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Title: Florida resources and sports
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055600/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida resources and sports
Physical Description: 32 p. : ; 23 x 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The record company
Place of Publication: St. Augustine Fla
Publication Date: 193-?]
 Subjects
Subject: Description and travel -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Industries -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Statistics -- Florida   ( lcsh )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055600
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001712543
notis - AJC4888

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
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    Back Cover
        Page 54
Full Text











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PRODUCrs AND Scuu vwx DADm COUNTY
J. Tea A=: *= im 34d k Dktrkt a lk 1 wb 2. Bad .9 A. 3 DDeft aminbgr .1 Ca.noq.. EDbal. 3=
Lp4~s.4 Ommfduw Ti. J B i md L 8. Va=L A~em& Poo L. Khg0 .? uveV5w
Ami Pmaw. 8 .Lhafw .. ILm. l mVe _4Li 15k r ILI. s IL. Nomlk
3Ye4. IL unb Vk J e 24. Lof Jmhn Ob. IL h. hi Lb SON@ E eU Ue NOb Ceew.


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..AN n AL KINGDOM BT OUThERN R AS "


Florida geographically


F LORIDA has more sunshine in winter and less in
summer than the Northern States. In Florida
the shortest day in the year is only about three
hours shorter than the longest day, but along the
northern border of the United States there is a
difference of nearly eight hours. This, in part,
accounts for the mildness of Florida winters and
the coolness of Florida summers. The Gulf Stream
brushes the southeastern shore of the State and
also modifies the climate.
Florida has the oldest permanent white settle-
ment in the United States. It is the last State of
the Union to be developed.
It has 35,000,000 acres; 2,841,600 acres are in
water.
It lies between 24' 30 and 31' North latitude,
and 79' 48' and 87' 38' West longitude.
It has a thousand miles of coast line.
Its rainfall is fifty-six inches-nearly five feet.
It is the largest State east of the Mississippi
River except Georgia. It is equal in area to Maine,
Vermont, Connecticut and Rhode Island- four
times as large as Holland.
Its elevation is from tidewater to over three
hundred feet. 704 -42


Its mean annual temperature is from 68.8'.to
72.3'.
Its highest temperature for thirty years was
100.7.
Its lowest'as 0.2', 1899, at Tallahassee.
Florida is iirthe same isothermal zone as the
Madeira Islands, southern Spain, Sicily, 'Egypt,
southern Palestine, northern Arabia, northern
India, southern China, the Hawaiian Islands, north-
ern Mexico, southern California, southern Arizona,
southern,New Mexico, southern Texas, and south-
ern Louisiana.
Florida is the land of romance, legend, song and
story, from "Way DownUpon the Suwankee River"
to "The over-sea route along the keys," and from
Perdido's bordered valley to St. Augustine's
templed shrines.
It is bathed in the passionate caresses of the
southern sun, laved by the limpid waves of the em-
bracing seas, wooed by the glorious Gulf Stream,
whose waters, warmed by the tropical sun, speed
northeastward to temper the climate of Europe.
An emerald kingdom by southern seas, fanned
by zephyrs laden with ozone from stately pines,
watered by Lethe's copious libation, decked with
palm and pine, flower and fern, clothed in perpetual
verdure and lapt in the gorgeous folds of the semi-
tropical kQpe.


.-- ir_-_l I-L_- _r- ~. .~e























































,* -- IF
PRODUCTS AND SCENES FROm DADE COUNTY
1. i..,g Ar...d. ... i.n ERdt.d Diirt .f FI 2. H.r d.f AIpil D.ily. Ho...*.d. Fla. 3. RdI. D*IMtrt Chah., .1 C.. *Exibl. s
RedId District Fruit Festival. 4. Grapirw T,. hini t D1i.,.4d. S. Polloc V..iel *f Avocado P..... .King O..g.. 7. Taylo. Variety of
DAlii.... IS. T..Ie.it. J.jH ... lB .. me.10. Entrnc, to Futh Amam. Ril ll. Ditc Frut .estival Sle. Ap.p.l. 12. ..
D.Iki- I& impica*l Fruit. J-J-ho. 11. Lily of Jassmi a Glamo. IL Chr m, ra,* In Ue e aRSetin of Sout Dad County.


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... AN EMERALD KINGDOM BY SOUTHERN SEAS "


Florida
FLORIDA has more sunshine in winter and less in
summerr than the Northern States. In Florida
the shortest day in the year is only about three
hours shorter than the longest day, but along the
northern border of the United States there is a
difference of nearly eight hours. This, in part,
accounts for the mildness of Florida winters and
the coolness of Florida summers. The Gulf Stream
brushes the southeastern shore of the State and
also modifies the climate.
Florida has the oldest permanent white settle-
ment in the United States. It is the last State of
the Union to be developed.
It has 35,000,000 acres: 2.841.600 acres are in
:water.
It lies between 24 30' and 31' North latitude,
;and 79 48 and 87 38 West longitude.
It has a thousand miles of coast line.
It. rainfall is fifty-six inches-nearly five feet.
It is the largest State east of the Mississippi
riverr except Georgia. It is equal in area to Maine,
\ ermont, Connecticut and Rhode Island four
times as large as Holland.
Its elevation is from tidewater to over three
hundred feet. 7 ,


G geographically

Its mean annual temperature is from 68.8' to
72.3'.
Its highest temperature for thirty years was
Its lowest was 0.2, 1899, at Tallahassee.
Florida is in the same isothermal zone as the
Madeira Islands. southern Spain, Sicily, Egypt,
southern Palestine, northern Arabia, northern
India, southern China, the Hawaiian Islands, north-
ern Mexico, southern California, southern Arizona,
southern. New. Mexico, southern Texas, and south-
ern Louisiana.
Florida is the land of romance, legend, song and
story, from "Way Down Upon the Suwannee River"
to "The over-sea route along the keys," and from
Perdido's bordered .valley to St. Augustine's
templed shrines.
It is bathed in the passionate caresses of the
southern sun, laved by the limpid waves of the em-
bracing seas, wooed by the glorious Gulf Stream,
whose waters, warmed by the tropical sun, speed
northeastward to temper the climate of Edfrope.
An emerald kingdom by southern seas, fanned
by zephyrs laden with ozone from stately pines.
watered by Lethe's copious libation, decked with
palm and pine, flower and fern, clothed in perpetual
verdure and lapt in the gorgeous folds of the semi-
tropical zone.
































GROWING AND PACKING FLORIDA CELERY


FLORIDA
(REPRINT FROM BLUR BOOK OF SOUTHERN PROGRESS. 197)
TOTAL AREA. 58.666 SQUARE MILES; LAND, 54,861 SQUARE MILES; WATER, 3,805 SQUARE MILES.


1900


1910


Population... .................. .... 528,542 752,619 I
Property, true value .................. $355,743,000 $936,885,000
Assessed value property.............. $96,686,94 $165,000,000
Manufactures:
Capital .................. ........ $25,682,171 $66,290,643
Products, value ................... 34,183,509 $72,889,669
Mines and Quarries:
Capital ........... ........ ... ..... $20,794,901
Products, value................... $2,943,000 $8,846,665
Lumber cut, feet ..................... 788,905,000 992,091,000
Mineral produce, value ............... $3,326,517 $9,284,705
Phosphate mined, tons............... 706,243 2,067,507
Total land area, acres............ ..
All land in farms, acres...... 4,363,891 5,253,538
Improved land, acres ................ 1511,63 1,805,408
Number of farms ................ 40,814 50,016
Value all farm property............. $53,929,064 $143,183,183
Value farm land ..................... $30,23,016 $93,738,065
Farm products, value ................. 18,309,000 $43,689,000
Farm crops, value.................... $13,498,000 $33,217,000
Farm crops, acres..................... 1,020,003 1221,000
Citrus Crop:
Oranges, boxes ................... 273,000 4,888,000
Value .......... ................. ..
Grapefruit, boxes ................. 12,000 1,062,000
Value ........................ I .... _.
*Census 1920. t1912. 1922. '1923. 11924. (1925.


1925 1926
1,264,000 1,300,00
........ 2,440491,00
$620,913,000 (786,643,001
*$206,294,000
*$188,258,384 i$267,009,000
.......... ,067,
$.........8,976,41
1, 089,429,000 1,063,876,00
4$13,101,000 3$16,651,004
12,373,30 S2,672,65
35,111,040
*6,046,691 5,940,22
*2,297,271 2,280,0
*54,005 659
*$330,301,717 6$518,995,81
*$228,424,740 $417,215,1
$102,000,000 $88,0000
$84,245,000 $70,961,00(
1,134,000 1,062,00(


9,100,000
$25,500000
7,300,000
114.600.000


9,900,000
$24,800,000
6,900,000
$13,800,000


_ 1- ~=~__-~------ ----
































MOUR THAN AN ARMFUL OF FLORIDA TURKEYS


FLORIDA
(REPRINT FROM BLUE BOOK OF SOUTHERN PROGRESS 193)
TOTAL AREA, 58,666 SQUARE MILES; LAND, 54,861 SQUARE MILES; WATER, 3,805 SQUARE MILES.


Cotton Crop:
Acreage ..........................
Bales, number ....................
Value lint ........................
Value seed. ................... .....
Tobacco crop, pounds ................
Value ............................
Acreage .........................
Grain Crop:
Corn, bushels ................... ..
Value ............................
Acreage ..... ......... .. ..
Value .... .......................
L..... ........... ......
Cattle, number ....................
Sheep, number ...................
Swine, number..................
Horses, number..................
Mules, number ....................
Banking:
Aggrente resources ............
Paid-in capital ....................
Individual deposits ................
Railroad mileage ....................
Motor vehicle, number...............
Hihway diture .. ....
Public eh expenditureB....


*
Census 1920. 91912. $1922. $1928. (1927. **1925. 41904. $$1914. ill924.


1900
222,000
54,000
$2,592,000
$308,000
1,125,600
$24,211
2,056
4,156,000
$2,494,000
519,000
378,000
$189,000
33,000

751,000
125,000
464,000
43,000
14,000


$10,130,000
3,299
4*437,184
8766.000


1910
257,000
59,000
$5,500,000
$1,044,000
3,50,801
$1,025,476
3,987
8,190,000
$6,962,000
630,000
680,00
$442,000
42,000

845,000
114,000
810,00o
46,000
23,000
$73,573,258
$9,575,135
46,942,593
4,432
t1,749
:tt2,280,255
$1.773.000


1928
95,000
19,000
$1,700,000
$324,000
9,216,000
$2,882,000
12,000
7,891,000
$7,891,000
607,000
191,000
$168,000
11,000
480,000
89,000
516,000
25,000
42,000
$487,141,000
8833,577,000
$360,89,000
5,730
352,961
$44,556,039
1112.398.902


1929
95,000
29,000
$2.422,000
$390,000
11,070.000
$3454,000
12,300
8,438.000
$7,172,000
625,000
188,000
$150,000
12,000

480,000
50,000
490,000
24,000
41,000
$418,127,000
$81,132,000
$305,769,000
5,740
345,977
$48,00,000
1380,480381


- -- ---- ---





































G;.)H ING AND PACKING. FLOUIDA 4ICEL.ER


FLORIDA
IHEPRINT FKIRM BLI E BOOK OF SOUTHERN' PIO(;IRESS. 1927,

TOTAL AREA. 58.666 SQUARE MILES: LAND, 54.861 SQUARE MILES: WATER. 3,805 SQUARE MILES.


1925


19.26


'Population .......... ......... 528,542 752.611l
IPrperty. true value .. ... .... S:155.743.,000 $S:936.885,000
Assessed value property. .S... ...6.686,954 S165.000,000
Manufactures:
Capital ..........5.2171 S65.290,64:3
Products, value ...... ... $.4.18:3.50 872,i889.651
Mines and Quarries:
Capital ............ ... ............. 7 4, 01
Products. value. .... S2,9!43.00>0 SXX,46,665
lumber cut. feet ....... 7.05,000 92,091.000
Mineral products, value. .... ......... .:326,517 9.284.705
Phosphate mined, tons ... 70.24 2,067.507
Total land area. acres .... ...........
All land in farms, acres. 4.:;:.891 5,25:3.5:18
Improved land. acres .......... 1,511.65:3 1.805.408
Number of farms ..... 40.814 50.011;
Value all farm property .:1.21.061 S14:3,':1.18:
Value farm land ...... .. S:I.S2:.0 11 $11:.73;8,065
Farm products. v'aluc. 10,000 S4:1.68!9,000
Farm crops. value ...8. ::. ,000 8:1:,217.000
Farm crops, acres. 1.02(0. 0 ,) 1.221.000l
Citrus Crop:
Oranges, boxs ..... ..27:1.000 4.s81.0(00
V alue ...... .... .........
Grapefruit. hoxi .. ... 12..0 0;2.000
Value .............. ............ .. .
,Census 19!20. fl'12. .1922. *1923. "1924. 1925.


