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Group Title: Florida facts for tourists : authentic information concerning the state.
Title: Florida facts for tourists
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055589/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida facts for tourists authentic information about the state
Physical Description: 64 p. : illus. (part col.), fold. map. ; 23cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Bureau of Immigration
Publisher: State Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: [1932?]
 Subjects
Subject: Description and travel -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Cover title: Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055589
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000134221
oclc - 01710987
notis - AAQ0268

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front page 1
    Title Page
        Front page 2
    Main
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~- <'


Florida Facts


for Tourists


- A,


AUTHENTIC INFORMATION
CONCERNING THE STATE


Issued by the


State Department of Agriculture
NATHAN MAYO, Commissioner o Agriculture
Tallahassee, Florida


TH B CORD COMPANY, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA, U. I. A.





















WAVING COCOANUT PALMS LINE THE BEACH AT MIAMI


e'otoring in Ylorida
By NATHAN MAYO, Commissioner of Agriculture

FLORIDA offers perfect motoring throughout the year. No ice
coated roads, no frozen radiators, no blizzards to mar the pleasures
of travel. In the summer no suffocating heat but balmy breezes
beneath a smiling sky.
Over eight thousand miles of hard-surfaced highways invite motorists
to any point in the state; no mud, no dust, no sharp rocks to destroy tires,
no mountains to climb in low gear or in second, but smooth surfaces lead-
ing through hills and forests, over prairies and through tropical jungles,
along splendid shorelines, across fine bridges, past cultivated farms,
orchards and gardens, along beaches where the white flecked waves of
the deep blue ocean break on sands of golden hue or silver sheen -
Florida presents every variety of pleasant landscape except rugged snow-
capped mountain peaks.
Historic places abound. There is St. Augustine, the oldest permanent
white settlement in North America. Near Jacksonville is the site of the
earlier settlement by French Huguenots. New Smyrna has its ruins of
the Turnbull colony of Greeks and Minorcans. Near Bushnell is the
Page One





































































































SEAcH WEEDwAY ATr Ut. A~uGuSTnE



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****


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scene of the Dade Massacre,
while at Olustee, the Natural
Bridge, and Marianna are
battle fields of the war between
the states. The historic city of
Tallahassee is the only south-
ern capital east of the Missis-
sippi that was never captured.
At Pensacola are the old
Spanish forts.
Of great interest to the tour-
ists is the overseas route along it .
the keys, the railroad extend- M ,
ing 125 miles into the sea ..-
below Miami. There is the
proposed Royal Palm Park SUN-BATHERS AT CLEARWATER BEACH
containing three million
acres; the Bok Tower; the Gandy Bridge, longest bridge in the world,
and many other points which are described in this book.,
Whether you come to farm, fish or frolic, manufacture or merchandise,
study, teach, hunt or loaf do any or all of these things or do noth-
ing but live on your income-Florida invites you.


VIEW OF PALM BEACH AND LAKE WORTH FROM WEST PALM BEACH


Page Three








9lorida

journeys

N this book we offer to the
prospective visitor a
glimpse of Florida and
what she has to offer you.
Journeying in Florida gives
the greatest possible return for
time and money spent and will
prove to be a pleasant and
SOK TOWER AT MOUNTAIN LAKE profitable experience. Mar-
velous climate throughout the
year, together with delightful scenery make such a visit a source of last-
ing pleasure. Many who come remain as residents, and all those who
come once desire to return and partake of these enjoyments.
It is impossible to do full justice to the subject, just as it is impossible,
within the scope of these few pages, to furnish every detail of informa-
tion. We can only outline the advantages of our state from the tourist
point of view. Detailed information may be obtained from the Chamber
of Commerce in any community mentioned in this book. Hotel rates
and other expenses are very moderate. Tourist camps are to be found
in practically every community. Bus lines, railways and steamship lines
are available to every part of the state.
In the back of this book you will find a historical map which will
serve to guide you to the points of interest over the state. It will show
you roads to travel and places to visit, and its historical data will be
informative to the student.
For the purposes of this book we shall divide the state into four sec-
tions, the east coast section, central section, west coast section and north-
west section, taking them up in the order named.
First we give a brief general historical outline.


