, subsequent to his


railroad in Florida,


near


Townsend


Swamp, which


demise completed the vessel and


sailed


her to


Charles-


was fourteen miles in length and extended


from that


South


Carolina,


where she was
boilers were ot


and afterward


sold to the Brazilian


copper


.to New Orleans,
government. Her


and cost thirty-five


thou-


place to Jacksonville.


rodman


on the


survey


remuneration received


Our subject held


ing gang o
ten dollars


f that


a position
road and


per month and his


present


Before


surveying


day in active service.
drawn by David R<


studies


was enclosed in a account of poor health


and to recuperate engaged


crew


ed





FLORIDA


outside work. On July 13, 186i, he enlisted in Com-
pany H, Second Florida Regiment, and served on the
front until the third day of the battle of Gettysburg,
when he was captured and held as prisoner until Feb-
ruary 22, 1865, on which date he was exchanged. He
was orderly sergeant when he was taken captive and
upon his return was commissioned lieutenant. Vali-
antly and bravely he fought for the cause which he
represented and three times narrowly escaped death.
The first time he was wounded at the battle of Seven
Pines, the second time at Ellison Mills and the third
at the battle of Frasier's Farm in a seven days' fight.
Five balls had penetrated his hat and a piece of the
same was driven into the head and not taken out for
two months. His skull was injured in three different
places by the enemy's bullets. David L. Dunham took
part in fourteen large battles and could have been
excused from active service at Fredericksburg but
would not let his company go without him and on all
occasions during the war showed bravery and courage
in unmistakable manner. After hostilities were con-
cluded he returned to St. Augustine and engaged in
clerical work of various kinds, working for about fif-
teen years in the land department office, during which
time he held the position of clerk for six years, assist-
ant collector for seven years and collector for three
years. Shortly after the war he was also appointed
United States deputy marshal and was subsequently
made deputy circuit court clerk, holding this position
under his brother and two successors, and subsequently
was appointed clerk, discharging his duties with great
ability and circumspection, and in all held courthouse
positions for over thirty years. Whatever office he
held. he never forgot that it was a trust imposed upon
him by the people and never used it for furthering his
private ends. His careful methods and systematic,
painstaking work made him an efficient public ser-
vant and the record he made was an enviable one.
David L. Dunham married, in 1874, Miss Lillie
O'Hern, who was born near Middleburg, Florida, in
1854, a daughter of J. D. and Mary (Brantley)
O'Hern, natives of North Carolina and who both died
in this state. Mr. and Mrs. Dunham were the par-
ents of eight children, of whom four died in infancy,


the others being: Kenneth, who passed away at the
age of twenty-three years; Donald, a farmer of Clay
county, Florida; David R., of whom more extended
mention is made in another part of this work; and
Facio O., engaged in the hotel business at Miami,
Florida.
Mr. Dunham voted the democratic ticket until 19o7,
when he became an adherent of the socialist party,
believing that through the endeavors of this organiza-
tion will be brought about that release from oppres-
sion and political corruption so necessary for the well-


being of the masses. In 1908 lie was the socialist
candidate for the legislature and his personal popular-
ity is manifest through the fact that he was defeated
by only one hundred:and ninety votes. In 1912 he was
the party candidate for the office of state comptroller.
The family home was built by his mother-in-law and
is now known as Dunham House, having been con-
siderably enlarged and is so equipped that during the
season it can accommodate a number of guests. Mrs.
Dunham also owns another "Dunham House" at
Waynesville, North Carolina, which she conducts as
a summer hotel. The life record of David L. Dunham
is so closely interwoven with the history of the making
of this section of the state that the two can be hardly
separated and his efforts in every direction in public
or private life have been such as to solicit commenda-
tion. In public service he has given his best efforts
as unsparingly as if his private affairs were concerned
and his integrity, his patriotism, his loyalty no one
can doubt.


OSCAR


BLISS


SMITH.


A life of intense and well directed activity has
brought Oscar Bliss Smith to the high position which
he occupies in the regard of his fellow citizens, who
entertain for him the warmest esteem. His entire
career has been characterized by fidelity to duty and
his ability has enabled him to rise above the ranks of
the many and stand among the successful few. He
was born in Youngstown, Niagara county, New York,
April 27, 1837, his father being Obed Smith, who was
born in Massachusetts about 1786 and came from a
long line of enterprising, energetic ancestors who were
among the first settlers in Massachusetts. When but
eighteen years of age Obed Smith weighed two hnn-
dred and twenty pounds and could lift six hundred
weight. He married early and removed to western
New York, where most of his children were born and
reared. He was very successful as a civil engineer and
was engaged on the construction of large mills and
public works. In 184o he had a hundred thousand
dollar contract on the Illinois canal and during its
execution made his headquarters at Joliet. He was
the inventor of the "endless chain horse power," which
he used for years. He refused to secure a patent on
it, which another did and made millions from this in-
vention. Mr. Smith served as a captain of riflemen in
1812 and was reputed to be the best marksman in the
state and the strongest man physically. He married
Asenath Goff, who died at Joliet in 1841, while his
death occurred at Alpena, Michigan, when he was
eighty years of age.


__


I














































6t4Az





FLORIDA


Oscar Bliss Smith, accompanying his parents on
their westward removal, pursued his education in the
schools of Chicago and of Beloit, Wisconsin, to a large
extent. He is a high-school graduate and for a time
was a college student and has received much private
instruction of great value. When very young he de-
voted considerable time to farming in Michigan and
Wisconsin and thus early started out in the business


world. He was al
keeping in Chicago
when a young man
Peak, attracted by
of Colorado. He


Iso engaged in clerking and book-
for a number of years and in I860,
of twenty-three, he went to Pike's
the gold discoveries in that section
then returned to join the army at


Chicago, enlisting on the 2d of August, 1861, as a
private in McClellan's Dragoons. He was soon pro-
moted to the rank of corporal, sergeant and acting
lieutenant. While on duty he sustained injuries from
which he has since suffered and was discharged as
incurable in 1862. He then went to Manitowoc, Wis-
consin, but did not feel that his usefulness as a soldier
was over and reenlisted, becoming an aid to the adju-
tant of the Thirty-second Wisconsin Infantry, which
regiment numbered fourteen hundred and seventy-five
men. In that connection Mr. Smith had plenty of
hard work until the regiment's numbers were greatly
reduced by hard fighting. He was promoted from the
ranks to the position of second lieutenant for merito-
rious service and was discharged at the close of the war
as first lieutenant. He participated in the grand review
in Washington, where thousands of victorious Union
troops marched through the streets of that city, and was
mustered out June 12, 1865, after which he was sent
to Milwaukee, where he was paid off and discharged
on the I6th of June.
After the close of the war Mr. Smith purchased the
Manitowoc (Wis.) Tribune, which he published suc-
cessfully for four years. He then sold the paper and
removed to Knoxville, Tennessee, in 1869. There he
engaged in the book, stationery and printing business
for six years and again met with substantial success,
but owing to impaired health he sought a change of
climate and removed to South Orange, New Jersey,
where he published the South Orange Bulletin for seven
years. He was then appointed superintendent of con-
struction on the Narrow Gauge Railroad, the building
of which had just been begun. This was in 1882. The
line was to extend from Jacksonville to St. Augustine,
the principal part of the capital being supplied by
Walter Lyon of St. Augustine and his brother, Amos
Lyon, of New York. They sold out when the road was
in running order to Jerome Green and after his death
the road was purchased by H. M. Flagler, was con-
verted into a standard gauge and today constitutes a
part of the road that is one of the wonders of the
world. In 1884 Mr. Smith purchased lots and began
Vol. II-2


building houses in St. Augustine and during most of
the time through the intervening period to the present
he has been actively engaged in business. After Walter
Lyon went to California and there passed away Octo-
ber 5, i885, Mr. Smith began the construction of the
Lyon building, which he completed a year later. He
was at the head of a large wholesale business for some
years, at the end of which time he sold and published
the Daily News but at length disposed of that paper
to the Evening Record. He has since been manager
of the Lyon building, owned by a corporation, of which
he has been the president since I890.
Mr. Smith has not only figured prominently in
journalistic and business circles but has also been recog-
nized as one of the political leaders of the state. He
has always been a stalwart republican and for fifteen
years was engaged in the publication of republican
papers. At the present time there is no republican
organization and Mr. Smith, like other fair-minded
and progressive citizens, supports the candidates whom
he thinks best qualified for office. He has not been
very active as an office holder but his opinions have
carried weight in party councils. In I888, however,
he was elected senator in Florida and served in the


'upper house for four years. He has also been presi-
dent of boards of trade in several cities and at all times
has attempted to further public progress and improve-
ment. For some years he was secretary and treasurer
of the Flagler Hospital in St. Augustine.
Mr. Smith was married at Manitowoc, Wisconsin,
December 15, 1863, to Miss Huldah Ellen Lyon, a
daughter of Walter Lyon, whose family numbered
nine children, four of whom are yet living. Her par-
ents were both natives of Vermont and could trace
their lineage back to ancestors who came to America
on the Mayflower and further back to crowned heads
of England. Amos Maynard Lyon, a well known
capitalist of New York, now more than ninety years
of age, is her father's brother. Mr. and Mrs. Smith
hold membership in the Presbyterian church and for
nearly thirty years he has been an elder in the Memorial
Presbyterian church of St. Augustine and an earnest
worker in the Sunday school when his health has per-
mitted. His influence has always been on the side of
right, progress, truth and reform and his labors have
been an element for public benefit for many years. His
efforts in journalistic circles made him widely known
and aside from regular newspaper work he wrote many
poems, which he preserved and published in book form
of two hundred and twenty-two pages on the Ist of
July 1910o, under the title, "Poems for the Home."
The edition was simply for distribution among his
friends and not for sale. Suffering from physical dis-
ability since the war, Mr. Smith has found his writing
a source of great interest to him when he could not


b





FLORIDA


very well be otherwise


has been


one of broad


engaged.
usefulness


His life, however,
and worth and St.


Till engines


of death thundered harmlessly there,


Stands


the fortress


Augustine numbers him among her prominent and rep-


Fort Marion.


resentative


residents.


This sketch would be incomplete if


ure to add an example


O, weird are the tales


there were


of Mr. Smith's poetic talent


the "Old


.Sergeant" can


Uncanny the dungeons he exhibits so well;
And the sentinel owl at night on the wall


and we therefore append two of his interesting poetical
productions.


Utters


ear-rending


And a spirit,


shrieks, bravest


hearts to appall;


'tis said, doth inhabit the place


Where-methinks it is truly the Spirit of


THE OLD


Stands


FORTRESS.


the fortress


Peace-


Fort Marion.


All silent and


grim frowning


Where the billows the


Where


down


o'er the


memories of centuries


the palm ever gracefully bends to th


With the music of ages


singing


mid its


deep,
s keep;
e breeze
leaves;


While the roar of old ocean, as it falls on the shore,


Seems


to waken


Stands


the echo, "nevermore! nevermore !"
the fortress Fort Marion.


Here


a strange


With an odor


Little chapel where I
of incense pervading


Here, voice of the mission


)ious souls
it yet;


priest uttered his


prayer


And the choir sang Laus Deo in the close stifled air;


Here, where hearts grown aweary


Went


gently to


Stands


on life's thorny


rest till the great judgment day,


the fortress


Fort Marion.


Where


the Spaniards


first gazed


on this thrice


blessed


land:


List the voiced


and fears,


groanmgs


cheers


Where


warnor


and priest with


Step't ashore neath the palm


a stout-hearted band


trees,


with hearts


tuned


praise,


That reverberate still thro' the long fateful years,


As the sea breezes


sweep o'er the battlements tall


And the waves' rhythmic beat on the outermost wall


And the


blessing


of heaven


sought, for all


coming


Where the first of a people so mighty to be
Here called the land "Florida" on low bended knee,


Tell that Life, thro' all ages,


Or ever this


Sta


is laden


with care :-


thought is overwhelming, 'tis w
inds the fortress Fort Marion.


here


Stands


the fortress


Fort Marion.


Where the palm
And shimmering


tree is waving to-night in the& breeze
moonbeams illume summer seas;


Came


hither


strong


Brave men full of ho


Came


men from afar o'er the tide,
)pe with fair ones at their side


hither for homes by the deep sounding sea,


struggle with dangers and learn to be free.
the battles they fought, 0, the trials and care


Where the city is sleeping all peaceful around
And the spell of tranquility pervading profound,
Bids Memory range on the wings of the night,
With rust-eaten cannon and the old moat in sight,


Stands


the fortress


Fort Marion.


In those


years


far away!


For their monument-there


Stands


the fortress


Fort Marion.


Where


summer winds


And the sunshine doth


Where the red


men's


war-cry was


heard with


affright,


And the


scream


of the panther added gloom to the


Where the hiss of the serpent in thickets near by
Told only too surely that one smitten must die;


Where


peace


cont4


sway
And brotherly love


Let it truly


be .said,


Where they learn
Stands


blow and bright


flowers


bloom,


ever dispel winter's gloom;
entment aye hold their blest


is the rule of the day;


as the age


War no mor
the fortress


s go by,
re, and all enmities die,
Fort Marion.


Where


the settler scant substance obtained


And often one's life blood discolored the soil,


Stands


the fortress


for his toil


THE ROMANCE OF


Fort Marion.


MIGHTY


ACHIEVEMENT.


Where the


years


multiplied and in


each changing


stage-
Camp, settlement, village and city-the


In the passing of the
The varying vicissiti


Yet romance of the


centuries


ides


fair Florida has known


that have to wonder


ancient days


grown.


is told in.weird tales,


Saw constant
Awaited the


progression, while ever


strongest,


where'er


And a pleasing legend handed down through centuries
prevails.


he dared


And battlements grew, builded strong and with


care,


Brave Ponce de Leon was a


knight of eminent degree,


* I -
t
I





FLORIDA


Who dared the dangers


of the deep


He led the way to this great


and the evils


none


hero bold and true,


He gazed far out
had sailed,


He slept


above


upon the bay where the first his ships

he very spot where the warrior had


And ours the
may view.


right to hold the light that all the world


assailed


The Indian


braves


and drove them


back again and


Courage


to use the strength


one hath, the will


to do


and dare-


These be


the qualities


that win,


here, there and


every-


where.


again,
Where poisoned
and pain.
The ocean surf


arrows


on the


filled the sky singing of


outer


forth the


death


same


Love adds
a spring
That to his


fine fuel to the flame,


and the


lover sought


sweet tone


It sang


aging limbs the


strength, the


joys of youth


might bring.


of yore-even


now it sang


gone.
Enraptured with the lovely


scene


as it had


and with the balmy


He found


a land, if


not the


spring,


where men their


years prolong,
Where gladness dwells


in the hearts of all and the joys


He said: "I'll build a refuge and a thousand here shall
share


of life
Sacred tl


Cherished


belong.
he spot where


This beauty in a lovely home


he first stood,


memory


first ruler


and that


acquire;
Where the


of his brave


climate is so genial


and health and


as to fill the


strength


heart's


desire.


This home shall bear the


True manliness,


the richest


gift that


ever blessed our


hero's name,


a monument for


race,
Wds his in rare abundance, and to this the


Of love to Go'
to be
The Finder of


Then,
free,
May a


here's


d and his


fellowmen, and he


added grace
rave his all


fair Florida, a beauteous flowery lea.


to Ponce


who tread this


Four centuries!


de Leon,


sunn


How much


the noble,


brave


y soil be proud to emulate

of life in these four hun-


So men shall


pass by."
The home was
blest retreat


From the cold and


bless old Ponce


built and millions


de Leon forever as


since have found


storms of wintry clime


mid lux-


uries complete.
Then next, the builder turned to make a highway
and grand,


That men might reach


more easily the blessed


great


Florida


dred years!


generations come and go with cares and hopes


and fears,
But Florida remains the same as when the


And blest the soil


and gave it


fame, a


swee


Hero came
t, romantic


name.


centuries hence!


great deeds,
Accomplish work the
the seeds.


We have


been shown


Forgotten


world


then unless


requires,


what man can do, let


we do


sow


us consider


And the years flew by while


wisely th
As often o
unselfish


the builder built


more


tan he knew-


Occurs


when


He extended his
thousands own


The Builder


quite equals


the good we seek is

he built more homes


the Finder


many


in the heroism


shown.


One found a home for the love


he had


a darling


over the


The other


built for the lasting


of millions


The mighty


work


that men have done and to our


to be.


children tell


of five hundred


complete,
A tale that makes
ing- feat.


the world


miles of changes


wrought


awake-a wondrous,


can not all be great


but each


may surely


And do the good that comes to hand as the years go
fleeting by.


This latest


was convinced


that here


was lasting


he second
soil;--


came this


he trod the


sacred


He went to work and gave his best, as every true man
should.



Where.


Ponce


de Leon led his braves, this


one began


his toil.


And his achievement stands today unequalled
earth:


o'er the


band.


thee!


Their





FLORIDA


Romantic? Yes,
worth!
'Tis not for self
done-
He seeks reward
itself is won.


,and better still, it has true, lasting


he still toils on

where greatness


life is nearly


comes


when


heaven


COURTLAND BUCKMAN.


Real-estate activity


stands


indisputably


as one of


the strong sources of a city's growth, improvement
and adornment and the men who are active in that
field of labor have much to do with public progress,
controlling and directing the character of the work
accomplished for the city's benefit. Prominent in this
connection is Courtland Buckman, who for almost
eighteen years has handled Jacksonville property, ne-
gotiating many important realty transfers and winning
a large clientele. He was born December 8, 1862, in
Madison, Florida, where his mother had taken refuge
during the Civil war. The father, Thomas E. Buck-
man, removed with the family to Jacksonville, in which
city his children, of whom Courtland Buckman was
the third son, were reared and educated. After at-
tending the public schools Courtland Buckman, at the
age of twenty-one became deputy to his father, who
was then filling the position of county clerk of Duval
county, and upon the establishment of the criminal
court of that county in 1885 he was appointed by the
governor as the first clerk of that court, in which
capacity he continued until October, 1887. He then
resigned and became connected with, the mercantile
business in Daytona, Florida, where he not only won a
prominent position in business circles but after six
months' residence there became an acknowledged
power in political affairs through his election as mayor
of the town, serving for one term.
In June, 1894, Mr. Buckman returned to Jackson-
ville and for a year thereafter was connected with the
Singer Manufacturing Company, at the end of which
time he turned his attention to the real-estate busi-
ness, in which he has since engaged, ranking now as
one of the leading real-estate men of the city. He is
thoroughly conversant with property values, antici-
pating a possible rise or diminution in price, and so
conducts his interests that buyers and sellers are alike
satisfied while there is accorded to him the legitimate
and well earned profits of his labor. In February,
1908, Mr. Buckman completed, on the southwest cor-
ner of Forsyth and Hogan streets, Jacksonville, what
is known as the Buckman building, the first strictly
fireproof building ever constructed in Jacksonville.
It is built of steel and concrete, is five stories in height,


is one of the most substantial of Jacksonville's new
improvements, and located as it is, in the heart of the
business center, diagonally across the street from the
Federal building, or postoffice, it is one of the most
desirable business and office buildings in the city and
is a monument to Mr. Buckman's foresight and busi-
ness acumen. Mr. Buckman is one of the directors of
the Florida National Bank.
Mr. Buckman married Miss Mamie A. Berne, of
Cincinnati, Ohio. They are well known socially and
are communicants of St. John's Episcopal church.
Mr. Buckman is a member of the Board of Trade,
the Seminole Club, the Country Club and the Florida
Yacht Club, serving two years as its commodore, and
his attractive social qualities render him popular wher-
ever he is known.



DAVID R. DUNHAM.

David R. Dunham, who since 191o has been actively
engaged in the practice of law in St. Augustine, has
in that short time built up a general practice of envi-
able proportions which connects him with important
litigation before the courts of the state. He is a na-
tive of St. Augustine and a member of an old and dis-
tinguished family which settled here in 1830o. Born
December 29, 1886, he is a son of David L. and Lillie
(O'Hern) Dunham, of whom separate mention is
made. He has two brothers living, Donald and
Facio O.
David R. Dunham was reared under the parental
roof and grew to boyhood in this city, where he
graduated from the high school and" subsequently ma-
triculated in the University of the South at Sewanee,
Tennessee, from which he graduated in 1907 with the
degree of B. A. Subsequently he studied law for one
year at the University of South Carolina and devoted
another year to the same studies at Washington and
Lee University, from which he graduated in the year
19o09, being thereupon admitted to the Florida bar.
He at first located in Jacksonville, where he practiced
for a year but subsequently returned to his native city,
where he opened an office in 19gIo, succeeding to the
practice of the late Albert H. Mickler. His success is
the best evidence of his capability and in the short time
since he has located here he has secured an extensive
practice. He shows natural discrimination and his
pleas are characterized by terse logic, lucid presenta-
tion and a thorough understanding of the questions
involved. His political affiliation is with the demo-
cratic party and he has thoroughly acquainted himself
with the principles of the organization and takes an
important part in its local councils. He is an enthusi-





FLORIDA


astic young man, aggressive'
present attainments are any
store for him, a remarkably
his.


and energetic, and if
indication of what is
successful career will


JOHN SEWELL.


The city of Miami in behalf of its business and pub-
lic interests owes a great and lasting debt to John
Sewell, who since pioneer times has actively identified
himself with its growth and progress, leaving the im-
press of his work and personality upon community
history. He has developed here a large and well man-
aged mercantile enterprise, conducted under the firm
name of John Sewell &. Brother, while he has also
taken a conspicuous part in politics and in the pro-
motion of all movements of a constructive character.
He was born in Elbert county, Georgia, July 20, 1867,
and is a son of Dr. Jeremiah W. Sewell, a practicing
physician and surgeon, who brought his family from
Georgia to Florida and settled in Kissimmee.
John Sewell was reared in Elbert county and was
nineteen years of age when he moved with his parents
to Florida. He began his active career in connection
with the Florida East Coast Railway as foreman and
superintendent during the construction of the line from
Jacksonville to Miami, in the employ of J. S. Oliver,
who had a contract for the building of the road. About
1891 he left the employ of Mr. Oliver and, taking a
responsible position with the Florida East Coast Rail-
way, superintended the construction of about seventy
miles of track from Daytona to Rockledge. He was
later transferred to the.hotel construction department
under the contracting firm of McGuire & McDonald,
the builders of all the Florida East Coast hotels, and
as foreman under them he helped to construct The
Royal Poinciana and The Breakers at Palm Beach,
where he had charge of grading the extensive grounds
on the Poinciana reservation. Here he remained for
several years and when the Royal Palm Hotel was
begun in Miami was again transferred, coming to this
city in charge of the excavation work. By March, 1896,
he had begun excavating where the Royal Palm was
to be erected and when this was completed was placed
in charge of the grading gang, cutting out the right
of way and grading streets and laying paving. Mr.
Sewell in the interests of McGuire & McDonald
cleared, opened up and paved a number of the princi-
pal streets on the original townsite, the work being
done with Dade county crushed rock. It was he who
originated the idea of using this local product in
crushed form for pavements and building purposes and
in this way accomplished an important work in inaug-


rating a new home industry.


Altogether Mr.


Sewell


was in the employ
interests for seven


of the
years,


Florida East Coast
from 1892 to 1899.


Railway
In the


meantime he had established his residence in Miami
and opened up a business enterprise in the city. In
association with his brother, Everest George Sewell,
he opened a shoe store, which was the second business
enterprise founded in the new community. Mr. Sewell
left his brother in charge of the concern as manager,
to continue as such as long as he himself was engaged
in the hotel construction work. However, in 1899
he resigned his position with the Florida East Coast
Hotel Company in order to concentrate all of his at-
tention upon his other business affairs. The establish-
ment, founded with a capital of one thousand, five
hundred dollars, was conducted as a shoe store only
for. some time, a line of clothing and men's furnish-
ings beingafterward added. Under the name of John
Sewell & Brother the business has made a continued
growth during the years and the firm has met with
gratifying success, each year increasing their stock
until they now own one of the largest mercantile enter-
prises in southern Florida. During the fifteen years
that John Sewell & Brother have been in business their
sales have amounted to more that a million dollars.
Mr. Sewell has proved himself a capable, energetic
and discriminating business man and the substantial
and steady growth of the concern is in a large meas-
ure due to him. Possessed of an aggressive and dar-
ing spirit, he has, moreover, the power of carrying
forward his plans to successful completion and as a
result has worked his way upward, winning a degree
of prosperity which influences in an important way
general commercial expansion.
Mr. Sewell married, June i6, 1897, Miss Jessie
Byrd Keller, of Daytona, a native of Alabama. Three
children were born to their union: Jaqueline, who
died at the age of four; John Jackson, aged eleven;
and Crozier Keller, aged-ten. It is not alone as a busi-
ness man, however, that Mr. Sewell has done splendid
work for Miami, for since the early days of the city's
foundation he has taken a conspicuous part in pub-
lic affairs, proving his loyalty and good citizenship by
constructive public service. From 1901 to 1907 he
served as county commissioner and during the time
was largely instrumental in bringing about many
needed improvements, including the securing of good
roads for Dade county. To the duties of the office
of county commissioner he added in 1903 those of
mayor and for four years served in that capacity, giv-
ing to the people of the city the services of a capable
executive, a far-sighted and able business man and
a discriminating politician. Beyond all question his
life has been successful, for its activities have touched
and affected only those business affairs which are im-
portant and constructive in character and those politi-





FLORIDA


cal and public interests


which


are entirely honorable


There he conducted business for two years, when with


and worthy.


Miami


He is, therefore, a valued


in the ranks


of her


progressive


addition


citizens.


a capital
Greenfield
in April,


one hundred


venture-he


dollars-his


started for


profits in the


Leesburg,


Indiana,


At that point he opened a harness


WILLIAM B.

The life record which an


shop, which he carried on
and turned his attention


BARNETT.


American


which he continued


citizen holds


highest esteem and honor is that of a man who, in spite


of obstacles and difficulties,


can prove


character and ability and win for


of prominence in
only in attaining
moting public pi
William B. Barne


which


his worth of


himself a position


his activities are


of value


individual success, but also in pro-


prosperity.


Such was the record of


*tt, formerly president


of Jacksonville,


tional Bank,
thrown upon


which is


at the age


his own resources


of the National


now the Barnett Na-


of fourteen


years


and steadily


was


worked


to Kansas,


cantile


where


enterprise u


until 1854, when he


sold out


to general merchandising,


for four


years.


he successfully c
ntil I870, having


purchased and laid out the


He next removed


:onducte
in the


town of Hiawatha


where he conducted business as
until he made his entrance into


January, 187(
ganized the f
watha under


Company
Morrill,
Kansas


y


business


the firm name


, one of the partners
who subsequently se


;a a mer-
meantime
t, Kansas,


a general merchant
banking circles. In


;s associates
of Kansas
Barnett, M<


E. N.


;rved


as governor


and congressman from that state.


his way upward, advancing step


by step


until his even-


later president


is now conducted


paced
lations
figure


energy
i. He


carried him into prominent business re-


was recognized in


in financial


circles


his day as a leading
unhout the state of


name


a few years Mr.


After


Barnett


withdrew


from that institu-


Mr. Barnett was born September


place being
Virginia. H4


.Nicholas


county,


sonville, Florida.
further operations


2, 1824,


Virginia,


e was a son of William


Barnett,


private
name c


in the banking line, he opened
e Ist of May, 1877, under the fil
of Jacksonville, continued busing


county,


Pennsylvania,


under this name as a private Bank until April


became a prominent stone and


the bridges


Gauley


rivers


structures


war.


brick contractor, build-


for the government over New and


in Virginia, which remained


from 1823-4
Mr. Barnett


substantial


destroyed during the
soldier in the War of


when it received


National
president,
October 2
Charter c


Charter


Bank of Jacksonville, with
which position he retained
!x, I903. At the expiration
on April 15, 90o8, the old


and became


Mr. Barnett as


* National
went into


1812. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Jane


Murray, was


also a


native


Pennsylvania, and a daughter


emigrated
to the Re


from Scotland


evolutionary


of James Murray, who


States


war and served


prior


as a captain in


the Barnett


ness, taking over a majority
tional Bank of Tacksonville.


rational
of the


tew Bank was started in
Mr. W. B. Barnett. T


Bank began
assets of the


ie name was changed
honor of the original
he bank is capitalized


the Colonial army.


In 1825


William


Barnett,


at seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars and has re-


removed with


his family


and it was there that his son and namesake was reared,


sources
one of


the safest


and most conservative institutions


acquiring
schools.


a good, practical education in the public


The father turned


his attention to the live-


south of the Mason
owns its own bank


and Dixon


Line.


The institution


an imposing and attrac-


stock business


industry


tive structure with a colonade front


of the Colonial


close attention accumulated a comfortable fortune,


lost most of


indorsing


n


packer, who was at about that time,
Mississippi.


Barnett


college.
plans a


The father's


nd necessitated


otes for
drowned


a large
in the


was at that time preparing
losses forced him to change


entrance into


the business


style. It is thoroughly eq
and is a fireproof building.
been a most commendable


tempered
depositors


quipped, has splendid vat
The policy maintained 1
Ie one. Progressiveness


'y a safe conservation
is carefully guarded.


ilts


interest


joyed a continuous period of prosperity and the results
achieved prove the value of the business methods


was but fourteen years


a four years'
and saddlery


saved a small


sum of


apprenticeship at


trade
money


and equipping a little harness


and during


the harness-
that period


Susea in opening
Greenfield, Ohio.


employed.
On the 9th of November,
Mr. Barnett was united in


for more


life's journey


I849, at Leesburg,
marriage to Miss
half century they


Sarah


traveled


were separated in


Bank


^


]






















































V .


A. r





FLORIDA


the death of the wife on the 8th of April, 190go. The
children of this marriage are the sons, W. D. and B. H.
Barnett, who are now majority stockholders in the
Barnett National Bank. Mr. Barnett gave his political
allegiance to the Republican party and while in Kansas
represented his district in the state senate, in which
he made a most creditable record. For nearly two-
thirds of a century he was identified with the Masonic
fraternity, being initiated into the lodge at Goshen, In-
diana, in 1846. He was a member of the Royal Arch
chapter and the Mystic Shrine. His was a notable
record of a successful and honorable achievement.
For many years prior to his death he lived practically
retired, his sons relieving him of the active business
management of the bank. He died October 21, 1903,
in his eightieth year. One of his achievements in
Jacksonville was the building of the old Masonic
Temple. In recognition of his services to Masonry,
Jacksonville Lodge 187, A. F. & A. M., has been named
the W. B. Barnett Lodge.


CHARLES A.


CARSON.


Charles A. Carson stands as a central figure in the
business, political and educational life of Kissimmee
and Osceola county, his activities touching and influ-
encing the general advancement and development
along these lines. He is known as a capable organizer
and promoter, his enterprise and executive ability hav-
ing been factors in the foundation of many of the most
important industrial, commercial and financial con-
cerns in the city and his business discrimination and
foresight elements in their continued growth. His
name is a synonym for progress and for that public
spirit which makes individual prosperity a valuable
public asset. He was born in Reynolds, Georgia, and
after completing a public-school education entered
Mercer University in Macon, from which he was
graduated. He afterward engaged in teaching in
Reynolds and Butler, Georgia, and he followed that
occupation until 1883, when he came to Florida. He
settled immediately in Kissimmee and at once identi-
fied himself with business life by organizing the Waters
& Carson Grocery Company, Incorporated, with which
he is still connected. He organized the State Bank
of Kissimmee in 190go and has been its president since
that time, the remarkable growth of the institution
being largely due to him. The officers at the time of
organization were as follows: President, C. A. Car-
son; vice president, J. M. Lee; and cashier, N. B.
Carson. This is one of the most solid and safe finan-
cial institutions in this section of the state. It was
organized with a capital of fifteen thousand dollars,


which has since been increased to fifty thousand, the
present surplus being thirty-two thousand, five hun-
dred dollars. The amount on deposit is two hundred
and fifty thousand dollars and four per cent interest
is paid on all savings accounts. The bank occupies
a fine modern two story brick building, seventy-five
by seventy feet in dimensions-a valuable addition to
the business section of the city. The present officers
are: C. A. Carson, president; John M. Lee, vice presi-
dent; M. Katz, second vice president; and N. B. Car-
son, cashier. The board of directors is as follows:
C. A. Carson, John M. Lee, N. B. Carson, N. C. Bryan,
M. Katz, HI Fleming and E. L. Lesley. In addition to
the enterprises above mentioned Mr. Carson is known
in Kissimmee as the founder of the Kissimmee Lum-
ber Company, of which he is president, and as
president of the Osceola Hardware Company, and the
Kissimmee Phone Company. He was in addition one
of the incorporators of the American National Bank of
Tampa and one of the organizers of the Florida Na-
tional Bank of Jacksonville--connections proving con-
clusively the scope and importance of his business
identifications.
Beneficial and far-reaching as has been his work
along business lines, however, it forms only one of his
varied interests, for he is not only a powerful force
in county and state politics but he is one of the leaders
in the promotion of the cause of education in Florida.
He has devoted much time and active labor to school
affairs and during the three years of his service as
county superintendent of schools accomplished con-
structive and progressive work, having graded the pub-
lic schools before the state law was passed requiring it.
While in the senate he aided in the passing of the state
high-school law and served as a member of the com-
mittee on education for six years. He was for a simi-
lar period of time trustee of the University of Florida
and is now in the sixth year of his service as president
of the board of trustees of Columbia College in Lake
City. He has had a long and distinguished public
career. He was treasurer of Osceola county for three
years immediately following the formation of the
county, serving from 1887 to I89g. From 1893 to
1900 he was president of the Kissimmee city council
and in 1896 was elected to the state senate. He repre-
sented the nineteenth senatorial district, comprising
Orange and Osceola counties, and during the eight
years of his able service was the instigator of much
progressive legislation, aiding in the passage of the
railroad commission bill, the first primary election law
and the state high-school law.
Mr. Carson married Miss Anna Bryan, a daughter
of John M. and Louisa M. (Norton) Bryan, of Kis-
simmee, the former state senator and railroad commis-
sioner. Mrs. Carson's mother is a daughter of





FLO


RIDA


Captain Nathan Norton, of
Mrs. Carson has two brothers,


the Confederate army.
William James and Na-


than P., both of whom have served in the United States


senate, the latter being a member of the


present con-


His religious
although his


faith is


that of the Baptist church, and


professional duties


are making


demand upon his energies, he always finds time for
work in behalf of the church and for the civic welfare,


gress.


five child
Elizabeth


Mr. and


en:


Mrs. Carson


became the parents


James M., an attorney in Jacksonville;


B., who lives at home; Charles A., Jr., a stu-


earnestly
ter of civ


supporting all
ic virtue and


I movements
civic pride.


which


are a mat-


dent at Colorado College,


Colorado ;


Anne


who is


attending


the same


institution; and Inez, who is a


student in Columbia College, Lake City.


is a member of


Mr. Carson


the Baptist church and has


deacon in it for the past twenty-seven years.


is scarcely a


been a
There


phase of legitimate activity in this sec-


tion of the state which his wise and well directed labor


has not affected in a vital way and the city


ness policies,


in its busi-


its educational institutions, its standards


and ideals has profited
work and personality.


greatly by the influence of his
Kissimmee is proud to number


him among her citizens and he in turn is proud


achievements of the city with which


interests


for almost thirty


of the


he has allied


years.


FRANK


Frank


L. Mayes,


Pensacola Journal, has been a factor in the upb


L. MAYES.


and principal


and development
the columns of h
ures and through
for the general g


Illinois,


December


of the city through his
is paper of- progressive


of the
building


advocacy in
public meas-


cooperation in many movements


od. He
x6, 1873,


and Jennie (Johnston)


who moved from Illinois
Dakota.


was born near


Rockford,


and is a son of James


Mayes,


the former a farmer,


to Iowa and thence


to South


The eldest


JAMES


Mayes
mother
Dakota.


BOOTH.


of a family


was obliged at the
with the operation
He attended the


winter months


James
enjoying


Booth,
also a


city attorney of


large and


was born in Goshen,


growing


New Hampshir


1884, a son of Charles A. and Celestia S.


who are also residents of St.


was afforded liberal


tended
pleted


the University


St. Petersburg,


private practice,
e. December 24.


(Carr


Petersburg.


educational advantages.


r) Booth,
The son
He at-


of Maine, in which he com-


his law course with the class of 1910,


same year


came to


upon the general


continues.
conveyances


St. Petersburg, where he
practice of law, in which


He has also made a si
and corporation law,


specialty c
and his


those branches make constant demand


his ability


an envia
Florida


in that connection


reputation.


and the
entered
he still


)f titles and
practice in


upon his time,


has gain


He is now attorn


Bank & Trust Company, and in


ed for him
ey for the
1911 was


elected city attorney, to which position he was again


chosen in 1912.
new charter f


government.


In his


official capacity


for the St. Petersburg


While the


he drew up the
admission form


practice of law he regards


as his real life work and to it gives


his time and


Home


attention,


the major


he is also a stockholder


Security Company and the


and in this


of five


children,


. of thirteen
the homestead


district


schools


way acquired hi


Fran


to help his
d in South
during the
s prelimin-



ary education, supplementing this afterward by a
years' course in Dakota University at Mitchell.


earned his


own education,


unaided by any


three
He
Sout-


side help in paying his expenses through the university.
For two years after leaving school he taught school,
but in I896 became a reporter on the Pensacola Times,


thus beginning


business,


his identification


in which he


influential a place
cola he returned


with the newspaper


since won so powerful and
eighteen months in Pensa-


to South Dakota


and there became


part owner of the Mitchell Gazette, with which he was
connected until 1899, when he again came to Florida,


settling
A short
est in tl


in Pensacola, where
time afterward he be


he Pensacola


the Journal I


paper one of


Journal


he has since remained.


aught a controlling


and is now


publishingg Company.


ublisht ing Company
the best in Florida


size of the city and


the trade t


finest in the United States.


leverage


he has to a


inter-


president


He has made


and, considering the
territory, one of the


With this


extent been


power as a


responsible


the turn in public sentiment which has made


in the


Florida Bank


Trust Company, which he represents in a legal capacity.


Mr. Booth has


of the Florida


had military experience as a member


National


Guard,


rank of second lieutenant.


pendent
ternities,


in which he holds the


He belongs to the Inde-


Order of Odd Fellows and to two college fra-


the Phi Alpha Delta and


Alpha Tau Omega.


a great
greater


and which will


in the future


He has conducted a fearless


gressive newspaper, has


stand


for what he


Pensacola


make


and ag-
:e a firm


questions


not been afraid to take


believes


to be right upon


involving municipal rights or privileges or upon polit-
ical issues, never allowing material considerations


to influence his point
sentative journalistic


of view.