1,264.000 1,300,000
..... 1$2.440,491.00
S620.!913.000 S786.643.000

206.294.000 .....
*S188,258,384 S2'17.00,000


* 1, .08,.42l.000
e$1:l,101,000
v2.:173,5:10
:15,11.040)
6.046,691
2,297,271
54,005
33:1:0,301,717
8228.424.740
S102,000.000
884,245,000
1.134,000

4.1110 4.1114III
$25.500,000
7.:100.000
14. 6004.010O


S58.067.662
K9.176,4 13
1,061,876.00(1
S16.651,00(i
2,672.650

541440.22:1
2,280,0041
511.20L2

4l17.215.17:
$8S.000.0001
87(0.9461,000
1.062.004'
94,1900,000'
s2 1.800,004
6,400,04) 1
S1:1.800.0011



































MORE THAN AN ARMFI L OF FLORIDA TI'RKEYS


FLORIDA
REPRINT FROM RLIUE ROOK OF SOUTHERN PROGRESS. 1130r
TOTAL AREA. 58.666 SQUARE MILES: LAND, 54,861 SQUARE MILES; WATER, 3,805 SQUARE MILES.


I Cotton Crop:
A create ..........................
Bales, num ber ................... ..
Value lint ........................
Value seed ........................
Tobacco crop, pounds ................
V alue ............................
Acreage ..........................
Grain Crop:
Corn, bushels .................. .
V alue ............... .......... .
A create ..........................
Oats, bushels ................... ...
V alue ................. ............
Acreage ............. .......... .
livestock:
Cattle, number .................. .
Sheep, number .................. .
Swine, number .................. .
Horses, number ...................
M ules, number .................. .
banking:
Aggregate resources .............
Paid-in capital .................. .
Individual deposits ................
railroadd mileage .................. .
Itor vehicles, number ..............
1 highway expenditures ...............
iblic schools, expenditures .........
*Census 1920. +1912. *1922. 1l928.


1900

222,000
54,000
$2,592,000
$303,000
1,125,600
$254,211
2,056

4,156,000
$2,494,000
519,000
378,000
$189,000
33,000

751,000
125,000
464,000
43,000
14,000


$10,150,000
3,299

*$437,184
$766.000
1927. *1925. a1904.


1910 i"

257,000
59,000
$5,500,000
$1,044,000
3,505,801
$1.025,476
3,987

8.190,000
$6.962,000
630,000
680,000
$442,000
42,000

845,000
114,000
810,000
46,000
23,000
$73,573,258
$9,575,135
$46,942,593
4,432
t1,749
S$2,280,255
$1.773.000
f11914. 1924.


1928

95,000
19,000
$1,700,000
$324,000
9,216,000
$2,682,000
12,000

7,891,000
$7,891,000
607,000
191,000
$168,000
11,000

480,000
59,000
516.000
25,000
42,000

$487,141,000
$33,577,000
$360,889,000
5,730
352,961
$44,556,039
$12.398,902


1929

95,000
29,000
$2.422.000
. $390,000
11.070.000
$3,454,000
12,300

8,438.000
$7,172,000
625,000
168,000
$150,000
12,000

480,000
59,000
490,000
24,000
41,000
8418,127,000
$31,132,000
$305,769,000
5,740
345,977
$48,500,000
'$30,460,813









pr







FLORIDA HAS EVERY TRANSPORTATION FACILITY


Railways
Although water competition is potentially within seventy-two
miles of any point, Florida's railways have continued to spend lib-
erally because they believe that the development of the state will
proceed steadily. I
Mileage of railways, December 31, 1927.......... 8,220.63
Railroad improvement and new lines from 1920-1927 $142,198,57
Tonnage hauled by railroads in Florida, 1927....... 18,033,986


Highways
Florida's faith in herself is exemplified in the extensive construction of
hard-surfaced highways which contribute materially to the relief of her trans-
portation problems.
Mileage of hard-surfaced roads ............................ 8,631
Expended for roads 1915-1929 by State Highway Department. $90,483,742.89

Airports in Florida
On the authority of the Aeronautic Branch of the U. S. Department of Com-
merce, there is included a list of all airports recognized in Florida, as of May
1,1928:


Arcadia ................ Auxiliary
Arcadia Carlstrom Field Auxiliary
Avon Park .............. Auxiliary
Bartow ..................Auxiliary
Clearwater ..............Municipal
Fort Myers.............Municipal


Hialeah .................Municipal
Inverness ............. Commercial
Jacksonville, Camp Johnson (Army)
Jacksonville ............. Municipal
Jacksonville, Paxon Field (Com'rl)
Key West .............Commercial
Key West, Naval Air Station (Navy)
Lakeland ................Municipal
Miami..................Commercial
Miami ................. Municipal
North La Belle ........... Auxiliary
Ocala .................Commercial
Okeechobee ............ Commercial
Orlando .............. Commercial
Palmdale ................ Auxiliary
Pensacola ........ Naval Air Station
St. Augustine ............ Auxiliary
St. Petersburg ........... Municipal
Sanford .............. Commercial
Sebring ................. Municipal


Stuart ................ Municipal
Tallahasse ............. Municipal
Tampa ............... Commercial
Tampa .................. Municipal
Titusville ............... Municipal
West Palm Beach ......Commercial


By the same authority there is included a list of additional proposed airports:
Bradenton Eustis Gainesville Lake Jovita Mount Dora Olympia Palm Beach Sebring Vero Beach
Dunedin Fort Pierce Lake Wales Miami New Smyrna Orlando Pinellas Park Titusville Winter Haven


Shipping
Convenient to every section of the state is at least one of Florida's six major
ports, which are fast increasing their tonnage to and from the ports of the
world.
The Six-Pert Total of Florida's Commerce, Foreign and Domestic, in 1927
Tons Value
Fernandina ............................... 321,184 $ 8,476,800
Jacksonville .............................. 3,718,752 218,789032
Miami ...................... ............. 1,329,591 43,551,539
Key W est ... ............................. 727,814 65,567,943
Tampa .................................. 3,873,477 102,034,470
Pensacola ................... ............. 752,879 23,429,227
10,218,697 451,849,011
Less Domestic ............................. 7,064,042 312,386,009
Total Foreign Commerce ................. 3,164,655 $139,463,002


I




























P44
Web


r, r
~I







FLORIDA HAS EVERY TRANSPORTATION FACILITY


Railways
Although water competition is potentially within seventy-two
miles of any point, Florida's railways have continued to spend lib-
erally because they believe that the development of the state will
proceed steadily.
Mileage of railways. December 31. 1927 ............ .220.63
Railroad improvement and new lines from 1920-1927 S142.1:9.557
Tonnage hauled by railroads in Florida. 1927 ....... 18.033.986


Highways
Florida's faith in herself is exemplified in the extensive construction of
hard-surfaced highways which contribute materially to the relief of her trans-
portation problems.
Mileage of hard-surfaced roads ........................... 8.631
Expended for roads 1915-1929 by State Highway Department. $90,483,742.89

Airports in Florida
On the authority of the Aeronautic Branch of the U. S. Department of Com-
merce. there is included a list of all airports recognized in Florida, as of May
1. 1928:


Arcadia ................. Auxiliary
Arcadia .Carlstrom Field Auxiliary
Avon Park ..... ........Auxiliary
Bartow ..................Auxiliary
Clearwater .............. Municipal
Fort Myers .............. Municipal


Hialeah ................. Municipal Stuart ................... Municipal
Inverness .............. Commercial Tallahassee ............. Municipal
Jacksonville, Camp Johnson (Army) Tampa ................ Commercial
Jacksonville ............. Municipal Tampa .................. Municipal
Jacksonville, Paxon Field (Com'r'l) Titusville ............... Municipal
Key West ............. Commercial West Palm Beach ..... Commercial
Key West. Naval Air Station (Navy)
Lakeland ............... .Municipal
Miami ................. Commercial
M iam i .................. M municipal
North La Belle ........... Auxiliary
Ocala ................. Commercial
Okeechobee ............ Commercial
Orlando ............... Commercial
Palmdale ................ Auxiliary
Pensacola ........ Naval Air Station
St. Augustine ............ Auxiliary
St. Petersburg ........... Municipal
Sanford ............... Commercial
Sebring ................. M municipal


By the same authority there is included a list of additional proposed airports:
Bradenton Eustis Gainesville Lake Jovita Mount Dora Olympia Palm Beach Sebring Vero Beach
Ounedin Fort Pierce Lake Wales Miami New Smyrna Orlando Pinellas Park Titusville Winter Haven

Shipping
-C convenientt to every section of the state is at least one of Florida's six major
ports, which are fast increasing their tonnage to and from the ports of the
world.
The Six-Port Total of Florida's Commerce, Foreign and Domestic, in 1927
Tons Value
Fernandina ....... ... ............... 321,184 8.476.800
Jacksonville ... .................. 3713.752 218.789,032
Miami .............................. 1,329,591 43.551,539
Key West ........... ... .. ..... ... 727,814 55,567,943
Tampa ... ...3.. .. .73.477 102.034,470
Pensacola ... ............ 752.879 23.429.227
10.218,697 451.849.011
Less Domestic ....... ............ 7.054,042 312,386.009
Total Foreign Commerce ................. 3.164.655 $139.463.002


_F1 I ~ILI







ROADS AND HIGHWAYS


8,631 Miles of Hard-Surfaced Roads


I7


STATE ROAD DEPARTMENT
Organizaton of Department................... October, 192
Receipts to December 31, 1929................ $91,166,8267 (Table)
Disbursement to December 31, 1929............ 90,483,742.89 (Table)
State System Legislatur 1923 ................ 3,08. miles
State System Legslture 192 ................ 654.0 miles
State System Leilature 1927................ 8,524.0miles
Mileage of 1st Preferential System............. 2,406.26
Mileage of 2nd Preferential System ........... 874.24


Datu
1916-1917
1918....
1919 .. .
1920.....
1921 .....
1922.....
1923 .....


CONTRACTS LET OCTOBER, 1915, TO DECEMBER 31, 1929
Amosut is Miles of Fet od AmOant in Mn. tof Fet r
DollarI Highway Brid Dat- Doll. Highway BridW
0. 0. 0 1924..... 4,4 022.70 180.91 9,244
136,289.23 19.21 47 1925 ..... ,341,199.87 334.9 5,419
506,067.16 27.88 2,627 1926 ..... 11.161,610.78 531.95 9,267
79,600.00 0. 370 1927..... 13.926,983.26 725.10 22,871
820,707.08 35.49 12,847 1928 ..... 7.084,017.64 630.68 6,829
2,35,497.97 84.52 5,656 1929 ..... 5,19,405.45 313 7,219
6,247,115.47 287.80 12,056 -
3,171.49 93862









FACTS ABOUT FLORIDA'S CLIMATE


IIDADAT!VV IaWl:I7A. flATA PnR FL2)RIDA


TEMPERATURE

Metr Iparllturf'l Highet Lo-1l Avrra1e
the .orl_
70 --41 101 22 7 99
71 0 +0o0 19 53 01
712 +0 4 101 12 52 51
69 -0 9 100 II 45 50
710 0- 2 103 20 49 62
71 2 +-04 104 17 56 9
70.5 -4) 3 102 17 48 36
71 0 +0 2 104 --2 53 93
707 -4 1 104 13 61.19
6.8 -- 1017 12 58 47
70 11 0 105 13 51 24
698. -- 0 105 17 55 79
69 9 -0 9 102 20 48 13
70 5 -1 3 103 10 61 43
70 9 + 1 101 i 14 53 7
71 5 t 7 102 21 4915
71 2 +04 103 20 4 54
71 +0 3 103 16 49 52
9 -1 6 102 19 50 88
72 3 +1 5 104 15 47 40
71.1 0 3 104 21 64 88
71.2 +0 4 104 23 48 02
703 -05 107 19 49 08
70.4 -0 4 10 23 56 30
71 1 +03 102 21 4710
70 3 -0 102 13 41 36
713 +0 I 106 11 50 09
71 6 O 101 14 37 35
70 1 -017 102 19 57 79
72 2 14 103 27 45 24
723 + 5 103 21 57 53
71 4 +0 6 102 15 50 17
70 8 0 0 103 12 61 62
71 7 t0 107 -t 9 64
70 5 --0 99 21 5 58
708 5263


COMPARAI"V ANNUAL DAA FOR P AIn 1


I Depaturte 'm Gr-1ttl in
Ihe ormlo ] 24 hour.
-4 64
+0 38 603
-0 12 12 50
-7 13 5 07
3 01 9 05
+4 -1 27 7 78
+1 30 12 18
+N 5% 1 N5
-5 84 13 32
-1 39 8 76
+-3 16 9 06
-4 4N I10 48
+N No 10 00
+1 13 10 12
-3 48 14 96
-4 9 9 79
11 12 00
--1 75 9 70
-. 23 12 .541
+12 25 1 1 00
-4 61 852
-3 55 7 66
+3 67 15 45
-5 53 10 84
-11 27 1 7 94
--2 .54 6 98 -
+4 72 11 5 9
+5 16 930
-7 39 11 73
+4.90 7.91
-2 46 29,00
+8 99 23 22
+0 01 15 10
+6 95 10 00


April

Juy

Oct.
Jun
June
May
Oct.
S.pt.



t l.