Pa. F~r



















FOUNTAIN Of YOUTH AT ST. AUGUSTINE


historyy
F LORIDA has a background of more than four centuries of color-
ful history since the coming of the white man. Indian races, ex-
tending into the dim shadows of the forgotten past, roamed its
hills and shores. Explorers and settlers from Spain, France and Eng-
land have left their imprint. Some of the most interesting incidents in
the history of the American nation have to do with the old and the new
land of Florida. Over its soil a prehistoric people roamed, then the
Indian. The first flag waved was the royal banner of Spain; next the
lily spangled flag of the Kingdom of France; then the British Union Jack,
the Stars and Stripes; the Stars and Bars of the Southern Confederacy,
and again Stars and Stripes of our own United States.
Traces of occupation by all of these people come vividly before us as
we tour the state. The ruins and monuments of the early colonists; Indian
settlements; battle fields; these mingle with modern structures and engi-
neering feats. The past and the present combine to interest all observers.
The white man's first recorded contact with this land was on March
27th, 1513, when Ponce de Leon sighted the shore near what is now St.
Augustine. His later attempts at settlement failed. Navarez in 1528
and DeSoto in 1539 led exploring expeditions through Florida. The
only worthwhile result of these expeditions was the introduction of the
orange, which they brought from Spain.
In 1562 Jean Ribault, a Frenchman, visited this land and made a


Pwge FLi



























OLD FORT MATANZAS. NEAR
ST. AUGUSTINE


OLDEST SCHOOLHOUSE IN U. S.. ST. AUGUSTINE


OLD CITY GATES. ST. AUGUSTINE


OLDEST HOUSE IN U. S.. ST. AUGUSTINE


OLD SPANISH FORT SAN CARLOS AT PENSACOLA


Page Sis






glowing report of what he saw. In 1564 French Huguenots under the
leadership of Rene de Laudonniere established a colony named Fort
Caroline near the mouth of the St. Johns River.
A Spanish settlement under Pedro Menendez de Aviles was established
at St. Augustine in 1565. This settlement has had an unbroken history
to the present day. Menendez's first task was the destruction of the French
Fort Caroline, with the slaughter of its defenders. A French fleet under
Ribault was wrecked on the coast and its survivors were captured, and
slaughtered by Menendez's soldiers. This ended the first period of
French contact with Florida, although an avenging expedition in 1568
destroyed the Spanish garrison which Menendez had established on the
site of Fort Caroline.
The stone ruins of Missions are to be found in many places today,
missions established among the Indians by Spanish priests. The Spanish
also established a settlement at Pensacola. Many of these early build-
ings and forts still stand at Pensacola and St. Augustine, and will be
more fully described in the paragraphs devoted to these towns.
In 1763 Florida was ceded to England and remained loyal to that
country during the Revolutionary War. Up to 1784, when Florida was
ceded back to Spain, the English established many fine plantations in
Florida and more than fifteen thousand English families left Florida
when their flag ceased to fly over its territory.
Spain sold Florida to the United States in ,1821 for $5,000,000.
Florida was one of the eleven seceding states in 1861 and her citizens
played a prominent part in
the war.
In recent years thousands
have come from other states
to make their homes. Other
thousands come for an annual
visit in the salubrious climate.
Henry M. Flagler on the east
coast and William B. Plant on
the west coast were far-seeing
capitalists who had much to
do with the modern develop-
ment of the state.
As the meeting point of
Anglo-Saxon America with
Latin-America Florida, with
its beautiful setting and
matchless climate, will play a
most important part in the
days that are to come. WATCHTOWAT sTOu UFI T SAN MARCO