He has other


interests throughout the


repre-
south,


while


ble


editor


owner


Frank


~^


P






FLORIDA


being principal
he is connected


owner of the Meridian


Dispatch,


with business interests of


as a member of the Chamber of Commerce;


he was president


from 1906


Mr. Mayes married,


Kingsbery,
the parents


of Hartford,


of four


to 1907.


December


25, 1899,


South Dakota,


children,


Howard


Albert, Margarita and William Kingsbery.
Mr. Mayes is a member of the Osceola and
Clubs and fraternally is connected with the
of Pythias and the Knights of the Maccabees.


Miss Lois


and they are


Charles
Socially
the Elks
Knights
He was


also for two years a member of the South Dakota


National


Guard.


He is


church and interested ii


Association.


Press


In 1912 he w
Association.


a member of
n the Young


the Presbyterian


Men's


ras elected preside
In political cir


Christian
ent of the
cles, too,


he is well known and prominent, giving stanch alle-


giance to


the democratic


vate citizen anm


progressive


party and working


d as a newspaper edit
democratic doctrines.


as a prn-


tor for the spread


In 19o8


public schools.


Pensacola
of which


After completing the


studies he learned the


usual course of


printing business, with which


he has ever since been successfully identified.


he purchased


Times


Courier,


an excellent weekly journal,
entire county in a thorough


The excellence


culation
secured


of the paper


which he


In 1899
has made


covering the news of the
and interesting manner.


has brought it a large cir-


and Mr. Moore's energy and enterprise have
for it a profitable advertising patronage, so


that it ranks today among
this section of the state.
Mr. Moore married, June


important


12, 1907,


journals


Miss Eva Lillian


Keeling, and they became the parents of two children:
Za-Ida and Eva Lillian, who live at home. Mr. Moore


is a member of
is connected w
Masonic order.
democrat. As


the Methodist


Knights


church


and fraternally


of Pythias


In his political views he is a stanch


editor of the


in the direction


he was


sent as a Bryan delegate from the third congressional


district


at Denver,


of Florida to the


Colorado,


democratic convention held


and is a man whose


life have always


Times


Courier


is a


thought and opinion in
high moral character


merited


respect


of his fellow citizens.


and in 1912 he was a Wilson


delegate
member


to the Baltimore convention and was the only


delegation


who voted


Bryan for temporary chairman.


For several years


he has been chairman of the democratic executive


P. CARUTHERS.


committee for


ing
serve
colon


co


the administration o
d on the governor's


el.


and upbuilders


its most
business


congressional
f Governor


district. I
Gilchrist


staff with the rank of


imDerea among
Pensacola and


the real pri
stands today


and able citizens.


circles is most


commendable


3moters
among


His record in
. for he has


shown himself a man of resourceful ability,


unabating


suCce5


perous


energy and keen
ss and made his


whose


discrimination have gained


career


in all


respects


pros-


and successful.


Caruthers


has devoted his


entire


c


farming and stock-raising and while


,range
mak-


ing his home in Clearwater has a farm about two miles


east of the town
He was born F4


Florida,
(Phillips)
county, G


and is


and an
ebruary
a son


Caruthers,


eorgia.


dren when they
ter county, Flol
days were spen


orange grov
14, l849, in
of Samuel


were


e ot seven acres.
Sumter county,
and Mary Jane


natives of Burke


They were parents of seven chil-


left Georgia


a, about 1846.
in Sumter and


and removed to Sum-


Their remaining
Orange counties,


* but they passed away in the former county at an


advanced age.


The father made


farming


and stock-


OSCAR


Oscar
nalistic


C.. MOORE.


C. Moore, prominently connected


interests


of Marianna as editor ot


Courier, was born on a farm in


Georgia,


raising


his life work.


the Baptist


I with jour-
f the Times
October 17,


1874. He is a son of Andrew B. and Georgie (Smith)
Moore, natives of Georgia, who came to Florida in


i882 and located in M
gaged in railroading.
children: Lula, the dec
Jackson county; Omah,
C., of this review; and


Oscar


[arianna, where the father en-
To their union were born four


:eased


wife of J. B. Justiss, of
died in childhood: Oscar


Amos Green,


C. Moore was still a child


of Marianna.


when


he moved


He was


an active member


church and his political allegiance was


given to the democratic party, but


desired


office.


The grandfather


and became


in the new world,
I. P. Caruthers


settling


was


twelve children, seven
maturity, but only our
of the brothers, A. L.,


served
Florida


as soldiers
regiments.


war during the last


he never held


nor


of our subject was


the founder
in Georgia.


the eleventh
of whom r<


of the family


in
each


a family
ed years


subject is now living.
Walker, Iverton and


in the Civil war


Four
Albert,


as members


Caruthers was also


six months


of the struggle,


manhood


parents


to Jackson county


in Marianna, acquiring


and he grew to


his education in the


beef cattle


only a boy


for the Confederate army,


of fifteen years.


He was reared


although
in Sum-


*





FLORIDA


ter county and continued


about


seventeen


years


his residence there until


ago, when he came to what


tion and n
McAllister


slaves


prior to the Civil war.


is of English descent on both sides but the


is now Pinellas county and has


since been engaged


McAllister family


is of old


American


establishment.


in farming, stock-raising


ing an excellent tract


orange


of land


growing, hav-


two miles east of the


Her paternal great-grandfather, John Hatchett, was
born in England and had the distinction of attending


town devoted
tract planted


to general


oranges.


farming


and a seven acre


Both branches of his


business are now proving profitable,
tilled fields and carefully cultivated g


ductive of good crops. F
Caruthers has made his 1
water.
On the 3d of March,


ror the


past t


for his well
roves are pro-
hree years Mr.


lome in the town of Clear-


the wedding of Napoleon Bonaparte.


emigrated to the


American


family in the United State;
Hatchett, grandfather of th


Dr. and Mrs.


but their


generation is


ney G. Hatchett, of


Mr. Caruthers was


were eight


He afterward


colonies and founded the
s. His son was William
ie subject of this review.


M. Hatchett have passed


represented by


Navasota,


Texas.


away,


Captain Pinck-
In their family


children, of whom four daughters and two


united in


marriage


to Miss Elizabeth Matchett, who


sons survive, although Mrs. McAllister is the only one


was born in Georgia, January


19, 1850.


The follow-


residing


in Florida.


ing year her parents, William and
Matchett, who were also natives of


I Nancy (Collins)


Georgia,


Mrs. McAllister. acquired her education in the


removed


Academy,


from which she was graduated


to Sumter


county,


were passed.


the parents
Hillsboro c
Florida; J.


Florida, where their remaining


Mr. and Mrs.


of eight children:


country;


J. W.,


A., at home; B.


in this volume; F. Idella, the


a merchant
M., represent


Caruthers


became


now living in
of Webster,
ited elsewhere


wife of Captain


E. B.


Edy, of Nassau, Bahama islands; N. E., the wife
of Phil Blanton, of Hillsboro county; J. M., of


with highest honors in her


ward, when


she was


seventeen years


Dne month after-
of age, she mar-


ried Joseph Robert Cook, a prominent merchant of that
city. They resided in Atlanta and Fort Gaines,


Georgia, for
leaving one
passed away


r


fourteen


years,


when Mr. Cook died,


son, Harry Hatchett Cook, who has
. Two years after the death of Mr.


his widow married James T. McAllister, of Fort


Orlando, Florida; and D. R.,


water.


a merchant


The religious faith of the family


of Clear-
is that of


Gaines,


Georgia,


families in that


a representative


state.


one of the oldest


Their married life continued


the Methodist Episcopal church, in which Mr. Caruth-
ers has long held membership. His political belief


is that of the


cising his rig
in politics,
upon his bu
are bringing


democratic


,ht of


party,


franchise


preferring


Isiness


but aside from exer-


he has never been active


to concentrate


affairs,


him substantial


energies


which, capably directed,


success.


for four years, at the end of which time Mr. McAllister


passed


away,


leaving


sons:


James T., Jr., who


died at the age of three and a half years; and William


A., who is
Georgia M
In 1898


Maimi, where


bered


sixteen years


military


Academy


and a student in the


at College Park,


Mrs. McAllister, then


she has since


a widow,


remained.


among the earliest settlers in the


but two years


Georgia.


came


is num-


city, which was


at the time of her arrival, and


since she has been


MRS. EMMA CORNELIA McALLISTER.


Mrs. Emma Cornelia McAllister,


who by her


cellent business judgment, her executive ability and her


great success has
ability in the field


prominent


done much to prove a woman's capa-
of business, is today one of the most


real-estate


dealers in


portant and valuable holdings
propertv. She is a native of Geo


near West
nelia Hatcl


Miami, controlling im-
in city and county
,rgia, having been born


Point, her maiden name being Emma (
iett. She is a daughter of Dr. James


Hatchett, a prominent physician


practiced


and surgeon,


his profession successfully


Point and Fort


served


as surgeon


Gaines.
in the


was in her maidenhood
father, William Cotton,
Troup county, Georgia,


During the Civil war he
Confederate army. His wife
Miss Louisa Cotton and her
was one of the pioneers of


where he had


a large


planta-


in its
she has


among


greatest


of the


business development. For many years past
been an extensive dealer in real estate in Miami


and the vicinity ai
ness judgment,
haustive energy,


business:
ties on


s.


She has


being possessed


tact and force
has built up a


of excellent busi-


as well


large


as mex-
growing


at all times a long list of proper-


the market and has made many profitable sales


to northern
All of her
principles a


1 people desiring to locate in the south.
affairs are conducted on strictly business


nd as


a result


she has amassed


a fortune


which any man might well


I


and achieved a success of


be proud.


She has acquired much valuable real estate


both within and without the


city and handles a great


deal of her own property, it being her custom to buy


outright, improve and sell.


vanous
groves,


times


owned


seven


In the past
al excellent


she has at
grapefruit


some of which she herself planted and devel-


oped, and in the course of her


business career she


W. S.,


]








































.'
n~-f


7%


4-






FLORIDA


has disposed of


several large and


people who desired to invest in real
tion of the country.


member of the Elks Club,


enterprising in


he also


Mrs. McAllister has an attractive home on Twelfth


street,


native


stone,


and she


possesses


and while successful


business and progressive in citizenship,


the social qualities


1910,


s that make

Mr. Ahemrn


has made this a center of hospitality for her many


united in marriage to Miss Isabelle


Boston, of


Detroit,


friends in Miami.


She belongs to the Baptist church


Michigan, and they have one child, Mary


Catharine.


an active religious worker,


and is
in the
teacher


integrity gained the respect and
ates and in all the relations of 1


a capable, self-reliant and


affairs


of the


Sunday


taking great


interest


school, in which she is a


industry and


esteem of her associ-


ife


attractive


proven


woman.


herself


Jacksonville


citizens


counts


and regards


New England enterprise
Ahern is president of 1


vestment Company


and t


vice president of the City


one of its valued


that day fortunate which linked


with Florida resources. Mr.
he National Security & In-
:he Fosyth Realty Company;
Security Company, the Home


Telephone
Company;


Company


and the


secretary of the


ment Company;


Southern States


Grand


Refining


Boulevard Invest-


committee


JOHN J. AHERN.


of the city council; and


a member of the Knights of


Jacksonville's
representative i


proving


real-estate


circles


in John J. Ahern,


a forceful element in the city's


a worthy
labors are
growth and


Columbus.
church and


He is a member of the


in politics


Roman


is a democrat.


improvement. He was born


in Middletown, Connecti-


cut, September 1o,


1877, his parents


being William and


GEORGE


WHITING ALLEN.


Catharine (Murphy) Ahern.


After


acquiring


a good


public-school education in his native city he turned his


Broad,


varied


and important are the activities


to the grocery


tinued for several years


as traveling
Armour &


r business in which he
and then went upon the


salesman for the meat-packing


Company


and W. P. Sumner.


house of


was


which George Whiting


connected.


Allen, of


He has left the


quality for good upon the
interests of the city in t


Key West,


impress


social, busin


has been


of his individ-
aess and official


thus engaged


for several years


and it was he who


stands


as a leading


factor


in financial


circles as


established the butter


and cheese


department in the


south for Armour & Company, of which department
he was given charge, making it a paying enterprise.
Recognizing something of what the future had in


store for Jacksonville becau


ise


of its natural advan-


tages and the fact that the tide of settlement was


largely flowing


opened


been successfully engaged in that business.


dies both city property and


1902, he
has since
He han-


outside lands, now manag-


president of the First National Bank


West


of Ke


and there has been no movement instituted


social,


educational


through the past twenty years,
of George W. Allen has not beei


Moreover,


port of Key


that of any other


position


during the


McKinley and remained


y West
for the


of the city,


with which the name
a intimately associated.


for the


longer period than
was called to the


of President


as the incumbent of the


his interests from well appointed


Bisbee t
sonville


building.


No one more stanchly


or has firmer faith in


future than Mr.


preciative


Ahern, and


its inter


offices in the
supports Jack-
ests and in its


his fellow townsmen, ap-


of his attitude in this connection,


until its
Florid


native


abolishment by act of congress
a is proud to number Mr. Al


sons.


tember i,


He is


England ancestry,


descended


represented


in June, 1913.
len among her


from sturdy


in the Revolutionary


twice elected him to the city council,


of which he has


war. His grandfather was George Allen, a prominent


president pro tern


forth earnest effort to improve


paving


for four years.


He is


ever


lature as a colleague


system,


ten feet or


nessed his


arrival


For many years he conducted


a ness as a wholesale


served


of Gideon


state legis-
His father


profitable estates


estate in this sec-


built of the beautiful


popularity and high regard.
On the 8th of September,


She has by her own energy,


Mr. Ahern as


chairman of the


pavmg


attention


Catholic


he present generation.


southward,


a real-estate office


, in November,
in that city and


and material welfare


his service as collector of customs


extended over a
appointee. He


first administration


seeking


the city's improvement and is


His birth occurred in Jacksonville,


and widening its streets
si of sidewalks which si


citizen of Connecticut, who


His efforts are of a practical nature his abode
f tangible results. He is also a mem- Key West
street beautifying commission and a remaining


a native of Enheld,
1823. The year. 1852


He is likewise






FLORIDA


firm of Allen Brothers,


and as such


played


a leading


part in the commercial development of the city. He
was also mayor of Key \Vest, was special deputy col-
lector of customs and clerk in the United States district
court for the southern district of Florida. He passed
away October lo, 1891, his remains being laid to rest
in the Key West cemetery. William Smith Allen was
united in marriage to Mary Jane Sprague, who was
born at Lyons, Wayne county, New York, January
16, 1827, a daughter of Nehemiah Sprague. Her
death occurred at Ithaca, New York, September 12,
1869.
For a half century George W. Allen has been a
resident of Key West, coming to this city with his
parents in his boyhood days. In his youth he spent
six years in school at Ithaca, New York,-from 1863
until 1869-and a part of his education was also ob-
tained in the public schools of Jacksonville and of Key
West. In early manhood he held several official posi-
tions including that of deputy clerk of the circuit court
of the sixth judicial circuit of Florida. Later he was
deputy clerk of the United States court. While hold-
ing that position he studied law and in 1879 was ad-
mitted to the bar, since which time he has practiced to
a greater or less extent in Key West. However,
various other duties have devolved upon him. Even


before


his admission


to the bar he was elected, in


to the state senate from the twenty-fourth senatorial
district of Florida and in 1882 was reflected but re-
signed the office in 1884 for the purpose of devoting
his entire attention to his law practice and to the bank-
ing business, in which he had become interested. It
was in 1884 that he aided in the organization of the
Bank of Key West, serving as one of its directors
and as its cashier from that date until i891, when the
bank went out of existence. He organized the First
National Bank of Key West on the 24th of Decem-
ber, 1891, was elected its president and has since re-
mained in that position, directing its activities and
shaping its policy. He is likewise a director of the
Florida National Bank of Jacksonville and thus his
name has become a prominent one in connection with
financial interests in the state. In addition to super-
vising his banking affairs he has found time to devote
to public service and his official record is most com-
mendable, being characterized by the utmost fidelity
and capability in the discharge of his duties. In 1879
he was appointed deputy collector of internal revenue
in which capacity he continued for twelve years. In
1896 he was nominated as the republican candidate
for governor but declined the nomination. The fol-
lowing year President McKinley appointed him col-
lector of customs at the port of Key West. He enjoys
the distinction of holding the position longer than any
other appointee and was the last to serve in that con-


nection, the office passing out of existence on the 3oth
of June, 1913. In I9OO he was the republican can-
didate for secretary of state and in I908 received his
party's nomination for congress, while in 1912 he was
the republican candidate for congressman at large.
For many years he has been a member of the re-
publican state committee and was a member of the
notification committee in 19o8 that waited on James S.
Sherman and informed him of his nomination for the
vice presidency. In 1904 and again in 19o8 and 1912
he was a delegate to the republican national conven-
tions and is one of the foremost leaders of his party
in the state.
On May 26, 1880, Mr. Allen was united in marriage
to Miss Leonore Browne of Key West, who was born
in this city and comes of an old Virginia family rep-
resented in the Revolutionary war. Two children
have been born unto them, Mary Lilla and Genevieve,
the latter now the wife of Dr. William R. Warren, a
prominent physician and surgeon of Key West.
There is one child of that marriage, George Allen
Warren, now about two years of age.
Mr. Allen is a member of the Monroe County Bar
Association and of the Florida State Bar Association
and is president of the Florida State Bankers Asso-
ciation. He is a member and vestryman of St. Paul's
Episcopal church and belongs to the Masonic, Odd
Fellows and Elks lodges. He is a member of the
Metropolitan Club of New York; of the Metropolitan
Club of Washington, D. C.; of the Seminole Club of
Jacksonville; the Elks Club of Key West, and is a
member of Florida Red Cross board, the Florida His-
torical Society, the National Geographic Society and
the National Rivers and Water Ways Commission.
All these indicate the extent and scope of his interests
and his activities. He keeps informed upon all the
significant and vital questions of the day and is ever
arrayed on the side of progress and improvement. He
has wide acquaintance among the thinking men of the
country, especially along the Atlantic coast, and his
worth is acknowledged by all with whom he has co-
operated in efforts to promote social, intellectual,
political and moral progress and to secure the adop-
tion of higher ideals for the betterment of the in-
dividual, the community and the country.



WILLIAM B. OWEN.

For a third of a century William B. Owen has been
a member of the Jacksonville bar and has had im-
portant professional connections as shown in a large
and distinctly representative clientage and in his serv-
ice on the bench. New Jersey claims him as a native





FLORIDA


son, his birth having occurred June 17, 1855. His
college training was received at Princeton, where he
completed a classical course and was graduated with
the B. A. degree in 1876. With a foundation of good
literary training he began the study of law under Henry
C. Pitney, the present vice chancellor of the state of
New Jersey. In 1876 he came to Jacksonville for the
first time and from that year until 188o spent the
winter seasons in this city and the summer months in
St. Paul, Minnesota, where he still pursued his legal
studies.
In the last mentioned year Mr. Owen was admitted
to practice at the bar of Jacksonville and has since
been an active factor in legal circles here, represent-
ing a large clientage save through the period from
1888 until 1892, when he served upon the bench of
Duval county. His deductions were strictly fair and
impartial. He has wide knowledge of the law, both
in principle and precedent, and his thorough legal
training has preeminently fitted him for many re-
sponsible positions he has filled. He was formerly
counsel for the Land Mortgage Bank of London, Eng-
land, formerly vice president of the Commercial Bank
of Jacksonville and also held the position of president
of the Southern Klondike Mining Company.
On the 20th of September, i888, Judge Owen was
united in marriage to Miss Hattie L. Kidd, of Chi-
cago, and they had one child, a daughter, Aileen. Mrs.
Owen died June 6, 19o6, and Judge Owen married,
in June, 1912, Miss Anna Milne, a daughter of James
Milne, of London, Ontario, Canada. The family at-
tend the Presbyterian church, in which Judge Owen
is an active worker, having served as one of its eld-
ers. He is a member of the Jacksonville Board of
Trade and in strictly social lines his connection is with
the Seminole and Country Clubs. Along professional
lines he is a member of the American Bar Association,
the Florida State Bar Association and of the Jack-
sonville Bar Association. His political support has
always been given to the democracy and in 1882 he
was elected to represent his district in the lower house
of the Florida legislature where as in all other relations
of life he has made a creditable record.


GEORGE


WALTER ATKINSON.


The career of George Walter Atkinson although de-
void of spectacular phases is one that may well inspire
and encourage others, for it shows what may be ac-
complished when energy and ambition lead the way.
Coming to Florida in 1887, a young man with prac-
tically no means, having started out in life as a poor


boy, he is now the owner of one of the most valuable
potato farms in the neighborhood of Federal Point,
being one of the substantial men of the region.
Mr. Atkinson was born in Chester county, South
Carolina, June 4, 1868, a son of John T. and Mary
Jane (Cherry) Atkinson, who were both natives of
the same state and county. There the mother passed
away but the father spent the remaining days of his
life with our subject on his farm near Federal Point.
He had been the owner of a valuable farm of three
hundred and six acres devoted to cotton culture, having
learned the methods of operation from his father, with
whom he worked for many years on a large property
of one thousand acres. The Atkinson family is of
English descent, representatives of the name having
come to America during colonial days and locating in
Virginia. Members of the family removed from that
state to South Carolina, where they and their descend-
ants have resided for over a century. The maternal
grandfather, John Cherry, who participated in the
Revolutionary war as a colonel, was also born in
Chester county, South Carolina, and was of Irish de-
scent. Mr. and Mrs. John T. Atkinson were the
parents of five children: Edward M., of Chester,
South Carolina; Tillman, who passed away at the age
of twenty-two years; George W., of this review; John
V., of Federal Point; and Mary Graham, who makes
her home with her brother John.
George W. Atkinson was reared under the parental
roof and in the acquirement of his education attended
the neighboring schools. He assisted his father with
the work of the farm until 1887, when he came to
Federal Point, where he has made his home since.
The first four years after his arrival he worked as
a farm hand, being overseer for J. F. Tenney and
Dwight Wheeler for the last three years of that time.
His ambition and desire to get on in the world made
him careful of his money and two years after coming
to this state he was able to buy a farm upon which
he moved after giving up his position as foreman.
He has since devoted his entire time to this property
on which he has made substantial improvements and
where he follows farming along most approved and
scientific lines. He owns about one hundred acres,
part of which was wild when he bought it and part
in old orange groves which had been destroyed by
frost. Mr. Atkinson now has sixty acres under culti-
vation which he devotes to potato growing and six
acres in an orange grove which he planted himself.
Since his arrival here he has set out several groves
which he has sold to advantage. Besides raising Irish
potatoes he also grows all of the feed which he needs
'for his mules and sells a considerable amount of grain
each year. Another interest to which he devotes some
of his time is cattle raising and he derives from this





FLORIDA


undertaking


a substantial


the course of years he has


addition to his income. In
become the largest and most


now representing


his official


his district in the


record is


one which


state senate


reflects


credit


successful potato grower in the


Federal Point


district.


honor upon the state that has


honored him.


His place, which is


furnished with everything desirable


born in Burwell,


South


Carolina, January 24,


to scientific


agriculture,


is improved with two sets of


buildings and his property divided


one of which is known as


Rose Cottaj


two farms,
ge and the


comes


of Irish,


His parents were Elija
Wall, who were also r


English and
and Mary A


natives


of the


Welsh
ngeline


ancestry.
(Roberts)


district in


which


other, which is t
Gum farm. It c
trees of that kind


which


add greatly
Interested


is place


of residence,


as the Sweet


lerives its name from a number


which he has set


out in his yard and


to the attractive appearance


of the


along all lines of agricultural en-


deavor, he has also given


raising
garden


that can be


sidered


sub-tropical


considerable time to


plants and vegetables and in


is represented practically every variety


grown here.


one of the most


and he may well be


is considered


handed


that he


Mr. Atkinson


is con-


prosperous men in this region
Id of the fact, especially when
started out practically empty-


and has succeeded in acquiring


property


their son was born, but in
The father came of colonial


Wall, served


x849 removed to Florida.


stock.


throughout the seven


lutionary war, enlisting


native state.
black plague
thus left an


His father, Herdy


years


from North


His parents died of the


and the grandfather of our
orphan, was reared by James


who was childless and


Florida Elija Wall
nam county, where
was born July 4,


adopted him.


settled


at Putnam


of the R
Carolina,


bubonic or


subject,
Knight,


On coming to
Hall, in Put-


spent his remaining


and his


It was his custom


invite the surrounding


wife on
and he ne


country to


the 3d of
;ver failed


celebrate


interests, the value of


of affluence in this


rank him among the men


district.


birthday, usually


man most careful in his


holding a barbecue.


dress, always


He was a


wearing immacu-


Mr. Atkinson was married


January


20, 1891,


this characteristic is sym-


Miss Lucy Atkinson, a cousin, who was born in the


same county and state as was her husband


is a daughter of James
son. Mr. and Mrs. C


Always interested in the


and who


Lucy (Crosby) Atkin-
tkinson have one son,


innate refinement and culture.


engaged in agricultural


tivating


pursuits,


between


aid of his


negroes.


development and


He always
e and cul-


hundred acres of
He was one of
state and secured


advancement of his
all public measures


district,
and mo


Mr. Atkinson


ivements,


the improvement of the locality, a


has attained


brings to


undertaken


deep interest and,


a highly creditable prosperity


government.


nearest


time was at Hawthorn, fifteen miles away.
trails were everywhere visible, for the red
d left the state only in 1818. He was one of


has been constructive in


the agricul-


the first representatives


county in the


this section and has become a


legislature, where he was a colleague of Colonel F. L.


man who is
Actuated by


considered


fashioned virtues of
trained success. He


regarded
confidence


contact.


He has not


ing the changes that have
stretches of waste lands


a pioneer


industry and


of civic expansion.
exercising the old-
honesty, he has at-


is a man of sterling character,


wherever


known,


and one who in-


whom


been an


he comes in


onlooker, witness-


e made and are making


into fertile


fields, but is


Dancy,
district
public


while Judge Putnam was sena
Mr. Wall was always deeply


affairs,


accepted sense of
capital by stage
railroads at that
session, being dis
political affairs. I


a crat and


process.


career is
answer.


of the fact that success


is ambition's


tor from 1
interested


but was not a politician in the


and


term. -I
horseback,


time;


for there
resigned


were no


one


management


a believer in the princi
August 30o, 1890, having


who passed away I
ered ten sons and


John P., the seventh in or<


long survived
1858. The fai


two daughters,
ier of birth, and


of Clay county, are the


the eldest,


served


only ones now living. Geo
h the Palmetto Regiment


WALL.


South


Carolina in


the Mexican


Putnam county bears


impress
all. who


in the charge at Cherebusco, Mexico.
of the name) died in childhood in iI


who was at one time representative


George
;i. Tho


from Clay


(second
,mas P.,
county


has in


various


ways


with its material


in the state legislature, became a captain in the Seventh


development and


activity.


was


state







FLO

Cumberland Gap, leaving three sons and one daugh-
ter. Elizabeth E. passed away January 27, 1854.
Angeline Ursula became the wife of B. W. Powell
and at her death left one daughter. Stephen Jack-
son served for four years in the Civil war, being an
orderly sergeant of the Second Florida Cavalry, and
died at Putnam Hall, leaving one son. Roan L.,
who was an officer in Captain Moseley's company of
the Seventh Florida Regiment, died leaving two sons
and a daughter. Rienzi G., who was a private of
the Second Florida Regiment, was taken sick while
at the front and returned home, where he passed
away. Lawrence D. served for four years with the
Second Florida Cavalry, was afterward for three
terms the representative for Bradford county in the
state legislature, and died in January, 1913, leaving
two sons and three daughters. Belton S., who served
for three years in the Second Florida Cavalry under
Captain Stephens and after the latter's death, under
Captain Gray, afterward went to Missouri and served
for three years in the United States regular army on
duty against the Indians. He was a fine looking man, of
soldierly bearing, and was a fearless fighter. He
stood six feet and one inch in his stocking feet and
was the only red-headed member of the family. He
had three sons and three daughters. John P. was
the next to him in the family. James L., of Clay
county, has four sons and five daughters. After
losing his first wife the father married again and
had two daughters by that union: Mrs. Hortense J.
Ward, of Alachua county; and Mrs. Florence L.
Goodson, of Putnam Hall.
Since the removal of the family to Putnam county
in x849 John P. Wall has continuously made his home
within its borders and now owns and occupies the
old homestead upon which his father first located and
which he secured from the government. There are
about three hundred acres of land with ninety acres
under cultivation. He has upon the place an orange
grove and other fruits, and he also engages in stock-
raising and general farming. At one time he engaged
in the operation of a sawmill' and also carried on
merchandising at Putnam Hall before the building
of the railroad. He has handled considerable real
estate and it was he who secured the right of way
for the railroad. He is also president of the Inde-
pendent Fruit Growers Association of Lake Geneva
and Putnam Hall. Deeply interested in all that per-
tains to the progress and welfare of the community,
he has cooperated in many movements for the general
good, and his labors have at all times been of a char-
acter that have contributed to general prosperity as
well as to individual success.
In politics Mr. Wall has been a lifelong democrat
and his fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth


RIDA


and ability have again and again elected him to pub-
lic office. For fourteen years he was justice of the
peace and his decisions were ever strictly fair and
impartial. For two years he was a member of the
county school board and twice he was offered the trus-
teeship of one of the state educational institutes but
declined. He has been closely connected with the
work of framing legislation in Florida and was elected
to the lower house of the general assembly in 1893,
1895 and I897, and again in i9oI, 1903 and 1905.
In 1911 he was defeated for state senator by twenty-
one votes by S. J. Hilburn, who later resigned, where-
upon Mr. Wall was elected to fill the unexpired term
without opposition. His long service in the general
assembly has enabled him to take an active and prom-
inent part in shaping state legislation, and his influ-
ence has, again and again, been found an active
factor in championing movements which have resulted
beneficially to the state.
In 1872 Mr. Wall was united in marriage to Miss
Nannie L. Wilson, who was born in Clay county,
Florida, April 13, 1856, and has been a lifelong resi-
dent of this state. Her parents were Jesse and Mary
(Knight) Wilson, whose parents were natives of
Georgia but pioneer settlers of Florida, where their
last days were passed. Mr. and Mrs. Wall have
become the parents of nine children. Belton Percy,
the eldest, resides in Jacksonville. He was a rail-
road man for twenty years, being for sixteen years
with the Florida East Coast Railroad, during which
time he rose from the position of brakeman to train-
master, but has now retired from the service on
account of his health. Jesse Verner, a traveling sales-
man, makes his home with his parents. John P.,
now an able attorney of Seattle, Washington, was
graduated from the Washington and Lee University,
making the finest record of any man in the school
from Florida, standing first in his class. Dr. W. W. C.
Wall, a graduate of the Southern Dental College, of
Atlanta, Georgia, engaged in the practice of his pro-
fession in Washington. He served in the Spanish-
American war as a member of Company D, First
Florida Regiment. During his service his health be-


came impaired, resulting in h
November 19, 1912. He left
ter, who are now in Seattle.
E. W. Watkins of Putnam
wife of W. J. Deal, of Mon
Essie is a teacher in Palatka
is at home. Worth Bagley
years.
Mr. Wall is prominent i
forty-two years he has beei


ternity, 1
years has


uis death at Putnam Hall,
a widow, son and daugh-
Mary B. is the wife of
Hall. Annie B. is the
tezuma, Georgia. Henry
high school Alice Irene
died at the age of four


Masonic circles.
a member of the


filled all of the chairs, and for many
n worshipful master. His religious faith






FLORIDA


is indicated by his membership in the Baptist church.
His life has been one of continuous activity, in which
he has been accorded due recognition of labor and
he is numbered among the substantial citizens of
his county. His interests are thoroughly identified
with those of Putnam and at all times he is ready to
lend his aid and cooperation to any movement
calculated to benefit this section of the country or ad-
vance its wonderful development. The terms "prog-
ress" and "patriotism" might be considered the key-
note of his character, for at all times he has been
actuated by an intense fidelity to his state and her
welfare.


NOEL


A. -MITCHELL.


The leaders are few. The great majority of men
are content to follow in paths that others have marked
out, lacking the initiative which enables them to branch
out in new lines and pass on the highway of life many
who, perhaps, started out ahead of them. The quality
of successful accomplishment, however, is possessed in
large measure by Noel A. Mitchell. His originality,
versatility, persistency and initiative are the factors
which have made him, as a young man, one of the
foremost citizens not only of Florida but of Connecti-
cut, while his business activities have also reached to
other states and along certain lines have extended from
ocean to ocean. In connection with his real-estate in-
terests he is the most extensive advertiser of Florida.
In the north he is the owner of a theater with a seat-
ing capacity of two thousand, and as a confectionery
manufacturer his name has become known throughout
the length and breadth of the land. These are but a
few of the lines along which he has operated and in
his vocabulary there is no such word as fail. He was
born at Block Island, Rhode Island, January 9, 1872,
a son of James and Mary J. Mitchell, who were also
natives of that state and of English descent, the an-
cestors in both the paternal and maternal lines having
arrived in New England in colonial days. The family
is related to Benjamin Franklin. James Mitchell was
a soldier of the Civil war and was wounded at the
battle of Gettysburg while serving under "Fighting"
Joe Hooker. He participated in a number of other
hotly contested engagements, including Antietam, and
was crippled for life at Gettysburg by the bursting of
a shell. He also followed contracting and building
and both he and his wife died in Rhode Island about
ten years ago.
Noel A. Mitchell spent the greater part of his early
life in Providence, Rhode Island, and was a high-
school pupil at Block Island, while in Providence he


attended night school, devoting his days to the selling
of newspapers. He afterward went to Atlantic City,
New Jersey, where he learned the confectionery trade
and began the manufacture of the famous Mitchell's
Atlantic City salt water taffy, now known from coast
to coast. For twenty years he has engaged in the
manufacture of that confection and the business has
reached mammoth proportions.
The boy who started out selling newspapers on the
city streets is today regarded as one of the foremost
business men of Florida. Ten years ago, after spend-
ing one year in California and not liking the climate
there, he came to this state, drifted to St. Petersburg,
and saw the possibilities of the place. He entered the
real-estate field in a small way and during the past
six years has been extensively engaged in real-estate
dealing. He purchased a block of ground where his
office is now located, securing a tract one hundred and
thirty by one hundred feet, for which he gave fifteen
thousand dollars and for which he has since been
offered eighty-five thousand. Something of the nature
of his business methods is indicated in the fact that
he has been termed "the real-estate man with a con-
science." "He never sleeps" has also been used to
characterize his business methods, and in advertising
he terms himself "the sand man," for he has pur-
chased what others have regarded as wide sand waste
and has transformed such tracts into beautiful resi-
dence or business districts. He has made several addi-
tions to St. Petersburg, and the methods which he has
employed are such as will bear the closest investigation
and scrutiny. He has made advertising, honest deal-
ing and enterprise the foundation of his success. He
now has a large amount of property listed and sells
much of his land at public auction. H. Honore of Chi-
cago, Illinois, is now associated with Mr. Mitchell in
his real-estate transactions as a silent partner. Mr.
Mitchell is an expert in writing his own advertise-
ments, being able to seize upon the vital point in pre-
senting the matter to the public, while his original
methods attract attention and his reputation for busi-
ness integrity has made it known that what he says can
be depended upon. In addition to his large real-estate
holdings in St. Petersburg and this section of the state,
he is a director and was one of the organizers of the
Central National Bank. He has had extensive write-
ups in magazines and current literature under the
title The Career of an Advertiser. He employs four
sales people and several stenographers in the conduct
of his real-estate business, and he spends his summers
at Savin Rock, Connecticut, where he has developed a
large and most attractive amusement park; containing a
theater with seating capacity for two thousand. He
has many other forms of clean amusements and is
always on the lookout for something new, novel, and
















L~..jA. -1


zxc"y








He seems to grasp


termination


which grows


stronger


face of dis-


business possibilities


ever,


a situation


that his judgment


ty trade transaction.
Mr. Mitchell was married


Gladys


Katherine.


is seldom,
at fault in


in 1899 and has one child,


an Episcopalian


a thirty-second


in religious


degree


Mason


couragement and difficulties.


Governor


entered


became identified


the office of


years


mayor of


After winning
upon the pract


his degree
ice of law


there residing fi
winning election


that city when


but twenty-three


age. He served for two terms, his


adminis-


an Elk. He belongs to the St.
he has done amateur dramatic


Petersburg Club


work


on many


tration being marked by able,


tive methods,


far-sighted and construc-


and .at the age of twenty-six he was


the negro and the Iri
a prodigious spectach
under the name of


Gras Association,


belongs to


Yacht


impersonations of
ted at Savin Rock


and carnival


the Mardi Gras,


entertainments
organizing the


and was its first king.


and Anglers


Club of St. Peters-


burg. He may see visions and dream dreams, but


soon makes these practical and


man of action,
he undertakes
community in


intense and vital,


and 'the
which he


success.


result


resultant


realities.


sent from his district


sentatives.
senate foi
president 4


After two years


r a term


house


repre-


he was elected to the state


of four years and was made


in 1905,


his work in the


presaging his present progressive services as governor.


At the age


eral ol
years,


he accomplishes


proves


of benefit to the


operates as well as a source of


f


of thirty-two he was elected


Florida


and acted in


capa


attorney
city for


in which connection a local paper wrote:
nell has stood from the first for publicity


affairs.


He advocates


sale of. large


in all


the advertising of any


tracts


and has


a numimber of resolutions requiring


and other


data to be


furnished to


intro-


monthly re-
the internal


improvement


trustees.


In the early part of his


he offered a resolution


GOVERNOR


PARK


TRAMMELL.


of'a regular


to discontinue


attorney by the trustees,


the employment
and another to


agent,


employee or attorney of the


In Governor Park


Trammell Florida has it


1
In


the qualities


of statesmanship necessary in the


tion of the vital interests


a great


control
measure
direc-


commonwealth.


He is a man of constructive political ability, keen fore-


and discernment and


integrity.


His life has been devoted


d unquestioned
almost entirely


trustees


from


getting


any commission or compensa-


tion from the purchasers of public
pardoning board. Mr. Trammell takes


every application
and that, while
the law-abiding
law-breaker."


have thorou


On the


the position that
igh investigation


justice should be tempered with mercy,
' must be remembered as well as the


to the public service, his


advancement


ability and power have become
During his service as governor


strated the strength


ideals and


record


known


commg


as his


and recognized.


he has already


and practicability


the qualities


reflects


demon-


of his political


of his statesmanship.


credit


has honored him.


among her native sons.