Mor.


tek.
Oct.
Mr.y


Oct.
Oct.
Sept.
Oct.
4p.1.


19
25-26
11-12
7
21
II
3
22
1
3
12-13
17
271
27
22-23

13
28-29
21





9-10
25
26
17
9-10
29-30
19-20


.Month and Date


MAXIMUM RAINFALL AT REGULAR STATIONS, 1926

Ja.. | F.b. Mar. April May u. July A.u. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. A.o..rI


l........ l JW4. 3 w .m e 4 7' 3 '. .s 4 a2 A1d
19*i.7t4.. 76 9 49 64 9682' 79 l70 913 0' 79 .2. 102
5 'li0 t *1- I13 2 160 82 1,030' 07 12 26 170 2, 268
l..... 176 142' fir' I.9' 1.12 1139 2969 4.34P t 1 12 0 194205 30.
h.- 3 07 8 s 1 77 1 1 2 .6 1 64' 3 01 70W 1 706- 20:. 7 08
IApuIeohi..; t1-.k.o 1ll.;: SKey Wot; 4 Mimi; aPensacola; 'Tamtp. tAt Icd 4.


Grcltnt I Month
Monthly
23 25 June
14 13 i Jue
19 78 =Spt.
21 03 Oct.
20 90 June
23 01 S.pt.
31 26 A.
29 10 Oct.
1794 Ji unr
21 72 Ione
20 25 Spt.
19 04 ISpl.
21.39 Oct.
24 76 A.ut
20 99 Aug.
20 05 pt.
27 8 Oct.
26000 July
27 81 Oct.
17 73 Aug.
28 14 .Sept.
22.87 S.
13 53 No".
20 70 Ae.*
30 57 July
20 06 Aw.
15.88 Dec.
18 67 July
21.50 Feb.
31 34 Oct.
2389 Oct.
19.93 May
39.08 Oct.
18.74 May
22 78 July


P CIFITATION







ROAI)S A)ND IIGHW\ S


A. 1600-
-1 IOYIII


STATE ROAD I)EP ART
Organization of Department..... ............
Receipts to December :;1. 1929 ................
Disbursements to December 31, 11929... .
State System Legislature 1923 .... ... ... .
State System Legislature 1925 .. .. .. .
State System Legislature 1..27......
Mileage of 1st Preferential System ............
Mileage of 2nd Preferential System ... .


M ENT
October. 1925
811.l166,826.47 (Table)
!9I.483,742.89 (Table)
3.508.5 miles
5,654.0 miles
8.524.0 miles
2,406.26
874.24


CONTRACTS LET OCTOBER 191. TO DECEMBER 31, 1929
Amount In Ml.,- ,fI F*t of Amount in Mile of FKrt of
ID llars !l.uhl lirlg, IIr. Dollar. ltih hw. ItHritr6 -
I. O. 0 121. ... 1.456,022.70 180.91 9.244
13.i,2.8 .2:; l:I.21 -1; 125. .. 5,341,199.87 334.!15 5,419
566.057.1t; 27.,S 2,627 I21; ..... 11.161,610.7s 531.95 9.267
79.600.0 0o. :170 1!7 ..... 13 926,983.25 725.10 22;371
1' 0.707.08 :;5.4 12.847 192S... 7.0S4.017.64 630.68 6.829
2.355.47.97 8 4.32 5,551; 12:*: .... 5,519,4015.45 313 7.219
1;.217,115.47 127. 12,05.;
3.171.49 91.852








FACTS ABOUT FLORIDA'S CLIMATE

COMPARATIVE ANNUAL I)DATA FOR FLORIDA


)IIP \1 ER Irt lTi PItEt I ITl1


4 4,, h l urrl. l .r r h -t

h ,14,11 7 I .


7l1 -.2 11 11


7,+ I l l I I i
; 1114 II 'II III 12',

i1 I 1 I ,- ', h
7II'11 I' ,I .,I 74


7. 1 1 4 I I I1

; .71 I 1 1 11

1112 1i t'II a 7. 44 .1
41 + iI 111 I 47 1 li I i 4.
'., '11 I, 2 .... :I 11..1 \,,

i I I 7 1 I II i
4 II II1' -21 .. 4 1.1,
.14 4 111 24 47111 .1 1.4 4,.I
i11 I 4I lhT ;, 1 714 11 \,.


1 1 11 24 7 I .i 4 Jl 7 i 1 .h

TiI iI f42l 4 I4 17, M II 21 22) Ih1
Ti I o 17 1 11 '.2 l I 1I-



M7 A MU A1 1A RF Il RT IO 192
71 1 1.,




MAXIMUM RAINFALL T1" REGIGILA.R STATIONS. 1926


I''ll 4 4 I ,

1 .H l I hI1 ," ,r
.1", J7 ,







2 1." ,Il
I 1 I 21 71 .,-







" 1 .....
-i 27 u11









22 71
;. '. 17

27 1,.. II
T 141 11,11






I- 1A l 74 I
I :II 22 7

1. ,111 '.1 jll,
11.21 1", 4.I112



I 1 l4 I


' 131 4' 74 11..
I 1 21 22 7 \1


J., I. 1.r \pril .1., J .i. .lul l\ l 1- I 1 4. I l i. .iu.




4,,1 11,7 I l., 1. 1 11 7 141. 1 '.' 12 I1i 1 2 1 71 41 4 ht

' I 7.".. !J k I 1. .1,4. .. 1.2. -' ]1 1.. 4%1111, I \ ', 4.1 1 1
L4L I H 117 4 A 771 4 4 2' 4 1, I mll '2 I1 7
SpaI, h e in I II l t 1 1. am Pl l-arol" T "mp t 1I l < r

.- -,
7 ") 1 i 1 1 7 t ,i ;, .1, 4 '






INDI

H APPILY the South is rapidly awakening to its possibilities as an
dustrial field. In Florida, the past three years have witnessed
marked activity in this long deferred line. Manufacturing enter
prises have begun to operate all over the State.
Florida is ready with the three essentials to successful manufacturing
FIRST-RAW MATERIAL
Florida has an abundance of timber, minerals, fibres, tobacco, sugar can
fruits and vegetables for canning, fish and oysters for canning; tung l
production has a promising future, peanut oil production, materials h
paper manufacture-all these offer opportunities of large importance fI
manufacturing.
Each man, woman and child in the United States consumes an average
of 110 pounds of sugar per year. Almost half of this was imported. Fli
ida has a big future in this industry. This State has soils admiraM
adapted to the production of sugar cane. Beyond a doubt this vast e
portunity is going to be utilized.
SECOND-POWER
Not only has Florida supplies of raw materi-
als, but she has the second requisite for manu-
facturing. which is power. Within the past few


Jjjjjj o,








RIES

cars $100,000,000 has been expended in Florida for new construction
I:r electric light and power service. Electric power is now available
through a network of wires reached at a distance of not over twenty
miles from any well-developed point in the State.

THIRD-TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES
Florida has these in her ports, her railroads and her highways. Of
the ports she has six of major importance and fifteen of minor impor-
tance. Florida's physical shape is such that the most distant point in
the State is not over seventy-two miles from salt water.
Our last enumeration lists a grand total of 7,517 industries now
functioning in the State of Florida. These turn out annually products
valued at more than $250,000,000. Our manufacturing has shown a
most remarkable growth in recent years, the increase having been more
than 300 per cent in the last decade.
Captains of industry are coming southward. The industrial center
4 oz our nation fifty years from now will be in the
Land of Dixie. Florida wants factories. They
will thrive here and those who work in them will
have a fair chance to enjoy what God meant
that all of us might enjoy-Health, Happiness
and Prosperity.





'


. .











*.Ot*Bw it CYrWsheeErf-


* .


S(CON I)-P'OW ER
Not 1oly hau Fltritia supplites if rai\ miateri-
al-. but -he has the secrinmd retluisite fior manu-
f(it:uring whiwh i pi,-wvr. Within the liilt few


Nut tm1uSW





,r'p Nqe .9iadr itr~u 7uirg Sptir 7 stepte~,7rs~ln ~r,~Ahrit,*'wf


1-4


Oh 'e rf uam. ivv4~C f*izA4r. *I/II~ Iatfla


'Plant of 71ord,


INDL
PAI'I'ILY th, S,,thi l iillvy a;iaknlin t it poIt ,lilltii it- ain r
ilHutriril hiclh. In Floridta. thie ltat thte year. i ale witnessed
mliarktei avttiity in thi Istnr I. fTri rill line. )litnufaUtluring entt
!ir-i. hal\i lt-un to icHruate all i.-ri the Stat..
Floridal i.ireiy ith! tlht tIhri,, .-e-ntials to- suice-ful mtianufIlatutir
FIRST--I'W .M.ATERI %1.
Flrila h i-a an lundanict, f timliler. miiti als. tili't., ltia'cot. tugar car.
fruits andl \v'gtaible frir canning,. fish anti lyst ri for canning; tunK
prii'luetiiin ha a itiinmisin. future. I-anut (il proilucitn. materials f
palter imanufl'atulre all the is itflt'fe ipoir*tunitie. o)f large ilniportainc f
manufacturing.
Each man. liwoman antid hild in the U'nted States romtunltu an avvraL
"f 110 pounitls of il ugar per year. Allmst half of this was inlllirted. Fih
Ila has a big future in thi, industry. This State has -oils aldmnirab!
;idalpted it, the pi odilucltiio of sugar trne. Iteyontil it tloulit this vast oi
portunitlv i- going to he utilized.







l I ES

r- In1l.O0)O.t(i has Icen expended in Florida for new construction
il .lctric light and power service. Electric power is now available
*,,uh a network of wires reached at a distance of int over twenty
I.- from any v.well-develoiHd point in the State.
TIl IIRI-TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES
I lrida has these in her ports. her railroads and her highwayy. 1f
Sp irts she has six (of major importance and fifteen of minor impor-
.i:ir. Florida's physical shape is such that the most distant point in
ate, Stat, is not over seventy-two miles from salt water.
o)ur last enumeratioln lists a grand total of 7.517 industries now
: nrtioning in the State of Florida. These turn out annually products
.alucd at more than $250.)000.000. Our manufacturing has shown a
remt remarkable growth in recent years, the increase ha ng lwen more
ihan 3:0l per cent in the last decade.
I apltain- of induotOy are coming southward. The industrial center
oi our nation fifty years from now will be in the
Land of Dixie. Florida wants factories. They
.will thrive here and those who work in them will
have a fair chance to enjoy what (;God meant
that all of us miiht enjoy--Hi< lth. Hniippin'
ad Pr 'Pir-p y.


j i eiqC ~ P


Ii 11]an


*


SM47r..AVilat ClMW*Wff*?


T ret&Taw


:~nwl6rlT~aul~~sei4~bc*r


b~A


L





COLLEGES, UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING



Florida's Institutions
of Learning
Maintain High
Standards









F LORIDA State Institutions of Higher Learn-
ing are the State University at Gainesville,
the State College for Women at Tallahassee,
Aid the Agricultural and Mechanical College for
Negroes at Tallahassee.
Other State educational institutions are the
School for the Deaf and the Blind, the Industrial
School for Boys (delinquent) and the Industrial
School for Girls (delinquent).