Page Seven





































RUINS OF SPANISH MISSION NEAR NEW SMYRNA


OLD SPANISH GOVERNOR'S
MANSION AT ST. AUGUSTINE


.- .'-a ----^

OLD SLAVE MARKET.
ST. AUGUSTINE


ZERO MILESTONE OF OLD SPANISH TRAIL AT
ST. AUGUSTINE


Page Eight










Sast Coast

HERE white sands,
blue sparkling
waves and swaying
palms make winter only an ex-
pression. Under the glorious
sun, refreshed by the salt
breeze from the gulf stream,
old and young live and play.
Any season of the entire year
is delightful along this 500
miles of fairy shore. This part MONUMENT TO FIRST CONSTITUTION
of our state being first of our GRANTED FLORIDAT BYA SPANSH ING.
land to be discovered and
settled by the Spanish, romance still lingers over all.
JACKSONVILLE
First we come to Jacksonville, through which thousands of visitors
pass annually by train, boat and motor to all other parts of the state.
Located on the mighty St. Johns River, 20 miles from the Atlantic coast,
Jacksonville is a great commercial center. In its port may be seen craft
from all the seven seas. Aside from its industrial importance, Jackson-
ville has for its visitors 67 beautiful parks and many recreational advan-
tages. Excellent hotels are available. Plenty of yachting and boating,
tennis courts, five 18-hole golf courses, excellent theaters and unsur-
passed nearby beaches are awaiting the tourist. A municipal airport
offers sky trips at reasonable rates. In South Jacksonville is a large
ostrich and alligator farm.
Near Jacksonville is the scene of settlement and conflict by French and
Spanish long before colonists landed at Jamestown or Plymouth.
Under the giant live oaks, with their trailing Spanish moss, you will
find a welcome that makes a charming introduction to the sunshine-land
of Florida.
FERNANDINA
On the coast, northeast of Jacksonville, lies the interesting fishing town
of Fernandina, established by the Spanish in 1680. Its picturesque fleet
and the nearby remains of occupation by early settlers and by pirate
bands make this community a spot well worth visiting.
Pge Ni.e












































RIVER BRIDGE
.




















VIEW OF ST. AUGUSTINE
FROM BRIDGE OF LIONS


JACKSONVILLE BEACH


Pqu Tem






ST. AUGUSTINE


In 1565 the Spanish found-
ed this city on the site of the
ancient Indian village of
Seloy. Its old buildings, the
narrow streets of the Spanish
section, combine with cordial
friendliness and tropical
vegetation to charm the visitor.
Old Fort San Marco frowns
on Matanzas Bay, her walls,
moats and dungeons as solid
as when built by the Conquis-
tadores. The old city gates, the
oldest house, slave market,
ancient cathedral, etc., present
a quaint old-world air to this
beautiful spot. Here, also, is
the famed Fountain of Youth. AN OLD SPANISH STREET IN ST. AUGUSTINE
A new million-dollar bridge
connects with Anastasia Island and its marvelous beaches and alligator
farm, while another crosses North River to the other beaches and to the
fine swimming pool in the casino.
Excellent hotels, the beautiful plaza with its band concerts, two fine
golf courses, driving and bathing on 15 miles of beach, together with
many other forms of enjoyment are in store for you.

ORMOND-DAYTONA BEACH
Proceeding south from St. Augustine by motor, one may pass over
Road 4 through Bunnell, or drive down the Ocean Shore Boulevard, past
the beaches on Anastasia Island, through Summer Haven and Flagler
Beach to Ormond, just north of Daytona Beach. Ormond is on Pelican
Island, between the ocean and the Halifax River., A bridge here con-
nects with the mainland, or one may proceed south to Daytona Beach
on the island road. Ormond has splendid hotels and an 18-hole golf
course, besides its world renowned beach, bridle paths, boating and other
recreational facilities. This is the winter home of John D. Rockefeller.
Daytona Beach, five miles south, is located partly on the island and
partly on the mainland. Four free bridges connect these sections.
Daytona Beach, thanks to its location, topographical beauty and
equable climate, occupies an unusual place among Florida cities for the
reason that in recent years it has been developed into one of the best-
known combined winter and summer resorts of the nation. The average
winter season temperature of Daytona Beach is 61, while that of the


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A DRIVE NEAR DAYTONA BEACH


BOARDWALK AT DAYTONA BEACH


DAYTONA BEACH YACHT BASIN


TARPON CAUGHT ON EAST COAST


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Ct 'is


THE FAMOUS ORMOND BEACH SPEEDWAY


Page Twelve


.^'3 ./**






summer months is 81 and at no time in history has the mercury gone
above 96 in June, July or August.
It has the Tomoka River, pictures of which have made it almost as
noted as the song-famed Suwannee; it is skirted on the east by the At-
lantic and the world-famed Ormond-Daytona Beach Ocean Speedway,
on which all automobile speed records have been made; it is center-
traversed by the glinting-watered Halifax River, sentinelled on the west
by a chain of small hills and lakes at the highest point on the Florida
East Coast. A concrete "boardwalk" parallels the ocean for half a mile.
The international fame of Daytona Beach is based chiefly, of course,
upon its wonderful beach, on which international speed contests, usually
held in March, have been revived in recent years. Every reader is
familiar with the story of the records made there by the monster cars
which flash along the sands like comets. Twice every twenty-four hours
the mighty rollers of the Atlantic pack down the sand until it is as smooth
and firm as any cement surface. The width, length and straightness of
this beach make it the best place in all the world for speeding cars.