Florida


He was born in


the common-
numbers him
Polk county,


During
political
became
influenti.


g all of these
prominence had
recognized as or
al factors in the


efficient work and


portant


I far-i


years


Governor


been waxing


Trammell's


greater until he


ne of the most powerful and


public life
sighted polio


positions


public morality were recognized and
in the election of 1912 he was chosen


of the state.


icy in various im-
I his hirh ideals of


rewarded w
as the chief


a son of John W. and Ida (Park) Trammell.


father,


a pioneer of Polk county, was a prominent


ecutive


inaugurated


on the democratic


governor January 7, I913,


icket.
for a


term of


farmer and cattleman


leaders


of the state.


in 1887, I889


n and also one of the political
He was elected to the legislature


1891 and was one of the foremost


four years and the


following


transmitted


first message to the legislature. This message, prob-
ably the most concise resume of the present conditions


factors


in the early development


he and his wife are now deceased.
In the common schools of his native


acquired his early


and future


needs


of the state ever submitted


to the


legislative body of Florida, expressed an earnest de-


county


education and


nberland University of Lebanon,
he completed a law course and


was graduated with the class of


earned the money necessary


May, 1899.


to defray his
played that spir


expenses
it of de-.


sire tU
looking
people


o cooperate with th
g to the prosperity,
of Florida. Amor


progressive nature


deemed


ie legislature in every effort


and happiness


of the


the recommendations


conducive


more rapid


development were the abolition of the convict lease sys-


to guarantee bank


state prison farm,
a corrupt practice


a fund
act, di-


term


entertainmg.


on


ti


ge






FLORIDA


rect election of United


the facilities


of the


States senators,


College


of Agriculture,


enlargement of


protection


Levy county,


in the


Florida, and acquired his


East Florida


Seminary at Gainesville.


education
He later


to the cattle industry, the muzzling of the lobbyist, pub-
lic school libraries and the repeal of railway land grants
law. He also made an especially strong plea in favor


entered


Emory College


which he was


graduated


A. B., immediately


Oxford,


Georgia,


in 1884, with the degree of


afterward


beginning


the study


a statewide


tablishment of
construction c
economical an
conviction tha


movement


for good


roads


a state road commission to


f public


highways


and the


insure the
substantial,


d systematic lines, and submitting his
t no one thing would add more to the


comfort, convenience and material advancement of


the state than a thorough


On the 21st of


October,


stem of good roads.
190o, Governor Trammell


medicine.
ceptorship
Bellevue H
the degree


present
of media
widespre


He worked


for some


of his father and
Hospital Medical C
of M. D. in I887


time under the


was graduated


college


in New


From that


from the


York


time to the


he has been actively engaged in the practice
cine in the state of Florida and has gained


ead


distinction


After practicing


for eight


in his


chosen


years as


field of labor.


an associate


of his


was married to Miss
Thomas C. Darby, of


and orange


nected


grower.


Virginia
Lakeland,


Darby,


a daughter


a prominent merchant


Fraternally the Governor is con-


with the Knights of Pythias and the


of the World.
of orderly pr


Woodmen


in his career has been one


ogres


look and wider


sion, bringing
opportunities.


him a broader
The people


recognized his merit and ability and have accorded him


father at Bronson he came in x896 to Miami and is one


of the
railroad
munity


pioneers in the city, for in the
I was completed to the town site


sprang into e:


ticed his profession


since that time


same year me
. and the .com-


distence. Dr. Jackson has prac-
with marked success in Miami


and today


among physicians and surge
nition as one of the mosi


occupies a prominent place
eons. He has gained recog-
t able practitioners in this


honors and distinction.


In the


discharge


of his duties


section of


state and by his labors, his high


profes-


governor he
o the realms


gone beyond the field


of statesmanship,


making


of politics
expediency


sional attainments and
justified the respect an


his sterling characteristics has


d confidence in which


he is held


secondary


to honor


and public


righteousness and the


claims of self-interest entirely subsidiary


of the people
commonwealth.


to the welfare


and the general advancement


of the


by the medical
is a member of
ex-president o:


States


Medics


lI


fraternity


and the


the American
f the Florida
Societies. He


general


Medical


public.


Association


State and the


Southern
a member


and ex-president


Dade County


Associ-


action and is now surgeon in charge of the Florida East


Coast


Railway Extension Hospital.


JAMES


Dr. Jackson married,


Barco,


a history of the medical


fraternity


in Miami


October


of Bronson, and
aged fourteen; and


3, 1894, Miss Ethel
ave two daughters:


years


mention


be made


of Dr. James


Dr. Jackson is well known in social circles of


Jackson,


who was a pioneer physician


in the


being a member of the


Biscayne Bay


Yacht


who has for the pas
cessful practice of h
in Hamilton county,
son of Dr. James M


t seventeen years been in the suc-


is profession


here.


He was born


zo, 1866,


was


and is a


born in South


first Masonic


and is besides affiliated


Benevolent Protective


Carolina and
first medical


who was graduated
colleges in New Orlea


from one of the
ms. the establish-


Order of Elks


years of


residence


of Pythias.


His many


city have made him widely


and favorably known here, while his


ability places


University.


He practiced


medicine


in the state of


in the foremost


ranks


of the medical


fraternity.


Florida for nearly ha
his son, the subject


Ilf a century, dying at the home of
of this review, in Miami, on the


of May, 1911, at the age
es M. Jackson, Sr., serve


of eighty years. Dr.
d through the entire


LIVINGSTON


Civil war in the Co
and then as surgeon.


Miss Mary


rfederate a
His wife,


Glenn


Shands,


rmy,


as a private


who was in her maid-


was born


in Spar-


Hotel interests


resented


in Volusia


Elmore


county


Livingston


tanburg, South


Carolina,


30, I907,


sixty-nine.


child born to his


Jackson
parents.


review


He was


rearec


was the only
d in Bronson,


of his native


in Seabreeze and pr
He was born in M
lis early education i
city and afterward


schools






FLORIDA


Wesleyan


University in Delaware.


his books he came to Florida,


After


locating in


He has since been identified


here and has
line of work


laying aside
Daytona in


with hotel inter-


founded a conspicuous success in


upon ability and


and developed i
greatest business


s a valuable addition


interests of


Florida


a


to
ndh


have been forces in the substantial growth and


of the community where he makes his


one of the
is activities


progress


home.


experience.


purchased upon coming
Breakers in Seabreeze,
were destroyed by fire.


here The Clarendon and The


which


on February


14, 1909,


One year from that date work


JOHN


S. TAYLOR,


was begun


on the new


Clarendon, on


the site of the


old hostelry, and in the same year


s a notable


completed. It is
hotels of Florida,


south of the Mason
is of the Spanish type,


addition


the building


to the


tourists


being the finest institution of its kind


and Dixon line.


The building


spacious in plan and of


appropriate to the climate and
attractive to the eye. The m


in forced concrete, n
absolutely fireproof.


every


detail


has been


making


surroundings


a design
and very


materiall employed is


the Clarendon


throughout


In the equipment of the hotel


provided to


insure the safety


comfort of the guests and nothing has been overlooked


John S. Taylor, Jr., is one of the old-time
of Pinellas county, in which he has made


since the ag
has covered


seven


years.


residents
his home


His business activity


farming and stock-raising and he has also


been prominent in political circles.
Hernando county, Florida, October


John S. and Margaret
were natives of Georgia,


in Florida.
state about
same time.


He was
12, 1844,


Ann (Carter)
although they


The father, born


born in
a son of


Taylor, who
were married


in 1813, came to this


and Mrs. Taylor arrived


They resided


about


in Columbia county,


which might add


to their enjoyment.


There are music


Lake City, and afterward removed to Alachua county.


rooms,


ballrooms, billiard


rooms


and bowling


indoors, while outdoor amusements provided


tennis,
fishing,


golf, horseback riding,


hunting,


automobiling,


surf bathing and, in


y


include
actingn,


ever


of amusement known to resort hotels of the


y kind
higher


Subsequently
county, near


they took up their
Brooksville, where


abode


in Hernando


Mrs. Taylor


away when her son John was about seven years of age.


The father afterward b
Pinellas county, leaving


brought


his three children to


them with


his father,


class.
oughly
always


Guides and experienced


trained
on hand


deerhounds,
to conduct


hunters with thor-


bear and bird
parties fond of


liam Taylor, who was a native of


grandfather


Georgia.


and the father died in this


Both the


district.


former was a farmer and stockman and the latter was


sport,


and for lovers


of automobiling


there is


a merchant in his early


life, while residing in


Alachua


greatest


automobile


speedway


in the world and


are many miles of good motor roads through the coun-


In addition


to this there


is usually


a one or two


county, but
fruit growing
There were


later engaged in farming, stock-raising and
ig. He died at the age of eighty-two years.
three children by his first marriage: John


passenger aeroplane


or hydroplane


at the disposal


S.; William J., now .deceased; and


Margaret


the Hotel


Clarendon


guests.


Every room has hot and


cold running water, steam heat and a telephone, while


the hotel is


elevator service.


supplied


with a very adequate


electric


In addition there are connected with


widow
losing h


of Benjamin Campbell, of Seminole.


lis


first wife the father married


again,


that union there was a daughter, Nancy


who is now the wife


of Dr. McMullen,


After
and by


Elizabeth,
of Iargo,


the hotel Turkish baths,


and manicuring


and hair


Florida.


dressing
the Van


parlors.
Noys H


the E. L. Potter


Mr. Potter is also connected


[otel in
Hotel


Mr. Potter married


Illinois,


a daughter


cum) Buell.
Helen Buell.
name stands
efficient and


successful in
and has made


Los Angeles and


Company


president


of that city.


Miss Jessie Buell,


As previously stated, John S. Taylor has resided
continuously in Pinellas county from the age of seven


years and has been an interested witness


of Evanston,


of Augustus C. and Helen
id Mrs. Potter have one dat


In Seabreeze
as a synonym
modern in hotel


the management


and Daytona Mr. Potter's
for all that is up-to-date,
1 operation. He has been


of the new Clarendon


finest


resort hotels in the


and progress of the sta
its welfare. He served
under Captain J. W. I
close of hostilities and
of the time, remaining


In 1867 Mr.


of the growth


te and an active participant


d as major in
?earsons, from


the Civil


war,


;ty tor a part
entire period


Taylor was united in marriage to Miss


Georgia A. Ham, a native of this state and a daughter


because he understands the business with which


is connected in


a pioneer


of Bryan county,


Georgia,


and because


he is in addition a careful, conservative and far-sighted


man, possessed
organizing abilil


an initiative power and
The institution which he


passed


away


a great


in Pinellas county


stock-raiser


war.


in 1875.


was a


and owned a
Mr. and Mrs.


:e


4


passed


I






FLORIDA


had no children


nieces.


of their own but have reared two


They are members


pal church, South, and


with the


of the


Mr. Taylor


Methodist


Episco-


is also connected


Masonic fraternity and the United


ate Veterans Camp.


lowed


C


Throughout his life he


horticultural and agricultural


now the owner of one hundred


two miles west


of Belleair.


:onfeder-
has fol-


pursuits and is


* and ten acres of land
This tract is under a


years


of age and


supplemen


in private schools, by stu
He also spent two years in
and for a time was a studer


Heiskell,
bar in I


of Knoxville,
ka6. He then


tanooga and for ten years
with the Florida bar. It


ted his education, acquired
dy in Gainesville College.
the Tennessee Law School
it in the law office of S. G.


where he
practiced


was admitted
for a time in


has been actively connected
was feared that he had a


high state of cultivation, and his


practical


gressive methods are evidenced in the neat appearance
of the place.
At various times Mr. Taylor has been active in polit-


ical circles.


After the reconstruction days


and dur-


ing the first democratic administration in the county


he served for two years


missioners.


on the board


He was also appointed


of county com-


on the board


supervisors of roads and bridges, but that office was
abolished by the legislature the following year, the


board of commissioners


the fall


of 1884


Mr. Taylor


house of the state legislature


representing


the western


taking over its duties.


was elected


to the lower


re and served for one term,
part of Hillsboro county.


tubercular condition when he came to


under


the influences of


at once began


the sunny clime of


this state, but


Florida


to improve in health and during the


year gained forty


was a resident


po


of Tampa


unds. For eight
and has made his


Pinellas county since its organization.


the county to leI
of organization


He canvassed


public opinion upon the


and took an active


in the creation of the county.


served as city attorney
until June, 1911, under
had been attorney of P


ization.


He is a mem


Bar Associations and


of Tampa
the Wing


question


re and helpful part
He had previously


from June, 1909,
administration and


inellas county since its organ-
ber of the County and State


the American


Bar Association,


He has ever s
building of the
and his labors


suiting
an active


sought to advance the welfare


and up-


e section of the state in which he lives,


have been


potent


in benefit along many li
'e, aggressive citizen, an


able business man,


wins the warm


factors for good, re-


Lines.


He is known as


enterprising


and reli-


and one who in social relations


regard


of those


with whom


comes


in contact


and is recognized as a lawyer of


high professional standard
tion and success through
tion of the law points in


been a lifelong det
On the i2th of
united in marriage


a representative


the period


ability who holds


rds, and has gained distinc-
his clear and wise applica-


litigation.


nocrat.


March, 1886,
to Mrs. Sarah


of old southern


of his residence


In politics he

Mr. Rowland


wa,


E. Tardy, who is


families,


in Florida he


and during
has demon-


strated his personal worth and given evidence of his


acquired ability in the line


of his profession-ability


W. R. ROWLAND.


W. R. Rowland,


of St. Petersburg,


the office of county attorney of Pinellas


now filling
county and


that has enabled him to successfully


tricate law problems and
win the verdict desired.


so present


ve many
cases as


moreover


is the oldest


attorney


i years


of continuous


connection with the


ability


profession


as a member of the bar


in the county. His
is recognized by all


and in the


at the


trial of cases he has proven resourceful,


same time giving


evidence


EDWARD


C. ROMFH.


that he is thor-


oughly grounded
He was born in (
and is a son of


(Johnson)
son. North


were married


father


in the 1


basic


;ainesville,
William


principles of the law.


Georgia,


August


R. and Sarah


A
3l


Rowland, the former a native of
Carolina, and the latter of Georgia.


in the Empire


engaging much of


State of the Sou


\, 1864,
izabeth
Ander-
They
ith, the


the time in the livery busi-


Edward


C. Romfh,


one of the leading


of Miami, is president of the First .National


has been connected with fil
the foundation of the city.
rapid advancement through


financiers
Bank and


nancial interests here since
He has made steady and


the years,


a man of


initiative and power, and he has today gained a posi-
tion of distinctive precedence. He was born in Cam-


ness. He served for two years in the Civil war as


den, Arkansas,


February


8, 1880. and is a son of


a member of
Gainesville a


a Georgia


It the


regiment and is now living in


age of eighty-one


years,


but his


Georj
The


'e


B. and Elvira


father is a native of


Virginia


Alabama


(Jordan)


Romfh.


and afterward


wife passed away twelve years ago.
W. R. Rowland, the eldest in a family


remained


at Gainesville,


Georgia,


moved to Florida,


of four sons,


until twenty-one


l


i888 he removed to
the family went to Ai


ocating at
Titusville.


Altoona,


whence in


Seven years later


tlanta, Georgia, but after a resi-






FLORIDA


of six


months


there returned


locat-


Melbourne.


Edward


accompanied his


various removals, acquiring


schools.


associated with


his brother,


his educa


E


the mercantile business at West


In I
Eugene
Palm


parents in their
,tion principally
896 he became
B. Romfh, in


Bea


after


business standards,


a thorough
relating to


central figure
where his we


modern


business methods, and for


and complete understanding


the baking


in general


always


business.
business


well used,


which has been worthily attained,


g of everything
is, moreover, a


circles


anda ms success,
have made him


prominent and important as a factor in general


less than a year they


On the Ist


of August


moved
t, 1898,


turned to Florida and located. at


to Nacogdoches,


Texas.


Edward C. Romfh


Miami,


where he


vancement.
Germany, I
hard and


bold was born in Wurttemberg,
14, 1872, and is a son of Bern-


Seybold,


both of whom


has resided


since pioneer times, becoming


reside


many important


phases


of the city's development


John Seybold was reared in


Germany


and there


progress.


Throughout the thirteen years of


dence here he has been identified


acquired


with the banking


a public-school education.


seventeen,


he crossed


In 1889, at the


the Atlantic to America


business,


first becoming connected with


Biscayne, which


In 1902,
First Na


he entered


after four years,


national


-Bank


the Bank of


in 1898 as bookkeeper.
was made cashier of the


position


for eight


and located first
spent two years e
In 1892 he came


played


in Baltimore,


engagedd in
to Florid;


as a journeyman baker,


Maryland, where he


learning the


baker's trade.


and for a time was em-


at St. Augustine


years, winning promotion in


1910 to the office of presi-


and later at Palatka.


In 1894


he embarked in


dent. Since then he


has aided


materially in keeping


ness for


himself in the latter city but after the dev-


the institution upon a sound financial basis and has
been an active and prominent factor in its substantial


growth.


He is widely


recognized


financiers in this section of the state and


earned


an enviable


reputation as a care-


stating
greatly


Proceeding
a bakery


railroad


frost of 1895 business
affected and he decided


g


to West


Palm Beach,


for about one year but no


been completed


conditions there were


he there conducted


sooner n1
and the


town


ful man of


business, his honorable methods


won him the confidence


and regard


having


associates


his fortune


community.


He arrived here on the 28th


in the new
of April,


and friends.


Miami


Savings


He is chairman of the board of the


Bank and


also treasurer


Telephone Company.
On January 26, I


Marie
South
They !
years
years.
history
ment a
terests


of the


Miami


married


Antoinette de Camp, a native of Greenville,


Ca!
hav


rolina, but
'e two son


at that time a resident of
s: Edward C., Jr., who


Miami.
is five


of age; and Lawrence de Camp, aged three
Mr. Romfh is thoroughly familiar with the


md
S0
UnK


f


an early period


I has done much to advance
A man of liberal views and


he is honored


as one


substantial


citizens


i896, and was therefore
in the city. However,
there were already two


considering


one of


the first business


he found -on


his arrival


other


overcrowded,


turn his attention to some other


Accordingly,
ness of that


bakers


he determined .to
line of endeavor.


he started a lunch counter, the


in Miami,


successfully for a short time sold


ing in payment a
idleness following


rowed a gun
accompanied
broke out in I


Miami


note.


During t
transaction


first busi-


and after conducting


the enterprise, tak-


he brief period
Mr. Seybold b


and went upon a hunting


a friend.


expedition,


While he was gone fire


and the entire city


was destroyed,


and pioneer


residents


community.


erty was


destroyed,


ng up along with the rest of the
of Mr. Seybold's personal prop-
including the clothes which he


As a result of


SEYBOLD.


the fire the purchaser


of his


Mr. Sevbold


career


of John Seybold


offers


ex-


clothes


persever-


ance in the accomplishment of success, for


qualities,


for recognizing


outlook was discouraging for he had no money and
the only business with which he was thoroughly famil-
iar was not then a lucrative one in Miami. He accord-


opportunities,


ily upward in the business
trol of the largest bakery


largest


in this section of


he has worked his


world, being today


in Miami
he state.


t


r stead-
in con-


one of the


His name stands


left the city
the outbreak


army was encamped


of this fact,


and went to Jacksonville, where
of the Spanish-American war, the


for some time.


Mr. Seybold


Taking
i pies


advan-
for the


dence


busi-


usimg






FLORIDA


he made about two thousand dollars in a short time.
This money, however, he subsequently lost in new
business ventures and in x899 returned to Miami with
very little more than he had when he left the city.
He has since remained here and his present prom-
inence is a proof of the excellent results which have
attended his well directed labors. He bought on
credit a small bakery and centered his attention upon
making his fortune with the result that he soon se-
cured a large and representative patronage and his
business expanded rapidly until it is today one of the
most important in this part of Florida. The store is
located on Twelfth street, the city's main business
thoroughfare, and is upon a fine business property
with a frontage of fifty feet on that street and extend-
ing in the direction of Eleventh street for two hun-
dred and fifteen feet. The building is a modern two-
story concrete block structure erected by Mr. Sey-
bold and in it is found large ice cream parlors, an
excellent soda fountain and a bakery with a capacity
of several thousand loaves a day. The goods sold
here are always fresh, wholesome and thoroughly
pure, baked according to the most sanitary methods,
nothing being left undone which makes for high
quality and purity. Mr. Seybold always follows the
most modern business methods and his progressive
spirit is constantly evidenced in the way his large


concern is managed, for he
tion of detail which is the f
work. In the garage upon


has achieved t
foundation of
his property


perfec-
ffective
found


four motor trucks in which his goods are delivered
to his many customers and there also is his own pri-
vate automobile, for he is an enthusiastic motorist.
Naturally, in the course of years Mr. Seybold's suc-
cess and prominence have carried him forward into
important relations with the general business life
of Miami, where he is recognized as a man of initia-
tive, energy and resource, possessed of the unflagging
determination which eventually overcomes all obsta-
cles and the ability which commands opportunity.
He is a director in the First National Bank of Miami
and prominent also in other important business enter-
prises in the city.
In 1902 Mr. Seybold married Miss Ellen Freedland
and they have three children: Helen, who is seven
years of age; William, aged six; and Constance, aged
two. Mr. and Mrs. Seybold are members of the
Lutheran church and are highly respected and es-
teemed in Miami, where they have an extensive
circle of friends. Fraternally Mr. Seybold belongs
to the Masonic order and the Benevolent Protective
Order of Elks. In the course of his long residence
here he has proved himself a valuable addition to the
ranks of energetic and progressive citizens, his splen-
did success in the building up of his large concern


being recognized
the present wealth
community.


as an important contribution
and the future prominence of


JEPTHA VINING HARRIS, JR.

At the foot of Duval street and with the broad
expanse of the waters of the gulf of Mexico before
it, stands the home of Jeptha Vining Harris, Jr. The
structure, of unique and attractive design, is built of
brick and concrete and is surrounded with magnificent
lawn and flower beds. By many it is regarded as the
most beautiful home of Key West. Hither Mr. Harris
retires at the close of busy days spent with clients or in
the courts, for he is a leading member of the Florida
bar and possesses comprehensive knowledge of legal
principles, in the application of which he is seldom if
ever at fault. He was born in Columbus, Mississippi,
May 4, 1865, a son of Dr. Jeptha Vining Harris, who
has been a distinguished and highly respected citizen
of Key West since the early '70s, prominently con-
nected with many events which have shaped the history
of the island city and of the state. Before coming to
Florida he served throughout the Civil war as a member
of the Confederate army, which he entered as a private
but later became a surgeon. He was a physician by
profession and for a third of a century remained in
the active practice of medicine in Key West, but is now
living retired, having put aside further professional
cares. In all the years of his residence here he has
also figured prominently in connection with events of
public importance, and his official record is one over
which there falls not the least shadow of wrong or
suspicion of evil. For several years he served in the
state legislature, being a member of both the upper
and lower houses, and he was also collector of cus-
toms at the port of Key West from I885 until 1889,
filling the position under appointment of Grover Cleve-
land. For a number of years he acted as county
superintendent of public instruction, and in various
other ways he has furthered public progress along lines
of intellectual, material, political and moral develop-
ment.
Jeptha Vining Harris, Jr., was a lad of about six
years when his parents came to Key West, where he
has since made his home. His early education was
acquired in the public and private schools here and
later he entered the East Florida Seminary at Gaines-
ville, in which he completed the full course by gradu-
ation when but seventeen years of age. He received an
appointment to the United States Naval Academy at
Annapolis, Maryland, but after pursuing his studies
there for a year he resigned in order to prepare for


I


I


I






























































































* ~ ,-.


~P- C






FLORIDA


a professional career.


apartment of
graduated in


In 1885 he entered the law


Tulare University,


I I886.


to the bar in the


He w
Crescent


from which he was


as soon afterward


city and then,


admitted


returning


Key West, was admitted to practice in the courts of


Florida. V
partnership


Within


a short space of time he entered


with G. Bowne Patterson


and the firm,


commodore of
only deserving


sentative


the Key


West


mention


a prominent


Yacht


Club. He


in this volume as


southern


a repre-


family but also


a citizen whose ideals of life are high and whose activi-


ties have been an element


and legal


status of the city


in upholding the
and in furthering


political
its social


and moral development.


under


the style of


Patterson &


Harris, maintained a


continuous existence for nearly a quarter of a century,


or until


g191, and during that period enjoyed a reputa-


tion as one of the strongest


part of the
was made


state.


legal firms in the southern


In 1895, by appointment, Mr.


prosecuting


Florida, and held the


sixteen


attorney


for Monroe


Harris
county,


office without interruption for


years, a record most creditable, as


his capability


many


and his fidelity


to duty.


cases and lost but few.


o duty.
No c


it indicates


He has argued


ne better


knows


the necessity for thorough preparation and no one more


industriously prepares his cases than Mr.
course in the courtroom is characterized


.ness and dignity that


analysis


Harris.


by a calm-


indicate reserve strength.


of the facts is clear and exhaustive


sees without effort their


so groups


bined


force


relation


them as to enable him


and he


and dependence and


to throw


upon the point they tend


Harris is a valued member of the Key


ciation


and of the Florida


also has business interests


being a


their com-


prove.


West Bar Asso-


State Bar Association. He
aside from his profession,


director of the Island City Bank and a


in and attorney
On the 2d of


Curry's


director
Sons.


1892, occurred the marriage


E. Curry,


JUDGE


JOHN


Judge John Moses
tired from the United


engaged
is number


MOSES


Cheney,


Chene
States


CHENEY.


who has recently


district bench and is now


in the private practice of law in Jacksonville,


is numbered


among the standard-bearers of


the repub-


lican party in the state and is one who, although
stanchly advocating the principles in which he believes,


ever commands the respect


his political
unassailable,


tion to


opponents,


and confidence


for his record


even


in public life


being characterized by unflagging
the general good, while partisanship an


sonal aggrandizement are


to the


always


made


best interests of the majority.


Milwaukee,


Wisconsin,


and is a son of Joseph


he was born January 6,


Y. and Juliette


Cheney, both representatives of


In the common schools
shire, John M. Cheney
and afterward entered


Institute of New


a daughter of


the late William Curry, th
merchant of Key West who


cantile


house


Curry'


Harris have an only daughter,


accomplished
convent at Key
young ladies a


young lady
r West and in


Mawr.


of the city.


furnishings, which


s Sons.
Marian


Mr. and Mrs.


E. Harris,


lady who was educated


Miss Wright's


in the


School


The Harris home is not
iful but also one of the
It is a palatial residence,


was designed


by Mr.


subservient


A native


y 6, i859,
(McNab)


old Vermont families.


of Woodville,


pursued


his early


New Hamp-
Ilv education


the New Hampton Literart


Hampton, New


was graduated


with the class of 1881.


preparation for a professional career he attended


Boston


(Mass.)


Orlando, F
the practice
tive of the


awaited


Florida,


University
B. degree i
on the 8th


Law School,


in I885.


He located


of January, 1886,


of law and has since been a representa-


bar of


state.


No dreary


His comprehensive


novitiate


knowledge


ability soon won recognition that was manifest


growmg
cessfully


clientage,


and he continued


actively and


in the private practice of law until appointed


Harris, who also made the
of the adjacent grounds. TI


in 1899


and has since been the


social


to the position of


the meantime,


scene


functions.


United


States


however,


was elected


district
Id other


judge.
offices.


city attorney of Orlando and


was appointed supervisor of


census for Florida


is a member


of Trade and of th
interested in all the
organizations for the 1
city. His religious


Key West. Board
Commerce and is


those


McKinley. Higher honors were conferred
1906, when President Roosevelt appointed


States


attorney


for the southern


district


betterment


faith is


Episcopal


position


President


Taft, who continued


him in the


belief is that of the democratic


the Masons
of his recre-
the present


office until July, 1912, anid then appointed him United
States district judge for'the southern district of Flor-
ida. He took the oath of office on the 2d of Septem-
ber of that year and presided as judge over the United


WI





FLO


RIDA


States district


court until March 4, 1913,


when a


which he was graduated in


Immediately after,


deadlock


in the senate


Taft's appointees


prevented


being confirmed.


any of President
Retiring from the


bench, he resumed the practice of law on the Ist


ward he entered a bank as clerk, thus beginning his
connection with the banking business, in which he has
since attained prominence and importance. His resi-


May, 1913, at Orlando.


His broad experience


dence in Florida


dates from 1894, in which year he


comprehensive knowledge of the principles


prudence assure him a


continuance


of the liberal clien-


of juris-
eral clien-


went to De Land, where he entered the Volusia County


a connection which he still


maintains.


tage wh
judicial
owning


lich was


duties.


given him before
In addition he ha


he entered upon his


is other


connections,


a controlling interest in the Orlando


Water


gained rapid advancement, winning


the regard


of his


associates and the trust and confidence of his superi-
ors, and so conspicuous was his financial ability that


Company,


corporation


that supplies the


upon the organization


of the


Daytona


branch under


of Orlando


with water,


ice, gas


and electric


the name of the Merchants Bank he was made


current.
In Bristol, New Hampshire,
ber, 1886, Judge Cheney was


manager


on the 23d


of Novem-


united in marriage


Miss Elizabeth Alexander, of that city,


of Horace T.


Alexander.


a daughter


Mrs. Cheney belongs to the


and later cashier,


still holds and which


is in itself


ity and his high standing in
Merchants Bank of Daytona w


under the charter of the


a position


which he


a proof of his abil-


financial circles.
ias opened June I,


Volusia County


Bank, which


I896,
which


Florida chapter of the Daughters of the


Revolution and is connect
literary and social clubs.
riage are Miss Glenn A.,


Judge Cheney has


republican


American


ed with several prominent
The children of this mar-
Donald A. and Joseph Y.


ever given


and has been


his allegiance to the
one of its foremost


has been doing


business


a quarter of a century.


in the


county for more than


This latter institution


the fourth state bank organized under the laws of


the state of Florida and has
growth from the beginning. I
lished depositories for the state.


shown


a substantial


is one of the estab-
The Daytona branch


leaders since coming to this state.


candidate foi
ida-in 1900oo


r congress in the second


again


in I904,


was twice


district


and in


a candidate for gubernatorial honors.
the political situation of the country is


and thorough and he disp
affairs. His fraternal
Lodge, F. & A. M., of w
ter in 1894; the Royal A
high priest in 1899; an
Order of Elks. He al


Country Club and has


of Flor-


Igo8 he was
His study of


s comprehensive


h and he displays a statesmanlike grasp of
relations are with Orlando


F. & A. M., of which he


Arch Chapter,


was worshipful mas-


of which he


was


in 1899; and the Benevolent Protective


He also belongs


to the Orlando


attractive social qualities


which


a has had a continuous growth


since its


organization, as


is shown by the report of the board


of ganizaretors
of directors


which carefully examined the records of the


for the year
remarkable i


business


1912 and found them to show a very


increase,


the deposits


full one-fourth during the


business.


On March


was chartered


having


grown


past twelve months


27, 1913, the


as a separate


business with a paid-in capital of


Merchants Bank


institution and began
one hundred thou-


sand dollars and a surplus of twenty-five thousand


dollars;


deposits amount to one million,


three thousand dollars.


The building


and thirty-
is new and


bring him personal popularity,
a lawyer and judge has gained
prominence.


while his ability as
:d him professional


represents a value of thirty-seven thousand


a fine Indiana sandstone structure,


seventy


modern in


every


dollars,


thirty-seven


particular and


equipped with all the accessories necessary for


convenience


of the


patrons.


In addition to this build-


ing, which


was erected in. 191, the bank owns their


FREDERICK


N. CONRAD.


old establishment.


The two bank buildings


of the


Frederick


N. Conrad,


recognized as a


leader in fi-


Volusia
are by


County


and the Merchants Banks


far the finest in the


of Daytona


state of Florida outside


nancial
cashier
nected
terests,


and general business circles of Daytona,


of the Merchants


Bank and


prominently con-


with various other corporate and business


all important


as factors in the general


growth


of the city. He is a man of initiative, enterprise and
ability and by virtue of these qualities has steadily


of those


in the


Tampa, which


none finer


cities of Jacksonville,


have larger


Pensacola


banks and larger buildings


or more convenient.


credit for the rapid expansion
is due to Mr. Conrad, who


Much of the


of the Merchants Bank


given


largely of his


time and efforts to promote the growth of the institu-


worked his


way upward in the business world until


tion along modem


his administrative and


execu-


his name is a synonym for. progress


and well


tive ability


evidencing themselves in his systematic


directed


business activity.


was born in


Seneca


work and his capable management of the important


New York,


and there acquired his education,


affairs


under his


charge.


In addition to his


connec-


also vice president


hI


_


who has





FLORIDA


of the Daytona Public


was one of


Service Company, of which he


orgamzers;


Realty Company;


president of the Conrad-


vice president and


treasurer


mission
enterprise


business


for himself


. for three years,


secure


and conducted his
g a large and repre-


sentative patronage in recognition of his honorable and


Arcade


Port Orange


Amusement Company; president of


Development Company;


the Heard National Bank of


of the Daytona Board


of Daytona


hardly
section


a phase


of Trade;


a director


Jacksonville; treasurer


treasure


t. Thus it may be seen that 1
of legitimate business activity


r of the
there is
in this


of the county in which he is not active and


upright
interests


business dealings.


In 1899 lihe


and entered the service of the


trolling the Mallory


at Key


West.


Steamship


He has remained


concern ever since, r
ing clerk to that of


finally on


disposed


of his


company con-


Line in the offices


connected


with this


from the position of bill-


bookkeeper,


the ist of January,


then cashier,


1913, winning


promo-


prominent, for he possesses the rare power of enlarg-


tion to the office


of agent, succeeding


Robert


ing and extending his interests without
impairing his efficiency. It is hard to dete
of his many activities have been most d


in any way
ermine which


directly


bene-


Southwick in


conscientious and


duties,


giving


that position.


He has proved


efficient in the


to the company


discharge


services


capable,
of his


of a valued


ticial since all have been consistently constructive and


progressive.
Mr. Conrad married, in


O'Connor, of


Minden,


daughter, Jean Frances.


connected


and trusted representative and


sighted


September,


1905,


Miss Kate


Michigan, and they have one


Fraternally Mr.


Conrad


the Benevolent Protective Order of


Elks and he is a member of


the Halifax


River Yacht


Club. He is well known throughout Volusia county


not only as


one of its foremost


financiers


and busi-


ness men but also as a man of straightforward


upright


character.


merits the confidence


respect of all who know him and is numbered among


a resourceful,


business man.


On April 28, 1892, Mr. Pinder married
line Elizabeth Saunders, also a native


is Bahama islands,


having
city.
three
lows :


Mrs. Pin<
children,


her father, William Uriah


Miss Caro-


S


one of the leading merchants


ler


died November II,


Abaco,
aunders,
of that


909g, leaving


one son and two daughters,


Edna Louise, who


was


George Meredith, born July 2
Elizabeth, whose birth occurred


Pinder is a member


born Jul


!2, 895g;
August <


as fol-


y 14, 1893;
and Fannie


of the Plymouth Brethren church


most substantial


citizens of the city and


Volusia


and politically is affiliated with the


democratic


county:


He is not active as an office seeker, preferring


concentrate his attention


upon the


discharge


of the


responsible
performance


RIDLEY CURTIS PINDER.


ganizing
success.


po


duties entrusted to him, bringing to their
an intelligence, business ability and or-
wer which form the foundation of his


Ridley C
connected \
local offices


stages


p


urtis


Pinder,


vith the Mallo


at Key
progress


of agent, is a native of


who since 1899 has been
'ry Steamship Line in the
, rising through successive


and advancement


to the position


L. D.


SMOOT.


the Bahama islands,


Abaco, June 7,


Finder,


were also


1871. His parents,


Uriah and Elinor


born in that city, but when the sub-


ject of this review was still a child moved to Key


West where


they continued to


reside


during the re-


In his


posi


L. D. Smoot
development a
lic work undi


tion as .chief engineer of J
has done much worthy of pi


and o0
er his


organization
direction.


acksonville,


of the system of
He is actuated


mainder of their


lives, the father dying


October


31, i899, when he was seventy-three years of age,


that he does by a spirit
added to his practical and


of progressiveness which,
comprehensive professional


and the mother
of sixty-eight.


In the


passing away


acquirement of


July 21, i897, at the age


an education


Pinder attended public school in Key


completing a course, in


in Poughkeepsie,


mneteen.


Eastman's


New York,


Ridley


Curtis


West, later


Business


graduating at


Returning home he obtained


College
the age
employ-


knowledge, proa
of the nation's


duces splendid results.


capital,


ington, August 31,
E. (Goldsborough)


having


1879, a
Smoot.


He is a native


been born in


Wash-


son of John D. and Mary


His early


education


was


acquired in the public schools of Washington and in


1896 he entered Cornell University,


for two years.


which he attended


He next became a student in


ment in a local commission
engaged in that line of work


house and he remained


others


George
for one
in those


Washington


University,


year, acquiring
two institutions.


the active practice of his


remained


In 1900oo he entered upon
profession in connection


s


;1





FLORIDA


with railroad
connecting ti
entered the


work in the


ie capital
depot qi


extension


of electric lines


with its suburbs.


lartermaster's


department


others.


He may not have genius or any


phenomenal


Ie characteristics, yet he is capable of mature judgment of
in his own capacities and of the people and circumstances


Washington and was given charge of road construc-


that make up his life contacts and experiences.


He is


tion around
Virginia.


the signal corps buildings at Fort


Returning to the District


he was connected with municipal


ous branches of


Meyer,


eminently


of Columbia,


engineering in vari- he now


the department, there remaining


a man of business sense


won for him the


occupies


ness, however,


position


in Jacksonville and the


has been but


and these qualities


prominence


state.


one phase and feature


years..


On the 9th


of October,


19II, he


appointed by the board of bond trustees of


sonville,
the city,
served.


Florida, to the position of


in which capacity


During his


been engaged in


tablishing str
making plans


sojourn


making


eet and


for drainage,


he has


chief engineer of
since acceptably


here he has principally


topographical surveys, in es-
rade improvements, and in


sewer


water exten-


existence


and has


not precluded


his activil


support of many measures which have had


object the upbuilding and welfare of


native


ty in and
for their


state.


of Florida, Mr. Upchurch was


Callahan on the loth of March,


iel S. and Sarah
on the paternal
maternal is of I


A. (Parker)


, i86t, a son of
Upchurch. TI


side is of Scotch
French Huguenot <


born


Nathan-
te family


descent, while the
ririn and the first


sons.


electric


He is also the author if a plan to place all


light and


underground


power lines


in the


business


section


and bring about an entire reorganization


of all the seven branches


supervision. He
his control in all
of the business c,


great strides


has about eij
departments


to be placed under his


ghty engineers under
and has each branch


carefully systematized.
for the benefit of th


the departments" and has
stantial good.