COLLEGES. UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING



Unexcelled Advantages .
are Offered
by Florida Colleges
and Universitjes










Independent schools throughout the State in-
clude John B. Stetson University at DeLand,
Rollins College at Winter Park, -Southern Col-
lege at Lakeland, Miami University at Miami,
Florida Military Academy, San Jose at South
Jacksonville, Bob Jones College at Lynn Haven,
and others in various sections of the State.
Private schools conducted in Florida in the
winter and in the north in the summer are a fea-
ture of the educational advantages in Florida.






COLLEGES. UNIVERSITIES .\N) OTHER INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING ;






Fl,,,id '.P tittir.,












LORIDA State Institutions of Higher Ltearn-
ing are the State University at Gainesville.
the State College for Women at Tallahassee.
and the Agricultural and Mechanical College for
Negroes at Tallaha*,see.
Other State educational institutions are the
School for the Deaf and the Blind, the Industrial
School for Boys (delinquent) and the Industrial
School for Girls (delinquent).





FI


I '1





SI.LEGES. UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING




UIne.,rclled Adra states Wag "
are Offered
II! Florida Colleges
ralp' Iniriersities










Independent schools throughout the State in-
clude John B. Stetson University at DeLand,
Rollins College at Winter Park, Southern Col-
lege at Lakeland, Miami University at Miami,
Florida Military Academy, San Jose at South
Jacksonville, Bob Jones College at Lynn Haven,
and others in various sections of the State:
Private schools conducted in Florida in the
l j / winter and in the north in the summer are a fea-
ture of the educational advantages in Florida.













F LORIDA'S sports are far from being
confined to those enjoyed along its
beaches or streams. Many prefer
the creation of their own particular
type of recreation-and what a rare
opportunity for such Florida holds!
Well planned programs find the day
well filled with outdoor entertainment.
Annual trap shoots, daily contests in
the hundreds of milder forms of out-
in-the-open contests, horse-back rid-
ing, afternoon parties on beautiful
tropical lawns all these and more:
too, await you under kindly, colorful
skies, either day or night. Yes, you,
too, may enjoy life anew in Florida-
the land of Sunshine. Flowers, Nature
-happiness!



i/j


i






















v UNTERS in Florida have naught to
Sfear for want of game. Whatever
may be the call of the wild that
appeals most, whether the path may lead
to domestic prey or through the winding
trails where rove the wilder game, there
is an answer in the native wild life of
Florida. Along the famed Tamiami Trail,
on the salt marshes, lingering in the bays
and lagoons in every section of the State
may be seen myriads of colorful birds.
Here, too, are the resting places and
feeding bases for practically all kinds of
water birds that frequent the vast
stretches of coastline. Chief among vari-
eties most sought by the hunter is the
S wild turkey.






















LORIDA.'S sports are far from being
confined to those enjoyed along its
beaches or streams. Many prefer
the creation of their own particular
type of recreation-and what a rare
opportunity for such Florida holds'
Well planned programs find the day
\well filled with outdoor entertainment.
Annual trap shoots. daily contests in
the hundreds of milder forms of out-
in-the-open contests. horse-back rid-
ing. afternoon parties on beautiful
tropical lawns all these and more.
too. await you under kindly, colorful
skies, either day or night. Yes, you.
too. may enjoy life anew in Florida-
the land of Sunshin. Flowers. Nature
-h-alpiness'


I a


~-----i


I i
























UNTERS in Florida have naught to
fear for want of game. Whatever
may he the call of the wild that
appeals most. whether the path may lead
to domestic prey or through the winding
trails where rove the wilder game, there
is an answer in the native wild life of
Florida. Along the famed Tamiami Trail,
on the salt marshes, lingering in the bays
and lagoons in every section of the State
may be seen myriads of colorful birds.
Here, too, are the resting places and
feeding bases for practically all kinds of
water birds that frequent the vast
stretches of coastline. Chief among vari-
eties most sought by the hunter is the
wild turkey.






















LORIDA within whose broad reaches
lies the Nation's "Last Frontier"--
truly is the sportsman's paradise. With
its 2,000 miles of sea coast, thousands of
lakes and rivers and huge expanse of wood-
lands, Florida gives to the lover of the great
outdoors that bit of true Nature long ago
gone from other sections. Here is the home
of the last of the fast Vanishing American,
for only here may he find the lure, the love,
the peace of Nature as his ancestors knew
it when all the country was one great un-
conquered frontier. Florida of today,
through its program of conservation, pre-
sents in woods and streams the same Flor-
ida of centuries ago. It truly is the sports-
man's paradise-and it beckons you come!


















A ONG the most alluring of all ex-
periences encountered in Florida
waters is the solving by fisher-
men of the mysteries of the deep. A
trip to Florida would be incomplete
without a day or many of them spent
as a "salt" atop the waves of the ocean
or gulf. And what a thrill there comes
with the landing of a fighting tarpon,
the elusive sailfish, or any of the plenti-
ful deep sea finny tribe! Such oppor-
tunities may be had at most any time,
whether within the company of your
own specially arranged party, with a
sailor of yore as your guide, or from
any of the countless fishing piers that
dot the entire peninsula-a haven for
those who prefer pole and line.


















F LORIDA within whose broad reaches
lies the Nation's "Last Frontier"-
truly is the sportsman's paradise. With
its 2,000 miles of sea coast, thousands of
lakes and rivers and huge expanse of wood-
lands, Florida gives to the lover of the great
outdoors that bit of true Nature long ago
gone from other sections. Here is the home
of the last of the fast Vanishing American,
for only here may he find the lure, the love,
the peace of Nature as his ancestors knew
it when all the country was one great un-
conquered frontier. Florida of today,
through its program of conser\dtion, pre-
sents in woods and streams the same Flor-
ida of centuries ago. It truly is the sports-
man's paradise-and it beckons you come!




NISi ,











-s r~.-

-9 -_-


AMONG the most alluring of all ex-
periences encountered in Florida
waters is the solving by fisher-
men of the mysteries of the deep. A
trip to Florida would be incomplete
without a day or many of them spent
as a "salt" atop the waves of the ocean
or gulf. And what a thrill there comes
with the landing of a fighting tarpon,
the elusive sailfish, or any of the plenti-
ful deep sea finny tribe! Such oppor-
tunities may be had at most any time,
whether within the company of your
own specially arranged party, with a
sailor of yore as your guide, or from
any of the countless fishing piers that
dot the entire peninsula-a haven for
those who prefer pole and line.


*'7)


MW L A


I/Vf n/ar


_
--- .e







INFORMATION FOR THE HUNTER AND FISHERMAN


GROUP I


Escambia
Santa Rosa
Okaloosa
Walton
Holmes


Cities Population
Pene1.ola ..45.000
MiHon ...... ... 2.100
Bada.. ........ 1.000
Cratvie ...... 1,000
Camp Walton ......... 00
Valparais .. 300
DeFualak Spings ....... 3.000
Pt. W ashie ton ........ ....... .... .
Bonifa ... ........ .. .
Poe de Leon ....... ...... 1.200
Wet l .......... ..... o00
Chip.ler .. ..2.280
Very n .................. 1.200
Car.viUl ..... ................... 1 00

Gadsden Jefferson
Libery Madison
GROUP II Frnklin Taylor
Leon LaFayette
Wakulla Dixie

Citiu Population
River Jnction .... .... 2.000
Greenboro .... 400
ML P ia Ua t ... ........... ... 200
Quin. ........ ................. s. o
Havan .. 1....000
Apalae icola ...... .... .00
Talla ....... 18.000
Montice o ...... .. ...2....... .000
Lloyd .. .. ........ 00 oo
W atima ... ......... ..... 500
Aueilla ... ...................... 500
St. Mark ... .......... ... ..... 00
Pan ra- ... ................. .... 600


GROUP IHn


Cities
Jasp ...
White Sprins
Jenn ......
Liv Oak ......
Wellborn ... .
Branford ......
Dowlinq Park ....
Falmouth .
O'Brie .... ....
Houston
Lake City
Ft. White ..
Ne.to. .
Bell .. ........
Maeley ....
Sandere. ......
Olustee ........
Lake BStkr .
Raford .......
Worthington ..
Providen ...
Gainesville ..

GROUP IV


Hamilto
Suwann
Columbi
Gilchris
Baker


SLevy
SMarion
Sumtei


n Union
ee Alachua
a Bradford
t Nassau
Duval

Population
2.000
1.200
100
4.000
500
700
... 200
.3..... 00
.. 200
1.0
1.6,000
.... 500
6000
......... 600
400
.. 1.200
....... 1.000
.......... 400
100
100
... 10.000
Citrus
Hernando
r


Cities Population
WIIa.boo... ...0.... 9*
........... .. ........ -...I... 600
yaka.o ...... .................... 1.00
oa.L ......... .................. 81
a.lk ............ .............. 2.0
Sl 5Wi .. ..................2..... SO
Mel'st"h .............................. 1.10
addieh .............................. a"


Washington Half of the counties of this group are well stocked with deer;
Bay more than half are well stocked with turkeys; quail are plenti-
Jackson ful over the entire area; ducks are plentiful in all but three of
Calhoun the counties listed; geese are seen only occasionally; black bass
Gulf are abundant.
Number Tourist Number Tourit
Hotel Camp Citis Population Hotel Camp
4 1nl City ..... ........... 4.St
4 I Panama City 4.892 5 5
S 1 Lynn Ha ....... .. ............ I.81
I None South Port ...................... M .
$ None West Bay .. .. 45
4 None Marinna ..... ........ 2
2 None Cottondale ....... ........... I.000 I
5 2 Campbleton .... ............ 60 I
1 None Malone ........ ................ 400 1
Non, None Gravill .. ....................... 2.0* 2
2 Non Greon ood .... ... ............... U0
1 1 Bloontatw ....................... Non
Alths ........... ................... 1.000 1
1 None WngrhitLa .......................... 6.4. 1 Non
I None Port St Joe .......... ............ MO None
1 Non Idklood ........................... Non
With the exception of possibly one, maybe two counties, deer are plentiful
throughout this group of counties; turkeys are numerous in more than half of
the counties; quail are plentiful in all but one county; ducks are well dis-
tributed through the area; the only extensive goose shooting to be found in
the State is found in the coastal counties of this group; black bass are found
in abundance.
Number Tourit Number Tourit
Hotels Camp. Cities Population Hotels Caps
2 1 Sopehoppy ..... ................. .. 00 1 None
1 None Crwfordvile .... ....... ........ 0 1 None
1 None Madion.. ... ....... .... ........ 2. 40 4
S 1 Green lle ...... .. ..... .. ..... 1.00 2 1
1 1 Bristol ................................ 1.m I None
I I Perry .................... .. ,000 None
S 2 Hampton Sprin .. ............ 100 1 None
3 2 Seanlon ....... .. .... .......... I00 1 None
1 None Boyd .. ... .... ....... 00 I None
1 None Carbur .... .... ................ 00 1 None
1 None Mayo .... .. ............... ... 1.00 None
1 None Cro City .... .. .... ............. .500 None
2 None


Clay
St. Johns
Putnam
Flagler

Number Tourist
Hotels Camps
3 2
5 .2
2 2
6 2
2 None
3 1
3 None
I None
1 None
1 1
10 2
1 None
2 None
1 None
1 None
1 None
1 None
2 1
i 1
1 1
1 1
7 1


There are only a few counties in this group in which deer are
plentiful, these are in the eastern section; turkeys are less abun-
dant than in other groups; quail are plentiful over the entire
area; ducks are found in numbers only in a few counties; geese
none; black bass plentiful.
Number Tourist
Cities Population Hotel Camps
Waldo... ..... .... 1.000 1 Non
Stark ......... ... ...... .. .000
Lartry .......... ................. ,00 1 1
H ampton ........... ................... 00 1 I
Frnlandina ........... .............. 3,000 a I
Yule ...... .. .. ........ 400 1 None
Cala an ...... ................. 0 2 1
H illiard ......... .. .......... 400 1 I
Jacksonvlle ......................... 147.200 20 5
Green Co Spn ... ............... 2,000 None
Keystone Helihts ........... ...... 1 2
Penney Farms ... ............. 00 1 None
St. A ustine.. ............... 14,000
Hastins ........ ......... ........ 00 4 2
Palatka ...................... ...... 8.0 10 1
Cre.ent City ...... ... ........... 1 50 1
E. Palatka ............... ........... 0 No
Weaka ........ ... .............. 0 2 None
Interlachen ........ .......... None
Bunnell ............ .................. 700 5 1
Plasler Beach ........... ....... 200 i I
St. Johns Park ................ ... 100 1