DELAND
Inland from Daytona Beach lies DeLand, county seat of Volusia
County, in which both cities are located.
Three splendid golf courses offer reasons for golfers to come to De-
Land. Big game, quail and ducks are in season during tourist time
and can be reached in fifteen minutes to an hour over good roads. An-
other three reasons: The world's biggest black bass in the lakes and
streams; finest speedway of
record in 40 minutes of the
city; bathing in salt and fresh
water. Still another three:
Sea fishing for monsters that
try the most sporty anglers of
the country; motoring over
miles and miles of fine high- I.
ways; wonder springs to visit
(three of them), and a water
trail so good that yachts come
from any port in the world to
DeLand's side door.
For those who prefer to
take their pleasures in quieter
ways, or diversify them still
more than suggested above,
there is a whole lot of super-
vised play on the city play-
grounds. The most popular ALONG THE INDIAN RIVER


Pae Thirtwm




































SHADY STREET SCENE IN DELAND


BLUE SPRINGS. NEAR DELAND HUNTING IN VOLUSIA COUNTY


PONCE DE LEON SPRINGS. NEAR DELAND. AND
OLD SPANISH MILL


Po Furiew
























BOARDWALK AT CORONADA BEACH. NEW SMYRNA


of the games are bowling, shuffleboard and quoits. Matches are held
with the visitors of nearby cities.
Concerts by the city's own famous band; musicals by a large choral
society; indoor concerts by the Stetson band, concert orchestra, male and
female glee clubs, and athletic events of all kinds throughout the season.
NEW SMYRNA
The Spanish landed here and founded a settlement and fort very early,
about 1565. New Smyrna claims to have been settled even before St.
Augustine. The settlement was later abandoned, the ruins of the ancient
fort and old Spanish mission being evidences of this occupation. A large
Indian shell burial mound is to be seen near the beach.
In 1767 Dr. Turnbull founded a colony of Minorcans and Greeks
here, naming the town New Smyrna in honor of his wife's former home.
The modem town of New Smyrna has fine hotels, splendid beaches, a
9-hole golf course and other attractions among most beautiful natural
surroundings. Tourists find a most cordial welcome here. Quiet amuse-
ments abound and those who are fond of hunting or fishing may here
indulge to their hearts' content.
Volusia County has many other spots of interest. DeLeon Springs,
one of the largest outflows of water in the state, is near DeLand. Recrea-
tional grounds and a fine bathing pool among mighty trees delight the
visitor. Here are the ruins of an ancient mill. Two miles from New
Smyrna is the Indian River Dude Ranch, a well equipped ranch with
modern cabins, wholesome food, good saddle horses and experienced
guides, where guests may hunt, fish, swim and follow trails through
woodlands and prairie as primitive as when the white man first landed.