On the 2oth of January,


marriage


already


19OO,


to Miss Loraine


of Philadelphia, and they have four ;


John Alden,


American ancestor settled in North Carolina in colonial


days. In 185
removed with


county.
in those


;8 Nathaniel
his family to


He was a man
early days wa


S. Upchurch, the father,


Florida,


settling in


Nassau


of notable intelligence and even


s a successful


His wife belonged to one of


He is mak-


real-estate


the oldest


agent.


families


both ancestral lines


received


accomplished


Mr. Smoot. was
P. Williamson,
sons: Lloyd D.,


inheritance


sterling qualities which ever command


appreciation.
:h of education


The father, realizing the
as a preparation for life


respect


value


practical


and responsible duties, sent his son to the public schools


when


Kenneth McLean and


advanced


as far as pos-


ing his college
the Sigma Chi
Society of Civ
a Mason. He
his profession


reached an enviable


engineer


Mr. Smoot


became


and he is a member


a member


of the American


'il Engineers. He is both an Elk and
has made continuous advancement in


increasing


and responsible


position


lity has
as chief


of Jacksonville.


Carolina.
South at


He afterward entered the University


Sewanee, Tennessee,


educational institutions ii
He started in the business


one of the noted


part of the country.
in 1882, then a young


man of twenty-one years, turning his attention to the


manufacture of


He owned and operated


a logging


business


so wisely


directed


grew ana win
tend the scope


his business interests that his patronage
uin a few years he was enabled to ex-


of his interests by the


establishment


another lumber manufacturing plant,


Florida became a center of interest


to enter-


uprising business men many decades ago, the lumber
industry has been one of its chief sources of wealth,


and among those who have made their


fortunes


in the


at Race I
extended


Georgia.


his business


across


political circles.


interests
; citizen-


and became a recognized leader
In 1886 Nassau county elected I


conduct


of the lumber business or subsidiary interests


Jacksonville.


He is a man


as its representative in the general assembly,


enjoyed


the distinction


where he


first democrat that


of keen
utilized


enterprise who has readily


opportunities


that others have


recognized


county


passed heed-


meantime


his business interests


continued


history


is the


progression under the steady hand of


consistent master


harmonious and well balanced.


strong character


story of an orderly


one who is
e organism


He possesses also a


and one that inspires


whose


confidence in


grow


and develop as the result


and recognition and improvement


is 1809


he became


church Company,
tion as one of the


of his initiative sl
t of opportunities.


:he partners in the D
has since maintained


Since


a posi-






























































'(9






FLORIDA


Jacksonville but of


facture
larging


the state.


of lumber on
and improving


removed from


state.


They began the manu-
grc


an extensive


i


the plant, which in


Race Pond,


Mr. Upchurch


company and removed


order to


more capably


greatly
I895


Georgia, to Moniac,


became


treasurer of


his headquarters to Moniac


direct


the firm at that point. TI
almost phenomenal growth.


increased
nual figure


the growing interests


he business


has enjoyed


Year by year its patronage


until its sales reached a most gratifying


re.


every


Mr. Upchurch


phase of the


tion of the timber


the market
ests of the


is thoroughly


lumber trade from


in the forest until it


a finished product.


business in principle and


an-


familiar
the selec-


is placed upon


He guided the


inter-


detail, formulated


died after a brief married


Some years later he


wedded Belle W. Upchurch, a daughter of


church,
dren :
first ma
F. by tl


of Raleigh,


George
marriage;


North Carolina.


He h


W. G. Up-
as six chil-


H., John J., Jr., and Frank D. by the
and Susie E., Garland L. and Marion


he second.


Mr. Upchurch
Germania Club.


belongs to the


He has


active factor in democratic


opinions


carry


weight


ing element in shaping


religious belief


which he


guided him


is that


is most loyal.


in his


relations


Seminole Club and the


long been recognized


circles


as an


in the state and


its councils and fo
its policy and act
of the Methodist
High principles


orm a guid-
;ivity. His
church, to


ever


with his fellowmen and


the conduct of his business affairs and it is well known


his plans carefully and
As a result thereof the


was prompt in their execution.


business


kept growing


that he holds


a high


standard


of business


ethics.


and for


some time


Mr. Upchurch concentrated his energies


upon this


undertaking.


Georgia


regarded him


representative a citizen as


as a valuable,
did Florida an


worthy and
d three times


HON. RHYDON M.


CALL.


honored him with election to the state legislature,


serv-


In the


year 1893 Rhydon M.


Call received


ing during the terms of I895
from the fourth district, while
represented his county in the hou


term he was again a member
in shaping much constructive


and 1896 as senator
in 1899 and 1900oo he
se. In the succeeding
the senate and aided


legislation


pointment to the


circuit


court


bench


and for


than twenty years presided over that court in Jack-


sonville, until on Marc
by President Woodrow
iudee for the southern


26, 1913, he
Wilson United


district


was appointed
States district
rida, assuming


period of six years.
possibilities of the
immediate benefits 1


He recognized the


state and


needs


and the


duties


labored not only for


I, 1913.


member of


excep-


the bar in this city


continuous connection


business interests were extending


only in scope and volume but


ing it impossible


also in variety


to longer


concentrate his


ability, knowledge
have ever kept hin
fession in Florida.


conscientiousness


service


energies


upon a single undertaking, he removed to


establish


office and


headquarters there and from that point supervise all of


his varied c
opportunities


concerns.


He is constantly watchful


for profitable investment of the


which continues to flow


and industrial


from his numerous commercial


enterprises


has won in business
men of the state.


circles ranks


position which he
m with the leading


He is now treasurer of


Upchurch Investment Company, president


anuary 13,


Florida, his parents being


(Mays)


natives


George


of Kentucky


lina respectively.


his uncle, R
the paternal
practicing pi


Major George
Keys Railroad


and laid out the town of


3, in Fernandina,
W. and Starke


and South


The family came to Florida


K. Call, was


grandfather,


George


territorial governor,
W. Call, who was a


physician, settling in Leon county,


W. Call was attorney for the Cedar


of its


Fernandina,


construction
in which he


Lumber Company and vice


p


Development Company. I
United States Trust and


Of him it has been said:
sive and enterprising st


is with


he always


his time


opportunity of


president of the
HIe is vice presi-


Savings


Bank.


"He is noted for his progres-
rit. which is of such a char-


is as ready


means


as he


and talents, wherever he recognizes an


advancing the


best interests of the peo-


or his state."
F April, I890, occurred the marriage of
and Miss Susie Hawkins, a daughter
awkins, of Kings Ferry, Florida, who


made his home.


He was a gallant officer of the Second


Regiment in the


the battle of Seven


front as captain


Pine


of his


rank of major when he
Rhydon M.; and Sarah,


Civil war
s in 1862.
company,
fell. He


Judge Call was but four years


his father's
maternal gr
(Smith) M


serving


with the


of age at the time of


and was reared


grandparents, Dr. Rhydon G. and Sarah B.
.ays. It was while spending his youthful


orange
primary


ranch in Putnam county
education. He attended





FLORIDA


vate schools


and pursued his


academic course in the


Washington and Lee University at Lexington,


ginia, after which he entered
in that -institution and was
g


degree
of Vii


in 1878.


ginia,


upon the study


radnated


He was at once


but did


not begin


O


Vir-
f law


with the B. L.


fare and progress of
few men in judicial
period, and none has
fearless in conduct or


and state.


service


The record


extends over


been more
stainless in


faultless


a longer
in honor,


reputation.


admitted to the bar


to practice


until two


years later, when he opened an office in Jacksonville
and entered upon the active work of the profession.


In this connection it has been


WILLIAM


RANDOLPH PORTER.


said of him:


remarkably short time he thoroughly established
self as a lawyer of unusual ability and from that
he has been prominently identified with the legal


fession
advocate


of the state.
and as circuit


opinions of his contemporaries


the third


oldest


the first has


lorida district, entering up
3. Judge Call is well fitted
distinguished


William Randolph
and general manager


pany,


Both in the capacity of an


has he won the golden
s." Judge Call is now


practitioner in Jacksonville and from


maintained an enviable position at the bar


of this city, early proving his


intricate


and involved problems of the law.


low townsmen,


appreciative


with the
His fel-


of his public spirit


his ability, have frequently called him to positions of


honor and trust,
most creditable.
that of member


chosen


in 1882,


and his record has at all times


The first


office that he ever held was


of the city council, to
continuously serving


during which period he


tives in
ments.
Cleveland


exercised his official


support of many progressive pu
He was district attorney under


first administration and


tor of Duval county.


He served in


which he was


six years,
1 preroga-


blic move-
President


was county solici-
the former posi-


tion for two years, or until succeeded by a republican


appointee, an
him county s
until June 3
position on t
tendered him


mained


id in 1891 Governor Fleming


solicitor,


in which position he


when he


appointed
continued


resigned to accept a


he bench of the fourth judicial


by Governor Mitchell.


circuit,


Judge Call re-


upon the circuit bench by reason of suc-


cessive appointments,


and his twenty years'


were characterized by a masterful grasp of
lems presented for solution. On March


Judge
United


tl


service
ie prob-


1913,


Call was appointed by the president of the


States,


the southern
April I, 1913.
portant and


Woodrow


Wilson, district judge


profound legal knowledge,
sive experience.
On the 2d of March, 188
riage of Judge Call and


a daughter of


Henry E.


upon his duties
for this im-


position on account of his


his ability and


his exten-


was celebrated the mar-


I Miss Ida Caroline Holmes,
Holmes of Jacksonville. They


had one child, George W., now a student in


ington an
16, 1896.


and Lee University.


Mrs. Call died


the Wash-
December


Judge Call belongs to the Seminole Club


and the Church Club.
along those lines which


His interests chiefly center
we most to do with the wel-


occupies a leadi


cles of the country's
an active factor in
West in recent years
upon the substantial


Porter, as
of the Key
ng position


secretary,
West Re
in the bu


southernmost city.


the rapid


treasurer
ealty Com-
siness cir-


He has been


development of Key


and his success


qualities


has been based


of energy


was born here May 12,


son of Dr.


citizen ot F londa who for the past qua
tury has been the state health officer.
Porter has spent his entire life in his n


Joseph Yates


enter-


and is the


Porter, a distinguished


the exception of two


years


He completed his education
North Carolina, finishing a


by graduation
succeeding tw<


with the


) years he was


passed


in


at Binghan
four years'


class of 1889.


an employee


.rter of a t
William


Ltive city with
Jacksonville.


IS


school


course there
During the
in the State


Bank of Florida at Jacksonville and then returned


Key West,


where he established


real-estate agency.


devoted his


suiting


a fire insurance and


To this business


attention in a


in the attainment of


twenty-two years he has


he has


most capable manner,
substantial success.


represented a large


in fire insurance and real estate


member of


being
at Ke:
Bank.


George
v West


clientage


and is now the senior


the Porter-Allen Company,


W. Allen, recently collector of
and the president of the First


In I9o4 Mr. Porter became one


izers and incorporators of the


pany and was made se
as its general manager,


George W. Alien
the company. T
lows the practice
has negotiated n


being
he Ke


cretary
which
his pa:
v West


Wes


partner
customs
National


of the organ-
t Realty Com-


and treasurer as


position he yet holds,


rtner and


president


Realty Company


of handling its own real estate


iany important property


The Porter-Allen Company


surance business


in Key


is an important factor.
and in the pursuit of a


transfers.


does the largest fire


West.


In both Mr.


Porter


His enterprise is unfaltering


persistent


with a most satisfactory reward.


other
Bank.


interests


On the Igth


united


marriage


Alabama, a daughter


who up


purpose
Jn ad


he has met


addition to his


of the First National


of January, 1898, Mr. P
to Miss Grace Dorgan, o
of Major Lyman C.


to the time of his death,


Porter


was


of Mobile,
. Dorgan,


about twelve years


l's


he is a director


aduated


"* .


district,


m


It I I I


Florida









ago, was one c
nred citizens.


>f


Mobile's


most prominent and


Mr. and Mrs. Porter have one child,


a daughter, Jessie, now


various


their objec
labors and
productive
the board


has been
sioners.


Porter


fourteen years of age.


is a Mason


the Elks lodge.
municipal plans


and is


a past


e


Fra-
exalted


He has been identified with


and projects which


the betterment of


conditions


have for
s and his


ideas are at all times of a practical nature,


of good
of public


a member


While


and of constantly


results. H
works and


of the board


[e is now chairman of


for the


six years


of county commis-


his business interests are extensive


growing


found time and opportunity


affairs,


being never neglectful


importance,


he has


ever


to cooperate in public
of any duty of citizen-


ary of the same year came to Miami, which was at


that time


sprngnmg


existence.


A railroad


was built into the


the time
few had


Mr. Lummus t(
preceded him


his residence


here very


to the townsite and he was


the second man to erect a business house in the com-


munity.


soon as his building was completed he


established himself in the mercantile business here
and until 19o8 conducted a large establishment, win-


a representative


selected line


reasonable


of goods,


prices.


patronage by reason of his well


courteous


When he severed


service


and his


his connection


with merchandising


tion to banking,


of Bay


becoming


Biscayne and


vice president of the


atten-
Bank


winning advancement


ship; on the contrary it is


of Key West's
cooperation can
the city's welfa


recognized


foremost residents and his


be counted


re


at all time


e is one
aid and
s where


are involved.


lowing year to the presid<
office which he now holds.
is one of the strongest and


tutions
the city.


encv


of the institution,


The Bank of Bay Biscayne
best known financial insti-


is besides


the oldest bank in


It has a capital of one hundred


thousand


its business is constantly increasing


in volume


JAMES

s position


E. LUMMUS.


as president


importance.
directed its


of the Bank of


Biscayne and through the force of his great abil-


ity and business


discrimination James E. Lummus is


of its


As its


head Mr. Lummus has largely


policies and


present


and executive ability.


city's leading


controlled its


prosperity is due to


He is numbered
his judgment be


financiers,


growth


organmz-
I among


con-


a central


figure in financial circles of Miami, where


he is honored


as one of the


pioneer


builders


sidered
finance.


thoroughly sound on matters of banking and
In addition to his connection with the Bank


the city. H
23, 1867, at
(Epperson)


e was born in Bronson,
nd is a son of Ezekiel


Lummus,


natives


Florida, December
S. and Frances J.


of Georgia,


where their


of Bay Biscayne he is


various


a stockholder


other financial institutions


In Arcadia,


Louisiana,


in 1893,


and director


of the city.
Mr. Lummus


mar-


marriage


war.


occurred at the time


In 1867 they


of the close of the


removed


locat-


tried Miss Georgie


Georgie


Elizabeth,


Brown and they have a daughter,
who is nine years of age. Mr.


in Levy county, near Bronson.


a veteran o
that conflict


f the Civil war,


in the


Confederate


James E. Lummus was reared


county, remaining


upon


was seventeen years of age.


to Bronson and t
suits, becoming a


turned his


having


The father was
served through


army.
to manhood in


his father's


At that time he went


attention


to business


clerk in a store there and remaining


Lummus is


South.


one of the leaders
city's interests and
prominent in public
of the city and serve
an able, constructive


making his


official


a member


of the Methodis


Since coming


to Miami


in all projects
he has through


affairs.


it Episcopal
he has been


for advancing the
ut the period been


He was the second mayor


ed three years, giving to the people
re and businesslike administration,


service equal his business


enter-


capacity for three years.
he entered Eastman's


Poughkeepsie,
ated in i888.
position as. a
when he went


conducted a


year he again


New York,


At the
Business


as a force in


community


development.


College in


from which he was gradu-


Returning to Bronson, h
clerk and continued in
to Fort Fannin, where


mercantile store of his own.


went to Bronson


W. Epperson,


.concern


ie resumed
it until li


THOMAS


EDWARD


FITZGERALD.


one year


Thomas Edward Fitzgerald, who combines prom-


a partner-
ihe general
conducted


mence


success
his lega


activity


in journalism has won


in both lines of work which claim his interest,


1


patronage


representative


and


ant and his two papers--the Gazette-News


[ import-
and the





FLORIDA


10o, 1879, and is a son of M. C. and Catherine


bert) Fitzgerald, who moved


to Ellsworth,


(Lam-
Viscon-


sin, when the subject of this review was still a child.


Thomas Edward ]
in Ellsworth and t
journalism, his first


on the Eagle.


Fitzgerald, acquired his


there


education


began his connection with


position


He afterward


being
served


as printer s d
as apprentice


the Ellsworth Gleaner and thoroughly mastered the


printer's trade,
pleton (Minn.)


rising
Press


to Florida, settling at


identified


himself


ing the Gazette-News,


edits.
March,


in it to be foreman of the


In January,


1901, ne came
he immediately


purchas-


I.


Daytona, where


with journalistic interests,


which he


now controls and


The Gazette was established at Ormond


F. A. Mann.


property of L. M.


It later became tlhe


Murray, who brought it to Day-


tona, where it was consolidated with


a weekly, published


E. V. Blackman.


the News,


Mr. Mur-


ray sold the Gazette-News to Marie E. Mann, a


ter of the


founder of the


transferred the paper, in


Fitzgerald,
possibilities


the present editor,
and brought it to


Gazette, and she


January,


1900,


who has de
the position


the leading journals of Volusia county.


r. Mur-
daugh-
in turn


Mr. Fitzgerald served for three years as quarter-


master
Second


commissary


Regiment,


rank of lieutenant.


Florida


of the Second
National Guard,


His fraternal affiliation


tensive and representative,
Chapter and Commandery in


is a member of


the Nobles of


is affiliated with the Independent


and i


s past


Daytona


exalted


ruler and


Lodge, No. 1141,


B. P. O.


as delegate to the grand lodge


Battalion,
with the
IS are ex-


for he belongs to
the Masonic order


the Mystic


Order


Shrine.


of Foresters


a charter member of


of that
of that


He served


organization at


the convention held in July, 1911, at Atlantic
and also at the convention held in Portland,


in July,


Halifax
retary
tion.


River


1912.
Yacht


of the Florida
In his political


Socially
Club and w
East Coast
il views he


democrat and his political,


him in


business


a foremost


honored and valued


he belongs


t


'as for two years


City,
Ore-
o the


sec-


Automobile Associa-
* has always been a


and social


position


among


citizens.


to T. E.


veloped its
of one of


George


HOWELL H.


ISLER.


Crouch


bought and


conducted the Gazette-News for


period of one year but at the expiration


time Mr. Fitzgerald
has continued to be


of that


again assumed ownership and his


guiding


hand in


its publica-


tion. The Gazette-News Company has for the


eight years also issued a resort dai
Daily News, published during the mo
her, January, February and March.


e Gazette-News
T. E. Fitzgerald


C. S. Harris,


secretary and


Aside from journalism
of the most prominent and


tona,
much
John I
mitted


two yea
elected


extensive


ly,


the Daytona


,nths of
These


Decem-
papers


Company, a cor-
is president and


treasurer.


Mr. Fitzgerald is also one
successful lawyers in Day-


patronage connecting him


important litigation.
B. Stetson University
to the bar in April, 1


irs


he was elected


He studied law at


at De
905.


and was


After practicing


city attorney


in xgo8. Resigning the position he


into partnership


tion still continues and


est in the


important


with E. F. Oates.


was re-
entered


Their associa-


the firm is one of the strong-


connected through


its practice


legal business.


Mr. Fitzgerald married,


on August
daughter of
berman and


an attract


they have made
friends.


in Minneapolis,


I1o 190, V, M iss u.nna
Tohn S. Vandewater,


11 owner
ive homr


a center


Minnesota,


Vandewater,


Howell H. I
superintendent


in this


Isler, ably filling the


of schools


section September


position


of Leon county,


I7, 1874,


Mary (Wiggins) Isler,
engaged in teaching all


of county
was born


a son of Thomas


natives of
during his


prominent in educational circles.
also as a veteran of the Civil war,


Confederate army as a private.
the hand at the second battle o


honorably


discharged


was for many years


time of
master


and makes


was


He was honored
having served in the


Gettysburg


at the close of hostilities.


a justice


his death, July 28,


her home in Tallah:


three children were born:


jamin Isler,
police of Ta
Howell H


of Leon county;


llahassee; ;
. Isler was


and at the age


career, e
followed


ngagmng


reared


peace


and at the


i, was serving as post-
His wife survives him
issee. To their union
ttie, the wife of Ben-
Erastus R., chief of
rell H.. of this review.


his father's


of eighteen began his independent
in teaching, an occupation which he


for seven years thereafter.
he established himself as


Tallahassee, his straightforward business methods and
honorable dealings winning for him a large patron-


age. In November,


perintendent


Mr. and Mrs. Fitzgerald


e in Daytona
of hospitality


Beach,
for their


served,


1912, he


of schools of Leon county and has


proving


practical,


far-sighted


and conscien-


discharge


On November
Sadie Sloan, of I


I5, 1905,


married


\


J f


I


k
j


.*


___~_~


&a


in turn





FLORIDA


children, Thomas J., Bessie Louise and William E.
Mr. Isler belongs to the Baptist church, and politically
is affiliated with the democratic party. He is a mem-
ber of the Columbia Woodmen and the Woodmen
of the World and in social and official life is recog-
nized as a man of genuine personal worth who has
won the respect and esteem of all with whom he has
come in contact.



JOHN LOWE, JR.

Key West owns John Lowe, Jr., as its oldest na-
tive citizen and one of its best known merchants and
business men. He has always resided here, his birth
occurring at the family home in Key West, March
I, 1833, so that he has now passed the eightieth
milestone on life's journey. His father, John Lowe,
was born on Green Turtle Key, of the Bahama islands,
and was a' sea captain and seafaring man. He mar-
ried Bianca Kemp in early manhood and together they
removed to Key West, a short time before the birth
of their son, John Lowe, Jr. At different times the
father served as captain of a number of vessels sail-
ing the waters adjacent to Key West. He had a long
and eventful career. On one occasion it was believed
that he was drowned but he was resuscitated and lived
to the advanced age of eighty-nine years, his remains
being now interred in Key West cemetery by the side
of his good wife, who had died a few years previously.
Their family numbered nine children, five of whom
were born in the Bahamas, and the other four in Key
West, following the arrival in this city. Of the nine
four are yet living, namely: John; Mrs. Mary Lowe,
a widow; Mrs. Amelia Delaney, of Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania; and William H., of Key West.
John Lowe, Jr., acquired his education in Key West
but his opportunities in that direction were very lim-
ited. He probably did not attend school more than
six months altogether but experience has been his
teacher and under her direction he has learned many
valuable lessons. When a lad he frequently accom-
panied his father to sea and thus became familiar
with various phases of seafaring life and boating.
At the remarkably early age of thirteen years he was
given a license of ship master and made several side
trips to nearby points. At fifteen years of age he
entered the employ of his brother-in-law, the late
William Curry, of Key West, who up to the time of
his death a few years ago was the most prominent
merchant of this city. Mr. Lowe remained in Mr.
Curry's business for thirty years, serving successively
as clerk, salesman and manager in that well known


mercantile house.


He finally retired from his posi-


tion and embarked in merchandising on his own ac-
count, conducting a large store for thirty-five years.
The business is still in existence, being now owned
and carried on by his sons to whom it was turned
over several years ago that the father might be re-
lieved to some extent of arduous business cares. For
.- about sixth fve years Mr. Lowe was closely associ-
ated with commercial interests in Key West and
throughout the entire period maintained an unassail-
able reputation for business integrity as well as en-
terprise and progressiveness. During all this period
he also owned and operated a sponge fleet and in fact
the sponge industry for many years was his chief
business, it reaching such extensive proportions that
it overshadowed his mercantile interests. At one time
when the sponge industry was at its greatest height
in the waters adjacent to Key West Mr. Lowe had a
fleet of fifteen vessels which he operated in connec-
tion with the gathering of sponges. This indicates
something of the mammoth proportions to which the
business attained.
Fifty-five years ago or in i858 there was celebrated,
in the Lowe family home at Key West, the marriage
of John Lowe, Jr., and Miss Mary Elizabeth Lowe,
the wedding ceremony being performed by the Rev.
O. E. Herrick. These worthy people are still travel-
ing life's journey happily together as man and wife,
enjoying excellent health. They became the parents
of seven children of whom their first born, Emma L.,
died at the age of three years. The others were: Ed-
ward L.; Emma L., who became the wife of Philip J.
Bayly, but both she and her husband are now de-
ceased; Eugene, who died at the age of eight years;
George L., who is cashier of the First National Bank
of Key West; Stephen F., who is in charge of the
mercantile house of John Lowe Jr.'s Sons; and
Charles R., who died at the age of thirty. The eldest


son, Edward L
tile business of
In religious f
his entire life


., is also connected with the mer
John Lowe Jr.'s Sons.
aith Mr. Lowe is an Episcopalian
has exemplified the teachings of


can-

and
the


Christian faith. Though he has recently passed his
eightieth birthday he is yet enjoying good health and
would readily pass for a man twenty years his junior.
He is strong and vigorous, his eyesight and hearing
are good and he bids fair to live for many years to
come. In the memorable hurricane which spread
over the coast in 1909 Mr. Lowe suffered a property
loss of over thirty thousand dollars but his accumu-
lations previous to that time prevented this from
causing him any serious financial embarrassment. In
fact his well directed business interests have brought
to him substantial returns, enabling him in the even-
ing of life to spend his days in rest from further
labor, surrounded with all of the comforts and many





FLORIDA


which go to make life worth living.
of the city's best known residents and
personal worth is acknowledged by all.


EUGENE EDGAR


WEST.


A man of great natural ability, Eugene Edgar West
has won success in business since he made his initial
step in commercial circles. His advancement has been
uniform and rapid and has been truly merited, for
after all that may be done for a man in the way of
giving him opportunities for obtaining the advantages
which are sought in the schools and in books he must
eventually formulate, determine and give shape to his
own character, and this is what Mr. West has done.
He is persevering in the pursuit of a persistent pur-
pose and has gained a most satisfactory reward. His
life is exemplary in many respects and he has sup-
ported interests which are calculated to uplift human-
ity while his own high moral worth is deserving of
warm commendation. Jacksonville is proud to number
him among her citizens. He is a southern man in the
best sense of the term. His birth occurred in Brooks
county, Georgia, July I, 1857, and he comes of Scotch


and English origin, his paternal ancestors
pioneer settlers of North Carolina, where
tives of the name participated in the Indian
wars, while a number of the family fought
can liberty in the War of the Revolution.


having been
representa-
and colonial
for Ameri-
Mr. West


also had numerous relatives who were in the Con-
federate army and his oldest brother was killed while
on active duty near Richmond, Virginia. James West,
the father, was a splendid type of the ante-bellum
planter and southern gentleman. He was born in
North Carolina in 1811 and in 1830 removed to Georgia,
where he wedded Mary Ann Hunter, a native of that
state. Nature endowed him with a strong mind and
though he may not have had the school advantages of
many, in the school of experience he learned valuable
lessons and became a man of wide influence in political
circles as well as in private life. In 1850 he was
chosen to represent his district in the state senate and
was the author and champion of the bill which created
Brooks county from portions of Lowndes and Thomas
counties. During the Civil war he became a member
of the State Militia. In 1863 he removed from Brooks
to Madison county, where his remaining days were
passed upon the home farm. His fortune was largely
swept away by the Civil war but he always remained a
hospitable host and a kindly, charitable man, noted
for his kindness to, and consideration for, his slaves
as well as for his equals.


of the luxuries
He is today one
his business and


The exigencies of war having destroyed the fortunes
of the family, the four sons of James West were thus
thrown upon their own resources. They had wise home
teaching and a beautiful environment which developed
kindly consideration for, and helpfulness toward, each
other. These traits have been manifest throughout
their entire lives and their love and labor for each
other have been notable and touching. They started
out without capital save health, strength, energy and
determination, and fortune has been won by all. The
eldest surviving son, W. S. West, is now a distinguished
lawyer of Georgia and also one of the prominent rep-
resentatives of democracy in that state, having served
almost continuously as a member of the legislature
since I892. He has taken a prominent stand in regard
to many vital and significant legislative problems and
for ten years before he secured its enactment was the
champion of the uniform text-book law. He was also
a strong advocate of bills to erect a new passenger
station for the Western & Atlantic Railroad in At-
lanta and to provide for the next leasing of that road
at sixty thousand dollars per month. His labors were
also largely instrumental in securing the passage of
the bill resulting in the establishment of the Agricul-
tural, Industrial and Normal College in South Georgia
and at the session of I905-6 he presided over the state
senate as its president, in which connection he added
new laurels to those which he had previously won. An-
other son of the family, Abram Hunter West, of Jack-
sonville, has large interests in plantations, in lumber
and in manufacturing industries and enterprises of
various character, having gained a most creditable
position in business circles. The third son, John W.
West, is extensively connected with various industrial
and commercial enterprises and like the others has
been conspicuously successful.
The record of Eugene E. West is in harmony with
that of his brothers. He had only such educational
opportunities as he could obtain in private schools of
Madison and Brooks counties but his ideal home
training stimulated his ambition and directed his en-
ergies, and upon the excellent foundation of character,
of ability and enterprise, laid in his home surroundings,
he started out to build the superstructure of success.
Nature endowed him with a strong constitution. More-
over, it is well known that power grows through the
exercise of activity and his intelligently directed labors
have constituted the source'of his continuous advance-
ment. He was first associated with his brothers in a
business way but when he had reached a point that
would make such a course practicable he branched
out independently in connection with the manufacture
of turpentine and lumber. He gave unfaltering at-
tention to the development and control of the business
and, as the years have passed by, has gained a place



















tt Lz/~f






FLORIDA


among the


substantial


and prosperous residents of the


state. His judgment has been seldom if


ever at


he has recognized and utilized opportunities that others


have passed hee
the coordination


dlessly by and has secured


of seemingly diverse


he has brought into a unified whole.


the nature and


present


extent


of his


time is indicated


dent of the Ellavill
and is extensively
tine business under


le,


Wes


business


results


elements which


Something


interests


by the fact that he is
it Lake & Jennings R;


at the
presi-
ailroad


engaged in the lumber and turpen-
.r his own name. He is likewise


here became


ceeding


the proprietor


a general


his uncle, John McDougall,


Tallahassee and a large landowner.


Dougall


soon became


business prospered


securing


for him


For about


postmaster under
after the latter's


to succeed
July of the


1


a pioneer
Alexander '


well known in the city and his


, his honorable and upright methods
a large and representative patron-


twenty years


he served


as assistant


his brother, John McDougall, and


death, April


23, 1912,


to the office, entering


same year.


He has


was appointed


upon his d
since done


duties


a great


part owner of the


West


valuable real estate


office building as well


in Jacksonville


and is


as other
a stock-


deal of practical and able work and is managing the


affairs


of the department in


a thoroughly


businesslike


holder in the Heard National Bank of this city.


On the 28th of February,


in wedlock to Miss


of John V
Augustine.


three of whom


1889, Mr.


West was joined


Louise Frances Brady,


i. and Louisa


became


A. (Lourcey)
the parents of


are living, E. E.


Hunter West and Lois Evlyn
Mr. West belongs to the Se
Clubs and his fraternal relatio


West.
eminole


a daughter


Brady,


of St.


five children,
, Jr., Joseph


and the


ns are with


Osceola


the Benevo-


and efficient way.
Mr. McDougall married Miss


they have become


at home;
lahassee;


Eliza Brokaw and


e the parents of five children: John,
the wife of James Messer, of Tal-


Mary, who married


W. S. Quaterman,


Tallahassee; and Peres and Abram C., both of whom


reside at home. Mr.
political beliefs, and


church.


In all of his


McDougall is a republican in his


is a member of the


business


Presbyterian


and official


dealings


lent Protective Order of


Elks, the Travelers Protective


Association and the Concatenated Order


of Hoo Hoos,


which is a social organization among lumbermen. He
is an active democrat but is interested in politics solely
for the purpose of supporting its principles and assist-
ing in the election of the best men for office. His life


he has been thoroughly reliable and straightforward


and his


influence


is at all times in


measures and movements


general


calculated to


favor of those


promote


welfare.


has been one of continuous activity


in which has been


accorded


due recognition of labor and today he is num-


THE DE


SOTO


NATIONAL


BANK.


bered among the


substantial


citizens


of northern


Florida.


His interests


are thoroughly identified with


It has been said that banking


institutions are


those of the


state and at all times he is ready to


heart of the commercial body, indicating the health-


his aid


and cooperation to any movement


calculated


fulness


of trade.


One of the substantial moneyed in-


benefit this


section


of the


country


or advance


stitutions of


Arcadia


and that section of Florida


wonderful development.


the De


Soto National Bank,


which was organized on


the 6th of June,


1907, by


W. G.


and B. F.


Welles,


brothers, the former having


been president since its


organization,


while the latter continues


as cashier,


ALEXANDER


Among


the earlier residents


bered Alexander
ing figure in the


McDOUGALL.


of Tallahassee


McDougall, who has


business


life of the


and who is now serving as postmaster.
in Greenock, Scotland, November 6,


num-
lead-


city since 1876
He was born
1849, and is a


with R.
dents.
dollars,


E. Whidden


The bank


now has


and C. G. Davis as vice presi-


was capitalized


a surplus of


lars and average deposits of
five thousand dollars. The
a brick and stone building


for fifty thousand


seventeen thousand


one hundred and seventy-
bank owns its own home,


sixty-five


feet and three stories in. height.


one hundred


The ground floor


son of Alexander and Mary (McDonald) McDoug
both of whom have passed away. They had a la
family of children, of whom the subject of this
view is the only one now surviving.
Alexander McDoueall acquired his education


is occupied by the bank and stores and the upper floors


constitute the


De Soto.


bank is thoroughly equipped in the most modern man-
ner with fine bank furniture and fixtures, has a strong


fire-proof


deposit boxes.


schools of his


native county


brothers, the real promoters and managers of


the in-


was sixteen years became connected


ing there, ren
America. H
VoL n--4


with mechandis-


until July, 1876, when he came to
immediately in Tallahassee and


own large


orange


groves


and also have ex-


today among the prominent and prosperous citizens of





FLORIDA


De Soto county.


W. G. Welles came to


Florida from


his fame spread through the


commercial


New England about


Welles


twenty-eight


twenty years ago,


years


ago and B.


of the


and during the entire period


country.


msurance


ser


compares


vices were soon sought by
of the north, to whom he


of their residence in this state the brothers


have been


invariably


gave


satisfaction.


During the late Civil


factors in the
Florida, their


upbuilding of


efforts


Arcadia


and southern


being particularly valuable in


war he was indispensable to the several


manders on


this station, in


the repair


naval


com-


of their


connection


with the development of De


county.


vessels, and stood


high in their


confidence.


drooping flags at half-mast from each cupola and place
of business in our city, and the shipping in our har-


GEORGE


L. BARTLUM.


and the shichpping in
action in which he


bor, testify the appreciation i
by our citizens. His remains


were attended


was held
to the


grave


by his Masonic brethren and


a large


concourse


Among


the various


largely in the


business interests


commercial


activity


of Key West is


the sponge industry, and in connection


which


feature


Key West is
therewith the


of citizens.


He leaves


and a good name


a large family to bemoan his
as their chief inheritance."


The wife of John Bartlum bore the maiden name


of George


L. Bartlum is well known.


In fact


of Sarah Lowe.


They were


married in the Bahamas


is one of the leading


section


sponge


merchants of this


of the state and in the conduct of his


business


before r
survived


emovmg


to Key


her husband,


West.


Mrs. Bartlum long


passing away February 7,


employs the most modern and progressive methods of


when ninety years


securmg


and handling the


them for the market.


of May, dl
this city.
cestry, the
settling in


Born i


sponges
in Key


and preparing


West


on the ist


he has been continuously a resident


He is descended


from Scotch-Irish an-


representative of the name in America


South


Carolina.


From Charleston, that


George
counted
West, a p


L. Bartlum has


one of the


position


intelligently directed


in the
tended


schools
Moore's


of his


foremost


for many years


business


men of


to which he has attained through his


efforts.
native


Business College of


He began


his education


and afterward


Atlanta,


Georgia,


state, his paternal g
hama islands and in


West


grandfather remover


parents


d to the Ba-
came to Key


His father, John Bartlum, was a native of


from which he was graduated in


of a century he


of a century and
industry and


has been connected


.. For a
with the


quarter
sponge


has gradually worked his way upward


the Bahamas, born


he became
in 1871, a


a reside


It the


on Green
it of Key


Turtle
West.


age of fifty-seven y


and in


He passed away
ears, and at the


until he i
sentatives


is today one


of its


in southern Florida.


lost prominent repre-
He has thoroughly


acquainted himself with every phase of the


business


time of his death a local publication wrote of him


as follows:


"John Bartlum was a native of


and through
ward, honors


progressive methods
orable dealings has built


and straightfor-
an industry of


Bahamas and
scarcely more


read and v
knowledge
mechanism.
prenticeshipl
forty years
the lot of f


and a mechanic


rare genius.


school learning than enabled him to


write, he was nevertheless always seeking


from books
Without


which
having


as a shipbuilder, he


treated on subjects of


served a da
commenced


a day's


the construction of a small vessel on


large, gratifying and profitable proportions.


a sponge


in addition


several


years


m sponges.
maintained


sponge


operator


fleet consisting


of twenty


to maintaining this f
been a large buyer


fleet he


He now


vessels


has for


of and dealer


In fact he has for several


the leading
actor at Key


position
West.


years


as the largest
There is no fea-


the lot of ground on Whitehead street, adjacent to the
one on which stands now the two-story building of


Captain


Benjamin Baker, then


a wilderness.


ture of the business with which he is unacquainted
and his industry has largely set the standard for
activity in this field. In addition to his connection


at that time the writer made his


learned


to appreciate


his natural,


in that particular line of mechanism.
building small vessels of the most be


designed
ing qual
Messrs.