Deer are well distributed through this group of counties; turkeys in moderate
numbers; quail are plentiful; ducks in coastal counties; geese, none; black
j bass plentiful.
Number Tourist Number Tourist
Hotels Camps Cities Population Hotel Camp
I I Bua ll .............................. 1,0 1 I
1 I W ildwood ....... ..... ............... 1 00 2 1
1 1 Inver ss ................ ......... 1.400 Non
8 3 Crystal River ............ .............. 1.200 4 1
S I H .... ........................ 4 1
1 I Brood.0k le .... .............. 2.6M 3a
1 1 Noeletoa ............. ........... 1 1 None
I 1







INFORMATION FOR THE HUNTER AND FISHERMAN-Continued


Volusia Orange
(ROUP V Seminole Osceola
Lake


Number
Cities Population Hotel.
DeLand .... .. ...... 611.O
Datona Bh ........... 18000 47
Orange City ... ... ........... ... ... S00 1
Sanford ........ .. ........ 8.000 1
Lonwrood ....... ......... 5. 600 1
O o ....... .......... .000 1
AilUso te .. ... .. ....... 1
Tavasr .... -.. ..........e.... 1.000 2
Eustis ..... ..... ............ 4.
Clermopt .1.000 3
L ur ...... ..... ... .. 6.000 3
Gro el naa ..... .. .... ....... .. 800 1
Umtill ... .. .......... 900 2
MLt. Plmouth ....... ....*.. ....... 150 1
Mt. Doa ........... .. ......... .... 1. 0 O
mt. Dorn 1.300 4
Minnola ....... ... 175 1
Howey .. ... 50 1
Fruitland Park .... :............. ... 250


(ROUP VI


Pasco
Hillsboro
Pinellau
Manatee


Hardee
Sarasota
DeSoto
Charlotte


Number Tourist
Citie Population Hotels Camp
Dade City .......... .... .000 3
New Port R .................. 1.000 1 1
Tampa ...... ......................... 140,000 40
Plant City .............. ... 8.000 4 2
St. Peterburs .............. ..... 40.000 1 2
Clerwater .............. .......... 10.000 10 1
Tarpon Sprin ..... .............. .000 6 1
Safety Harbor ................... 1.00 2 1
Bradenton ... .......... 12.500 9 3
Pa'metto ....... ....... 1. 00 1
Ellenton ........ ...... 500 1 None
Manatee ......... .... 1.200 1
Onren ............. 00 1 None
Myakka City ...................... 300 1 None


I This area as a whole is well provided with deer; turkeys abundant in spotted
Localities; quail plentiful; ducks generally abundant; geese none; black bass
Plentiful.


Tourist
Camps



2
None
1
I

None
2
None
1
None
Noue
None
None
None
None


Number
Cities Population Hotei.
Orlando ......... .. ............ 12.000 8
Winter Garden ..... 2.00 4
Winter Park ...................... 3,000
Apopka ........... ............... .5 0
Oakland ...... .................... 500 2
Pine Castle ... ..................... 600 1
New Sm .......................... 8,000 10
Kissimmee ...... .. ..... .. 4,000
St. Cloud ... ....... ............ 3.500 4
Holopaw ....... .......... ...... 2.000 2
Kenu ville ...... .................. 1.000 2
Winter Haen ......................... 8,00 10
HNim e City ......................... ,0 m 3
Ft. Mede ... ....................... ,100
La W al ...... ......... .... 00
lakeland ... 20,000 8
Bartow .......... ................. 5.000 4
Fro tproof ... ................... .... 2000


Tourist
Camp
1


There are not many deer to be found in this group of counties; turkeys, with
the exception of a few localities, are scarce; quail are abundant; ducks are
scarce; geese none; black bass generally plentiful.


Cities Population
Wauchula ........................... 4.600
Bowing Green ........................ 1.M00
Zolfo Sprin ..................... 400
Sarasota .. .500
Venice ........ .0... .... ............
Nokomis .. .......... 400
Entlewood .. ... .. ............. 5_
Osprey ............. ................ 400
Bee Ridge .......................... .. S00
Arcadiah ......................... .. .186
Ft. Ogden ......... .......... 500
Punts Gorda ............... ....... 3. 3
El Jobean ....................... .... 150


Number
Iotel
4
2
2
12
2
1
1



4
1


Brevard Okeechobee Martin Possibly half of these counties will show some good deer shoot-
'7ROUP VII Indian River Highlands Palm Beach ing in certain localities; turkeys are scarce except in restricted
St. Lucie Glades locations; quail are plentiful; geese none; black bass plentiful.
Number Tourist Number Touriat
Citie Population Hotels Camps Cotien Population Hotel Camps
Titusville ...... ............. ..... ,00 Sebrin .. .. 400 1
Coea ....... ........... ... ..... 3,500 5 Desoto City ......................... 00 1 None
Ea Galli ..... ...... ........... 2.500 2 1 Lake Plac id ......................... 50 2 1
Melbourne .................... ..... 1500 3 1 Brighton .. ........ ........... 100 1 1
Mieeo .............. ..... .... .. 100 1 Moor Haven .. .................... 1.000 1 1
Scottemoor ..................almdle 10.......... ............... 100 1 None
Vero Beach ......... ........ 3, 0 2 Stuart..... ......... 2.500 7 2
Wabaso ............ 500 None Olympla ... ........ ....... 400 1 1
Sebstan ............... ... 500 1 None Indiantown .... ..... ....... 300 1 None
Roseland ........ ............. 50 None West Palm Beach ................... *0.000 50 4
Felemre ..... ..... ..... 500 2 Non Palm Beach .. ........ ......... 10.000 0 I
Ft. Pleree .. .. .. .. 5.000 4 1 Lake Worth ............ ........... 8.000 10 1
Okeeobe ...................... 1.00 5 1 Delray ............... ...... 2.0000 5
Sherman ... .. ........ ... 500 1 None Boca Raton ........................ 1.000 2
Avon Park ........................... 4,500 5

Lee Broward Deer are fairly well stocked through the area; turkeys less plentiful; quail
CROUPVIII Monroe plentiful; ducks not abundant; geese none; black bass plentiful.

Number Tourist Number Tourist
Cities Population aotels Camps Cities Population Hotels Camp
Ft. M ........... ......... 10,000 1 Hollywood ........... ... .. ..... 400 7 None
Punt ............ 2 1 Da is ..... .... .. .2,000 a None
Esto ... ...... .00 1 1 Halandale ...... ................ 1.000 1 None
Sanfll ...... .......... ........... 200 1 1 PoemmM ........ .................. .500 3 None
LaBle ..... ... 1.00 2 M re ....... ............. ... 1.0 1 None
Clewieton ... ... ..000 3 1 Miami................ ... .......145.00 0 1
ade ..... .... ... 2 1 stead ............................ .00 3 1
Naple .. .... .. .............. 1 1 Miaml Reaeh M...l......... adjining M'
Mare ......... ....... ...... .. .. 1 1 Cer Gables ....... ..adjoiaing Miami
lmmokalem 1 I Haleah .. ....adjoing Miami
P d ........................ 11.000 10 None Ka W t ............... ...... ..... 20000 4 None






INFORMATION FOR THE HUNTER AND FISHERMAN-Continued


GAME
Seasons
Deer (Buck only)-November 20-December 31.
Quail, Turkey, Cat Squirrel-November 20-February 15.
(Unlawful to hunt Turkeys with dog.)
Marsh Hens or Rails-September 15-November 30. (Can
be taken in salt marshes only.)
Ducks, Doves, Geese, Brant, Snipe, Coots-November 20-
January 31. (Ducks on Lakes lamonia and Jefferson in
Leon County, Miccosukee in Leon and Jefferson Counties,
may be shot on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays only.)
No Open Season
No open season on Wood Duck (Summer Duck), Fox
Squirre Doe Dr, Plover, Yellowlegs, Swan, Woodcock,
all imported game-all non-game birds EXCEPT:
Unprotected
English Sparrow, Sharp-shinned Hawk (Little Blue
Darter), Cooper's Hawk (Big Blue Darter), Goshawk, Great
Horned Owl, Crow, Jackdaw, Byzzard, Butcher Bird, Wild-
cat, Weasel, Skunk, Flying Squirrel, Panther, Bear, Opos-
sum, Red and Gray Fox, Alligator, Rabbit.
Bag Limits
One Day-Deer (Buck only), 1; Quail, 15; Duck, 15;
Doves, 25; Geese, 5; Brant, 5: Cat Squirrel, 15; Coots, 20;
Gallinules, 15; Rails or Mash Hens, 25; Rails and Gallinules
in the aggregate, 25.
Season-Deer (Buck only), 2; Turkey, 5; 200 of any other
game birds or animals.
General Provisions
Possession must not exceed two days' bag limit at any one
time; unlawful during closed season, except during the five
days immediately following the open season.
Transportation-Two days' bag limit may be transported
as personal baggage during open season. Restricted as to
license.
Sale of Game, both native and imported, unlawful except
as provided for from game farms, and reindeer meat im-
ported and sold under permit from State Game Commis-
sioner.
Closed Areas-All State Breeding Grounds.
Game Farm Privately owned may be operated under
license.
FRESH-WATER FISH
Legal Minimum Lengths
Measurements from end of nose to fork of tail Black
Bass, 12 inches; Bream, 5 inches; Speckled Perch, 7 inches.
Bag Limits
One Day-Black Bass. 12; Speckled Perch, 30; Bream, 30;
Shell Cracker, 30; Warmouth Perch, 30; Redbreast, 30;
Jack, 15; Pike, 30; a mixed string of above species, 40.
Season
Open throughout the year except where fixed for a County
on request of Board of County Commissioners.
Legal Methods of Taking
Hook and Line, Rod and Reel, Bob, Spinner, Troll. Un-
lawful to possess nets, baskets, traps, gigs, dynamite or
other similar devices upon fresh waters of State except-
1. Nets and wooden baskets prescribed by Commissioner
may be used for taking catfish and carp in the Apalachicola,
Chattahoochee and Choctawhatchee Rivers.


2. With consent of Commissioner and Board of County
Commissioners nets of not less than four-inch stretched
mesh and not more than one thousand yards long may be
used to remove rough fish or to retain desired balance be-
tween game fish of different species.
3. Sturgeon nets of eight-inch stretched mesh, and not
more than six hundred yards long may be used for catching
sturgeon. Shad nets-as prescribed by the Commissioner, for
catching shad in St. Marys and St. Johns Rivers from Volu-
sia BarLNassau River, Boggy, Mills, Loftin, Little St. Marys
and Thomas Creeks in Nassau County; and in Ocheesee Lake
in Jackson County for catching suckers during season pre-
scribed by Commissioner.
4. Cast-nets not to exceed seven feet in length and four-
teen feet in spread, minnow dip nets not to exceed four feet
in diameter, and minnow seines not over twenty feet long
and four feet deep may be used for catching bait. None of
the following minnows shall be used for bait-bream, crap-
pie, bass, trout, jack, pike, perch. If caught in nets they
shall be returned to waters immediately.
5. All fish other than those mentioned in paragraphs
1, 2, 3 (with the exception of garfish, black or mud fish),
shall be returned alive to the waters from which they are
taken.
General Provisions
Possession-Not more than two days' bag limit at any one
time except by dealers.
Transportation-Of Black Bass as personal baggage per-
mitted. One day's bag limit of Black Bass; two days' bag
limit of other species out of State, by holder of non-resi-
dent license permitted.
Sale-Sale of Black Bass unlawful except those taken
from Lake Okeechobee and the St. Johns River as far south
as Volusia Bar, including Doctors Lake and Lake George-
the Suwannee River as far north as the forks of the river
forming the east and west passes.
Other species of fresh-water fish may be sold by licensed
dealers.
FUR BEARING ANIMALS
Raccoon, Muskrat, Beaver, Civet Cat, Otter, Skunk, Red
and Gray Fox, Bear, Panther, Opossum. The first five named
species are protected.
Season-December 1-March 1.
Fur bearers may be taken with dogs, gun or traps.

Trapper's License Required
Trappers must visit traps once each twenty-four hours.
Each trap must bear owner's name. Traps in the open must
be staked.
Traps not to be set on enclosed lands of others except on
written permission of owner.
Transportation and Sale--Legal during open season and
during thirty days immediately following.
Packages containing hides or furs for shipment must bear
name of shipper and license number.
Fur Dealers and Buyers of Alligator Hides must buy
license. Report of number of hides bought, name of trapper
and trapper s license number together with number of hides
and furs bought must be made to Department by purchaser.
Common carriers may not lawfully transport hides or furs
which do not have marked thereon name and license number
of dealer or trapper.




















MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF AREAS CLOSED TO
HUNTING UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF SECTION 4,
CHAPTER 13644, LAWS OF FLORIDA ACTS OF 1929



Areas open to trapping (without
guns or dogs) during open season
December 1st to March 1st.






LICENSES
(Issued by County Judge or his authorized agent)
Cost shown includes Judge's fee*
Game
Series A-Resident County Game License..........$ 1.25
Series B--Resident, Other than home County....... 3.2
Series C-Resident State ........................ 8.00
Series D-Non-resident State .................... 25.50
Fishing
Series E-Resident, County other than home.......$ 1.25
Series IR-Resident State ........................ 3.25
Series F-Non-resident County .................. 3.25
Series G-Non-resident State .................... 10.50
Trapping
Series N-Resident County ................... ... 3.25
Series Q-Resident, County other than home....... 10.50
Series P-Resident State ...................... 25.50
Series O-Non-resident County .................. 2.60
Series X-Non-resident State .................... 100.50
Exempt
Residents of the State sixty-five years of age or over, Con-
federate veterans entitled to pension under the laws of Flor-
ida, Children under fifteen years of age, not required to
secure license for taking game, fresh-water fish or fur-bear-
ing animals.
*State Licenses may be issued by any County Judge in the
State. County Licenses can be issued only by Judge of
County for which License is secured.



















O N FVFRY hand here one finds in
season those scenes in the lives
of every sportsman which in
later years bring memories of hap-
piness and outdoor experiences long to
be cherished. The old camp by the lake;
a tense moment before the felling of
a deer; "grunting" for worms which
soon are to be the bait for a string of
fish actually caught; days spent out in
the open, along the trail or stream;
nights around the campfire these
are but a few. The accessibility to
these and many other open-air pas-
times and pleasures has long been con-
sidered one of the most enjoyable and
happy features of a well-planned hunt-
ing or fishing trip in most any section
of Florida.







/// ^Q

/ m. L~j J i




















UTDOOR recreation in Florida is
unparalleled in its inexhaustible
variety. Aside from being the
favorite winter training home of par-
ticipants in the "nation's pastime," its
climate and outdoor facilities for re-
laxation and exercise make Florida a
favored land. Hundreds of miles of
excellent beaches along both coasts
have brought rare happiness to hun-
dreds of thousands. Sailing, boating,
canoeing, motor boat racing-all are
but a few of the means by which both
natives and visitors find pleasure sup-
reme in the beauty of Florida's waters.


,- If -


~i~iL~t'j;:c~-- I
























O N ;'\ .RaY lnd here One tinds ill
season those scenes in the lives
of every sportsman which in
later years bring memories of hap-
pIiness and outdoor experiences long to
Ibe cherished. The old camp by the lake:
a tense moment before the felling of
L deer: "grunting" for worms which
soon are to be the bait for a string of
fish actually caught: days spent out in
the open. along the trail or stream:
nights around the camptire these
are but a few. The accessibility to
thest anld mnlly (olhr open-air pas-
times and pleasures has long been con-
sidered one of the most eni oyable and
happylii features of a \well-planned hunt-
ing or fishing trip in most any section,
,f Florida.


1



























- ~ ~-q


UTDOOR recreation in Florida is
unparalleled in its inexhaustible
variety. Aside from being the
favorite winter training home of par-
ticipants in the "nation's pastime." its
climate and outdoor facilities for re-
laxation and exercise make Florida a
favored land. Hundreds of miles of
excellent beaches along both coasts
have brought rare happiness to hun-
dreds of thousands. Sailing, boating.
canoeing, motor boat racing-all are
but a few of the means by which both
natives and visitors find pleasure sup-
reme in the beauty of Florida's waters.


!


~ur


~CC.LC .~
."'
r_-




















Poas in Flora rously ex-
emplify the versatile outdoor re-
creational facilities that longhave
made this the "nation's playground."
Within easy reach may be found in-
numerable splendid and well kept golf
courses, over which, throughout the
year-'round season, are played ama-
teur and professional matches of local
and national prominence. Both the
beginner and the champion have found
new thrills along the fairways of the
200 more prominent courses in the
state. Practically all of these are
located either adjacent to or within a
few minutes' drive of your favorite
site or vacation home.






FLORIDA GOLF COURSES
Mies from
Name of Resort Name of Golf Course or Club Hole Yard Par Resert
Altamonte Springs .............. Altamonte Springs Golf Course ................... 9 1,825 30 *
Altamonte Springs ..............Sandlandos Springs Golf Club .................. 18 6,312 70 1%
Avon Park ..................... Highland Lakes Golf and Country Club............ 18 6,400 71 3
Avon Park .....................Pine Cret Lakes Country Club ................... 9 3,100 36 3
Babson Park ....................Golf and Yacht Club ........................... 9 3,100 34
Babson Park ....................Scenic Highlands Golf Club ...................... 9 3,400
Bartow ........................Municipal Golf Course ......................... 18 6,00 70 %
Belleir (No. 1) .................. Bellair Country Club ........................... 18 6200 72 *
Belleir (No. 2) ................. Belleair Country Club .......................... 18 6,250 72 *
Blountatown ................... .Blountstown Country Club ...................... 9 2,28 36 1
Boes Grande ................... Gulf Shore Golf Course ........................ 9 3,050 35 %
Boynton .......................Gulf Stream Club Golf Course (Members only)...... ....
Bradenton ......................Bradenton Golf and Country Club................ 9 3,165 38 %
Bradenton .............. .. ... Palma Sola Country Club ...................... 18 6.396 70 1%
Bradenton ......................Palmetto Country Club ......................... 18 .... .. 6
Brooksville .....................Hickory Hills Golf Club ........................ 18 6,100 71 8
Captiva Iland ................. Cip ivi hotel Golf Course....................... 7
Chipley ........................Chipley Country Club .......................... 9 2,800 36 3%
Chipola Park...................(Under Construction) ........................... 9 3,20
Clearwater .....................Clearwater Country Club ....................... 18 6.172 72 %
Clermont ......................Palisdes Country Club ........................ 18 6,240 .. 4
Cocoa..........................Poinsett Golf and Country Club................... 9
CoralGable ....................Coral Gables Golf and Country Club............. 9 3,080 35
Coral Gables .................. Miami-Biltmore Country Club (No. 1)............ 18 6,407 71 *
Coral Gables ................... Mmi-Biltmore Country Club (No. 2)............. 18 6,466 72 *
Dade City ...................... ake Jovit Golf Cours ........................ 18 6,499 7L 4
Davenport ....................Holly Hill Golf Cour ........................... 18 6,=62 71 %
Daytona Bech ............... Daytona Beach Golf and Country Club............. 18 6,100 74 %
Daytona Beoh .................. Daytona Highlands Course ..................... 9 3,015 38
DaytaBeaeh .................. Seabreese Hotel Course ....................... 18 6,700 74
DelPunk Springs ............... DeFunak Country Club ........................ 9 3,140 36 1
DeLaad........................College Arms Golf Club ........................ 18 6,40 71 *
DeLd......................... DeLnd Country Club ......................... 18 6,074 71 3
Deand ........................ Poa de Lea Springs Golf Club ............... 9 3,06 36 8
De Leon Spring ............... DeLeon Springs Golf Course ................... 9 .... .. 1
Deray ........................Municipal Golf Course ........................ 18 6,617
Dunedin .......................Dunedin Isleo Golf and Country Club .............. 18 6,22 72 2
Custil .........................Lake County Country Club ....................... 18 6d68 .. 1
Floren Vil .................. Florence Vila Golf Clb ......................... 9 238 37
FortLudrdale ................. Flaer Link ............................... 9 2,00 35 3
Fort Luderdal ................t. Lauderdale Golf and Country Club............ 18 6,410 71 4
t. Made ..................... PembrokeGolf Course ......................... 9 .... .. 3
ort Myer ................... Fort Myer Municipal Golf Coure .............. 18 6,88 74 2
Fort Pler .....................Fort Per Golf and Country Club............... 9 ,002 .. 1
Fort Pier .....................aravill Golf Course .......................... 9 ,090 .. 1H
Frostproof .....................Protproof Golf Course .......................... 9






















PORTS in Florida vigorously ex-
emplify the versatile outdoor re-
creational facilities that longhave
made this the "nation's playground."
Within easy reach may be found in-
numerable splendid and well kept golf
courses, over which, throughout the
year-'round season, are played ama-
teur and professional matches of local
and national prominence. Both the
beginner and the champion have found
new thrills along the fairways of the
200 more prominent courses in the
state. Practically all of these are
located either adjacent to or within a
few minutes' drive of your favorite
site or vacation home.







FLORIDA GOLF COURSES


Name of Resort Name of Golf Course or Club Holes Yards
\ltamonte Springs ............. Altamonte Springs Golf Course.................. 9 1,825
\Itamonte Springs .............. Sandlandos Springs Golf Club.................... 18 6,312
\,.n Park .................. ... Highland Lakes Golf and Country Club............ 18 6,400
\,:n Park ...................... Pine Crest Lakes Country Club................... 9 3,100
llahs.n Park ................... Golf and Yacht Club ............................ 9 3,100
liabson Park .................... Scenic Highlands Golf Club ...................... 1 3,400
Bartow ....................... Municipal Golf Course .......................... 18 6,500
lklleair (No. 1) ....... ........ Belleair Country Club ......................... 18 6,200
IBelleair (No. 2) ................. Belleair Country Club ............. .. ... 18 6,250
Blountstown ................... Blountstown Country Club ....................... 9 2,285
BcKa Grande ................... Gulf Shore Golf Course .........: ............... 9 3,050
Boynton .......................Gulf Stream Club GClf Course (Members only)........
Bradenton ..................... Bradenton Golf and Country Club................ 9 3,165
Bradenton .....................Palma Sola Country Club ........... ...... ..... 18 6,396
Bradenton ...................... Palmetto Country Club .................. ...... 18 ....
Brooksville ................... Hickory Hills Golf Club ....................... 18 6,100
Captive Island .................. Captiva Hotel Golf Course ........................ 7 ..
Chipley ....................... Chipley Country Club ....................... .. 2,800
Chipola Park .................... (Under Construction) ........................... t. 3,320
Clearwater ..................... Clearwater Country Club ............... ..... .. 18 6.172
Clermont ......................Palisades Country Club ...................... .. 18 6,240
Cocoa .........................Poinsett Golf and Country Club................... 9
Coral Gables .................... Coral Gables Golf and Country Club.... .......... 9 3,030
Coral Gables .................... Miami-Biltmore Country Club (No. 1)............. 18 6,407
Coral Gables .................... Miami-Biltmore Country Club (No. 2)............. 18 6,466
Dade City .....................Lake Jovita Golf Course ........................ 18 6,499
Davenport ...................... Holly Hill Golf Course ... ....................... 18 6,623
Daytona Beach .................. Daytona Beach Golf and Country Club............. 18 6,100
Daytona Beach .................. Daytona Highlands Course ....................... 9 3,015
Daytona Beach .................. Seabreeze Hotel Course .................. ...... 18 6,700
DeFuniak Springs ............... DeFuniak Country Club ......................... 9 3,140
DeLand ....................... College Arms Golf Club ........................ 18 6,240
DeLand ........................DeLand Country Club ................. ........ 18 6,074
DeLand..........................Ponce de Leon Springs Golf Club ................. 9 3,059
De Leon Springs ............... DeLeon Springs Golf Course ............... ......
lelray .........................Municipal Golf Course ......................... 18 6,517
Dunedin ....................... Dunedin Isles Golf and Country Club .............. 18 6,225
Eustis .........................Lake County Country Club ...................... 18 6,528
Florence Villa .................. Florence Villa Golf Club ................. : ....... 9 2,538
Fort Lauderdale ................. Plagler Links ................................ 9 2,600
Fort Lauderdale ................. Ft. Lauderdale Golf and Country Club............. 18 6,410
It. Meade ......................Pembroke Golf Course ........................... 9 ....
Fort Myers ..................... Fort Myers Municipal Golf Course ................ 18 6,388
Fort Pierce ..................... Fort Pierce Golf and Country Club ................ 9 3,002
'ort Pierce .....................Maravilla Golf Course ......: .................... 9 3,090
Srostproof ......................Frostproof Golf Course .......................... 9 ..