& Curry,
after turn


acquaintance
native-born t;


Successively


with the


sponge


business


a large mercantile enterprise
quarter of a century, his sto


sponge neet
is a man of
successful c


he has owned and conducted


in Key


stock consisting


purpose,


carrying


West


r mainly of
goods. He
forward to


own


a large business firm on
ine out some of the most


business


schooners that ever sailed on the water, they
I to him the construction of the clipper ship,


an extensive
started on his


concern


energy.


and mission business.


name


__


*- ^ f


built up





FLORIDA


sentat
forwa


ive of the sponge industry and


.rd


progression


from that time


Charles B.


has been continuous, his


Rogers


in the Pittsboro


had the b
> Scientific


benefit of a course


Academy,


and when


even-paced e
relations.
On the 6th


united i
of Key
family


energy


carrying


of September,


n marriage to
West and a :
of this city.


into important

Mr. Bartlum was


SMiss Mary


member


also a native


of the well known Lowe


Mr. Bartlum


votes with the


seventeen years


business


world


the employ of tl
Keys, with a n
He had early le


made


his initial step in the


by removing to Florida and entering
he Florida Railway as a clerk at Cedar


So
a


nthly salary of twenty-five


rned


the eternal truth


dollars.


that industry


wins and industry became the beacon light of


his life.


democratic


party,


and although


usually accepted sense
eral important and res]
inrg been cashier in th<


-~0
Grover
years


Cleveland's


he was


a memi


of the


a politician in the
he has held sev-


ponsible political positions,


customs


house


administrations.
ber of the school


West and for five years he served


as


under both of
For several


board
mayor


of Key
of the


From
vanced


that period to the


utilizing


present he has


his time and


steadily


opportunities to


best advantage until as a wholesale merchant of Jack-
sonville he ranks among the most prominent business


men of Florida.
when in 1872 he


was


established a


mercantile business at Cedar


twenty years of age
retail and wholesale
vs. Success attended


was also a member


of the Chamber of


him in that


connection owing to his close application.


Commerce
in its vario


nicipality.
rave to the


for a number of
>us movements f


As chief


years
or the


executive


and has
benefit


officer


cooperated
of the mu-


of Key


West


businesslike


capable management and unfaltering energy.


he sought a still broader field of
the mammoth wholesale grocery
ville which is now conducted un


In I886


established


business in Jackson-
der the name of the


ministration character
and improvements.
yet he did not pract
blocking progress.


*rized


by many


needed


He avoided useless
ice retrenchment to
His reelection was


reforms


expenditure,
the point of
evidence of


the confidence and trust reposed


Consolidated (
president. Th
that maximum


;rocery


Company. of


e business is carefully systematized


results are secured


Mr. Rogers was formerly


at minimum effort,


access in commercial lines.
president of the Florida


ficial record,


like his business


career,


is unassailable.


Naval
others


Stores & Commission Company, which


establish


he has closely
interests, and


CHARLES


Hon. Charles


tion in c(
president
wholesale


ommerc


B. Rogers
ial circles


B. ROGERS.


are such
scrutiny.


occupies an enviable
in Jacksonville, bein


Grocery


dealers


in groceries.


Company,


His private interests,


however, have not been allowed to exclude


participation in
in the welfare


represented
indicating hi


ture most strongly


his district


affairs,


in the senate,


his active
concerned
re. he has


his record there


interests


as factors


in good government and


general improvement.


A native o
in Pittsboro,


Carolina, i
er 4, 1852.


Ir. Rogers was born
His parents were
Roaers. The father


was a planter of North Carolina, who at the outbreak
of the Civil war espoused the cause of his loved south-
land, joining the Confederate army. He was captured
in front of Petersburg in 1864 and sent to Point


Prison,


where he died


before


hostilities


ed in 1899. Since starting in busi
applied himself to the control of


the methods


as will bear the closest


Ist of June, 1875,


riage of Charles
man, a native
Bronson, Florid


B. Rogers and


of South
a. Their


ness
his


he has employed
investigation and


as celebrated
Miss Mary


Carolina,


mar-


A. Coach-


then residing


family -numbers


and four daughters, as follows:


Mrs. Mary F. Mit
H.: Mrs. Caroline


Frank;
It has


Pensacola


Rogers


Miss Joanna E.;
been said of Mr.


of strength and


standing
all classes


influence


Bower,
Alonzo
Rogers


Charles
i, Florida


sons


B., Jr.;
; Edgar


of New York city;
C.; and Winifred.


is a man


in his community, of


in the business world and popular among
*
of people. His success in life has been


due to energy, close


nomenal


perseveranc


and good judgment."


however, t
favorably
movements


application to business and phe-
e joined to rare native ability


It is not only


in business


Rogers has become widely and
for he has cooperated in many


result


state. He is a member of


ed beneficially to city and
the Jacksonville Board of


His wife, who was also a


Carolina, was a daughter


served


as an officer


and now makes


native


of Charles Li
War of 1812.


her home


Trade and has been a recognized leader in


circles,


serving for


council and for


with her son in


democratic


four years as a member of


several years as


of election commissioners.


a member of the
In 1898 he was


chosen to represent his


district


in the state senate,


,


e





FLORIDA


where


careful consideration to


all questions


which came up for settlement, and was connected


with much important


social lines
Country and


constructive legislation.


his connections are with


Church


Protective Order


is indicated
church. A


Clubs


of Elks,


and with the


while


his membership


A life of intense and


church.
fourteen


He is also prominent in public life and for


years


board of public


e Seminole,
Benevolent


his religious faith
in the Episcopal
ell directed activity


and high purpose has brought him to the
tion which he occupies in the regard
townsmen.


enviable posi-
of his fellow


position


straight for


istration,


istration
sighted
of the


has been a member


instruction.


mayor


ward, progressive
distinguished by


of Quincy,


of the county


one time he held the


giving


to the city


and businesslike
constructive ai


work in the public interests.


state bar association.


of well directed


suiting


cess, and


in the


activity


attainment


wherever


admin-
Id far-


He is a member


His life has


and intelligent


a fair


he is known


been
effort,


measure


honored by


reason


of his


genuine


worth.


EDWARD


C. LOVE.


DAN HARDIE.


Edward C.
public-spirited c
prominence and


C. Love,
ed citizens


one of the
of Quincy,


progressive


where


success in the general


he has v
practice


An analysis


factors


of the elements of success


which make for


progress


of the


along any line shows


United


ern district
born March
and Mary D.


state.


States


district attorney for the north-


of Florida, is a native son of


the city,
C.


20, 1872. His parents were Edward


G. (Smith) Love, both natives


The father was


lawyer here
distinction a


vention
vention.


of this


for many years a prominent


a leader in politics,


as chairman of


serving


the congressional


and a member of the state constitutional con-


He died


his wife since June,


five children:


in October,
1884. To


Edward C.,


1891, having


To their union


g survived
were born


of this review; James


who is engaged in the practice of medicine in Jack-
sonville; William G., an attorney of Columbus,


Georgia ;


Herbert A.,


a banker


of Quincy,


Florida ;


and a child who died in infancy.


Edward C. Love acquired


his early


education


the common schools of Quincy and later attended


the University


of Florida,


from which he was grad-


that one of the greatest of the forces by


attain prosperity is


enthusiasm.


is that constructive imagination


constructive


which developed be
nity advancement. 1
which Dan Hardie


Dade


work and


which


And equally
which makes


furnishes


the initial


becomes a great factor in commu-
The conspicuously successful work


has accomplished


county is explainable


man of enthusiasm
which he added thos
discrimination. H


in Miami


as sheriff


in this way, for he is a


and imagination-qualities


those of aggressiveness,


foresight and


He is known among his many


as Dan and he has made


as a synonym
standards of
beneficial


in Cincinnat
of Dan and


for uncompromising


of political morality


work in


i, Ohio, O
Mary Jane


side in East Liverpool,


the public
,, October
Jane (Ryan
ool. Ohio.


friends


the name honored


integrity,


and powerful


service.
18, 1872,


was born


and is a son


Hardie, who now re-


The father is


a native


uated


with the degree


of A. B.


He received


of Scotland


and the mother of Illinois.


degree in law from Washington


& Lee University in


the same year took up the


his profession
among the stro
He has i ad


in Quincy, where


practice of


is now numbered


and able lawyers of the community.


made an excellent professional record


When
removed


from Cincinnati


where he remained


to St. Loud


until he was thirteen


At that time, fired by a desire to
to make his own way in life, he ra


t his parents
is, Missouri,
years of age.
and


see the world


has secured


Love was appointed


patronage. In June, 1913, Mr.
by the president of the United


going


to New Mexico, whence after six months


southward


into old Mexico


as a cowboy


States,


Woodrow


for the northern district


Wilson, as United States attorney


of Florida


and immediately


and miner. In 1893 he started
ultimately to sail for Africa, b


eastward,


intending
Fort


Africa, but on reaching


the administration of the office.
Love's wife was in her maidenhood


a native


of Florida, and she and her


Pierce,


Florida, became so


impressed with


the climate


and advantages of the state that he abandoned the
idea and determined to make a permanent home here.


husband are well known in social circles


of Quincy.


For two years he lived


in Fort Pierce and in


Fraternally Mr. Love is connected with


the Masoniic


the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and


the Woodmen of the World,


are in accord with the


and his religious


doctrines of the


views


Presbyterian


Beach,


managing


acting


leisure hours


very young


a fish house,


learning


stenography
his


as a beach comber for six months,
being spent hunting and fishing.
and full of the spirit of adventure.


law, and


I P 4


of the s








left Fort Pierce and came to-tMiami, settling on the
present town site one year before the railroad was


This city


he spent nine months in


the construction of


since been his home, al-


the Bahama


islands


the Colonial


in Miami, 1


he and his
for their t
strong and


n


Iardie has one of the most beautiful homes
located on .the south side of the city, and
wife have made it a center of hospitality
nany friends. He is a fine type of the


I able business


man of the present time,


was at that time employed


Donald, contractors in charge


McGuire


& Mc-


of the construction


who, unspoiled by success, works uninterruptedly
the advancement of community interests. His


hotels on the


Henry
worked
dollar V


Florida east coast controlled by


M. Flagler. However, prior to that time he
on the streets of Miami at a salary of one


to make


the first im-


provements in the new community.


break of the


Spanish-American war he joined a Texas


regiment and was made


service until late


at Galveston,


in 1898,


Texas, with


corporal,
when he


honorable


remaining


portant
fare of


sive project
founding o
material an


activities


in promoting the growth


and wel-


Miami are far too numerous to mention


ever been inaugurated


f the city in
d substantial


which


he has


t no progres-
lere since the
not rendered


in the


was mustered out


discharge.


returned immediately


to Miami


and became a painter


JOSEPH


PEARSON


GREAVES.


and decorator,
several years.
elected sheriff


following that line of


occupation


At the age of twenty-eight h
of Dade county and reelected in


entering at that time upon his second term


years.


As sheriff he has made


for untiring work


in the best


o0


was


1912,
f four


a commendable record


interests


One of the best known


capable,
Florida is
six years
Miami.


as well -as


one of the


most


efficient and successful hotel managers


Joseph Pc
has been
Practically


earson


Greaves, who for


manager of the ]
all of his active


the past
Palm in


life has been


being known as a man untiring and


his work of reform.


No sooner did


indefatigable in
he take charge


spent in the hotel


business


experience, knowledge and


results


of his


ability are seen in the


of the sheriff's


office than he set about to abolish the


management


of the great enterprise,


the destinies


notorious
resort for


North


Miami,


then a


gamblers, thugs and


of vice and


which


criminals in the


he so ably controls


Mr. Greaves


and directs.


was born in


Brooklyn,


New York,


Inside a few months he


and resorts and


had closed


effectually wiped out North


all saloons


Miami.


February
Greaves,


21, i86o,


and is a son of Rev.


an Episcopal clergyman.


Frederick


The father


is an


For this one work alone he deserves


position
history,
tinction,
in which


among


reformers


a place


but it is by no means his
for there is hardly a lini
he has not done splendid


a conspicuous
e in the city's


only claim to dis-


Englishman by birth and education and
the United States in his early manhood.


New York


service


work.


Kansa
He w


He served


for some


he came


remaining in


time and then removing to Ot-


Is. where he turned


as,


his attention


to ranch-


however, unsuccessful at that work,


as chief of the Miami


fire department and as such


having arrived in Kansas just in time to encounter


established


it upon an entirely new basis, built the


worst


misfortunes which beset the pioneers


fine new central


engine house and


his power to promote the efficiency


did everything in
of the service. He


state.


sands of


Together


other settlers


with those


his crops were entirely


is at present connected with the department as as-


stroyed by grasshoppers,


chintz bugs,


prairie


sistant chief. A
Dan Hardie ZI
famous all over


bout five years ago


3Uaves,
Florida


a lightning
and said ti


he organized the


* company,
one of the


and droughts and he was obliged


to abandon ranch-


returning to his ministerial work in


is now pastor


of St. Stephen's


New York.


Episcopal


best boy organizations


in the United States.


in New York city and


in his seventy-seventh year


Hardie claims more boy friends than any other man


in Dade county.


He is in addition president of the


United Investment Company, of the Ocean


Amusement Company,
Ice & Cold Storage Cc


vice president


nmpany


Beach


of the Miami


and one of the origin-


still an active
and two of


ters.


England


e


and vigorous man.


Five of his uncles


his brothers were also Episcopal


e represents
and his son,


named in honor of 1


minis-


one of the oldest families


the subject
his paternal


of this review, was
great-grandfather,


ators of the Ocean Beach Realty Company, of which


Sir Richard


Pearson,


who commanded


a director.


He is besides


a partner


contractors.


3Ist of July, 19o4, in Jacksonville,
ie married Miss Anna Kelly. and tl


gunboat


Serapis


Paul Jones
Greaves ant


in the famous


nl


in the Revolutionary


d the Pearson


naval battle
war.


Ie against
Both the


families belonged to


and possessed





FLORIDA


"The Eagle
the subject


Does not Catch Flies."


of this review was


Miss Celia Amanda


was born in New


Storm,


The mother of


in her maidenhood


of Holland


descent.


York city and was a representative of


ests in accordance
hotel operation.
Mr. Greaves is


Hotel


Association.


with the


most modern methods of


a member of the New York State
He belongs to the Miami and the


one of the oldest Dutch


York families.


St. Augustine


Yacht


Clubs and


is well known


died August


2, 1891, in the fifty-fourth


of her


social


circles


of both


cities.


Josepi
parents


P. Greaves


moved


was eight years


to Kansas and he


when his


remained in that


state four years,


returning with his father and mother


WILLIAM


ALLAN


McRAE.


to New York


at the end of that time.


He acquired


an excellent public-school education and,


had the


advantage in his


youth of his


moreover,


father's


learning and of the opportunities provided by


and well selected


further


advantage


library.


He had,


of constant


cultured and educated mother.


ness career as a clerk in


moreover, the


association
He began


a broker's


William Allan McRae, who


and distinction


and distinctionrda
state of Florida,


reason


with a efforts.


his busi-


office on Wall


county,
Rebecca


of his
He ii


as commissioner


is serving with ability
of agriculture of the


is a man to whom success has come by
own indefatigable and well directed


s a native


of Florida, born in Wakulla


July 22, 1870, and is a son of William and
(Allan) McRae, the former a native of North


street


but, being


country, he became


York house,


desirous


a traveling


remaining


years, or until the
became bookkeeper


& Land
Manhatta


Company


Company
n Beach


gained his first
which he has s


nence.
of the


After


company,


in this


firm suspended


see something of the
salesman for a New


capacity f
d business.


or several-
He then


for the Manhattan Beach Hotel
of Long Island, controlling the


and the Oriental Hotels, and


experience in a


line of business


since won such distinction and promi-


two years he was made general


auditor


but this position furnished him with


employment only during the summer months when


Carolina and the latter of


South Carolina.


engaged in farming all during his life and


nent also in public affairs, serving


in the state legislature. H
vived by his wife one year.


four children:


Sarah


from fI


He died in


The father
was promi-
871 to 1873
nd was sur-


To their union were born


Rebecca, the wife of J.


Kelly, of Marianna, Florida; Christian Ellen, who
married Neil J. McLeod, and now resides at Chipley,
Florida; William Allan, of this review; and Leroy D.,
of Chipley, Florida.


William


he became


A. McRae
connected


was sixteen


years of


with sawmilling, an occupation


the northern resort hotels


were open.


In order to


which he followed for two


years,


during four months


winter employment also, without resigning
ion with the Manhattan Beach Hotel & Land


his position with the Manhattan Beach Hotel
Company, he applied for a position with t
de Leon Hotel of St. Au ine as assistant


and from the time he
the present he has bet


who controls


south.


Augusti
secured


with the
assistant


this place,


been associated


a great chain


Although he still


Ponce
cashier


in 1892, to


with Mr. Flagler,


of hotels throughout the


retains


tion with the Manhattan Beach Hotel


pany and although he
of the Oriental Hotels,


during the
Flagler inte
tion of as!
three yearn
Hotel in S
years and


winter


interests,
assistant


a summer connec-
& Land Com-


has been since x898


manager


has given all of his time


.r months to the promotion of the
winning advancement from the posi-


cashier


he was made


to that of
e manager


cashier.
of the


St. Augustine, where he remained


for the


past six


After
Alcazar
thirteen


years has been manager


of which time he also attended school.


eighteen he secured
in the following year
dollars out of the 0


earned.
Escambia
saved the
ward tool


He then


a position


a positi
saved


When


he was


as a farm laborer and


one hundred and nineteen


ne hundred and thirty which he


became


bridge watchman on the


Bay bridge and while he held that position


greater


portion of his


advantage


earnings.


of such summer school


He after-
ol courses


as he was able to attend and prepared himself to enter
the State Normal School at De Funiak Springs, in
which he was a student for three years, teaching dur-
ing the summer months to earn money to pay his


tuition.
study t


After completing the


he again


after one


prescribed course of


again turned his attention to sawmilling but
year began teaching, an occupation in which


he engaged for seven years,


ers in educational


circles


becoming one


of the


state.


of the lead-
1 November,


of the Royal Palm in Miami, this


itself an evidence
Palm is one of t
Mr. Greaves has d


of his


the finest


efficiency,


resort


position being in
', for the Royal


hotels


in the south.


I900, h(
Jackson
January


was elected superintendent of schools of


county,


assuming the duties of the


5, Irgo, and holding it for


has done much to make it so, for, under-


four years,


has worked


along p
, of the


progressive lines


t, directing


its inter- missioner of


Governor


he was


procure


when


coma-


years


n"'









































-aC p





FLORIDA


to the position, which he has


and creditable


way.


ment Mr. McRae


the scope and


In taking


since filled in an efficient


charge


of the depart-


was actuated by an ambition to en-


usefulness


of its


activities


and is


in much that has affected the public life and welfare
and is one of the county's most honored and respected


citizens
mayor


In I881 he was elected


on the democratic ticket, having


to. the office of


always


trying to bring together all the forces in the state
bearing on agriculture and also endeavors to maintain
a well organized and well directed immigration bureau.


an advocate of
ternal relations


retired on


the principles of the party.
are with the Masons. He


a farm


having


given


His fra-
now lives


active law prac-


was the advocate of


the immigration bill intro-


tice. His wife, who was


born in Marion


county


duced in the
lion acres of


session


of 1913.


With thirty-seven mil-


land, most of which can be brought to a


state of cultivation, Florida


offers splendid


induce-


a daughter of Captain J. T. McGahagin,


native of Scotland
of Florida during t


and a captain
he Civil war.


of the local guards


Their family


num-


ments


to the settler, and it is Mr. McRae's ambition to


bring about this development.


On the 5th of


Miss Mary
they are the


Virgin


parents


August, It
iia Parker,


Mr. McRae married


a native of


Georgia, and


of three children: William Allan,


bered four children:
living in Jacksonville;


An uncle of Edwin


Leitner,


served


J. M. Martin.


S


Barnard, of


Edwin
pencer


Ocala;


; and George, ;
of this review,


Grover,
it home.
Wilbur


through the Civil war under Colonel
He took part in the battle of Rich-


and Roy and Ralph, twins.


Mr. McRae


is a


mond, Kentucky, and during hostilities


went to


devout member of the Methodist church and an active


worker


in religious circles,


tendent of the
eternally with the


;unday sc
Masonic


cho


being at present superin-
ol. He is connected fra-


order, the Elks, the Knights


of Pythias and the Woodmen of the World, and his


political allegiance


is given


to the democratic party.


spring


with canteens for


again at the


spring


the front and bore
which he was greatly


Edwin
schools c


Spencer
)f Ocala


house,


water. He saw the flag
jerked it up, brought it to


it throughout the battle,


commended


acquired his e
and afterward


for his bravery.
,rly education in the
won the degrees of


Aside


from the public offices before mentioned


a member of the city council of Sneads


he was


for three years


Bachelor of
University i


Arts and Bachelor of Law


n 1911, having


been connect


at Stetson
d with his


and of Marianna for four years, and his


service


work


in the


has been at all times honorable in


father in law practice until the


has comprehensive and


latter's retirement.


accurate


knowledge of the


purposes


and beneficial in


its results.


law and


is developing the habits of the painstaking,


careful practitioner who is paving the
by the thoroughness with which he


way to success


prepares


cases.


HON. EDWIN SPENCER.


His political allegiance


to the democratic party and h4


nized leader


Hon. Edwin


practicing a
& Spencer,
member of
elected in ig


,s ju


Spencer,


attorney at law in


inior partner in the firm of


Ocala,
Spencer


has the distinction of being the youngest
the state legislature, to which he was
12. From early youth he has been a close


and discriminating student of political


issues and
victions.


he is fearless in defeat
It was a recognition


questions


ise of his honest con-
of his ability on the


ture in


in its ranks,


being


where he has tl


youngest representative in the h
pro tem of the house of repre
ing the youngest man, except


that position. His fraternal
Knights of Pythias and the I


In 1911 Mr.
Miss Katherine


has always been given
e has become a recog-
: elected to the legisla-
le honor of being the
louse. He was speaker
sentatives of 1913, be-
ing one,-to have held


relations


are with the


4oose.


Spencer was united in marriage to
Chapman, of Jacksonville, Florida,


part of his fellow


for his


present


most creditable


townsmen


office,
record.


that led to his


in which he


was boi


selection


is now making a
rn in Ocala, Feb-


and they have one
tive of the third 2


family is


promine


son, Edwin, who


generation
it socially


is a representa-


to bear the name.


and Mr.


Spencer's


ruary 2, I890, and is
J. (McGahagin) Spe
Dorsetshire, England,
the United States whe


a son of Edwin and Margaret


ncer.


The father, a


was born in


tinction


as a lawyer and lawmaker


well merited.


native


came to


twenty-one years of


graduated from the University of Michigan in


ROBERT DALE DAFFIN.


with the LL. B.


degree


and for


engaged in the
which he came


practice
to Ocala,


of law in New


Florida, in


Here he


The various


business interests


the growth and upbuilding of


which contribute to


Marianna are


not the


since remained and throughout the intervening


result of the labor


of one or


even a few individuals


period of


forty years


has maintained a


foremost posi-


but of the combined efforts


of many,


tion at the Marion county bar.


He has been a leader are certain


men who are acknowledged leaders


in the


years


I.


el





FLORIDA


world, n
plans, whv
pletion.
president
Iry-goods
profitably


in the business world. He
bama, September 16, 1853
Mary Jane (Ely) Daffin,
Maryland and the latter
father was for many years
an occupation which he fi
1856. The mother has atl
union were born eight chilh


nah, Georgia
of Lampasas,
widow of WV
Marianna; M
Robert Dale,
L., of Maria
At the age
his home witl
for two yeai
the operation
afterward sp<


turned


; Fa


nny,


of energy, capable of forming
they carry forward to success-
this class belongs Robert Dale
the company which owns the
: in the town, and his life record
lowed by all who seek progress


was born at Eufaula, Ala-
, a son of William R. and
the former a native of
of North Carolina. The
in the mercantile business,
allowed until his death, in
so passed away. To their
iren: Philip P., of Savan-
wife of J. W. Covington,


, Texas; Horace E.; Lottie, who is the
illiam R. Hatsfield and who resides in
oily, deceased; William R., of Alabama;
the subject of this review; and Ernest
nna.
of fifteen Robert D. Daffin went to make


h hi
rs,
of
ent


s uncle on
learning
a model
one year


his attention


to m


1 a farm and remained there
everything connected with
agricultural property. He
as a farm laborer and then
mercantile pursuits, clerking


in a store for seven years. At the end of that
he became interested with others in a drug bu
in Marianna and continued in it for two years,
which he purchased his partner's interests an
since conducted the concern as a department
being today president of the operating company.
house, of which he is now the head, is one
leading mercantile concerns of the city, its a
cash sales amounting to about one hundred tho


t time
siness
after
d has
store,
The
)f the
Annual
uisand


dollars and the methods employed commending it
always to the confidence and support of the public.
Mr. Daffin owns his own business building and a
great deal of other valuable real estate and is one
of the substantial and leading business men of
Marianna.
Mr. Daffin married Miss Carrie Belle Alderman
and they have become the parents of six children:
Sidney A., who is business manager of his father's
concern; Robert D., Jr., who has been for six years
a missionary in south Brazil; Bessie, the wife of J.
N. Dillon. of Marianna; Holden, a minister of the
Presbyterian church in Jackson Springs, North
Carolina; Frank C., who is in business with his
father; and Eleanore, who lives at home.
Mr. Daffin is a member of the Presbyterian church,
in which he is serving as an elder, and he guides his
worthy and honorable life by the high standards in
which he believes. -Fraternally he is connected with
the Masonic order. He has been a member of the


business
original
ful cornm
Daffin,
largest d
may be


1888, and is a
(Hoag) Felkel,
Florida, and the


fath
cam'
first
first
Fun


er was rear
e prominent
principal o
president
iak Springs.


the State Scho
Augustine and I
death, which oc
Methodist, and 1
democratic part'
her death havir
They had two
review: H. Russ


son of Henry Noel and Sofronia
the former a native of Leon county,
latter of Bainbridge, Georgia. The
*d in his native section and there be-
in educational circles, serving as the
f the Leon high school and as the
of the State Normal School at De
He afterward became principal of
ol for the Deaf and Blind at St.
held this position at the time of his
curred in 1905. He was a devout
his political support was given to the
y. His wife has also passed away,


occurred


children
sell, who


at Tallahassee


in I906.


besides the subject
is twenty-seven years


and a clerk in the Leon Hotel at Tallahassee; and
Lillian Effie, who married James Gordon Pearce, of
Jacksonville.
Herbert A. Felkel was educated in the public
schools of Leon county and after graduating from
the high school entered the Florida State College at
Tallahassee. From there he went to the University
of Chattanooga and later attended the University of
Florida, at Gainesville, where he became prominent in
many phases of community life. It was heie he first
became connected with the newspaper business, in
which he has since attained success, 'for he- founded
and named the Florida Pennant, the first student
publication ever issued in the university. -This paper


city council and although not an office seeker is
active in citizenship, especially in the support of all
projects that are calculated to promote general
progress and improvement. Starting out in life at
the age of fifteen, he has steadily worked his way up-
ward in the world, winning not only prosperity and
prominence, but something far greater and higher-
the respect of those with whom his years of active
life have brought him into contact.



HERBERT AUBREY FELKEL.

Herbert Aubrey Felkel, whose identification with
journalism began in his university days and has
continued to the present time, is one of the most
powerful and aggressive young newspaper men in
Pensacola, where he is editor of the News. His ex-
perience has proven valuable to him and has brought
him to a position of prominence in his chosen field of
work. He is today the youngest editor of a daily paper
in Florida and probably in the entire south, as well as
the youngest member of the Associated Press. He
was born in De Funiak Springs, Florida, June 23,


-- -- - - v w -


g





FLORIDA


is still in existence as a monthly magazine. Mr.
Felkel became its first editor and, aided by the power
of his paper and his unusual ability in its management,
became a force in the university, influencing to a
great degree its thought and opinion. He was at that
time what he has been ever since, an independent
journalist, and this in the end deprived him of his
degree, for some of his writings met with the dis-
favor of the faculty and the editor was expelled by
Andrew Sledd on the day his class was graduated.
After leaving school Mr. Felkel continued his
journalistic work and has now been in the newspaper
business six years, during the last four of which he
has been connected with the Pensacola News. For
three years he has been its editor, with the distinction
of being the youngest editor of a daily in Florida, and
by his able, aggressive and well directed efforts has
made the journal a power and a vital force in com-
munity affairs.
Fraternally Mr. Felkel is a member of the Benevo-
lent Protective Order of Elks and Alpha Tau Omega,
a Greek letter college society. He belongs to the
state militia and is active in the affairs of the Osceola
Club. His religious views are in accord with the
doctrines of the Methodist church, and politically he
gives his support to the democratic party. Al-
though but twenty-five years of age, he is already
one of the influential men of Pensacola, a man of
excellent special training, broad views and modern
ideas, and the prosperity he has already won is a
pleasant augury of his future accomplishments.



CHARLES HOWELL WARD.

Miami is fortunate in numbering among those
active in municipal service a man of such construc-
tive intelligence, well founded and broad views and
such aggressive activity as Charles Howell Ward, now
serving as secretary of the Board of Trade. His
ideas are modern and based on comprehensive ex-
perience, his standards are progressive, his integrity
unquestioned and he is besides a man of brains and
personality, qualified in an unusual way for his posi-
tion as a director of the city's business development.
He was born in Addison, Steuben county, New York,
June 30, 1858, and is a son of Frank H. and Char-
lotte (Howell) Ward, natives of the Empire state,
both of whom have passed away.
Charles H. Ward was five years of age when he
moved with his parents to Aurora, Kane county, Illi-
nois, where he was reared and educated. His busi-
ness career began at the early age of twelve, when
he entered the e~~ nl f t :.,. :-


--- "*.. .Za.lw y o. e..1 c a. 1Al gi. I,


uriungtoun &


Quincy Railroad Company as a messenger boy, re-
maining in the employ of the corporation for nine
years, rising through successive stages of progress and
advancement to a responsible position, resigning at
the age of twenty-one as trainmaster's clerk. After
attaining his majority Mr. Ward left Illinois and went
to Great Bend, Kansas, where he became connected
with the mercantile business. Three years of drought
and the failure of crops in that section, however,
practically paralyzed business conditions and obliged
Mr. Ward to discontinue his enterprise. Accord-
ingly, in 188i he left Kansas and went to Tucson,
Arizona, where he remained six years, engaging first
in mining and later in the cattle business and winning
a gratifying degree of prosperity along both lines.
In 1887 he went to Los Angeles, California, in the
boom days of that city and embarked in the real-
estate business, winning rapid success. However,
when the reaction came he went to the City of Mexico,
locating there in 1897 and remaining for fifteen
years, engaged chiefly in the manufacture of shipping
tags and paper boxes. While a resident of the city
he visited every state and territory in the republic,
studying business standards and conditions and after-
ward familiarizing himself with the life of the
different sections. He made some influential friends
during this time and belonged to the same Masonic
lodge of which Francisco I. Madero, late president of
the republic, was a member. Foreseeing the revolution
which deposed President Diaz, Mr. Ward returned
to the United States and came at once to Miami,
where he had previously determined to locate. He
immediately joined the Board of Trade and by rea-
son of his peculiar fitness for the position, his ex-
tensive and representative acquaintance throughout
the southwest and his practical knowledge, acquired
by wide travel, he was made secretary of the organiz-
ation before he had been in the city six months.
What he has accomplished in this position is called
miraculous even in Miami, which is a city of mir-
acles. When he assumed control the board occupied
a mere shack and even this it did not own. Today
its headquarters are in its own fine reinforced con-


create building which,
it stands, represents


lars. The membership
sixty to five hundred,
strengthened and much
accomplished through the
foresight of Mr. Ward.
of the Miami Building &
same position in the M
Roads Association, and


estate


holdings


in the


together with the lot upon
a value of twenty thousand,


has been increased from
trade relations have been
valuable development work
energy, ability and business
He is in addition secretary
Loan Association, holds the
liami Automobile & Good
has besides valuable real-


city and vicinity.


originator of the plan to build a highway


He was the
from Mont-




FLORIDA


real, Canada,


to Miami,


a plan


which


has been


Regiment and served as a private in Company


A for


adopted by the United


States


government, and he is


a short time, the


next command to which he was


always a leader in movements for the


advancement


tached


being the


Twenty-seventh


South


Carolina


of the


city's interests, his public spirit


aggressive and forceful
public service.


On December
Aletha Hubbard,


kind which


25, 1880,
a native of


Mr. Ward


of that


evidences itself


married


Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.


Infantry, in which his father, Alexander J. Champlain,
also served. Going to Virginia with Hapgood's Bri-
gade in i864, father and son fought against Butler's
army at Port Walthall Junction, Swift Creek and


Drewrys


Bluff, under Beauregard, protecting the


They have three sons: John Hubbard,


eight; Charles H., Jr.,
Barkley, aged thirteen.


aged twenty-six
The two oldest


twenty-
Ernest


sons are now


federate capital while Lee was


at the Wilderness,


with Lee's army aided in repelling the assaults of Grant
at Second Cold Harbor and in the battle of Petersburg,


in Barcelona,
Engineering C
charge of the


companyy


in the employ of the
of New York. The


construction of a large


elect


Pearson
r are in
'ic plant


June I6-I8.


After


this they were on duty in the


trenches before Petersburg or Richmond, participating
also in the fighting on the Weldon Railroad and at


which


their company


is installing in that city.


Reams'


Station


and in other important


engagements


Mr. Ward is prominent in the


Masonic


until December, 1864, when Hapgood's Brigade


passed


the thirtieth


degree.


He is a member of


sent to Wilmington, North


Carolina,


where Butler


First Presbyterian church


who by his


exemplary


private


of Miami


and is a man


life and valuable public


accomplishments has proven his worth as


a citizen.


was defeated and where the brigade was on duty at
the front until Fort Fisher fell. Mr. Champlain's
last battle was at Bentonville, where the remnant of


his brigade did


gallant service, and


there he was


wounded severely. Being sent to the hospital at Char-
lotte, North Carolina, he was still there when General


EDWARD


ALONZO


CHAPLAIN.


J. E. Johnston surrendered his


army


at Greensboro.


His father had fallen months before in one of the


A man loyal in friendship, faithful in citizenship and


battles in front of Petersburg and in


December,


honorable in


Edward


all business relations passed


Alonzo


sonville, April


Champlain died


23, 1911.


away


when


at his home in Jack-


He left the


work and personality upon the


city, having
cantile intere


business


impress
history


been prominently connected with mer-


sts


here since I888, and holding


at the


his brother, William Ervin Champlain, had been fatally
wounded at the battle of Fredericksburg.
In his life since the war Edward A. Champlain made
a similar record of devotion to duty and his activity and
enterprise in business brought him a gratifying measure


success.


He came to Florida for the southern


time of his death the position of


vice president of the


press Company, and was-its agent


at Cedar


Keys for


Consolidated Grocery Company. In all work of prog-
ress formulated during the quarter of a century dur-


ing which he


resided here he was an


active participant


and his well spent life, which would bear


investigation


respect


and hono


scrutiny,
r of his


the closest


gained him the unqualified


fellowmen.


was also


three


years,


after which he embarked in the wholesale


grocery business there, as a partner of C. B. Rogers.
In 1886 the firm moved its business from Cedar Keys
to Jacksonville, and later formed the Consolidated
Grocery Company, Mr. Champlain becoming vice presi-
dent. He was also a director in the Florida National


well known throughout Florida as an honored


veteran


Bank.


of the Civil
Edward


war.
A. Champlain


Mr. Champlain


was born in


Charleston,


married,


February


13, 1878,


Mary H. Hodgson, a native of Florida, and they be-


South


Carolina,


December


Io, 1844, and, although he


came the parents of five children:


Guy R., who lives in


was only in


his sixteenth year when the secession of


that state and the question of the relief of Fort


agitated


Sumter


the north and south, he entered the state mil-


Jacksonville;


Edward
Gertrud<


Annie


Alonzo,


J., who married J.
who died at the are


W., who lives at home;


C. Reynolds;


and Erne


two years;
st, who re-


itary service in


the Chichester Zouaves,


serving under


Major Stevens at the Morris Island battery on the


sides in Jacksonville.
Mr. Champlain belonged to the Jacksonville Board


occasion of


of the


West.


the firing on the United States


He was a member


of this company eight


of Trade, was a member


clubs, and


of the


Seminole


and other


the Confederate Veterans Association.


or ten months and then entered the Confederate states
service as private in the Marion Artillery, with which


he served


about Charleston, participating in the battle


almost a quarter of


a century he was a prominent resi-


dent of Jacksonville, taking
leading merchants of the city.


a high place among the
Continuously connected


of Secessionville and in other engagements. A year
later he enlisted in Colonel Charles J. Colcock's Cavalry


with its development and improvement, he watched


the progress of


the city


for many years


and took an


y
















































































































































































I








--






FLORIDA


active part in all that pertained to


the substantial upbuilding


death was, therefore,


Jacksonville and
ihnnred citizen.


widely


of the co
regretted,


Duval county


the general good and


mnmumty.


for it


a representative


deprived


largely interested
Peninsular coast


in the salvage


and keys


ness consisted principally in


and his


mercantile


furnishing vessel supplies


and farm stores for those connected


The firm


engaged


with shipping.
in ship build-


ship Stephen


cost of
George


eighty thousand dollars,
L. Bowne and Euchemia


were interested in many sloops


also the


pilot boats


L, and they owned
and schooners. I


Curry insisted


on the best obtainable workmanship


on the roll of eminent


and honored


citizens


West appears the name of


important


factor


memory is here cherished not only


by reason of what he has
to the straightforward,
which he ever followed, j
ing to the rules directing
ing integrity. For more


of whi


: vessels
finest of


built under his supervision


their class.


firm of Bowne
their store and 1


& Curry
ree stock


being destroyed, at a heavy I


business


1 actions accord-
strict, unswerv-


score years


ward, however,
and Simonton s
and land, store
the business was
In i861 Mr.


they purchased


where


W


pro
'ith


and storehouses wI


were


ne severe gale in
met with heavy
of general mer-
oss. Soon after-
>perty on Front
ample wharfage
ere erected and


resumed on an enlarged
Bowne withdrew from 1


sustained
that the I


to Chicago.
complete with


same relation
e of Marshall
No history of
tout extended


to Key West and vicinity


Field & Company


sustains


account ot ill heal
personal, to Mr.


business


reference


for on every hand are seen evidences


enterprise and public,
Turtle Key, one of
II, 1821, and whei
West on the id of Ii


mostly


1837, it was
y fishermen


to his life work,


of his


was born on Green


islands,
a reside


1a


September
it of Key


Curry's


successfully


his own name, after which,


was then succeeded


:h, selling
Curry.


interests,


for more than thirty years


in 1892,


by his sons,


W. Curry,


Sons.


nam


In I9o6 the b
e of William


A recent publication in


Charles, G
son-in-law
im name of


eorge H.
Captain
William


business was incorporated


writing


y Sons' Company.
of that firm said


His initial start in the b
with the mercantile firm


business world was as a clerk


of Weever


& Baldwin.