Miles from
Par Resort
30 *
70 l1
71 3
35 3
34

70 /
72
72 *
36 1
35 4

38 %
70 1l
. 6
71 8

36 3%



4

35
71 *
72
71 4
71 %
74
38
74 ..
36 1
73 *
71 3
36 8
.. 1

72 2
.. 1
37
35 3
71 4

74 2

11.







FLORIDA GOLF COURSES Continued
Miles frfe
Name f Resrt Name e Gf Cr r C lub Holes Yards Par Remrt
Fruitland Park ................. Fruitland Park Golf Club ....................... 18 6,125 69
Gainesville ..................... Gaineville Golf and Country Club ............... 18 ....
Green Cove Spring ............ Qui-i--Sna Golf Coure ......................... 9 2,821 3
Haines City ....................Haines City Country Club ....................... 9 3,202 72 1
Hampton Springs ............... Hotel Hampton Golf Course ...................... 9 3,100 35 *
Hollywood ...................... Hollywood Golf and Country Club................ 18 6,000 72
Homestead ..................... Homestead Golf and Country Club................. (Under Construction)
Howey .................. ..... Chain of Lake Gol Club ....................... 18 6,200 *
Howey ......................... Howe Golf Course ............................. 9 8,075 35
Indialantic-By-The-Sea .......... Indialantic Golf Course .......................... 9 2960
Invernes ........................... Inverness Golf and Country Club.................. 9 ,215 37
Jacksonaille.............. ...... Florida Country Club .......... ............. 18 6,195 73 5
Jacksonville .............. ....... Timuquana Country Club ........................ 18 6,42 72 7%
Jacksonvlle .................... Municipal Golf Course ........................... 18 6,28 72 3%
Jacksonille .................... San Jose Golf and Country Club.................. 18 6,068 72 4
Jackonville .....................Hyde Park Country Club ........................ 18 6,402 72 7
Jupiter Island (Hobe Sound)...... Jupiter Island Golf Club.......................... 9 2,00
Keley City ................... Kelsey City Golf Course ......................... 9 8,13 36
Keytone Heights ...............Country Club ................................ 9 2,900 85
Key West .......................Muniipal Golf Course .... ..... ........ 18 6,30 71 4
Kisimmee .......... ......Kissimme Go lub ............. 9 8,000 32 1
Lake City ...........: ..........Lake City Country Club ........................ 9 2,0 37 1%
Lakeland ....................... Lakeland Country Club .......................... 18 6150 72 2
Lakelad ..................... Cleveland Heights Golf & Country Club............ 18 6,359 71 2
Lake Wale ....................Municipal Course ............................... 18 6,502 72 3
Lake Wale ................... Hihland Park .................................... 18 .... 4
Lake Worth ..................... Lake Worth Golf Course ................................ 9 8,200 87 %
Leea bur ....................... Country Club ................................... 9 89 85 2
Lynnhaven ................... St. Andrew Bay Golf and Recreation Club ......... 18 6,710 74 1
Melbourne ..................... Melbourne Golf and Country Club ................ 18 ,406 .. 1
Miami .........................Miami Country Club ............................ 18 72 1
Miami ........................Miami-Hialeah Golf Courn ...................... 18 6,000 72 7
Miami .........................Golf Park Country Club ......................... 18 600 72 7%
Miami ....................... Opa-Locka Municipal Golf Course ................ 18 6488 72 8
Miami Beach ....................Municipal Golf Club ........................... 18 ,088 72 *
Miami Beach .................... Bay Shore Country Club ........................ 18 6,300 71 *
Miami Beach .................... La Gorce Golf Club ............................. 18 6420 72 *
Mountain Lake...................Mountain Lake Club ............................. 18 40 71
Mount Dora ....................Lake County Golf Course ....................... 1 6228 72 3
Mount Dora .................. St. Andrews Course ............................. 18 6,070 70 5
Mount Plymouth ...............Golf Course ........................... ....... 18 6,240 72
Mount Plymouth ................ Glen Eagle ........................ ......... 18 86,90 72 .
Naples ......................... Naples Golf Cours ............................ 9 2,900 40
New Smyrna .................... New Smyrna Golf Club ........................ 18 6,200 72 1
Oakland ........................ West Orange Country Club ...................... 18 6,66 76
Oeala ....................... Ocala Highland Club ........................... 9 8,068 36 3
Oeala .......................... Oala Country Club .............................. 9 3015 37 1
Olympia ........................ Olympia Beach Golf Club ....................... 9 .... .. l%
Orange City ....................Country Club ................................... .. .... .. 1%
Orlando ........................ Orlando Country Club .......................... 18 6,92 70 2
Orlando ........................ Dubedread Country Club ............................
Ormond Beach .................. Hotel Ormond Golf Course ...................... 18 6,00 75 %







FLORIDA GOLF COURSES Continued
Miles from
Name of Resrt Name f Golf Course or Club Heol Yards Par eswrt
Palatka ......................... Municipal Golf Co rse ........................... 18 6,327 72 1
Palm Beach ..................... Palm Beach Golf Club ................. .......... 18 5,700 69 *
Palm Beach ..................... Palm Beach Country Club ....................... 18 5,917 70
Palm Bech ..................... Everlads Club (Private Club) .................. 18
Palm Bech .....................W inter Club .................................. 18 6,440 72
Palmetto ....................... Golf and Country Club ........................... 18 6,227 78 2
Panama City ................... Bunkers Coe Country Club ...................... 9 3,808 ..
Panama City .................... St. Andrew Bay Golf and Recreation Club..... .... 18 6,710 74 7
Pensacola ......................Pensacola Country Club ....................... 18 6,001 71 3
Penscola ...................... Oeola Country Club ........................... 9 3254 36 4
Plant City .....................Golf and Country Club ......................... 9 3,305 36 2
Polk City ......................Polk City Country Club ......................... 9 3,160 85 1
Punts Gorda ...... ............ Punts Gorda Gol Club ........... ........... 18 6,865 1%
Rocklede ......................Poinett Golf Club ............................ 9 ,068 8 *
Safety Harbor .................Country Club ................................... 18 6,245 72
Sanford ........................Sanford Country Club .......................... 18 6,04 70 4
Saraaota ........................Bobby Jones Municipal Golf Course.............. 18 6240 71 8
Sarasota ........................Whiteeld Estates Golf Coure ............: ...... 18 6,88 72 4
Saraot ........................Siesta Golf Course .............................. 9 8,800 4 5%
Sarasota ................:..... Sarasota Country Club ........ ................ 18 6,200 70 2
Sebring ............... ..... Ken.lworth Lodge Golf Club .................... 18 6,250 71 *
Sebring ........................ Golf and Country Club ......................... 18 6,449 71 3
Sebring ........................ake Sebring Country Club ..................... 9 S,0 70 83%
St Augustine ................ St. Augustine Country Club ..................... 9 2,700 6a *
St. Augustine ....... ........ St. Augtine Links .............................. 18 6,288 78 2
St. Auustine .... ............. St. Augustine Links ........................... 9 3U10
St Pe burg ................ Pasadena Golf Club ........................... 18 6,611 72 6
St. Petersburg ................. Jungle Club .................................. 18 6,049 70 7
St. Petersbur .................. Lakewood Etates Course ........................ 18 6440 71 4%
St. Petrsbu r..................Snell Isl ...................................... 18 6,08 71 2
Stuart ........................ t. Lueie Country Club .......................... 18 6140
Tallahassee .....................Tallahassee Country Club .................... 9 ,18 36 1
Tamp ........................Rocky Point Golf Club .......................... 18 6,059 70 8
Tampa ......................... Temple Terrace ................................ 18 6,545 7 10
Tampa ......................... Palma Cia Golf Club ..................... ..... 18 6,106 70 8
Tampa .........................Forest Hills Country Club ...................... 18 6,216 69
Tarpon Sprins .................Tarpon Springs Country Cub .................... 18 6,166 71 %
Tarpon Sprin ................. Sunset Hills Country Club ....................... 18 6,395. 71 1
Tavares ........................ Lake County Country Club ...................... 18 ....
Tavares ........................ Silver Lake Country Club...................... 18 ....
Tavare ...................... Howey-in-the-Hills ............................. 9 ....
Tituville .....................Whisperin Hills Golf Club ..................... 18 6,070 70 2
Usepp Isdand ................ Useppa Golf Club ............................. 9 2,830 33 *
Valparaso ......................Chicago Country Club of Valparaio .............. 18 6,60 72 1%
Valparaiso ...................... El Quistador (Open about January 1)............. 18 6,600 72 3
Venie ........................Venice Country Club ........................... 9 3,307 37 %
Vero Beach ................... Riomar Golf Club .............................. 9 3,16 .. 2%
Vero Beah ................... Royal Park .................................. 9 2,702 .. %
Wet Palm Beach .............. Country Club ................................. 18 6,251 70 .
Winter Have ................... Lake Region Country Club ...................... 18 6200 72 4
Wintr Haen .................. Florence Villa Hotel Club....................... 9 2.500 3 1
Winter Park ....................Aloma Links ................................. 18 6.275 72 1









POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES-1930 AND 1920
Tow o. 2.0 and Over in 1le.k P4h Type


297~. 1000.0 n.E Nf, l ~


Alarho ~ 2.eho.
Allord... Jarka
Afta--- t. Sprnu. Elri-le
A.-. Mari6 tIa-
A.tko-y Sa
ApoiacbkaI.. Fraaliod



A~tr&db Lk .2

All-oat D Ih Duol
Aol ara"l Polk
M"o Park Dklaod-
Baldol Do,oI*
Socrt. P~olk.



flo~loa...Plarlia
3.11.88 Ii. OvaI.r

6. ,.. 4306 M ....



3101.... Ora...
32o2.0.o. Calbo..
Sar Ra.... .- Pa.l. Dkro
Doalla. D Oln..


so.ila Gpoiagh
Solag G.... Ord...
46odOm~.. Maaat..~




DrIoa..a. L-7..
3..a.5.i PLaR.. .




cloraua N...ao.
Clodelark ...
Ca o r... ca


C aGa l e .......
C.L. .u c..i.tyut
C i ...... ....




c. my .. DW.-

CC'Y" at- cit-..
C.m~ P-aa
CDao .. Lar....









D. Uad- UrVard. ---
Comoo.Uah...... DLro1.ar
...... ..









C)adsi. Ct.... .....Cler
kr .... Dad...
Coroaad. 3.ar To- Clin.









K.. Galb r.
'V... ...... ... Di...

Dad. C~Iy. Uro ard
DCgmoark'... Volh....



Dad... ...Ouol

DanoY.... Pladoru
Daaf.. .. Mar

ld. 1..k.. Polk
mdr...ri.. Y Vo..
K~da..d... O- a aer..


1920 6 rTt" To... 0

S o ..
Bl 776 ElI..
221 207 I 12e.n2...
281 "207
77
337 367 Evertide
:.150 3.066 Feerd Poilt
1.134 796 PI4llIW...
4.0B2 3.479 Peraandna
570 420 FlaIr Br k
167 Forida City
164 IFrt lauloWjalo
1.849 713 Fort rad ....
3.35 M 0 Por ordM
>.200 I.2103 G rtFhr
168 149 Fot WBite.
212 .. Lpproof..
92 Frilrdl P.rk..
10 Flford.. .
400 237 G lo ie..
128 5-Old..ho..

312 .... G .oaB ......


3.96 3.se GrCt .. ..


S (1) aleGr Cit....
1.405 1.011 Gnrali .. ..
1671 62 Gn o...
312 (I) GD.oid...
637 701 GMac ....


ml7 si4 .rtl.
314 277 Hawt .......
920 1.065 Heuo..ad

2.066 60 H SpriWjo
726 574 HdloOt Hgkt.
421 UB.ill.
1.878 I..o = .... ....
45 494 Dt.....

2106S 496 H..ey4n.t.k-H .....
95 IAti tow .............
2.16 1,445 I l ..-. ....
31 .. .. .i ... ....


67 Mr.... .......
214 J ..
550 438 J .... ..
ao K=eu ty....

1.072 Irpotow Doihto

1.1 1.266 La 3.ll
1.071 ICKfL Ho.i.......

1,674 762 La Cr ...... .
60 117 Lady Lake *...
I.68 2 U Lake A r.. ..
1.4.3 Lke 3I.01r .... ...
2.666 2.067 aIgatW.
1,246 3.a24 Lb D i ...
2.333 1.051 .kLoLHdo ..........
231 .. Lak. Jo .. .. ..
6154 LkMait.
1.434 2I ake Walei.
m0. La. sikem ....
Lsm 125 4 Uk !.....
72 507 I Lake.W...
341 133 I Lko Wwrth
103 I Laa..


Poo .








2Bward..
rue












Polk bi..
Lake...
DL.d..





Polk ..
Lake .










Dade.
L-ke
arkio.A



JmGa ...
G.ak ...

Polk .. .
Bm-d ....
Dad. ....

larha...
Ald..



V.......
.-6......



Cs.-...


go;....
Dom-l....


MY .......
Daunt...
M..tl ...
ciay.
P40...... .

DAdryu...
ALark..

W. k.....


u.1 11.... .
pa. ...





Palt. 3rar
P.1 DrarI


1.748
I l
419
176
470
107
12.83l


*iS?



4.416
3-n

322
30



18.66
111
ill
331
562
3.401
264
6.940
I26


2)6a6 ot o '. atari to.n mu m.
- Dyetm 3am DtOj... amd Sab. ki- 1.W. Paylss CityIn 19
3 3~r1Mo-nAd itum. P-Falk 1-. 124.


2.6
172
313
356
3.023
462
86.666
2.66


1.91
4,803

1,48
270



1.012
329
1.719

904
23O
470
861
3.037
1.012

1.16
36
00


71



2.319
3 3


12.640
2.MO
471

2Us
isrru*
400


2920




1.

212
333
3.147
301
2.06




(0)





MO





656

761
3a






301
(I)


642


136



12
244
1,207




i77


I.Il
I.U


1931


------









POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES-1930 AND 1920-Continued
To.wa of 2.M fead Ow in meek FPae Tme

cITr. OW.0 on cunT 1930 i I W 1920 ow o cor T 1930 1 920
.ILMJ I I ; ILr. II
ao Pi1, w 222
.... .. ..... piel l ........ 1.429 9 P lk Cit ... .. Polk ........ 222 .
I............(klooa .. 21 ...... P i 400 350
L.I I .. ord. 5" 3 ... ..... .. .. Bil ". ....... Ip -
e... ...... Bll rd 324 373 Npuogl o ..Broa..d ...... 2. 4 63
t ... Cilr ..... ... oe de Lc l...... Ha ......3... 2. 3 2a0
. .o... i .. ... 1 199 Port Orse.. ........ Voloi .......... 3

b ...... Lke .......... ..... 4,113 1,835 Port Ricey ........... PloeO 104
. S.o : 2e:7, 3.103..... S. l? Joe... P rt G l f.: .. I i
,o..od .. .. iio ... .. 39 10 Port .Seal.. slarouLm 1 .53
a i e... .. 5 ... 929 374 Pert T..p City. 'b.dolh 1.2423 1.M
rele y .. 519 3.0 Pnt.i Gordi. .... arlol 1.9 1


Mrl.tok .
aiLlU..... .
Malabar....




lboue ...Bas
Mole .....

Mulu ....


M olle. .....




Mlsor B r....
Ml 1 .........

M wi py ......
11.6, ....

ln l a......

foltk K el ....
M0 a. '... ...

loltrdt". .
Noon r .







Oalkla..nd
Oamka.... ...
S.l......... ....
k .... .....
thined r.
OwtwsJ... .




Ovid ... .. ......

O rd ....... ......
a .......





r m. .. .... ......
UPl u Beal .rb ......
P n City .... ......
PUe0 ..... .....
P oLr ..... ... ....

rPiBb.... .
PIl. BoHj .





Priano Park




Plm rt i. t y.
Pi-taty


IMadio .


actkso..
'M.o.te..
'Jackmaa.. .
Uke....

Deovrd.


Dad ...
Dd. ... .

Dade .....
DHde...

AIaek. .


EMambi ..

JGflnad ....
Lake ......
Wed..


Colli ....
ALsa.. *
rPae...
Volute ....


OrLt c ....
oo.d...
Mla ......

Ok r.ob...
Hm e.....
Dalr.....
uCly......


P9.1 ...
8Mnle...





Tti ....
r..ile..


272
2,154
13I
418
3.219

3.372
ate)
oll
2.977
72
110.,67
6,494
612

726
1.419
104
lai
1(M
148

1.901
W7
012
1.013
2.02o

390
719
7"9
4.149
274

457
379
443
7.291
794

1.795
l5
339
572
661
27.330
1.617
347
1.042
275

2,256
1.70"7
10
95

3.043
3.402
233
925
31.579
2.744
624
421
465
I((.


440


1.070
2.499

1,499









510














1.135

















2O)
1.722






990




9.982
1,292




3.102



2.044
1.722
(I)






3.729


Roddik.....
3ow Juacti
RWrier
PZrimbe...

sc. A jmat....
St. Clond...
St. L...

St. ark..
84' 9ee. .1

sat. rtwabr*
Seaoti...


It..h Mit. ly.j
3-ru. ...
Seolleinooe



Treat.......








Verntn .i....
Stoset .....
Torll.Y~r











Tealrp.. la..
Ta~k.....
Whuomb or..... ..
Wetroamt. ea.
Wht. sprina ...
Wi.d..d.
Vilist......
Ve!-....



Waldo ..........
Woboetow...
k r,
Walak.
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Yaakoot...
Zopk97kiI..
Zolfo Sprin.


15-0.....
Maiom....



ri.llJa....
=a,:*.-.

WokeILl..... .
rime"..

r.m ......
90-to..



urecoed...
In.xla... ...
Dadi ..o...
aoti.......

lineall..
Dod..... .


k o e i............


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1A~k ......... -
9. da.a o ..-- -




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Harad.....
0.0.8a....
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Loedee..


3.788
400
363
5.,24
811

551
765
12.111
1.2
158

217
40.425
212
10.100
176
8.198



*IS
41
3.
us

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1.100







IM-
10.700
-,5 4
3.414

1.090
2.00
7-6

so

99
Of






581
614

940

l24
M4



Gls
2.021
7.190
3,18
458

748
272


I Not rturnd sepimai.


453
4-9
6.192
2.011
(I)




142

2.149




42
2.776
i.m


S.17
61.1



1.2,1

64U






571
2.0111





9-4
ll


823





1.021
1.07b



577
239


.:..~ .* *O


Lee

Lea
Ln
Let
LIa
La.


--~---


A


I























ATURE undisturbed- a rare virtue
indeed-but it is found in abundance
in Florida. In all living things there
Is becoming of Florida a feeling and knowl-
edge that what Nature created unto herself
should be saved for the pleasure of genera-
tions to come. Here, through a well planned
program to retain this great virtue, is
offered for your enjoyment and study the
wonders of the real forest primeval. Flor-
ida, in its preservation of its wild life, holds
in its bounds all those things which have
brought to it that truth that here and here
alone is America's last frontier.


-k r4








Florida Invites You!

POPULATION, Federal Estimate, June 80th, 1927 .................................. 1,363,000
sessed Valuation, 1917..... ............................... $322,216,072
1927 .................................... 727,821,818 (or over 125% increase)
league of railways, December 81, 1927 ...................... ............... 820.68
railroad improvement and new lines from 1920-1927.................. ........... $142,19A857
onnage hauled by railroads in Florida, 1927 ................................... 18,088,986
Tonnage hauled by ships in Florida ports........................................ 10218,697
Mileage of hard surfaced roads ................................ .............. 8,631
spended for roads (1915-1929) by State Highway Department ................... ..$90,483,7249
total building Contracts, 1923-1927................ ............................. $890,587,900
(or $176,107,580 per year)
Reurces of banks, 1927......................................................... $518,48829
alue of manufactures, 1925.......... ............................................. 267,009,159
value of minerals, 1926......................................................... 20,274,489
Acres in Florida, land and water .............................................. 37,546,40
Land area in Florida ........................................................ ... 3 85,111,040
Acres in cultivation, 1927 ..................... ............................... 1,485,064
(or 4.28% of land area)

lorida Leads the Nation in the Production of:
Grapefruit, Celery, Fuller's Earth, Phosphate (84% of the United States Production).
And in the Following Winter-Grown Crop#:
Tomatoes, Snap Beans, Eggplant, Cucumbers, Peppers, Irish Potatoes.

Farm Income of Florida, 1927 Interesting Facts
field crops ...................... $ 16,086,000 Total federal taxes, 1927........ .44,488,095.42
ruck crops ..................... 31,967,000 (or $32.64 per capital)
ruits and nuts .................. 50,692,000 Average rainfall 51.9 inches (93 stations).
vestock ......................... 586,594 Average temperature 72'.
poultry and eggs ................. 11,720,087 Exports from Florida, 1926....... $50860,904.00
Dry products ................... 12,619,19 Imports to Florida ............... 2706,991.00
miscellaneous crops ............... 6,427,019 Hotel rooms in Florida, 1928...... 261,987
$185,47,019

The fruit and truck crops grew on less than 300,000 acres, which means a production of over $285.00
er acre!
Florida ships ten per cent of all fresh fruit and vegetables of the United States from less than 300,000
res. This equals mere than ten per cent of the total value of carload shipments.
Florida has 8,805 square miles of inland water abounding in fish, and 1,400 miles of shore line, gulf and
.These water yield about 137,000,000 pounds of fish per year.


- ff M TM n U. aA

























N ATURE undisturbed -a rare virtue
indeed-but it isfound in abundance
in Florida. In all living things there
is becoming of Florida a feeling and knowl-
edge that what Nature created unto herself
should be saved for the pleasure of genera.
tions to come. Here, through a well planned
program to retain this great virtue, is
offered for your enjoyment and study the
wonders of the real forest primeval. Flor-
ida, in its preservation of its wild life, holds
in its bounds all those things which have
brought to it that truth that here and here
alone is America's last frontier.















JVA.


M a


If-B oi
~I of


t-'5








Florida Invites You!

POPULATION, Federal Estimate, June 30th, 1927 ................................... 1,363,000
Asse-sed Valuation, 1917 .................................... $322,216,072
1927 ................................... 727,821,318 (or over 1255' increase)
Mileage of railways, December 31, 1927 ......................................... .. 8,220.63
Railroad improvement and new lines from 1920-1927 .......... .. .................. 8142,198,557
onnage hauled by railroads in Florida, 1927 .................................... 18,033,986
Tonnage hauled by ships in Florida ports .......................................... 10,218,697
.lileage of hard surfaced roads ................................ ..... ............ 8,631
Erpi aded for roads (1915-1929) by State Highway Department ...................... $90,483,724.89
rotal building contracts, 1923-1927 ................................................ $890,537,900
(or $176,107,580 per year)
Resources of banks, 1927 ........................................................ $518,438,829
Value of manufactures, 1925 ................... ................................ 267,009,159
Value of minerals, 1926 .......................................................... 20,274,489
Acres in Florida, land and water ...................... .......... ................ 37,546,240
Land area in Florida ............. .... ......................... .............. 35,111,040
Acrv. in cultivation, 1927 ....................................................... 1,485,054
(or 4.23'/; of land area)

Florild Leads the Nation in the Production of:
Grapefruit, Celery, Fuller's Earth, Phosphate (84% of the United States Production).
A.d in the Following Wifter-Grown Crops:
Tmatoes, Snap Beans, Eggplant, Cucumbers, Peppers, Irish Potatoes.

Farm Income of Florida, 1927 Interestinf Facts
Field crops ......................$ 16,036,000 Total federal taxes, 1927......... $44,483,095.42
ruck crops ..................... 31,967,000 (or $32.64 per capital)
Fruits and nuts .................. 50,692,000 Average rainfall 51.9 inches (93 stations).
livestock ........................ 5,885,594 Average temperature 72'.
Poultry and eggs ................. 11,720,087 Exports from Florida, 1926....... $50,860,904.00
airy products ................... 12,619,319 Imports to Florida .............. 27,306,991.00
Miscellaneous crops ............... 6,427,019 Hotel rooms in Florida, 1928...... 261,987
$135,347,019

The fruit and truck crops grew on less than 300,000 acres, which means a production of over $285.00
per acre!
Florida ships ten per cent of all fresh fruit and vegetables of the United States from less than 300,000
crest. This equals more than ten per cent of the total value of carload shipments.
Florida has 3,805 square miles of inland water abounding in fish, and 1,400 miles of shore line, gulf and
ay. These waters yield about 137,000,000 pounds of fish per year.


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