"They


Two large


have established extensive new enterprises:


ship railways


vessels of one


business


was closed


At that time he se-
f the United States


respectively,


lighters,


vessels; a
Among


dredges


used in


Ilso docks,
others of


quartermaster and


Commander M
lowing his reti
clerkship with


accepted


spent two years with the fleet under


[cLaughlin in the Seminole war.


service he


manager


occupied


for the


their enterprises is the


in southern


a cent
n equal
r- public


power


largest ice manufacturing plant
Ln electric light plant of suffi-


to supply the city, a


magnitude
enterprise.


exemplify


md other


projects


progressiveness


Their storehouses, docks and


was afterward


and the firm of Bowne


succeeded by


a partner.
Mr. Curry


& Curry was thus organized


stories cover


is given 1
tematized


several
scores


of men.


ground, and employment
The business is all svs-


and each department has


in 1845.


continuous


stantly
forts,
w


From


and his activities


broadening lines.


reached


e progress was
out along con-


The importance of his


ice manufacturing plant is


mands ;
interests


conveniences


concentrated here.


are consumed


by those engaged


of the great
large quantities


shipping
s of ice


zv phases
e name o
In the v


of business life


in Key West with
was not associated.


mar-


Havana.


A cold storage


attached to the


plant is


Their extensive electric


adequate


motive


power


for man-


riage to Miss
John Lowe, v


the ownership


schooner


Euphemia Lowe,


joined t
)and i
which


Lavinia,


a daughter of Captain


of Bowne


& Curry


of the wrecking
a most fortunate


nation. Their
of vessels are
a continually 1


domestic purposes, aside
long lines of wharves, at


scene.


market,


present
too, is


investment.


During


his entire


was


where an almost incredible


of wrecks


was also extensively


CURRY.


His ability was an


mercantile house


energy ana
than three
ch he was


trees,


the Bahama


became


he retired


remained


a year and a
a position in


rement


the position


cantile


house owned by G. L. Bowne


Florida; a


that time forward


fe,
the


too, grew as the years went on until there were


designed


to meet local de-


in the export of


establishment


r





FLORIDA


amount of fish


is offered.


Their


great warehouses


are filled with one of the largest stocks of
chandlery, hardware and general merchandise


found


in Florida.


This firm also owns the large


bonded warehouses, in which thousands


Havana tobacco


are stored; and buildings


gifts and remembering frier
cious and generous manner.


his seventy-third


birthday


ids in their usually gra-


Mr. Curry
on that day.


fastened upon him soon afterward


of bales of


of like


portion are held in reserve for the storage of wrecked


cargoes which are
The firm is uni\


among


periodically


versally


the great business


under the present
is likely to be mai


brought


conceded a
firms of the


admirable management
intained for many yea


The former indicates how closely has


Curry been associated


opment
business


of Key
affairs.


into this port.
leading place
peninsula, and
ent its prestige
rs to come."


the name


with the upbuilding and


West and
William


indomitable enterprise and carried


devel-


the promotion of her
:urrv was a man of


forward


success-


ful completion whatever he undertook. He was never


actuated


never feared


the spirit


of vaulting ambition, yet he


to venture where


led the way, and the simple we


and ability
Mr. and
children:


carried


favoring opportunity
eight of his character


him into important relations.


Mrs. Curry


Charles,


became the


deceased,


parents of eight


of January, ir
thereby losing o0
honored citizens.


posing. ,
ory of th
Business


e


death


ne of its


called


celebrated
Ill health


and on the
him, Key


most valued, prominent


His funeral services were most im-


11 of Key


united to honor the mem-


man who had done so much for the city.


was practically suspended during


of the funeral,


West's


which was


most distinguished


from outside


the city. His


and beneficial


attended by all


the hour
of Key


citizens and many others


life was indeed


in its effects.


the material growth and


progress of


was as well a strong element in its


ment, for he set at
tion of integrity, ei
should be followed


with his


1 example
enterprise
by all.


city's greatness and


pressed in equally


for the


far-reach-


It was a factor


Key V
moral
present


lest


advance-
genera-


and unsullied honor that
His name is interwoven


prosperity


and is


indelible manner upon all of


influences which are factors for the betterment


individual arid the


community at large.


of whom mention is


made on another page of this volume; Louisa, the
wife of Dr. Joseph Yates Porter, state health officer


of Florida;


George


H., who was


born December 24,


DEXTER


MARVIN


LOWRY.


and died January


i6, 1906, leaving


a wife and


three children; Henry F., who
1854, and is now a resident of
Robert 0., deceased, mention


was born February 7,


n


Braidentown,
ed elsewhere


Florida;
in this


Dexter


Marvin Lowry, mayor of


prominent in various


phases


man to whom success has come


Tallahassee


of community life,


as a result of earnest


work; Eleanor, the widow of Captain Martin L.
Hellings; Florida E., the wife of J. Vining Harris;


and Milton


William, who since


dent and general manager of the


Company.


1907 has been presi-
William Curry Sons'


He is the only survivor among


sons and son-in-law to whom


his business upon his


retirement


Curry was born at Key West,
was educated in the north and


his early manhood


19o7,


return
of the


the three


the father turned over


in 1892. b
November


the greater


Iilton


labor,
energy.


close application
He was born i


January 23, 1876,


and is


and intelligently
n Valley Head,


a son


of George


Mary E. (Long) Lowry, both natives of
The father was for many years engaged in


there but is now


union were born nine


6, i866,
part of


was spent in New York city;


following the death


to Key


West


of his elder brother, he


and accepted the


great firm founded by his father.


presidency
During the


children:


tanooga, Tennessee; Lora, the


retired.
Forrest,


wife of


of Atlanta, Georgia; Dexter Marvin,


Charles


W., of Checotah,


of William Thompson, of


kogee, Oklahoma;
and Fred.


Nicholas,


directed
Alabama,


M. D.


that state.
merchan-
To their
of Chat-


W. C. White,


of this


Oklahoma; Sally,


Alabama;


George,


of Tennessee;


review;
the wife
of Mus-
Russell;


six years in which he has had active general manage-


ment the
has been


prestige


and good


admirably maintained,


general usefulness has continued


name of the house
and its sphere of
to broaden and ex-


Dexter


M. Lowry


his independent


when he was twenty years of age, going to ]
gee, Oklahoma, where he established himself


cotton seed


oil business.


career
Musko-
in the


After one year he went to


Milton Curry owns and occupies a palatial


in Key West and enjoys the


distinction of being


Eufaula, Oklahoma, and in
where he organized and


came to Tallahassee,


incorporated The


Florida.


one of the city's foremost residents.
On the iIth of September, 1894


Cotton Oil Company, of which


Mr. and Mrs.


He is also


vice president


Capital


William Curry celebrated
a banquet tendered their
daughters-in-law, and the


their golden wedding with
children, their sons and


grandchildren,


dispensing


He is recognized as a resourceful, able'and


business man, unwavering
standards and uvriiht an


in his integrity,


<


L
v


Id






FLORIDA


his business dealings, and success has attended his
well directed labor, making him today one of the
substantial men of the community.


welfare


of the


he has secured


resentative circulation which makes


a director


a liberal and re
him powerful


of public thought and opinion.


He has


Mr. Lowry married Miss Letitia


Rawls,


a daugh-


also a large


advertising patronage.


ter of Hon.


parents
ternally


W. A. Rawls,


of two


children,


and they have become the


Dexter


and Mary


Mr. Lowry is connected with the


Masonic


order, the Knights of Pythias and the Elks, and he


is a member of


his political


the Presbyterian church.


allegiance


to the democratic


He gives


Mr. Carter is a member of the Knights of Honor


and has been secretary since the foundation


order in


i88o.


citizen and a


of the


He is a progressive and public-spirited


far-sighted, able and


business man and as such a valuable


general


growth and development of the


discriminating


factor in the


in which


ticket has been elected


four times.


He has


given


est, straightforward and


mayor
to the


of Tallahassee


he lives.


city an


progressive administration


marked by


businesslike


interests and


constructive


has made a record


which promises well for his continued


work in the
in the office
political ad-


J. HOWARD


SYLVESTER,


vancement.


A local paper says of him:


"1


of Tallahassee is one of those clean-cut,


and magnetic


personalities


attract


from home and make friends both


:he mayor
vigorous


attention away
at home and


Gadsde
its gene
interests


1n


county finds


a worthy representative


ral agricultural, tobacco-raising
in J. Howard Sylvester, Jr., one


extensive landowners


and da
of the r


in this section of the state.


abroad.


He has been mentioned for numerous offices,


owns


and operates one thousand acres of


ranging from state senator


to governor


and member


Quincy


and by his practical and modern methods of


of congress, but he


so far resisted


the allure-


work, his industry,


honesty


and success has made


ments


of office other than that of chief


executive


substantial contributions to the general


progress and


the capital city of his


state.


There


are many,


ever, who expect to have the privilege sooner or later


advancement.
I7, 1873, and


was born in


Sis a son of


J. Ho,


Gadsden county, May
ward and Annie (Mc-


of supporting him for


a higher position and those


Call) Sylvester, the


former


a native


of Florida and


who know him have


no doubt that he would fill any


the latter of Tennessee.


The father has been engaged


office in the


state with credit and


distinction.


He is in farming all during


his active career


and is


now a


of that clean, progressive ty
are accomplishing things, bot
in the state of Florida today.


pe of


young


h political


men who


and material,


prosperous and successful agriculturist. He and his
wife became the parents of eight children: Sally V., the


wife of James


D. Beasley, of Tennessee; William, a


resident of


Bainbridge,


review; Donald


Georgia; J. Howard, of this


S., deceased; Robert


of Quincy,


Florida; Palmer H., of


Gadsden county;.Mary E., who


WILLIAM


W. CARTER.


married Fred


Foster,


of Port


St. Joe; and Pauline,


deceased.


William
newspaper


W. Cart
interests


er,


prominently identified


of Daytona as publisher of the


Halifax Journal, was born in


his education


in the public schoc


where he also learned


dence here


the print


Indiana and acquired
ls of New York City,
ter's trade. His resi-


dates from 1877. Two years


tablished a job printing office in the city.
F. A. Mann founded the Halifax Journal,


publication,


which has


since that time. Mr
building and opened


immediately


later he


In i882
a weekly


had a continuous existence


. Carter took an office in the same
a job printing establishment. He


became connected with


paper,


sisting in make-up work and in the publication of
the.Journal. In 1912 he purchased the paper and


since that


time. has conducted the enterprise alone,


making it an excellent weekly publication.


locating


in its columns


and by working


earnestly


progressive


public


measures


for the advancement and


Since beginning


vester, Jr.,
packer of
everything


his active career J. Howard


has been in business as a grower


fine tobacco.
relating to th


a practical, far-sighted
met with an enviable


forward h
profitable.


uis interests,


V


a


He understands thoroughly
is line of work and, being
nd able business man, has


degree of
which are


Succeed
today


s in carrying
extensive and


He owns one thousand acres


and in addition to his


proper
fifty
Mr


union


ietor


tobacco interests


a large dairy, keeping


of land


is also .the


one hundred and


high-grade milch cows.
Sylvester has been twice married.


was with


Miss Catherine


whom he had three children:


and Mary


Sylvester married


After the death of his


Mrs. Annie


(Ball) I


by her former marriage became the
John McFarlin.


His first


R. Woodbury, by
ohn A., James H.


first wife Mr.
IMcFarlin, who


mother of a son,





FLORIDA


Mr. Sylvester


views,


is a Presbyterian in his religious


while his wife belongs to the Methodist church.


Fraternally he i
and also belongs


of Elks.
development
agriculturists


is prominent in the Masonic
to the Benevolent Protective


order
Order


Closely identified with the growth and


of this


county


and business men,


as one of its


successful


he has the confi-


dence and esteem of the entire community, and his


place in the


business world i


on integrity,


s prominent and


secure,


honor and straightforward deal-


ganization o:
now serving
institution.
Company; v:


f the Bank of Orlando in


and he


as vice president and a director of that


is secretary of the


ice president


of the Orland


of which he was one of the organizers;


of the Board of Trade.
In i894 Judge Warlow


of Chicag
Wright.


0o,


Overstreet Crate


o Sanitarium,
and president


ige Warlow married Miss Halle Wright,
a daughter of the late Abner Miles


They have three children, Helen,


Picton and Thomas Picton. Jr.


Warlow is
section of tl


Thomas Picton, Jr. Fraternally Judge
one of the most prominent men in this


he


active in


the affairs of many of


JUDGE THOMAS PICTON


the leading fraternal organizations.


WARLOW.


190Io he served


From


1o00 to


as district deputy grand master for


No name is more


political,


business


the thirteenth


justly honored in


and fraternal circle,


than that of the Hon. Thomas Picton


serving


as judge of the criminal court of


man of varied interests


and of forceful personality,


he has during the twenty-nine years he


in the


identified himself


every phase of community


a great


force in the


for himself the


share


esteem


closely


i professional,
s of Orlando
Warlow, now


record.


has resided


with practically


development and


city's expansion


of his associate


has been


while winning
;s and his full


of business, political and legal honors.


Judge Warlow was
ents, and acquired his


was born in India, of English par-


education


in Switzerland


France. After completing it he came ti
in 1884 settled in Orlando, where he


sided.


He studied law and in


the Florida bar, becoming
firm of Massey & Willcox.
partner of Louis C. Masse
Mr. Willcox. He soon b
democratic politics, begin
1007. when he was annoi


Orange c
fice with


county by
credit t


- T'"' rr "


Governor


w;


connected
In 1893 1


y,


o America and
has since re-
as admitted to
with the law


d


was grand high


1910.
I097, B
business


district
priest


of Florida, F.


& A. M., and


of the Royal Arch Masons in


He is exalted ruler of Orlando Lodge, No.


Is


presidency
Bankers A
national p


enevolent Protective


world


he was


Order


honored in


of Elks.


In the


with the


for the state of Florida of the


association,


American


an office which brought him into


prominence as an organizer


The cause of education


and at present he
as chairman of


School
years,


for Girls.
secretary


and financier.


finds in him a loyal supporter


is doing


active


and beneficial work


the school board of the Cathedral
He is, and has been for a number of


of the Cathedral Chapter.


man of cosmopolitan culture, broad and


He is


liberal views


and effective public spirit and as such is a valued addi-
tion to the community in which he makes his home.


he was made


upon the retirement of


HON. WILLIAM


A. HALLOWES, JR.


came prominent in local


ing his public career in
hinted county solicitor of


Broward, filling that


to himself and to the


satisfaction


Hon. Williaim


A. Hallowes,


Jr., states attorney


the fourth judicial circuit of Florida and


tioner at the Jacksonville bar


the younger


representatives of the


a practi-


since 1903 is


profession who has


the entire community until 1909.


his election


Orange


by the


county


In March, 1911,


democratic executive committee of


to the


court of criminal


Gilchrist.


In the


nominated and he


office of judge of the county


record was ratified


primary


now serving


by Governor


was re-
position,


in that


gained


well envy.


city w
being
natives


a reputation that many


was born September


is still his place of


which


William A. and Lydia


of Georgia


and Florida


an older lawyer might
ember II, 1881, in the


residence,
(Telfair)


his parents
Hallowes,


respectively.


father, who has been engaged.in the turpentine busi-


discharging his duties with


scientiousness and


the other


positions


the same


energy, con-


public spirit which he brought to
of public trust which he has held.


is not alone along political lines, however, that


Warlow has made


his name a synonym for


progressive and constructive work, for


most important


city owe


business


their growth and


tive and organizing


Senator Massey


ability.


he took


corporate
progress
In


many of
interests


to his initia-


connection


a leading part in the or-


ness in Florida for a number of


dent of
Willial
cation,


St. John


years, is


now a


resi-


county.


im A. Hallowes supplemented his early edu-
acquired in the common schools of Duval


county, by a course in the University
from which he was graduated in 1903.


of Georgia,
He had pur-


sued the study of law there and following his grad--
uation was admitted to practice at the bar of the


state.
where


He then opened an
he has since remained,


an office in


Jacksonville,


and has gained


a not-


personality,






FLORIDA


able and enviable position in connection with the
work of the courts here. In 19e6 he was appointed
one of the referees in bankruptcy of the United
States district court in the southern district of Florida
by Hon. James W. Locke, district judge, and was
reappointed in 1908. The same year he was elected
states attorney and so excellent was the record which
he made in that connection that he was reelected in
1912 without opposition. Certainly no higher testi-
monial of his efficiency, fidelity and capability could
be given. He carefully prepares his cases and safe-
guards the interests of the public at large, presenting
his cause in a strong, forceful, logical manner. He is
a member of both the local and state bar associations
and has the high respect of his professional brethren.
In his political views Mr. Hallowes manifests a thor-
ough understanding of principles and questions in-
volved and his position is never an equivocal one. He
is an active advocate of any cause which he espouses
and is well known in both local. and state political
circles.
Fraternally Mr. Hallowes is connected with the
Woodmen of the World and belongs to the Masonic
order, and in social circles he is also widely and favor-
ably known. He was married on the 7th of February,
1906, to Miss Sara Rhea, a daughter of W. D. Rhea
of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. They have one son,
who bears the name of his father and grandfather,
William A. Hallowes.


PHILIP


KEYES


YONGE.


A man of constructive intelligence, modern views
and aggressive action, Philip Keyes Yonge has made
steady progress since the beginning of his active
career and today as president and manager of the
Southern States Lumber Company, stands as a prom-
inent figure in the industrial and general business
development of the city. An initiative spirit guided
by sound and practical judgment has influenced his
activities and forms the basis of a success which has
been wisely used in promoting the best interests of
the community where he has been an active business
factor for the past thirty-seven years.
Mr. Yonge is a native of Jackson county, born May
27, 1850, and is of English ancestry, the family hav-
ing been founded in America about the middle of the
eighteenth century. His father, Chandler Cox Yonge,
was also a resident of Jackson county, where he was
prominent in the law and in politics, serving as secre-
tary of the constitutional convention of 1838, which
drew up the laws under which Florida was admitted


to the Union. He was also a member of the first
state legislature and was later United States district
attorney under Presidents Polk, Pierce and Buchanan.
During the Civil war he was prominent among the
supporters of the southern Confederacy, serving as
district attorney for Florida under the Confederate
government and later organizing a company of volun-
teers, known as "Yonge's Confederates." In 1863 he
was commissioned major in the quartermaster's de-
partment of the Army of the Confederacy and sta-
tioned at Tallahassee. After the close of hostilities
he made his home in Pensacola, where he became one
of the most prominent and distinguished lawyers in
the state. His wife was in her maidenhood Miss Julia
Ann Cole, of Virginia.
Philip K. Yonge attended the University of Georgia,
graduating in 1871 with the degree of B. A. and re-
ceiving in the following year his degrees of A. M.
and B. L. In 1873 he began his career in Pensacola,
serving as clerk to the British vice consul, a capacity
in which he acted until I87g. He afterward spent a
short time in the real-estate and insurance business
and was for one year city clerk of Pensacola. Leaving
this office in 1876, he accepted a position as book-
keeper with the Muscogee Lumber Company and has
since that time been connected with lumber interests
here, his energy and industry aiding him in the de-
velopment of a successful business career. After one
year he was made secretary of the concern and did
capable work in this office until 1889, when the Mus-
cogee Lumber Company was succeeded by the South-
ern States Land & Timber Company, Limited, of
which Mr. Yonge was made assistant manager. He
afterward served for one year as manager of the
company's New York office and in 1892 was appointed
superintendent of the Muscogee Mills, a position which
he held for three years, or until the company went
into the hands of receivers. Mr. Yonge, as a man
thoroughly conversant with the condition of the busi-
ness and the details of its management, was made spe-
cial agent and manager for the receivers and had full
charge of the affairs of the concern until I898, guid-
ing the destinies of the company tactfully and wisely
through a trying period in its history and finally put-
ting its affairs into shape for reorganization. In I898
the Southern States Lumber Company was organized,
taking over all of the valuable holdings of its prede-
cessor, and Mr. Yonge was elected vice president and
manager. In 1903 he was made president and man-
ager. The Southern States Lumber Company controls
large and valuable tracts of timber land in Escambia,
county, Florida, and Escambia and Baldwin counties,
Alabama, and manufactures both rough and finished
lumber, operating one of the largest lumber export-
ing concerns in this section.





FLORIDA


On December


Lucie C.
Davis, f
Mr. and


Davis, a
formerly


13, 1876,
a daughter
residents


Mrs. Yonge


children, seven of
married P. A. Buc


Mr. Yonge married Miss


of John E.
of Column


became


par


whom are living:
k; Julien Chandler;


and Sarah C.
bus, Georgia.
rents of nine


A. Louise, who
John E. Davis;


Henry Mather; Malcolm Roland; Chandler
and Marjorie Jean.


Mr. Yonge is connected with the


Independent


Mrs. March spent her girlhood


in Greene county, Ohio,


on her father's


and on August


age of twenty-one married


March.


Willia


17, 1889, at
,m Everard


was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, June


1858, and was a son of


Edwin


Everett March, a repre-


sentative of an old English family and a direct descend-


ant of the Earl of March,


English


throne.


once the


The family


rightful heir to the


coat of ar


noble lineage and the family's position in


ns shows
England


der of Odd Fellows and socially belongs to


while his political allegiance


ocratic party.


From 1877


member of the board


cambia
during


county,


until


the Osceola


is given to the dem-
:8co he served as a


of public instruction


with the


which he declined


been a member of the


of Florida


and has


the past four years.
cola city council for


and political associations


exception


to act.


board


01


Since


of control of th


of Es-
ne year


he has
e state


been chairman of that board


He was a member of the


years.


Through his


b


for


Pensa-
iusiness


Mr. Yonge has become widely


known among the men of weight and influence in
Pensacola, in whose ranks he stands, and for over a
third of a century he has been a representative of the
city's most progressive and powerful business interests.


for many generations supported


of its members.


and fruit


by the great


was


wealth


William Everard March was a farmer


grower by occupation


and immediately


his marriage moved with his wife to Center Hill,


ida, where


started


he purchased


a bearing


new trees on another tract of land.


frost of 1895, however
influenced Mr. March


further south.
to Dade county,
miles south of


destroyed


all his


in his determination


Accordingly,
SFlorida, and


the present


that time having not yet b


made a
line of


thorough


in August,
started a


grove and
The great
trees and
to remove


I895, he


came


fruit grove ten


site of Miami, the
een founded. Mr


of everything


business and was recognized


authority on tropical


relating


town at
. March


to his


as a standard


fruit cultivation,


called upon by agents of the


United


States government


for data


on this subject.


In addition to being one of the


pioneers in the growing of citrus fruits


in Dade county


he was also extensively interested in local real estate,


MRS.


MINNIE HILL


MARCH.


acquiring large and important holdings.


He died May


13, 1911, leaving


It is seldom,


indeed,


conspicuous organizing and


power


of coordinating,


and such general business


by Mrs. Minnie Hill I
of the Hotel Halcyon


a woman
executive


possesses
ability, st


planning and systematizing
efficiency as is displayed


fred Lucile,


his widow


and one daughter,


who is now completing


a Fairmount Seminary,


daughter
After


JLarch in her capable management


in Miami.


She is vice president


Augusta


Washington,


Belton, died in


her education


Another


infancy.


the death of her husband Mrs. March found


f dependent upon
and courage, rare


her own resources


min a woman,


she determined


of the


operating


company


ow


concern, and the remarkable growth which


tion has made


directed
manage
county,
Gilbert


ner in the
the institn-


is due entirely to her intelligently


efforts since she assumed control as resident


in I9i1.


Ohio,
Walker


occupation.


October


I7, 1868,


Hill, a native of


was born in Greene
and is a daughter of


Virginia and a


farmer


With his parents he moved from Vir-


to enter the business world.
associates she purchased the


Miami,
Royal I


a fine modern


hostelry, second only to the
:edlv the finest tourist hotel in


Florida outside of those controlled by the Flagler inter-


ests. Mrs. March's


partners


being non residents, she


took active charge of the enterprise, changing the name
to Hotel Halcyon, a title under which it is now con-


to Greene county when he was still a child


grew to maturity there,


becoming one of the success-


ful and prominent farmers of that section of


state.


ducted.


She has enlarged


improvements in equipment


assumming


its capacity,


made


and furnishings


many


and since


charge


He has now, however, disposed of his property in Ohio


and makes


his home in Miami, where he lives retired.


tails of management,


leaving


nothing


tindone to make


the hotel modern and luxurious in every respect.


His wife was in her maidenhood


Miss Minerva


stace McFarland, also a native of Greene county.


Hill family is


of old Virginia


Revolutionary stock and,


Halcyon, loc
d according


beautiful design,


is one of the most picturesque and attractive places in


in fact,
bership


on both sides Mrs. March is eligible


in the Daughters oa
he Colonial Dames.


American


mem-


Revolution


it adorns


and beautifies.


cost, exclusive


The original
ich it stands,


unprovements,


Wini-


9










































fk:
Ai i
4'I


1'~ra


]AAv-r


I~





FLORIDA


thousand dollars and today, with the


more recent im-


and proving


himself


able, energetic


and far-sighted


provements it doubtless represents a total value of half
a million dollars. Although built along modern lines and
lavishly furnished at the outset, the hotel was not suc-


cessful


from a


financial


standpoint


in the beginning,


four expert hotelmen having made a failure of its


management.
upon a profitat


It remained for Mrs. March to put it
ble basis and to so direct its operation


in the


discharge


of his duties.


Mr. Gregory married Miss
daughter of Joseph and Nellie


and. they have become


May Theresa,


Nellie


Holvert Chatman.


Catherine


Saunders,


(Alexander) Saunders,


parents


Prescott,


of four children:


Gladys


Catherine


Mr. Gregory is a member


Methodist church, and fraternally is affiliated with the


that it is today not only a large, beautiful and attractive
hostelry but a profitable and well managed business
enterprise as well.


Mrs. March is a


member


of the


First Presbyterian


Royal A
Knights


Lrch Masons,


the Woodmen of the World, the


of Pythias and the


der of Elks.
demonstrated


Benevolent Protective


His ability and public


in his


conduct


spirit have


of the affairs


of the office


church of Miami, in which her husband was a ruling


elder, and
ways ready


she is interested in religious


to aid in the promotion


sion. She has not allowed


detract in any way fr
is an attractive and


work and al-


of church


expan-


he holds and he


is highly


only as a public official, but
right citizen.


esteemed and respected,


as an honorable and up-


her business success to


-om her charming personality and


broad-minded


proven her ability in the splendid
attended her labors.


woman,


results


who has


which


ELIJAH


BRYAN


ERWIN.


Elijah
position


Erwin,


of clerk of th


creditably and ably filling the
ie circuit court, was born in


Greenwood, Jackson county, December 22,


G. SCOTT


is a son of
Erwin the


GREGORY.


John M. F.
former of


and Georgia Carolina


whom


was born


in No


(Bryan)
rth Car-


G. Scott


G. Scoth
as sheriff


Gregory,


now serving


ably and efficiently


of Gadsden county, is a native


born in Wakulla county, March
son of Holvert C. and Elizabeth


ory, the former a
latter of Florida.


Civil war


as a serge;


tle of Natural


Bridge


native


of South


The father
ant and was
re. He


18, 1872.


of Florida,


He is


(Causseaux) Greg-


Carolina


served


and the


through the


wounded at the bat-


was prominent and im-


portant in local public affairs, at one time representing


his county in the state


assembly.


gave his attention almost exclusively


was prosperous


dying August 2,
wife until March
born six children:


vert Lee,
review;
Florida.


and successful


19, I892.
Julia and


For many years


lively to farming and
in this line of work,


was survived
To their union


Annie,


of Tallahassee, Florida;


Allien,


deceased;


G. Scott Gregory
farm and remained


at which time he


year was engaged
of that time he fo


Moseley
the cattle


e, deceased;
G. Scott, o


and Albert M., of


by his
in were
d; Hol-
of this
Quincy,


olina, o
native
came t(
where I


f Scotch-Irish descent
of Florida, of Irish


o


removing


this state


it, while the latter was


extraction.


in 1840 and located in


spent two years


to New


he returned to


as a school t


trleans. After th
Jackson county


rel t
ree


The father
Greenwood,


teacher
years


before
in that


and established


himself as a general merchant, following this line of


occupation


he joined the
as lieutenant in


After the close
legislature, sen
ing in this ti


Upon the exp
his mercantile


tent in
vived I


farming, passing a
him many years, dy
born three children


were born


until the outbreak of the


war,


Confederate army, going to the front
i Robinson's Company, Finley Brigade.
of hostilities he was elected to the state


legislature, serving
ing in this time


from 1865 to


far-reaching


eiration of


business and


his term of


1866 and accomplish-
and beneficial work.


office


also engaged
y in 1878. I


passing away 7in I57
years, dying in 1911.
children: Elijah B


of this sketch; John M. F., who


* was reared upon his father's
there until he was twenty years


came to Quincy


tobacco.


in dealing in


formed a partnership with


and together they remained nine


business,


tention to public


Quincy


Mr. Gregory


affairs.


He was


and for
At the
W. H.


years


then turning his at-
elected city marshal


and resigned this position at the end of


drowned in Lake Michigan; and


tain in the Thirtieth United
in Alaska.


At the


sixteen


States


he resumed


some ex-


His wife sur-
To their union


Bryan, the subject
was accidentally


Isaac,


who is cap-


Infantry, stationed


Elijah B. Erwin


position as shipping clerk in a warehouse in Neals
Landing but held this position for only a few months,
coming at the end of that time to Marianna, where


for two


years


he returned


he engaged in merchandising.


to Greenwood


and purchased


In 1887
an inter-


years to make the campaign for the office


He was elected in
TeL U--


and reelected in


of sher-
1912,


in a general store,


the conduct of this


dividing his attention between


concern and


a large


lumber busi-


I*


g


secured


of the


ways ready


I


when





FLORIDA


ness until 1904, when he


in Marianna. F
banking interests,


the Citizens


Bank


again


' took


his residence


[ere he has become identified


serving


for six years as cashier of


of Marianna and becoming a power


and a force in local financial


Greenwood in 1910o,


circles.


Returning


he again became connected


the mercantile business but after two years was elected


clerk of the
his official


circuit court, a position which he still fills,
life being marked by the same earnest,


capable and conscientious work, which distinguished


and made successful his business


In August,


Ackland Vereen and


children:
Roanoke,


Georgie,
Virginia ;


career.


Mr. Erwin married


they became


who is


a graduate


Miss Hattie


the parents of ten


a college


Margaret, who was educated at


Eufaula, Alabama, and who is now studying


in Mobile, Alabama; Hattie


who is


a


nursmg
attending


Ann (Manor)


Martin.


was a captain in the


family


The grandfather,


Revolutionary war.


is of English descent and


moved from Albemarle county,


Carolina.


Edmond


Martin was


South Carolina, and at one time


a large plantation in that
sive holdings in Florida
prominent and influential


number


was not a


terms in
politician


wedded


county, South
old families c


Martin,


1 the


state.
and


citizen,


early an
Virginia,
born at


owned


cestors


to South
Edgefield,


and conducted


Later he had exten-
was recognized as a


who served for


state legislature,


in the usually


accepted


Ann Manor, who was born


Carolina, and
if that state.


was so named


Marshall whose wife


grandfather.


although he
d sense. He
in Beaufort


belonged to one of the
Her son, John Marshall


in honor of


was


Chief


a sister of


Justice John
Mr. Martin's


In the family of Edmond and


school in Danville,


Virginia;


Sarah,


Marion, Lucy, Patty Irene, Elijah


M. F. and


Virginia, all of


Erwin is a member


Mr. Erwin


cratic


party,


portant connection,
of the Maccabees, t


whom liv


deceased;


Bryan, Jr., John
e at home. Mrs.


of the Methodist


Ann (Manor) Marti


adult age.


Alfred


the Confederate


court of


his political support to the demo-
raternallv has extensive and im-


being a member of


the Modern


Masonic order.


Woodmen
e last nam4


tion he has attained a position of promin


the Knights
of America
ed organiza-
ence, having


been for a number of years master of Chipola Lodge,
F. & A. M. A man of keen discrimination and sound


judgment, he confines
fairs of the public offi


tive ability and
well known anc


excellent


his attention largely to the af-


management


I prominent in


and his execu-
have made him


financial circles.


inquiries,


six years. E t.,
his life work, di
Abram, who ser
South Carolina,
age of fifty-two


in were six children
M., who became a


army and was


who reached
volunteer in


transferred


died at the advanced age


made th
the age


e practice


0


to the


of eighty-
f medicine


of eighty-two years.


in the Confederate


army from


under Colonel Carlcock, died at


years.


age of thirty-one years.
the youngest of the fam


Colonel Ma
who reached
birth until his
at the Citadel


arrived in
d a large


chase


l.uen passed away at the
Rosa Caroline Lawton was


rtin, the other member of the family,
adult age, resided at the place of his


ren
in


oval to


Charleston,


1 this


South Carolina, and


where


From


received


siderable acreage in Marion county


a con-


and here he has


COLONEL JOHN M.


Colonel


Martin


first milestone on life's journey


MARTIN.


has passed


the eighty-


and in the evening of


since made
a good plar
identified w
retired. H


his home.


has been more or less actively


pursuits


but is now living


life is receiving the respect and veneration which


ever be a
has been
honorable


remarkable


accorded to a man of his years,


characterized by
manhood. He


changes not only in the


whose


the qualities of up-
has lived to witness


district in


he makes his home but also throughout the


been an important factor in


work of general improvement and


latter part of


i86i he enlisted


federate army and


became


Artillery, which was


progress.


for service in


a captain
raised in


county.


country.
railroads


His memory compasses the period


were first


and telephone


tions.
taking
within


Since


built and in which


were given to tn
[844 he has been


a reside


He continued in command of that company until


the telegraph
as new inven-
nt of Florida,


wounded


at Richmond,


serious


up his abode in that year in Marion county,


the borders


of his residence


still makes his


Ocala.


home,


was born


Beaufort, now Hampton county, South Carolina,


i8, 1832,


and is


a son of


occupants
Martin to
kindness 1


and subsequently


Colonel


Kentucky,


struck


recovered.


t had been vacated by its
a Union man took Mr.


:ared fo
Martin


ation. For some time he was


incap


ir him-an act


has high appreci-
>acitated for duty


n





FLORIDA


but eventually returned
the interval, however, his


him nominated


him for co


a handsome majority


On the


expiration


to active


service.


friends without consulting
ngress and he was elected


over two worthy


of his


competi-


term he circulated


a printed card declining a reelection on the ground that


he was


too young a man to be


men might do the
military duty. TI
that he would hav


in congress


work and he could


here was


engage


in active


old army comrades
Episcopal church.


tin that
arduous,


His religious


faith is that of the


It is characteristic of Colonel


he should leave legislative


difficult


field service.


honors for


At no time of life


has he ever shirked his duty but has always been


faithfully discharging
upon him, ever holding


hood and


the tasks that have


to high


standards


devolved


man-


of citizenship.


every reason to suppose


been renominated without opposi-


tion had he


not declined further


legislative


honors.


He was then appointed colonel of


the Ninth Florida


F. F. BINGHAM.


Regiment and


served


for a


short time in this state,


after which he was ordered


to report


with his conm-


to General Lee.


Through


successive


stages o


ment in the business world F.


f progress and advance-
F. Bingham has worked


Cold Harbor, in the campaign


in the siege


of Petersburg and in


duty in all of the engagements


many of his neighbors, he
reconstruction days owing


but he reso
place again


Wilderness


was on active
vicinity. Like


suffered


to the ravages of war,


ilutely took up the task of bringing
into good condition and was meeting


substantial success when the


Prosperity


has again attended him


at the


lands are now largely


tables.
tract giv


devoted


I of 1895
since that


his way upward
stenographer with
pany to be secret


great concern.


from the position


the Southern
irv and assisi


As such he is


States Lumber
ant manager o
a power and a


influence in business circles of Pensacola


qualities by which he
organization, control a


tant affairs


under


Mr. Bingham


rose are effective
nd management o


today
)f the


his charge.


was born


Yankee


time.


raising of


As he prospered he not only


en


him by


boundaries and


number of


his father


remained upon


years


at the


but also extended its
the plantation for a


present


writing


tion in the public schools
later attending a business


to Pensacola


and secured a


Southern


is making


his home in Ocala.


In 1852 Colonel Martin


was united in marriage


lie Welborn, a native of
who died in 1859, leavi


W., an attorney


Meriwether county,
ing three children:


of Atlanta,


proved


the Southern


of Chicago
college. In


Spring,
is early
and St.


890o he came


position as stenographer
States Land & Timber


States Lumber


Cornm-


Advancement came
himself a man of


scientiousness


and, moreover, poi


executive


Georgia;


M., who is engaged in truck farming in Marion county;


and one who
tin wedded S
Carolina. Ti
riage: Salli<
Mary A. Bi
Waldo, living


ously stated,


infancy.


iarah


here are also t


e


rdsey,
upon
is lar


vegetables.
Colonel Martin


me management
long occupied
thrifty citizens
been interested


In 1864


Waldo, a native of
iree children by this


the wife of H. C. Monroe;


of Savannah,


Georgia;


his father's farm, which,


gely


devoted to


is practically living


it of his
a positic


interests 1
in among


of the community.


in politics



gate to many county,
both since and before


memorable
gate. For


assessed of organiz-
power of initiative,


there can be no real accomplishment.


department


the confidence


after department he rose, win-


of his


superiors and


ship and esteem of his associates, an indication of


Bingham's standing in bu
Mr. Bingham married,


gusta


as previ-


the production


retired,
sons.


leaving
He has


the prominent and


has always
as a dele-


and has served


district :
the war.


d state conventions
He was also at the


Charleston convention but not as a dele-


of years


Confederate camp, IE
always taken great


he was commander of
of Marion county and


pleasure in meeting


Oerting,


the parents
daughters.


a native of


seven


the republican party and
the Masonic order, the
lution and the Sons of I
known in social circles


worker ii
with the
member


asiness circles.


in x896,


Miss Fannie


Pensacola, and they are
en, four sons and three


fraternally i


n affiliates
s connected
American 1


federall Veterans. He is well
of the city and is an active


n the Presbyterian


Young


Men's


Christian


of the Pensacola Chamber


keeps in touch with


vancement and
gressive public
in securing for


with his belt line railroad


the general trend


gives an
projects.
the city


in order


active support


of Commerce he


of business


many pro-


He is especially interested


docks


connected


to improve trade


facilities


Com-


found





FLORIDA


and to meet more effectually industrial competition.


planter in


this state, he


purchased


two hundred and


His work in this
and far-sighted, a


city
force


has been efficient, constructive
e in public growth and an ele-


fifty acres of land in Gadsden county and has


been a successful


planter, raising high-grade tobacco.


ment in municipal development, while in


tions


his many fine qu


esteem and
in contact.


confidence


alities have gained fc
of all with whom he


social


for him the


come


He has made


extensive


and has installed


plantation being
the most modern


improvements upon his prop-
labor-saving machinery, his


today fully equipped
ideas.


according


Mr. Sizer married


Miss Alice Catherine Clark,


native of


Alabama, and both are widely and


ably known in this


vicinity.


favor-


Fraternally Mr.


HERNDON


SIZER.


is identified with the Benevolent Protective


Elks and he also belongs to the blue lodge


Order


of Masons


The tobacco


industry is rapidly


becoming


one of


the principal sources of wealth of Florida and the


men who are active in


its development are among


in New York.
the doctrines of
experience and


His religious views are in accord


the Baptist church.


A man of broad


identification with a representative


the factors in the upbuilding and


monwealth.


growth


of the com-


In Gadsden county the tobacco interests


*industry, his labors have not only proven an element
in his own progress but have also constituted a fac-


are in the hands of progressive, able and active men
who recognize the possibilities open to them in their


line of


work and whose constructive intelligence leads


tor in the development of


ever he
warmly


is known he is held i


regarded


where he


Gadsden county.
n high esteem and
is best known.


Wher-
is most


them to make the


best use


of their opportunities and


advantages. I
a prominent j
planters in the


amongg


them Herndon


)lace as one of


vicinity


Sizer occupies


the most successful


of Quincy and is a man who


ABRAM


WOLKOWSKY.


his individual


in general advancement
born in King Willian


a son of


prosperity an important factor
t. A native of Virginia, he was


1


Augustus


Sizer, natives of thatfstate.


the Civil war in the


army, and
engaged in
He had su


before


planting in


Home


county, October


2, 1868,


and Elizabeth H. (Ryland)


The father served


Guard of


and after the


during


the Confederate


close of


Virginia,


irvived his wife


their union were


since May


born nine children:


hostilities


May 16,
10, T899.
Robert I


The
striking


career
example


dustry and
success, fo


of Abram
les of the 1


I


Wolkowsky


power


perseverance in the


for he has


to a position of


flaggin
grant,
today
of Ke


labor.


many


of determination,


accomplishment of


risen from poverty and


affluence by his
At twenty-one a


obliged to peddle good
at fifty-one a successful
y West, owning two of


obscurity


own energy and un-


poor Russian


immi-


s for a living, he is
and wealthy merchant
the finest mercantile


New York city, who married
sen of Baltimore and they


Elizabeth,
nah, Georg


Minnie Theodora Thorm-


reside


on Long


Island;


deceased; John H., a resident of Savan-


nah, Georgia,


who first married Hattie


of North Carolina, who


is deceased,


E. Hammond


his second


union


establishments in the city.


The intervening


have not all been equally bright but their labors were
lightened by ambition and enthusiasm and in the end


all have brought him


something to the


incr


success


eased prosperity, adding
which places him today


being with Belle


ine, deceased; Sam
who married Grace


De Brummage


of Illinois; Cather-


of Seattle,


Comley, now deceased;


Washington,
Herndon,


among the men of marked ability and substantial worth


in the


where


he makes


Abram Wolkowsky


his home.


was born in


Russia,


March


of this


review;


who married


Thomas Miller, of


Virginia


Maryland; Mary
Lyne, of Orange,


Peachey,
Virginia ;


New York city,


Jones, of Cumberland,


who married


Oliver


and Josephine Julia, of


and he remained in his


native


he had attained his majority, when he


Atlantic, settling first
began his independent


in Nev
career


country until
crossed the


York city, where he


in the


new world. He


Richmond,
Until i8


Virginia.
i88 Herndon


no assets


Sizer remained in


aiding his father with the work of the plantation,


York,
of an


Virginia,


but in that


he went to New


joined his brother in the conduct


lumber


enterprise.


In 190o6


he traveled


pean continent and in the latter part of the


came to Florida,.where
nizing the rare oppor


he has


since resided.


where


important


on the Euro-
same year
Recog-


tobacco


beyond his


energy


and his hopefulness,


but he did not allow himself to become discouraged
and from that day to this has molded his career along
lines of determination and well directed ambition.


For a few years he worked


through the


coming in
with but


states of


to Florida.


eighty-five cents


as a peddler, traveling


Pennsylvania


Arriving


and Ohio and
in Jacksonville


in his pocket, he continued


goods,


chiefly jewelry, from


makes


ag





FLORIDA


house to house and after a few weeks spent in this
manner had accumulated enough money to bring him


to Key


West, where


figure upon the


streets,


selling his merchandise.


money,


for five


years


walking from


he was a familiar


house


to house


During all of this time he


practicing


strictest


thrift and


copal church, and in his


devoted their lives to the minis


Orlando


being now missionary


family were three sons who


stry, Bishop Gray of
bishop of the south-


ern jurisdiction of Florida, while the Rev. Joseph
Gray, formerly rector of the church at Gainesville


afterward of Nashville,


Tennessee,


some


economy,


and eventually had accumulated about three


years


There


were four


sisters


in the family:


thousand dollars, with which capital he embarked in


the mercantile business


he met with si
fully, making
and conformir


standards.


in I890. From the beginning


success, for he managed


a study of mo
Ie his activities


He is today


leading stores in Key


date clothing and


men's


his affairs care-


dern business conditions


to present
owner of


business


two of the


'est, one of them an up-to-
furnishing establishment on


Emma, who lives with her brother Bishop Gray; Mrs.
C. G. Joy, of Lawton, Oklahoma; Mrs. William


Magoffn, of
Boardman, of


Newport, Arkansas; and
Clarksville, Tennessee.


The other brother,


.


Rev. C. M. Gray,


Mrs. Mary


was reared


homee of Christian piety and devotion and his
tendencies seemed to fit him for the holy calling which
he made his life work. He was born in Waverly,


the corner of Green and


Duval


streets


and the other


a dry-goods store on the corner of Fleming and
Simonton streets. Both are modern, well managed


Tenness
became
Sewanee


ee, and after acquiring his
a student in the University


Tennessee, from


which he


early education
of the South at


was graduated


and profitable institutions, for they


a far-sighted,


discriminating


whom many years of hardship a
taught the value of economy in bi
things which form the foundation


ful merchandising.
Mr. Wolkowsky married,


Miss Rebecca L
they have three
Frank, born in


evinsky,
sons :


curred on the ioth
kowsky is considered


are directed by


and able business man,


nd privation


lying and
stones of


have


selling--
success-


on the Ist of May,


native


of Russia,


born April


3; and Joseph, who
of September, 1894.


today one of


se


15, I891;
birth oc-
Mr. Wol-


the substantial and


in 1874
in 1872
Bishop


and won his degree.
! and ordained to th
Quintard. Having q


he engaged a
Cleveland, T
Franklin and
until 1893; at
and at St. Pet


He was mat
ie priesthood


qualified


ie a deacon
in 1874 by


for the ministry,


activelyy in the work of the church


ennessee,
Spring
Ocala,
:ersburg


from 1872 unl
Hill, Tennessee,


Florida, from
from 1002 an


til


1882; at
from 1882


1902;


1912.


called to the latter city to become rector of St.


Episcopal church and during his


won many devoted friends
church, while his relations


residence


was


Peter's
here he


both in and out of the


with the


parish were of


prominent men of


Key West,


the industrial and corm-


the most satisfactory


character possible.


strove


mercial


interests


of which he has materially aided


at all times for the highest interests of the church


in upbuilding.
him because ii


His success


t has


difficulties and alm
and because it has


is the


been gained in
ost overwhelmir


come


to him


more


creditable


spite of hardships,
ig discouragements



as a result of


many


and its members and at the


promote the w
the community


earnestly


welfare ,


progress


at large,


along lines of


same tune


labored to


and betterment of


laboring


general


effectively


advancement,


reform


earnest


and persistent


labor.


and improvement.


During his life he traveled to


considerable


demise,


extent


accompanied by


and about four


his wife,


I


years
made


s prior to his
a trip to the


Holy Land and Egypt and


also visited


various


places in the Orient, deriving therefrom not only


CHARLES McILVAINE


GRAY.


much physical benefit but


also receiving


tion for his ministerial labors that


the inspira-


comes from


vYew-


Charles Mcllvaine


Gray, cashier of


the Central


the historic biblical


He married Clara


tional Bank of


younger


St. Petersburg,


residents of the


is active among


city whose


enterprise,


Bills Polk and they became the


dren, four of whom


parents


are now living:


of six chil-
Arthur R.,


bition and


factors
born in


progressiveness


are proving important


Franklin, Tennessee, February 5,


He was
I. and is


who is employed by the
their New York city ofl


i1


Westinghouse Company in
ce; and Clara, Charles M.


St. Petersburg.


passed away were


Gray, the latter
President Polk
Mrs. Gray was


a descendant


M. Gray was one


of great usefulness and his


age of
Texas,


memory


M. Gray was a native of Tennessee.


father was Rev. Joseph Gray, a rector of


yet remains as an inspiration and benediction to all


the Epis-


years


other


f,


1


setting.


_


I





FLORIDA


Charles


view,


M. Gray, whose name introduces this re-


was but


of the family


a young lad


at the time of the removal


from Tennessee to Florida and in the


schools of Ocala


and St. Petersburg


sued his preliminary education,


tended the University
Tennessee. Owing to


while


of the South


father's


later he at-
at Sewanee,


illness


incumbent upon him to start out in the


world and
collection
vanced to
1913, was
continues.
dicates his
a popular


patrons


entered the
department.
the position


elected


cash


Central National Ba


Subsequently


he felt it
business
nk in the
was ad-


of bookkeeper and in January,
hier, in which position he still


were killed during


the destructive


Not daunted by misfortune,


some of his attention to


had planted in orange


also destroyed


owner


in 1898.


of forty acres


between Hastings


resides,


devoting hi;


he made


frost of 1895.
a new start and


his land, which he again


trees, but his second grove


He has since become the


of valuable land


and Federal Point and there he
s acres largely to the cultivation of


Irish potatoes, which are followed in rotation by corn


and hay, his farm yielding
Besides this place he still oi
had previously purchased.


His long connection with the


capability, f
bank official,


by reason


winning


many


of his uniform


loyalty. He is
friends among
courtesy and


to the institution


question.
Mr. Gray i
and religious
vestryman of


various


interests


of the town.


the Episcopal


labors earnestly to
the influence of th


connected


promote the


organization.


Benevolent


Elks and the Woodmen


of the nature


of his recreation


fact that he is a member of


none


fraternal


He has been a
For two years and


growth


and extend


He is likewise


Protective


Order


rorld and something
is indicated in the


the St. Petersburg


thereon a number


him three crops


annually.


five acres which he


The home place


has been


of improvements


equipment as is considered


ern, progressive
St. Johns river


Wildwood
to him su


Farm.


farmer.


indispensable by
Iis land is situate


and is known under


Industry and


the mod-
ed on the


the name of


energy


bstantial success


has attained


factor in the


opment, having
tural resources


stretch of
have been


prosperity,


he has been a


general advancement and devel-
ibuted not only to the agricul-


state by developing


a productive


constructive value in trying


troducing new methods
agriculture in general.


which have


a bare


it his labors
out and in-


been of value


of the Pass-a-Grille


Yacht


He is well known among the leading


business men of the city and as his circle of


almost


coextensive


ance this is indicative


ac


\nglers
young
friends
quaint-


an upright


On January 19, I
marriage to Miss
Florida, where she


Mr. Atkinson


Rebecca R.


Taylor, a


native of


county


i87o, and a daughter of Ephraim Taylor. Mr. and
Mrs. Atkinson are the parents of five daughters:
Ethel, Irene, Maude, Grace and Ula. Both Mr. and
Mrs. Atkinson are well and favnrahlv known in thi


locality, where they are highly


V. ATKINSON.


high character,


having


esteemed as


made many


lasting


people


friends


since coming


to Federal


distinguishing


feature


in the


career


V. Atkinson is


the perseverance


which he evidenced


in attaining his ends,
today the owner of a
Point, Florida, known


and as a result thereof he is
productive farm near Federal
as Wildwood, and situated on


GENERAL



STEVENS


MAXWELL.


the St. Johns river.


South
mained


Carolina,


He was born


September 2,


with his parents until 1893,


roof and


tion in the schools of the


about


twenty


years


vicini


name


in Chester county,
74. and there re-


growmg


receiving his
tv. At the


came to Florida,


man-


educa-
age of
making


of Maxwell figures


of the history


of the south.


the name have been promin<
and political progress, and h;
upon the military annals of
Fortunate in having back of 1


ent in


prominently


on the


Representatives of
promoting material


Georgia


et tneir impress
and of Florida.


him an ancestry honorable


settlement near Federal


ployment as a


farm hand,


Point,


rT


tion for about six years. P
industrious, he accumulated


and there found em-


remaining ii
ersevering,


n that occupa-
energetic and


earnmgs


and only


and distinguished,


the lines of General


have been cast in harmony therewith and Jacksonville
has for a number of years known him as a legist, jurist.


soldier and also as one whose efforts


have'been


after his arrival was


enabled to buy an


trial benefit


in the development bf the state.


orange


grove comprised


ment, however,


of five


acres.


turned out unfortunate,


invest-


for his trees


birthplace was Fernandina


comes


and the year,


of Scotch ancestry, the


i866.


Maxwells figur-


years


was


on the road


bt


.





Maxwell's


1


*





S


















Jf




























II










4















*V


















ArA





FLORIDA


ing prominently in the land of hills and heather through
many centuries. Sir John Maxwell was chamberlain
of Scotland in the year 1241 and was succeeded by his
brother, Sir Aymer. One of the descendants of the
latter was the valiant companion of William Wallace.
In the present generation the family is represented in
Scotland by Lord Herries, Sir J. M. Sterling Maxwell,
of Pollock, and the Maxwells of Springkell. A branch
of the family was founded on American soil during
the period when Oglethorpe was colonizing Georgia,
and representatives of the name have since been prom-
inent in the south. One branch of the family settled
in Leon county, Florida, about 1840 and among Jack-
sonville's residents was David E. Maxwell, now de-
ceased, who served as a distinguished soldier in the
Civil war and rose to prominence in railway circles.
He was a nephew of Dr. George Troup Maxwell, father
of J. S. Maxwell. Dr. Maxwell became a distinguished
member of the medical profession, winning high hon-
ors in Florida. He commanded a regiment during the
Civil war, becoming colonel of the First Florida
Cavalry.
General John Stevens Maxwell, son of Dr. George
Troup and Martha Ella Maxwell, is indebted to the
public schools of Florida, Delaware and Georgia for
his early educational opportunities. He entered Prince-
ton University as a member of the class of 1889, but
left that institution at the close of the freshmen year.
He had previously, in the fall of I886, acquired some
knowledge of the real-estate business at Ocala and in
January, 1887, he took a second step in his business
career by entering the office of the auditor of the Flor-
ida Real Estate & Navigation Company at Jacksonville,
Florida, where he remained until January, 1889.
Within that period he several times won promotion. In
the latter year he turned his attention to the study of
law, and at the same time acted as stenographer to W.
W. Hampton, of Gainesville, Florida, attorney, with
whom he remained until February, 1890, when he came
to Jacksonville and accepted a stenographic position in
the law office of A. W. Cockrell & Son. In June, 1890,
he matriculated in the University of Virginia, where he
pursued a summer law course under Professor John
B. Minor, but the following September resumed his
duties with Cockrell & Son. In the spring of 1892 he
was admitted to the bar and continued in active prac-
tice until May 12, 1898, when he went to Tampa, Flor-
ida, to be mustered into the United States volunteer
army for the Spanish-American war. In December,
I898, he was mustered out and entered upon the gen-
eral practice of law in Jacksonville. His advancement
at the bar has been continuous. No dreary novitiate
awaited him. Almost immediately his skill and knowl-
edge won recognition and he has been continually ac-
corded a liberal clientage. In 1899 the city council


elected him city attorney of Jacksonville, but after a
contest in the courts the election was declared void.
The great fire of May 3, 190o, destroyed his law office,
but he immediately resumed practice and in January,
1902, entered into partnership with the Hon. Cromwell
Gibbons, who in the following year was speaker of
the house of representatives in the state legislature.
Under the firm name of Gibbons & Maxwell the part-
nership still continues, although in the interim Judge
Maxwell performed important judicial service. In
June, 1I07, he was appointed judge of the criminal
court of record for Duval county to fill out the unex-
pired term of Judge Samuel T. Shaylor. In May,
1908, he was nominated in the democratic primaries
for a four-years term, which appointment was not
made until May, 1909, so that he remains the incum-
bent in the position. His judicial duties have been dis-
charged with notable promptness and impartiality and
indicate his wide, accurate and comprehensive knowl-
edge of the principles of jurisprudence. In the trial
of cases he won an enviable reputation for his clear,
concise and forceful presentation of his cause, his de-
ductions always following in logical sequence, while
in the application of a legal principle he was seldom if
ever at fault.
On the ISth of November, I9o5, Judge Maxwell was
united in marriage to Miss Willie Mae Dancy and they
have one child, Martha Elizabeth Maxwell. Mrs. Max-
well's parents were William McLaws and Mae
(Young) Dancy, the former a representative of an
old Georgia family of Scotch lineage. General and
Mrs. Maxwell are communicants of the Episcopal
church and his political allegiance is given to the dem-
ocratic party. His social relations are with the Elks,
the Florida Yacht Club and the Robert Burns Associa-
tion of Jacksonville, of which he is the president. It
was Taylor who said: "Bind together your spare
hours by the golden cord of some definite purpose and
you know not how much you may accomplish. A man
is commonly either made or marred for life by the use
he makes of his leisure time." Recognizing this fact,
Judge Maxwell has "improved the shining hours,"
using his leisure for reading and recreation that has
constituted an even balance for his business and pro-
fessional activity. One point of great interest to him in
his life has been his military experience. On the 6th
of July, 1892, he joined Company A of the First Bat-
talion of the Florida State Troops, also known as the
Jacksonville Light Infantry. This was during a riot.
In August of the same year he was promoted to ser-
geant, but in 1893, because of business reasons, he
asked to be returned to the ranks. Promotion came to
him, however, in November, 1894,. when he was com-
missioned second lieutenant, and in May, 1896, he
was raised to the rank of captain. His company vol-





FLORIDA


unteered
in May,


for service in the Spanish-American war, and
x898, he went to Tampa, where he was ap-


pointed captain


teers,


U. S.


of Company


A., on the 19th of the month.


with his company


of infantry and assigned to the First Infantry.


28th of February,


rgo6, he became colonel of


I


He served


at Tampa, Fernandina and Hunts-


ville, Alabama, until mustered out of


hassee on the 4th of
and October of that


December,


year he was provost marshal of


the Fourth Army Corps at Huntsville.


ing January he resumed
ida State Troops as capt


talion,


his connection


am


of Company


and when the State Troops were


into two regiments he was commissioned senior major


and assigned


to the First Regiment.


colonel
On the
lis regi-


at the time of the outbreak of the war in


The smoke


from Fort


on the x6th of April of


that year he responded to the president's call for three
months' troops, joining the Second Ohio Volunteer In-
fantry. He continued with that command until after
the battle of Bull Run and was then mustered out, but


reenlisted for


serving


with the army of


ments and


cause


which he espoused.


has characterized


him in every


bravery and loyalty to the
The same spirit of fidelity


relation of life and


In early manhood Mr. Horr was connected with the


brokerage
cent years


business,


largely concentrated


ment and on the 27th of July, 1907,
as brigadier general in the Florida


assigned to command the


was commissioned
State Troops and


First Brigade, which position


upon his public duties. H
for the port and district of


1893, and was made United


e was collector of


y West from x889 until
States marshal for the


he occupied until January 4, 1913, when he was retired


with the rank of major general.


and military interests


Even his professional


do not constitute the entire scope


southern district of Florida in February,
has since been continued in this position,


period of fifteen


years, and


the record


He figured in financial


1898. lIe
covering a
ich he has


a public-spirited


of his activity, for Judge Maxwell is


citizen


progress of Jacksonville and the state. In the conduct
of private business affairs he has contributed to general


unprovement.


He became the


secretary of


the Ucita


Investment Company, which erected a ten story, steel,
fireproof building at the corner of Hogan and Forsyth


streets, and has in
of public progress.


credit to an honored family


a high


of American


of record.


e history is
He stands


citizenship-a


splendid example of the true southern gentleman, whose


activities


further


a


made
circles


for a number


of years


of the First National Bank


until 1909.
secretary o
and 1908.


as one of the


at Key


was defeated for


West from x893
the position of


state on the republican ticket in iSo4
.e is one of the standard-bearers of his


party and his position is never
he stands loyally by his honest
expresses fearlessly. He does


the scale of public policy but determines
principles which he believes to be right.


On the I5th
Mr. Horr was


of February,


united


at Sidne
to Miss


Frazer of Sidney, and
and Harriet K., the lat-


them by

-y, Ohio,
Lue E.


his participation in events of public moment whereby


the substantial welfare, upbuilding and


progress


Frazer,


a daughter of J. F.


their children


are:


Frazer


state are


concerned.


ter the wife of Dr. L. F. Hubble of


Sidney.


Mr. Horr


is a member of the Ohio Commandery


of the military order of the Loyal Legion and he be-


to the


Seminole


Club of Jacksonville.


acquaintance in the city in which he makes


JOHN FOLEY HORR.


a wide


his home, and


attractive social qualities


worth have gained for him the high regard
with whom he has been brought in contact.


A splendid official


Horr, who


record


since February,


is that of John Foley
1898, has been United


personal
of those


States


marshal for the southern district of Florida.


He is one of the republican leaders of the state and
his wide knowledge of the political situation and his


unquestioned interest


to occupy


the position


in the public good well fit him


that is his.


was born in


Mechanicsburg, Ohio, February
Dr. Obed and Catherine F. Horr.


in the public


schools


at Springfield, Ohio,


and in the


I5, -1843,
He was
Greenway


where he was pursuing


a son of
a student
Academy


his edu-


Ralph Veillard, a capitalist of St. Petersburg, who
has been actively identified with the material develop-


ment and political


progress


of the city,


as councilman and in that position exercises his official


First Florida Volun-


scarcely cleared away when


service at Talla-
. In September


In the follow-
with the Flor-


L, First Bat-
reorganized


three years,


the Ohio and Cumberland.


participated in a number of hotly contested


1903, he was commissioned as lieutenant


ever proved his


In this connection he


On the 20th of


has been especially manifest


and wholesale grocery
his attention has been


and one deeply interested in the welfare and


is most commendable.


other ways contributed to the work


Judge Maxwell's life


manhood and


his own interests but never exclude


an equivocal one, for
convictions, which he
not weigh his acts in


in marriage


RALPH VEILLARD.


Sumter's


engage-


service.


customs


directors


I


serving


is now


guns had


in his official


but in


wh


I


He has


as well as





FLORIDA


prerogatives in


support of


various movements and


measures which are of marked value to the community.


He was born


in the


gust, 1864, and was but
of his father's death.


western part of France, in


four years of


age at


the time


With his widowed mother he


have been productive of substantial


efits for St. Petersburg.
credit for what he has


He certainly


accomp


results


and ben-


deserves


much


wished, for he started


out in life practically empty-handed and his
ity has followed merit and ability.


prosper-


crossed the


the eastern s


eleven years in
ing much of the
engineer by the
He had receive


gained practical
road company.
spent three yea


Atlantic to Maryland in 1879, locating on
shore, opposite Baltimore. He spent about


Baltimore and that vicinity and dur-


e period was employed as
Baltimore & Ohio Railrc


'ed technical training


experience


After


in his


leaving


rs in the navy


a mechanical


LINCOLN


G. STARBUCK.


iad Company.


in France and


service


to the rail-


the railway service he
department at Wash-


Among
members
Starbuck,


the most able and


of the


Orange


in control of


tice in Orlando,


where


deservedly


county bar


successful


is Lincoln


a representative private


he also has acted


ington,


D. C., and in


the year of th
sire to locate


1895


xe big fi
in this


I895
reeze.


came to Florida,


He had


state and made


which


was


Ways had a de-
his way south-


ward to spend the winter here, but was so well pleased


for four full terms.


city, havi
his name
fessional


ing located


is one of the pioneers in the
in i89o, and since that time


has been well and honorably known in pro-
and social circles. He was born in Mis-


that he determined to remain. He opened


a fertilizer,


grain and electrical supply house in St. Petersburg
and conducted the business along substantial lines until


19II, when
Company.


he sold out to the E.


O. Painter


Fertilizer


In the meantime he had also engaged in
table growing and recently sold a sixty


fruit and vegetable


acre tract planted to grapefruit,


realizing


oranges


a handsome profit from thi


He cleared the land and planted the


and peaches,


is realty transfer.
trees himself and


souri and spent his childhood and early manhood in


Arkansas, comin


tember, 18
growing a
of work,
study law.
Orlando in


g from that state to Florida in
He turned his attention to o


and, although
abandoned it


he was successful


after five


years


In pursuit of this ambition'he


Sep-
range


in this line
in order to
came to


and read in the offices of the late


J. Hugh Murphy, a well known atto
admitted to the Florida bar in October,


irney.


was


1892, and since


developed a
studied the


chased


a fine property.


s fine proper
situation :


his land, which


oped it along
peach orchard


grove


scientific


It was only after he had


for several years tl
was a choice tract.


hat he pur-
He devel-


and practical lines and his


rd was the largest in Pinellas county, the
nicely in bearing when he disposed of it.


that time has practiced
and comprehensive kno


in this


where


his ability


knowledge of legal principles have


drawn to him a large and lucrative patronage.


the important


cases he has handled of


are especially worthy of note. '
that involving the contest in the


Among


late years two


The first of


was


wet and dry election


In all of his dealings he has met with


success


owinmg


to his judicious investment, his sound judgment and
his enterprise. He has handled considerable realty
here and for the past four years has been president of


197 in Orange
Starbuck was


James D.


Beggs,


county, in the conduct of which


associated


with the late Judge


acting on behalf of the


forces.


After a long and exceedingly bitter fight, during which


the St. Petersburg Building & Loan


In 1886 Mr. Veillard


Miss Minnie Jeffers,


was united


a native


and they have one child,


eave,


an electrician


Association.
in marriage


of Baltimore, Maryland,
. the wife of G. C. Len-


of St. Petersburg.


a daughter, Violet, when she was
Mr. Veillard has taken quite


also lost


twelve years of a
an active interest


the case


was carried to the supreme court, the verdict


was rendered


in 1901 1
case of s
county c
sessments


in favor


Mr. Starbuck


statewide inte
commissioners


carry


ficient petition


of the prohibitionists; Aga
was called upon to handle


interest, involving


Orange


the right of the


county to levy


on drainage work without


a suf-


as provided by law requesting them


local political


affairs


and is


now serving for


the third


to do


Representing M. M. Smith and two other


term as a member of the city council. It
ing his incumbency in this office that the
which has meant so much to the develop


city h
power


has been acquired.


It has been dur-


water


much to the development of the


He does everything


to further the public welfare and


identified with the Board of Trade since


in his


taxpayers, Mr.


front commissioners
The decision
is now used as


has been
organiza-


tion to


Starbuck


brought suit


and won his case without


of the


court


a precedent


his private practice


was an important
in similar cases.
Mr. Starbuck is


against


difficulty.
one and
In addi-
attorney


for the Peoples National Bank, for N. P. Yowell


in which


connection


for general improvement


future of this


section


ion he has also been a
lnt. He has great faith


of the


state and i


among those whose business enterprise


a factor
:h in the


s prominent
id capability


Company of
Company and
ing Company.


of Sanford, for the Curry & Smith Cigar
and the F. Joseph Raehn Plumbing & Heat-


At the present time Mr. Starbuck


serving as county solicitor


of Orange county, having


L p


as solicitor


s


o


h


h





FLORIDA


previously filled four full terms as


Orlando with credit to


faction
aided


himself


city solicitor of


and to the entire satis-


of the citizens whom he represented.


in the


organization


of the


Bank.
Mr. Starbuck is a member of


tion of Orlando,
the Independent
sided in the city


of the local Bc


Order


Peoples


He also
National


the Pioneers Associa-
)ard of Trade and of


of Odd Fellows.


since pioneer


times,


Having


he is well


favorably known here and his straightforward and


honorable


dealings have won


esteem


an extensive


for him the warm


circle


of friends.


jobbing


cities of the United


twenty-five hundred
i892 he resigned th;


dollars a


States


on a salary


year and expenses.


at position and began business


his own account in St. Louis as a manufacturer


extinguishers,
ing Company,
still conducting


business


Stempel was


organizing the Stempel Fire Extinguish-
of which he was president and which is
g in St. Louis the largest manufacturing


of that character


actively


in the United States.


connected therewith


when he sold out and came to Florida.


investment in
the cultivation


:itrus groves and was


of his


groves


in Lake


until 1897,


Here he made


largely engaged in


county,


He then went


ten thousand
to Lakeland,


dollars


through a freeze.


where he purchased some groves but also


lost part of that


O. A. STEMPEL.


orchard the following


year through


came to Pinellas county and took


up his


Inventor, me
-these four lii
O. A. Stempel


.rchant, manufacturer


and fruit-raiser


les of activity cover the fields


has labored,


bringing


in which


him a wide


ouaintance in business circles in various sections of


the country and gaining for
of success. He now makes


having


born in I
of Willia,
Berlin.


purchase


:d his pr


him a


substantial measure


his home near Clearwater,


sent


m 1912.


He was


Berlin, Prussia, August 9, 1845, and is a son
m and Louise (Grof) Stempel, also natives of
The father came to the United States with


Carl Schurz. He brouw
and, settling at Fort M


ght with him considerable money


Eadison,


He had been a surgeon


wa, purchased a large
in the Prussian army


and was a finely educated man, who spoke six different


languages.


Although he took up


agricultural pursuits


in America he was nevertheless induced to take charge


some difficult surgical cases while in Iowa.


from that state to


the south he purchased


Remov-
twenty-


four hundred acres of fine Mississippi bottom land and
there spent his remaining days. In 1849, the year after
he crossed the Atlantic to the new world, he brought his


family.


A few years later he


wife, who survived him,
married twice and had


unions,


of whom eight are


passed away and his


died in Missouri.


He was


abode at Clearwater,


ducted a livery business.


ent farm,


a fine
carries
and he
during


comprising


grove


covering


on gardening,


where for


In 1912 he came to his pres-


forty acres,


about
raising


upon which he


twelve


vegetables of


He also
all kinds,


has taken out a patent upon a method of pro-


vegetables in the summer time.


also has some fi
large brickyard,


Moreover,


ne clay land and (
his clay being


Mr. Stempel


expects to develop a
of superior quality.


he has extensive interests in


one time was the


owner


Texas


of over ten thousand


Iowa, Texas and Florida.
In 1872 was celebrated the marriage of Mr.


and Miss Elmira


daughter of
slaveholder .
who served i
was called u


Rosson,


Washington
of Missouri.


in the


acres m


Stempel


a native of Missouri and a
Rosson, who was a large


However, he


Union army.


had two sons


In 1909 Mr.


pon to mourn the loss of his


had but two children and the


deceased.


The son,


daughter, Louise


G. A. Stempel,


now married and has two


Mr. Stemp
indicated by
ius and natu


twenty


now living,


being the youngest child.
Upon the home farm in Iowa,
the first ten years of his life an


attended the country sc
Louis where he learned
trades and also master
quently he turned his


:hools.


O. A. Stempel


O. A. Stempe


I


He then went


the confectionery and I
.d the jewelry trade.
attention to the patent


spent
period
to St.
bakery
Subse-
right


business and he now controls thirty-seven patents upon


his own inventions,


of these. At
F. Meyrose L
pany of St. L4
during which


making


one time he was
amp & Lantern
ouis, filling that


considerable money


vice president of the
Manufacturing Com-


position


period he traveled,


for ten years,


making


studied
knowled


his investments


Stempel
:. They
, is also


of Clearwater, is
ouise and Dorris.
e of Florida as is


His inventive gen-


talents have enabled him to do
that is fast making it one of th


d properties of
the question of
ge is not only


a theoretical


fruits


and his


.practical character.


enables


to carry


forward


whatever he undertakes


a creditab
* business


>le


position


to successful completion
he has now made for


among


men of Pinellas county.


His enthusiastic


to Clear-


water is clearly reflected by the


appeared
Optic an
"Your ki
are now i


above


name


d is addressed


recent


in the Quincy (Illinois)
his friends in that state:
date received. The roses


farm.


of fire


but lost


a time he


con-


acres.


citrus


_


*

































































































































































































































































- \
L *j2





FLORIDA


much for you to see them. But because you can't I
will write you a little sketch of the country at the pres-
ent time. It is healthful, picturesque, historical. We
imagine that Irving must have visited this or some
similar place when he wrote the lullaby story of Rip's
twenty-year slumber. The bluff on which this beauti-
ful town is situated is nearly fifty feet above the level
of the sea and Clearwater Bay is one and three-fourths
miles wide, enclosed from the Gulf of Mexico by a
chain of long, narrow islands of sand as white as snow.
The roll of the surf on these islands cannot be equaled
for bathing even by that on the Atlantic beach. Thou-
sands of varieties of fish teem these waters and the
fishermen with their nets and sharpies are constantly
bringing carloads of them into the market, whence they
are shipped as far north as New York. Occasionally
a party wishing more strenuous fishing than is afforded
by these placid waters of the bay take larger boats and
go out into the Gulf for several miles, where .they
fish for snapper, grouper, kingfish and such varieties,
often coming in at evening with a ton or more of fish
caught entirely with hook and line. It is no infrequent
occurrence to see the flat, monster kingfish spring
twenty feet from the water with the decoy bait and
hook in his mouth, where he shakes himself in a vain
effort to gain his freedom. You might with the aid of
an eye glass observe about twenty miles off the shore
a fleet of sail boats apparently lying still. These are
the sponge boats with their Greek divers aboard, who
are risking their lives many fathoms under the heavy
waters, surrounded with reefs of glittering coral and
exposed to the dangers of sharks, devil fish, etc., while
obtaining wealth from the very depths of the sea. The
sponges from these waters are found in the markets of
every city in the country. We have all heard fish
stories but after living on this coast for years, as the
writer has, the old fish stories seem quite mild in com-
parison with what is true of these southern waters.
But it is useless to attempt to give in so short a space
even a synopsis of the thousands of curious and inter-
esting freaks of nature as found here. So I will go
ashore and climb the Clearwater Bluff, at the very
spot where General Jackson built Fort Harrison on the
bluff of Clearwater Bay, and which the records at
Washington, D. C., show to be the most healthful
place or camping ground in the United States. I find
myself surrounded by large seedling orange trees, now
laden with the noted orange, the 'Florida Seedling,'
the best in the world. These trees are over forty years
old, no frost has ever yet blighted them and they are
now laden with golden fruit, firm, sweet and juicy.
Then there are trees bearing great clusters of tanger-
ines, mandarines, kumquats, grapefruit and lemons.
From six to ten carloads of fruit leave this little vil-
lage daily and there are numbers of instances where


growers realize from six hundred to one thousand
dollars per acre from the sale of citrus fruits. In the
mid-winter season the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad
cannot handle the crop fast enough but soon they will
be getting scarce and then again you will see the trees
burst forth into full bloom. Who has not enjoyed the
fragrance of the orange blossom, let him come to
Clearwater during the months of February and March.
We have in our garden from November to June straw-
berries, peas, beans, beets, cabbage, tomatoes, roasting
ears, Irish potatoes, etc. We have only a population
of one thousand-no one has ever written much about
us, but we are gradually coming to the front as a win-
ter resort and I understand that we have some of your
Quihcy people stopping here at present."



GEORGE BOWNE PATTERSON.

For forty-two years George Bowne Patterson has
been identified with the bar of Key West either in
active practice as a lawyer or as a public official whose
services have been in the direct path of his profession.
Presidential appointment kept him continuously in
the office of United States district attorney for twenty
years, and the record which he made was such that
it placed his name on the roll of eminent representa-
tives of the bar of southern Florida. He was born
at Key West, October I, 1848, a son of Hon. Alex-
ander Patterson, whose birth occurred at Stoning-
ton, Connecticut, and who became a resident of Key
West in the '30s, and during the War of 1812, al-
though but a youth in years, served as a militiaman
from the state of New York. The grandfather had
also been a soldier, defending the interests of the
colonists in the Revolutionary war. The ancestry of
the family in the paternal line can be traced back to
Scotland, and it was while this country was still num-
bered among the colonial possessions of Great Britain
that the first of the family in America took up his
abode in New England, where his descendants lived
for several generations, Alexander Patterson remain-
ing in that section of thiecountry and in New York
until he sought a home in the south in the '3os. He
soon was recognized as a prominent factor in both
business and social circles, being identified with mer-
cantile interests for a long period. He also repre-
sented Monroe county in the state legislature for a
number of terms, being a member of the house dur-
ing the early existence of that body. He served as
mayor of Key West for a number of years and his
administration was at all times businesslike, practical
and progressive. During the greater part of the Civil
war he was in charge of the naval station at Key West





FLORIDA


for the United


18go
remain


States government.


He passed away in


at the advanced age of seventy-nine


ns


interred


in the


His wife, who bore the maiden


was a native


of German descent.


of Charleston,


years,


Key West cemetery.
name of Sarah Fol-


South Carolina and


Her death occurred


in 189go when


she had reached the advanced age of eighty-four years.


Her father


was Dr. Edwin Folker, who


time a very prominent physician


George
Mr. and
ters living,


was at one


of Charleston.


Bowne Patterson is the only living


Mrs. Alexander
g, both being r


Patterson


residents


but has


of Key


Sson of
two sis-


West.


Island city has been his home throughout his entire


life and his early education


instruction of


a private tutoi


was acquired
r. When th


under the


the Civil war


broke out his parents sent him to Cuba to continue


jamin Harrison,


though


a candidate


Mr. Patterson was importuned by


general of the United


to the position


Florida, bt
suited in tl
terson has
tions, incl
member of
The duties


of judge of the northern


it there were c
he appointment
i also held v;


for the posi-
the attorney


States to accept appointment


counterr


district


influences which


of another man.


anrous


minor


Mr. Pat-


official


including that of member of the school board,


the board of aldermen
of these positions he h


the same faithfulnes
positions of farther


and city attorney.
as discharged with


that has marked his course


reaching importance.


years he has been the legal
American & English Marine


Association


of London


writers in all salvage matters


For many


representative of


Underwriters


and of the French


Salvage
Under-


in his district.


his education and


he attended


a university near


Havana, from which he was graduated on the com-


pletion
Key
the H


of a three-year course.


He then returned to


West and entered upon the study of law with


Hon. Thomas


judge for the


ceptor.


J. Boynton,
district


southern


United


States


district


of Florida, as


After thoroughly mastering many of


principles of jurisprudence
in May, 1871, and in the i


he was admitted to


1871, and in the intervening period of


the bar
forty-


two years has remained an active representative of


the profession, practicing in the courts of Key


filling offices which have called into
and ability as a lawyer. Shortly
to the bar he was appointed b


office


of prosecuting attorney:


West or


play his knowledge
after his admission


by Governor Hart to the
y of Monroe county and


likewise
attorney


vice president,


one of the


for the First National Bank of


In the city of his nativity, on the
1876, Mr. Patterson was united in


Ida E. Bethel,


Bethel
Bethel,


directors
Key


26th of January,
marriage to Miss


a daughter of the late Judge
and a sister of Judge


of Key West,


who is


now occupying


eleventh judicial circuit court of


terson died


and five daughter


of Norfolk,


5, I906, leaving
s: Lucille, the


Virginia;


Braxton, of Jacksonville,


of H.


A. Prindle of


the bench
Florida.


Winer
L. W.
of the


Mrs. Pat-


six children, a son
wife of C. W. Oak-


Eva, the wife of


Florida;


J. Marshall


Frederica, the


New York city;


at home;


George Elliott, who is a graduate of the New
University and is now a practicing lawyer in


filled that position


for three years,


time Governor Hart appointed him
torney for the sixth Florida judicial


at the end


of which


prosecuting


circuit.


York


and Effie


Mr. Patterson


At the


estant


Episcopal church


Aletta, also at home.
s membership in St. Paul's


of Key West,


same time he was made a member of Governor Hart's


staff with the rank of colonel.


President Grant United


the southern


reappointed to this
and Benjamin Hai


district


In 1874 he was ap-


ed States
of Florid,


district at--


was


office by Presidents Hayes, Arthur


prison, concluding


a seventeen-year


is senior warden.


He is


a Master


Mason


and for


nine consecutive years was master
He also holds membership with


Odd Fellows, and in every relation


ling qualities


respect,


have commanded


>n of life his ster-
for him the high


confidence


service in that position


ministration
administration


of Grover C
n, from 1885


I 1894 und
leveland,
until I889,


under the second ad-


under


whose


he devoted him-


he has been associated.


period of
directed i


his course at the bar and in office
i the line of his profession and hi


has been


private


practice


occupied


the position


States


district attor-


ney. During
fice he made


Mr. Patterson's


incumbency of that of-


a clean and creditable record, as he has


done in every position


of public trust that he has been


to fill. For nine years he


Stoneman)


office


of postmaster of Key


resigning the position in


Because


fitness


as a financier


and an attor-


1909. During


active


member


all of these years
of the bar of the


he has remained an
city and for many


Frank


B. Shutts was chosen a special representa-
comptroller of the currency of the United


years was senior partner in the law firm of Patter-


son & Harris,


Harris.


During


associate


in practice being J. Vining


the administration of


States,
selecting


and that fact is largely


Miami


President Ben- bank in Miami


i as his home.
not proving entire


responsible for his
A receivership of a
ely satisfactory, Mr.


of judge




FLORIDA


Shutts was sent by the comptroller to clear up the


tangle and finally to


manner


bank won him


it possible


close the receivership.


in which he closed up the


a large


circle


for him to consider ]


liome and paved the wa
has had as a resident of


for tl


affairs


tact-


of the


of friends and made
Miami as a permanent
he uniform success he


this city.


In his home relations


happy.


On June 8,


Mr. Shutts


I910, he married Miss


is particularly


Agnes


John, of Aurora, Indiana, a daughter of the late John
and Julia (Bush) John, representatives of two of the


old families of that


state.


little daughter.
In all of his business and social


have a charming


relations


Mr. Shutts


Frank B. Shutts


diana,


September


pioneers, of
empire out o


was born in Dearborn county, In-


II, l87o.


that splendid
if the wilderness


is a son of Indiana


stock that has


created


His father is Abram


is looked upon


as a leader,


possessing


faculty called personal magnetism which


to him
integrity


and gives them confidence


He is an able and


that peculiar


draws men


in his ability and


successful


business man


Shutts, born in 1841, and his mother, Mrs.


(Barker)


Shutts, born in


tended the public schools at


graduated from the high


Five years
University.
the practice
practitioner
He served f


later he


Frank B.


4
b


Amanda
Shuts at-


is a prominent


figure in all of the lines of


are building up Miami


and southern


activity


Florida.


Aurora, Indiana, and was


school


of that


city in 1887.


was graduated from De


Immediately on hi
of law at Aurora.


at the bar, building up


Pauw


is graduation he began
He was a successful


a large clientele.


or several years as general counsel for


interurban railway operating in Indiana and Ohio.
He is president of the Southern Indiana Telephone
Company and has been largely interested in the elec-
tric light, gas and public water concerns in that part of


the state, as well as


in other manufacturing industries.


John Earle


of his


JOHN EARLE PERKINS.


Perkins,


who is now in


the third


service as treasurer of Leon county, is


bered among the


men on the


roster


most able, conscientious and


of county officials.


in Tallahassee, July 30, i87
Day and Joanna (Willson)


native of


Florida and the latter


and is


He w
a son


efficient
as born
of John


Perkins, the former a


of Missouri.


being impressed with the


909rom
i from


a business


point of


to this city, establishing


coming the
of the Flor
its subsidiary


possibilities of
Mr. Shutts re-


a law office


and be-


legal representative of Henry M. Flag
ida East Coast Railway Company and
ry interests in south Florida. In 1910


organized The Herald Printing
pany, which is the owner of th


leading


& Publishing Com-
e Miami Herald, the


daily newspaper in south Florida,


that time has


been president


principal stockholder.
was increasing to such


distance


in disposing


of the


Finding that


and since


company and its
his law practice


an extent that he required


of th


Mr. Shutts, on January
firm of Shutts, Smith &


ie large volume of business,
i, 1912, organized the law


Bowen,


a firm that has taken


a leading position in the practice of law in this


It is composed of


formerly


Frank B. Shutts;


of Jacksonville; and


of Indianapolis,


number of
organized
operative 1


years.


where he was


state.


W. Pruden Smith,


D. Bowen, formerly
city attorney for a


Mr. Shutts is president of the newly


Miami Building



& Loan Association, a co-


financial institution, which


is rapidly filling


a long-felt want in the city.
Mr. Shutts is a member of the Methodist Episcopal
church and his fraternal affiliations are with the Benev-


olent Protective


Gamma
Florida
of the


Delta
State


Seminole


Order


of Elks, the


Masons


and Phi


He belongs to. the Miami and the


Bar Associations.


He is also a member


Club of Jacksonville.


ler,


father enlisted in the Confederate army when he


seventeen years of age
tire four years. He
Gettysburg and was Ii


was


and served throughout the en-


was wounded


at the battle of


eft upon the battlefield,


where


he lay upon the ground for three days and three nights


before receiving help. The injury afterward
tated the amputation of his left leg. He jo


army as a private but his


efficient,


necessi-
ined the


loyal and able


service won him promotion to the rank of


and as such he


turning to Le
mission busin
life divided h
his duties as


received


his honorable


dischaq


captain
e. Re-


on county, he engaged in the cotton com-


ess and


for the last sixteen years


is attention between that


of his


occupation and


county treasurer, a position


which he


held at the time of his death. His wife has also passed


away. T
William,
George B
of the Ca
twins, the


'o their union were born seven children:


who died


., an


in infancy; Ida,


also deceased;


attorney; Thomas E., who is cashier


ipital City Bank; C
former a resident


latter deceased;


and John


o. W. and Maggie May,
of Tallahassee and the


of this


review.


The last named acquired his early education in the
Tallahassee public schools and supplemented this by
a course in a business college in Poughkeepsie, New
York, graduating in 1899. Immediately afterward


he turned his attention to banking, becoming


nected with the Capital City Bank,


for two years, after


which he


Bank of Madison, Florida.


con-


where he remained


spent six months


in the


His father's health fail-


ing at the end of that time, Mr. Perkins


was obliged


L


T.


1.




FLORIDA


to return home and assume
county treasurer, to which


the unexpired


position


term.


the duties of the


office of


he was appointed


In 1906 he was


and is now in his third term,


elections proving the


discharges
has made a


acceptability of


his duties ably


record in


elected


and deep


regret


still resides in that


to the


his two


his service.


and conscientiously


office for constant


consideration


of the best interests of the community.
Mr. Perkins married Miss Caroline C. Chaires,


was felt at his


passmg.


city. In their family


children, of whom Judge Walton


others


Susie Lee and


Judge Walton remained
to the time of his marriage.


His widow
were three


is the eldest, the


Will N.
at home with his parents


Practically his


has been spent in Palatka and in
ated from the high school. He pu


entire


1903 he was gradu-
arsued his law course


in the Washington and Lee University at Lexington,


they are the parents


born December 4,
the Presbyterian


with the '
Protective


given


of one son, John E., Jr., who


Mr. Perkins


is a member of


church and fraternally is


Woodmen of the


Order of


to the democratic


any movement calculated
ment and development.


connected


World and the Benevolent


His political


allegiance


and his support to


to promote


general


advance-


Virginia,


where


he was graduated


with the


class of


igo6. He took the bar examination in that state be-


fore the


supreme


practice in the
same year. Hi:
Virginia was he
in his minority


court


courts of t
s certificate


in 1905 and was admitted to


:his state
from the


in October of the


supreme


court of


eld because of the fact that he was still


and was


reached the required


given


him until he had


age of twenty-one


has since engaged in general


years.


practice and has


for himself a most creditable position


tive of the bar.


as a representa-


From the latter part of


JUDGE


V. WALTON.


November I, 1911, he


was associated


with H.


ryday, under the firm style of Merryday


Judge V. Walton, trained for hi
of the oldest and most efficient


s profession
universities


one


of the


south and since attaining his majority actively con-


nected
clientag


with the


practice of law,


at Palatka,


county, Tennessee,
John N. and Katie
mer a native of Ala


having now a large


was born in Gallatin,


August
Lee (


Sumner


16, 1884, his parents being


Vertrees)


Walton, the


Ibama and the latter of Tennessee.


They were married in Gallatin, Tennessee, although
John N. Walton had spent his early youth in his na-
tive state, there remaining until he entered school as


and since that time has been alone.


lawyer, well versed
On the 29th of


was united in


Howard,
daughter
two child


& Walton,


He is


an able


in his profession.


Nove


marriage


a native of Marion
of Captain James E
ren: Sophie Elizab


Lee. Mr. Walton
democratic party


nicipal affairs,


mber, 1909, Judge Walton
to Miss Sophia Elizabeth


county, Fl
I. Howard.


lorida, and


>eth Braulim and


gives his political allegiance to the


and takes an active


interest in mu-


cooperating heartily in many movements


for the welfare and upbuilding of the city along po-


a student in the University of Nashville.


attended the Emory and Henry I
where he pursued a course in civil


College
engine


He also


of Virginia,
:ring. When


Judge Walton was but six weeks old the family came
to Palatka, Florida, where the father entered the


litical and other lines.


Like his father, he


a mem-


ber of the Knights of Pythias fraternity and of the


Methodist Episcopal church.


His has been


spent life, evidenced by the fact that many


warmest


friends


a well
of his


are those who have known him from


wholesale
Vertrees,


business


in connection


and Jr., under the


with James


his boyhood days


to the present.


firm style of Ver-


trees & Company.


Mr. Walton remained a partner


in that business until his death, which


occurred


23, 1912, when


was an
church,


active


he was fifty-seven years of age. He
member of the Methodist Episcopal


ever making


his first consideration.


his religious
Fraternally


service


and duty


was connected


JAMES WILLIAM


It is significant


of the trend


more and more important


CASE.


of modern


times


business affairs are


with the Knights of Pythias, becoming a prominent
representative of that order, in which he advanced
rapidly until he became chancellor commander. He


trusted to


young


men, who


are proving


their ability


by the excellent results which they obtain and by the'
progressive policies which they advocate. James Wil-'


was also a Woodman of the World.


In politics he


liam Case is one


of the prominent men of this


was a democrat, active in
was made one of the three
the Putnam county bonds.


commissioner but


resigned.


support of the party, and


trustees


having in


charge


He was also elected county


Palatka numbered him


among her valued, representative and honored


citizens


in Hastings
success to


Florida, and


has done much by his rapid


justify the modern idea.


prominent in financial


of the


Hastings


Banking


dollar corporation, but


circles


He is not only


of the town


Company,


is connected


as cashier


a thirty thousand
with a number of


i,




FLORIDA


other enterprises


velopment of the
James Willian
North Carolina,


ilton and


were


natives


of the


which greatly contribute to the de-


was born in Guilford


June 9, 1877, a


(Thorp) Case.


county,


parents


secretary
vestment


and treasurer of the Southern


Hotel


Company of Hastings, an organization


is incorporated for thirty thousand dollars.


man who by the shi
his foresight and his


various


eer force


initiative is of


& In-
which


He is


great value to


organizations with which he is connected and


spent his
February


entire


2, IgOZ,


life as an agriculturist, passing


, in his sixtieth
name of Bruce


year. The mother,
in honor of Charles


who through the medium of them has contributed


largely to the rapid growth of the
In the fall of Igo8 Mr. Case was


town.
united


In marriage


who was


North Carolina in the


resident of
is of Englis


nial days. James


William


the fourth in order of birth
dren. He was reared on th


county,


days of her birth,


state.
to this


is now a


The Case family
country in colo-


t son and
nine chil-


e home farm in Guilford


schools


to Miss
lina and


Ethel Troy


Finlator, a. native


the expansion


of North Caro-


a daughter of John Finlator, and they


the parents of one son, James
In his political associations


and is


considered an important factor in


is a democrat


the local


of trade, the de-


in the neighborhood in the acquirement of his educa-
tion and subsequently attended high school to com-


plement his learning.


farm, ass


isting his father


until he was twenty-four
he was appointed deputy


He remained on the home
r in the management thereof,


years o
county


at which time


recorder,


serving in


its people,


life of tf
treasurer


he has become connected


ie town,


having been elected


of Hastings


present in that capacity.


tist church


and gives to


material support.


two terms


He is a mem
that organize


As a member


with the public
to the office of
and serving at
ber of the Bap-


ition n


noral and


of the Board of


that capacity
and ability.
management


for


a period of


six years


At the suggestion of
of the American


with efficiency


a boyhood friend the


Bank of


Trade he finds


often occasion


to assist in


promo-


tion of measures which have greatly benefited the com-
mercial life of the town. His fraternal relations are


Greensboro,


North Carolina, selected him


as the head


with the Knights of Pythias.


Mr. Case


is a man


of their savings de
spicuous capability


apartment and he


in this


position


it in order to remove to Florida.


served
until he


con-


resigned


In January, 1909,


strongly marked by character and
ful element in the community,
traits have won him the high re


has become a force-


where


guard


his sterling


we find him employed by Smith, Richardson
roy of Jacksonville, Florida, in which position


mained for a fe
time to Hastings


to accept


the position of


& Con-
n he re-


at that


cashier


the Hastings Banking Company, an office which he has


now held


for over three years. As cashier of the bank


of all with whom
ness or social way


his own ends, he
ant factor in the
along this line ha


contact


a busi-


has been actuated
has encompassed


has been and is a helpful and cooper-


general
Is always


advancement am


been of


a high


I his work
order. Al-


he virtually guards the interests of the institution and


though he has attained a position which would be


guides


its policies.


Conservative


yet progressive, he


credit to any man


twice his age and he could rest con-


has been instrumental in


ness of the


organization


of stability and solidity


greatly extending the busi-
and its present reputation


largely due


to his


efforts.


tented in the fulfil


be predicted that
carry him to man


Iment of his duties, it may safely
his force and aggressiveness will


y more conquests


equally honorable


He recognizes
safeguards the


that the bank which most carefully


interests


of its depositors


is the


one


and worthy, which hold forth


his industry,


common


sense


additional rewards


and intelligence.


patronage


and regards no detail too


lortant to assure it of his close attention. The
of which he is not only cashier but also a director


and one of its
deposits in excess


prosperous


speaks


For thirty years actively engaged in the profession
of dentistry in Key West, Dr. Kemp occupies a fore-


vailing in
his active


Hastings.
ties to ot


Mr. Case, however, has extended
er fields and acts as representa-
le Life Insurance Company of


most position in that line
is evident from the fact I


on several


in the city and his standing


occasions to serve as executive of important


'the business


company


having


state associations along professional


However,


efforts; He is also he has not confined his


Agnes Bruce


son of William Ham-


same county and there the father


received


of his will, his ability,


politically and socially prominent in


Greensboro, that
ih origin, coming


Case is the oldes


a family of


North Carolina, attending the common


William, Jr.


Mr. Case


councils of that party.
ment inaugurated for t
velopment of the city's


Always foremost in any move-


resources or the betterment of


Exchange


w months only, being called


he has come into
At all. times he


and confidence


by laudable ambition and, while he


1912,


greatly increased





FLORIDA


been distinctly successful
has been prominent in frat


in educational affairs and


circles


and ever been


to give his support to benevolent causes.


present serves with great


distinction as president


Key West city council, doing


promoting


measures


valuable work in


which will be of lasting benefit


and contribute toward the further growth of the city.


Here he was


born on March I,


liam Kemp, a native


Harbor


a son of Wil-


island, one of the


Dr. Kemp h
in educational


has ever taken an active part and


matters


and for twenty


ficially connected with the public-school


years


of education,


ten years
cation in


been a member


years


interest
was of-


system,


of the county board


and for a similar period following this
eld the office of superintendent of edu-


in Monroe county.


president of the


Key West city


at present
council,


serves


a position


which he has held for five consecutive years with credit


Bahamas.
In his ea
captain,
Key Wes


The father


was born


on January


i3, 1813.


earlier life he was a seafaring man and


and during this


West


a sea


pursuit became a resident of


in 1831, where later for many years he was


successfully engaged in the mercantile business.


to himself and


munity.
tee of the


conferring


Dr. Kemp


a benefit upon the


is a member,


steward


First Methodist Episcopal church,


and for many years has been superintendent of its


bath school.


com-
1 trus-
South,
Sab-


is prominent in fraternal circles, be-


died on December 19,


1882, deeply mourned by a


a past noble grand and past grand patriarch in


circle


of friends, and is buried in the Key West ceme-


tery. The mother of Dr. Kemp


was Amelia Lowe,


family


of this city


before her marriage


a member of the well known Lowe


and also a native of


having been born on Green


also deceased,


having


Turtle


survived


the Bahamas,
She is now


her husband


the Odd Fellows and also


of the World, in


a member


of the


which organization he has


office of clerk in the local camp for


sixteen


tive years. Along professional lines he
of the Southern Dental Society. His i


Woodmen


held the
consecu-


is a member


His interest in chil-


a dren has not only been manifest in his kindness toward


number


of years.


To them was b


of whom but two are now living,


Kemp being Walter J


ames,


The home of Dr. Kemp


the date


of his birth and


a jeweler
has been in


orn a large family
the brother of Dr.
er of this city.


in Key


here he attended


West since
private and


those whom he educated in his family but he


a director of the Children's Home


sonville and
of bettering


phaned children.


Society


ie is also
of Jack-


as such very much interested in the work
the conditions of unfortunate and or-


As shadowed forth between the


public schools,


1877 a
school's


and being


graduating
one of the


first graduating class.


from the high school in


two members


of the high


He subsequently


the life


work of Dr.


Kemp has been many-sided


and to whatever line he has turned his attention it


evident that he has attained


results.


is also


pleted a commercial course in Moore's


ness College


Southern


of Atlanta and then entered upon the


dent that he has nothing of the


dizement for he


has ever given his best


of self-aggran-
services for


study of dentistry and in
Pennsylvania College of


Since


the date of his


he has been


1883 graduated from the


Dental Surgery
s graduation,


actively engaged


at Philadel-


years


in the practice


the public's sake, and only for the public's


he therefore
natural and,


greatest


enjoys


the highest esteem and


as it should


reward


and in that


and the respect


respect


esteem I
receives


his profession


in his home


and has been increas-


truly his


greatest


success.


ingly successful, being
foremost members of


state. He combines


now considered as one of the


the dental fraternity


a deep knowledge of


of the


the scien-


tific principles underlying dentistry with a


mechan-


CHARLES RICHARDSON PIERCE.


ical skill and touch which


reputation and


secured


representative citizens.


Florida St
the Florida


State Dental
ida State Bo


still a member of
The marriage


has made


him the
He i
Society a


Board of Dental


made for him a great
patronage of the most


is ex-president


of the


and an ex-president of


Examiners


and is


that board.


of Dr. Kemp


occurred


in Key


on May 7, 1885, when he wedded Miss Mary A.


man,


a native


of Key


West


and a daughter of John


H. Coleman, formerly a well known


they have taken care


citizen of this


of several who


Among the
native sons i


the sp
today
he has


sponge


most able and successful of


is Charles Richardson


West's


Pierce, a pioneer in


industry in this section of the


one of its leading rep
been for many years


who are active
ment and in


representatives.


state and
Moreover,


prominent among those


in shaping the city's political develop-


various


positions


of responsibility, trust


and honor has accomplished effective and far-reaching


work, influencing to a


great extent municipal progress


along many lines.
Mr. Pierce was born in Key West, on the 22d
July, 1855, and is a son of Lewis Edward and Sarah


Pierce,


natives


of Nassau,


he held the












































joc-w


/ C_-,cOT


/00




FLORIDA


where at first he followed the ship carpenter's trade,
later becoming a merchant and a sponge dealer, build-
ing up a large and important enterprise along the lat-
ter line. He passed away in 1874 and was survived
by his wife until 1893. Among their children are:
Charles R., of this review; Mrs. Lydia E. Moss; Mrs.
Cornelia M. Allen; and Mrs. Annie B. Brown, all of
Key West.
Charles Richardson Pierce was reared in his par-
ent's home, securing his primary education in private
schools in his native city. He afterwards attended
Emory College at Oxford, Georgia, and had reached
the senior class when the death of his father made it
necessary for him to give up his studies and to return
home in order to take charge of the latter's extensive
sponge interests. He was then but a boy of nineteen,
but he ably took charge of all of his father's affairs,
settled the estate and succeeded to the sponge business,
which was already an important and profitable concern.
In his work as administrator he displayed the initiative
spirit and the excellent organizing and executive power
which have dominated his entire business career, bring-
ing him to a position among the leaders in the indus-
trial life of his city. He today controls large sponge
interests and is one of the most extensive dealers in
Key West, his success in the conduct of his enterprise
coming as a result of a thorough and exhaustive knowl-
edge of the business, his straightforward and honor-
able dealings and his strict adherence to progressive
and modern business methods. He is now having
constructed a large steam launch of one hundred tons
capacity, which when completed will be named the
Mascotte and which he intends to keep for general
wrecking and cable repair use.
Although Mr. Pierce is a resourceful, capable and
successful business man, it is not alone along business
lines that he has done splendid work for his native
city, for he has been for many years one of the great-
est individual forces in local politics, holding several
important official positions, in all of which he has ren-
dered faithful and honorable service. For several
years he has been a member of the board of education
and this is his second period of identification with edu-
cational interests, to the promotion of which he has
given a great deal of his time and attention. He served
for four years as a member of the board of aldermen
and almost continuously since the date of its organiza-
tion has been a member of the Key West board of pub-
lic works. As such, on the xIth of December, 1912,
he had the pleasure of laying the first brick in the
city's new system of street paving, upon the completion
of which all of the city's streets will be covered with
a good standard pavement.
On the 29th of June, i88t, Mr. Pierce was united
in marriage to Miss Annie Elizabeth Lowe, a native
VoL tn-


of Key West and a daughter of Samuel S. Lowe and
niece of John Lowe, Jr., of this city. Mr. and Mrs.
Pierce have three sons. Cleveland Reuel, aged thirty-
one, is a lawyer in Key West. Emory Lowe, aged
twenty-seven, is a graduate of the Georgia School of
Technology and at present is serving as city engineer
and street commissioner of Key West. He is engaged
in the hardware business in this city in partnership
with his brother Lewis Edward, aged twenty and the
youngest son in this family. Mr. and Mrs. Charles R.
Pierce have one grandchild, Emory Lowe Pierce, Jr.,
born May I, 1913, a son of their second son. Mr.
Pierce is a member of the First Methodist Episcopal
church of Key West and fraternally is identified with
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the
Masonic order. He was formerly vice president of
the Island City National Bank and is now a director.
He belongs to the Key West Chamber of Commerce,
being actively interested in the growth of the city and
in the advancement of its commercial interests. He
is a splendid type of the present-day American citizen,
zealous in promoting his own interests but always
eager to make them forces in general progress; ambi-
tious for political preferment but only as an avenue to
public service, and at all times honorable and upright
in his personal, political and business standards, while
at the same time businesslike, practical and enterpris-
ing in the methods by which he seeks success.



WILLIAM PRUDENT SMITH.

William Pruden Smith, who during the fifteen years
of his connection with the legal profession has made
steady and creditable progress, establishing himself
in an enviable position in the regard of the general
public by reason of his personal worth and his ability
in his chosen calling, is now a resident of Miami, con-
nected with the bar of Dade county as a member of the
firm of Shutts, Smith & Bowen. He was born in
Dalton, Georgia, March 4, I876, and is a son of Hon.
John Lee Smith, a resident of Cleveland, Tennessee.
John Lee Smith is recognized as an able and forceful
lawyer, as was his father also, the latter having been
Hon. Samuel Axley Smith, of Cleveland, who repre-
sented the third Tennessee district in congress for
many years prior to the-Civil war. Upon the outbreak
of hostilities he enlisted as a private in the army of
the Confederacy and served for four years, meeting
death in battle in North Carolina near the close of the
war. The mother of the subject of this review was
before her marriage Miss Rosa Pruden, a native of
Cuthbert, Georgia, and a daughter of William H. Pru-
den. Her father served during the Civil war as lieu-







tenant colonel of the


Thirty-second Georgia Regiment,


to make him a valued


and representative citizen.


Confederate


army,


having


moved


to that state from


Milford, Connecticut, with his parents when he was


was born in New
and he began his


for Sargent


Haven county,


independent career


& Company,


hardware


Connecticut,


in 1852


r as an office boy
manufacturers in


William


Pruden


Smith was


reared


Tennessee, and after completing tl
course entered the State University,


was graduated
was connected


in 1898.


one year


in Charleston,
e public-school
from which he


thereafter


South-


New Haven.


a natural


mechanic,


turned his attention


learning


pattern


making


expert workman
a position with 1


and becoming a sk
line. He afterward


Anson


ne soon
business,


accepted
ia, Con-


ern Railway, located


in Washington,


D. C.,


necticut, and there remained


for eleven


years,


1goo came to Florida, settling in Jacksonville, where


ing the


business in principle


he engaged in the general practice


years,


first as a partner of W.


of law for twelve


B. Owen


and later


practically everything
machine work. With


connected w
this excellent


training


a member
January, I


of the firm of Kay, Doggett
312, he removed to Miami an


& Smith.


id became one


to Orlando


Sperry


association


organized


the South Florida


with E. F.


Foundry


& Ma-


of the organizers


of the firm of Shutts,


Bowen, now one of the strongest and


Smith


most prominent


chine Company
of fifteen thous


incorporated


original


name.


law firms


in southern


nized as a strong


Mr. Smith


and able practitioner,


of legal principles


is comprehensive


Is recog-


whose knowl-
ive and exact


enterprise


organized
Works, its


as the South


present


B9I, wnen a was re-
Foundry & Machine
hnson is president of


and whose
logical. Hi


application


of them always correct and
lentified with much successful


the concern and


Three


years


E. F. Sperry secret
I Mr. Witchendahl


tary and tre
purchased


iasurer.
an in-


litigation
his mark
occupies
On the


still a young


in professional circles
a high and honored pi;


1903,


M


man, has


of the city,


made


terest in the business and has made an excellent record


where


ace.
r. Smith married Miss


period


association


Foundry


a well managed


concern.


& Machine


Works


business enterprise in every particular


May Garner, a daughter of
ner, of Jacksonville, Florid


Captain


Charles


E. Gar-


have two


and since its organization in


growth.


Its facilities


a steady


have been gradually enlarged,


dren:


Katherine


Pruden, Jr.,


aged fi


Rosalyn,
ive. Mr.


the buildings twice remodeled and other improvements


is a member


now covering


about three acres


the Yacht


of Jacksonville and belongs to the
Dade Clubs in Miami. Fraternally


Benevolent Protective Order


a member of the
professional lines


Nobles


e Country C
Tarpon and


he is connected
of Elks and the


workmen.


affording employment to thirty high-class
In years past, when iron was used more


extensively than steel for the same purposes,


company


he is a Knight Templar
of the Mystic Shrine. A


is connected


Miami


a great deal of work for the railroads of
hey have also made, put up and repaired
phosphate machinery used in central and


having


constructed


most


State Bar Associations.


iron stairways


in use in the large


position


in the ranks of


the legal



frater-


buildings.


One of the


most recent


nity in this part of the state and in
social circles alike has won a host of


professional and
warm friends.


and important of


contracts


was the installation


of nine flights of metal stairway in the new high school


at Tampa, the Hills
the St. Augustine high


county


school.


courthouse


In fact, no other Flor-


ida foundry has yet been able to turn out this class


CHARLES


EZEKIEL


JOHNSON.


of work as cheaply or as


At the present


they have three


important


contracts


of the same


Orlando numbers


among


its most progressive,


under


way. The general castings now made are prin-


sighted and enterprising
iel Johnson, president of
& Machine Works, and',


business men Charles Ezek-


the South


Foundry


since its organization one


cipally for architectural
machinery. The territory


sonville to Fort Myers.


purposes and
covered reaches


Situated on both, the Atlantic


the leading factors in


its steady growth and expansion.


Coast Line and


the Seaboard


Railroad


tracks,


residents


in the


and in


company enjoys unexcelled facilities for transportation,
being in immediate touch with all parts of the state.


came


Seminole Club and


time


C


I[





FLO


RIDA


brated Foos
This branch


worked up to large
to come. A special
gating equipment, wh


proportions during
y is being made of t


rich


is the


the months


he Foos


irri-


Nebraska, and began his education in the public schools


it in the


high school at
After laying


aside his books he engaged in merchandising for some


determined


to study


Accordingly,


running thing of its


kind ever invented.


Farmers and


he entered the law department of the University


trucker:
plants,
trebles


are beginning to find the vast utility of these


and in


regions


where


crop' returns, as in


and surrounding counties,


irrigation


many
. magic


priced rain-producers are worth their!


-even i
amount.
installed
fact, all


f they cost


but an infinitesimal


doubles and


parts of Orange
and moderately
r weight in gold


fraction


of that


Mr. Johnson and his associates have recently


in their factory a new engine


of the


equipment


is thoroughly


lathe and,
modern a


Florida and was graduated in


was admitted


pointed clerk
ficient and c
he resigned.


general


practice


of law


his knowledge and ability proving an excellent
way to a lucrative patronage. He is a member 4


Florida


State Bar Association


and is connected with


in the s
he was


and served in


1913,


his attention to the


up-to-date in every particular.
the South Florida Foundry &


His association with


Machine


not, however, limit the extent of Mr.


ness interests,


for he is


vice president


Works


Johnson's busi-
of the People's


business interests of this city as


president


Southern Florida Lumber Company. He
dent of the Osceola Journal Publishing


weekly


paper,


secretary


of the


So


of the


is also presi-
Company, a
uthern Utili-


National Bank
lando, Sanford


sonia,
Marcia,


to Orlando Mr.


and one of the organizers of the


& Kissimmee


Electric
Julia A.


and they


Welton


and Dorothy.


Since coming


Johnson has been actively interested in


the progress and advancement of the community and


Or-


Railroad.
Pratt, of


ties Companies.


On the 3oth


of September,


, 1912, Mr.
Adalene F.


Johnston was
Donegan, of


circles


and they


Mr. Johnston is a member of the Knights
To his many friends in this city he is


"Pat"


and he has made the name


united in marriage to Miss


Kissimmee,
of the city.
of Pythias.


familiarly known as


identified with the work


ment. He served as


a member


of the city council


two years, his term covering a critical
city's history, embracing as it did the


freeze


when


period
years


all business


in the
of the


was prac-


paralyzed.


Mr. Johnson voted


struction of clay roads in the town


for the con-


CHARLES


and also aided in


bers of the city council in


and is very popular in the


so long resided, his genial and social


salaries


for the


mem-


order


,ht be used for the general good
He has been identified with a


corporate and business


city where he has


interests,


Dr. Charles


county, Ohio,
and Jane Ann
of Connecticut


parents were married


Andrew


favorably known in Hastings as


of the com-
great many


growth c
Orlando,


geon,


having


located


in 1904,


their mention on account of


service
where


physician


but deserves


distinguished


military


the Civil war,


side of his brothers


conspicuous gallantry.


in Burlington,
. and is a son


Lattin,


and the mother of


Lawrence
of Charles


the father a native


New York.


in Dutchess county, New


and subsequently removed to Ohio, whence the
ceeded to Virginia, in which state both passed


In his younger days


trade


the father


while a resident


was a carpenter by
of Virginia, served


One of
sentatives
Johnston,


profession


the most successful of the


Kissimmee bai


known by everybody


in this city.


younger


is Rober
as "Pat"


repre-


t George
Johnston,


1911 has been practicing his


as county surveyor in Cabell
The parents were prominent i


they
highly
acter.
garet


Thompson,


deceased ;


and Lincoln counties.
in the districts where


them
I char-
Mar-
C., of


gas engines throughout this territory.
of the business will undoubtedly be


lightest and smoothest-


of that section, completing


Kissimmee, where he located in


time but later


1911 and


to the bar. In


of


of the circuit court


capable way until January I,


He has again turned


and has won rapid success,


Mr. Johnson married Miss


Connecticut,


Harold,


have four children:


closely


are well known in social


a synonym for professional ability,
nation and high personal integrity.


passage


business


a bill abolishing


saved


munity.


discrim-


ANDREW


has directly
his excellent


affected the growth of


fluenced
member


general


business and executive ability


development.


of the Hoo-Hoos


disposition
ing drawn


Fraternally he is a


rendered


he fought on the


during


and his sterling qualities
to him many friends.


of character


was born


"PAT"


who since his admission in


He was born in Howard county,


lived and all who knew them esteemed


for their substantial qualities of mind an
In "their family were three children:


_


.


t





FLORIDA


Hamlin,
review.


West


Dr. Lattin


Virginia ;


was a boy o


and Charles


Andrew,


two or three


years


of this


when


he inspires


kindly
sional


in his fellowmen, who


qualities


attainments


of mind and


esteem


character,


him for his
his profes-


and his self-sacrificing


public


the parents moved to Vir
Cabell county, that state,


ginia


and


acquiring


ie was reared
his education


the subscription


7, 1862,


schools


he enlisted


Virginia Cavalry, under


of those early


in Company


Captain


James H.


On Oc-
Sixteenth
Nounnan,


ALEXANDER


RAY.


remaining in active service until the close


was taken


prisoner November


12, 1864,


of the war.


at Cedar


Jacksonville has been signally
men who have occupied her


favored in the class
public positions, for


Grove,


and was interned in the military


prison


on the whole they have been loyal to duty and


consci-


Point Lookout, Maryland,


until his release June 28,


entious in meeting


every


obligation


that has devolved


During


the longer


period


of his service he


upon them.


Of this


class of public officials


is Alex-


held the rank of sergeant.


war he was employed fo
riage maker, but leaning
research work, he decid


Subsequent


r four


or five


to the Civil
years as car-


strongly toward study
d upon a professional


reer, and, studying medicine, graduated in
the Eclectic Medical College of Cincinnati,


search
began


for an
active


selected


practice


at Federal


Point,


ander Ray, now city treasurer.


New York,


Jacob and


Aug


Margaret


He was born in Water-


rust 30, 1854,
(Auchter) R


native of the Empire st
Both died in New York


Alexander


became


his parents being
ly, the former a
hitter of Germany.
I they removed in


tailor's
a years


trade.
when the


residents


county, this


state, remaining there


schools


came to Hastings, perceiving


service


education by pur
Stratton Business


suing a
College.


course


in Bryant


He started


and conscientious


performance


profes-


own account


sional


duties,


successfully


he has demonstrated


cope with the


ravages


of sickness and


ease and as his reputation has grown his practice has


increased.


Beside


attending to his extensive clientage


and has since been dependent upon
so that whatever success has come
result of his earnest labors. He ha
in the early mornings and during;


i nis own resources,
to him is the direct
d a newspaper route


he also conducts


modern


a drug store,


which is up-to-date


in all its departments, the prescription counter


married


vannah


F. Bickel, a native


June 30, 1874,


of Ohio,


Miss Sa-


and of this mar-


riage was born one daughter, Florence Maude,


wife of N. T. San
whom she has two


in October,


1888, in


ford, of Coalinga, California, by


Mrs. Lattin
and on June


passed a
20, 1890,


office boy
goods. Th
indicated in
until 1875,
In 1877


in a house
iat he was


remained


the business went out of


Mr. Ray came to


orange business a
in Putnam county.


until 1891,


entered


into business


nd settled


existence.


Florida to engage in the
on Fruitland peninsula


There he engaged in


orange grow-


when he came


connection


Doctor was united


in marriage to


Mrs. D. C. Guthrie,


who passed away in July, 1894.
Although Dr. Lattin gives the most of his


atten-


Tampa and Key
Line. He was


West Railway, now the Atlantic Coast
afterward with the Florida Fruit Ex-


change until the memorable freeze of


1894-95.


tion to I
his time


'is


extensive


professional


work and employs


largely to perfect his knowledge


and experin-


ness, in which


his attention to the retail grocery busi-
he continued until 1899. On the ist


ence by reading


latest


broadly and comprehensively of the


achievements and


discoveries in the world


of January of that year he entered
office as chief clerk under A. M.


the city treasurer's
Ives and held the


medical science, he has found time to devote to pub-


lic office,


having


served for two


years as the


position for ten years.
treasurer for a longer


Mr. Ives not wishing


period,


Mr. Ray


to act as


then became


treasurer


the Episcopal chu
with the Masonic


his comrades in
his membership


of Hastings.


His religion


and he has fraterna


order.


He keeps


I arms of days long
in R. E. Lee Camp,


is that of
1 relations


in contact


58, U. C.


candidate for the office and has three times been elected


opposition.
I? It is an


gard entertained for him by the people, who
his ability and integrity as a city official. He


can be


recognize


record of Dr. Lattin re-


pounds


to his credit


and honor


rich reward in the confidence


has found


regard


tinue in the office until June, I915, and the consensus
of public opinion seems to be that he will be the choice
of the people for a fourth term. He never forgets


years







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