Pep FifIm


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MELBOURNE BEACH AND
CASINO








TURTLE MOUND.
NEW SMYRNA


ROAD ALONG INDIAN RIVER. NEAR VERO BEACH


aw Sirtm






South of New Smyrna the highway skirts the famous Indian River pass-
ing through a number of pretty little cities. Tourists are welcome here
and the Indian River affords excellent fishing. A succession of beaches
on the Atlantic supply surf-bathing facilities to all these communities.
TITUSVILLE, COCOA, ROCKLEDGE AND EAU GALLIE are towns having
these advantages, together with good tourist quarters. These towns are
centers of the famous Indian River fruit section. Cocoa and Rockledge
are the oldest tourist towns on the central east coast.
MELBOURNE, the "midway city" (half way between Jacksonville and
Miami), has an airport which is a port of call for the mail planes flying
between Jacksonville and Miami. There are two golf courses on the main-
land and a bridge connects with the Indialantic Beach, splendid for bath-
ing and where there is another golf course, municipal pier and casino.
VERO BEACH, further south along the Indian River, is surrounded by
fine citrus groves as well as pineapples and bananas. Vero Beach has a
good casino and beach. Two golf courses, tennis courts, and other amuse-
ments are to be found. A fine pool is located at the casino.
FORT PIERCE, in St. Lucie County, is 250 miles south of Jacksonville.
Its climate is delightful and its surroundings most pleasing. A center
of fruit growing and commercial fishing, Ft. Pierce also has much to
offer the tourist. Hunting, fishing, bathing, boating, two golf courses
and good hotels are among the attractions. Here was a fort and trading
post back in the early days and portions of the "dead-line fence," beyond
which Indians might not pass, still remain.
STUART, in Martin County,
is opposite the St. Lucie River
inlet, famous for fishing and
yachting. An 18-hole course
and good hotels are available.
PALM BEACH and WEST
PALM BEACH, three hun-
dred miles from Jacksonville,
are the world-renowned play-
grounds of famous and prom-
inent folk. Palm Beach has
long been a famous resort for
American and foreign wealth
and fashion. Tropical gar-
dens, palatial homes and
yacht basins abound. Lux-
urious hotels are at hand
and beaches, golf and other
amusements fill the play-
hours of the joyous pilgrims. LAS OLAS BEACH. FT. LAUDERDALE


Page Sevawaeo













-~ --


FISHING AT FT. PIERCE


TROPICAL PARK NEAR VERO BEACH


BATHING AT PALM BEACH


PORT EVERGLADES-FT. LAUDERDALE'S DEEP-WATER HARBOR


Page EBighm























NEW RIVER YACHT BASIN. FT. LAUDERDALE


Across Lake Worth lies West Palm Beach, business center and sister
resort, vying with Palm Beach in its tourist attractions. Color and life
are there, with ample tourist accommodations. Golf, tennis, motorboat-
ing, harness racing, hunting, aviation, afromobiling, riding, bathing in
surf and pool, roque and many other amusements are offered.
LAKE WORTH, a city just to the south "right on the Gulf Stream,"
has a casino, alligator farm, golf course and good hotels amidst tropic
vegetation.
FORT LAUDERDALE, first established as a military post in 1837, is a
commercial center and deep-sea port between the ocean and the Ever-
glades and is midway between West Palm Beach and Miami. The New
River forms the ocean outlet and is a basin for the many yachts that
gather there. Fort Lauderdale's port, "Port Everglades," is a port of
call for round-the-world liners. Excellent golf and fishing are to be
had and an alligator farm and Seminole Indian village are in the im-
mediate vicinity. These Indians live under primitive conditions here
and elsewhere in the Everglades region. They have never acknowledged
allegiance to our government but still maintain their own language and
tribal laws, even to the administration of the death penalty. Their
brightly colored costumes, palmetto-thatched open huts, heavy bead orna-
ments worn by the women and the knowledge that their chief source of
livlihood is still the bounty of nature in fruit, fish and game, all add to
the attraction.
On south, through HOLLYWOOD-BY-THE-SEA, with its hotels, golf
courses and beaches, to the "magic city" of-
MIAMI-Royal palms wave in the soft sea air, white-capped breakers


Pase Niuetle




































PAJAMA AND BATHING SUIT FASHIONS AT MIAMI
PAJAMA AND BATHING SUIT FASHIONS AT MIAMI


4. 4
.4
'-4-
4-44
.1

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ARMY PLANES OVER MIAMI


TROPIC DRIVE AT WEST PALM BEACH


AQUATIC SPORTS AT MIAMI


Pro TwIuy






roll in upon golden sands-the very winter air is sun-drenched and in-
vigorating. On this gulf-stream bordered shore rises an artist's dream
of a city.
Miami is built on the site of old Fort Dallas, which was established in
1836. Beginning from almost nothing in 1896, Miami has risen to a posi-
tion of leadership in resort life and as the commercial center of southern
Florida. Across Biscayne Bay, on a beautiful sub-tropical key, liesMiami
Beach. Connecting these cities are fine causeways. Pleasure craft crowd
the bay; hotels, casinos and cafes are ready to hand; excellent theatres
provide first-rate entertainment. There are swimming pools, tennis courts,
golf courses, polo fields, bowling greens; fishing at your pleasure-
nothing lacking to fill the tourists' hours and bring joy and satisfaction.
CORAL GABLES and HIALEAH, together with MIAMI BEACH and the city
of Miami proper, make up Greater Miami. City authorities and citizens
have left nothing undone that could add to the happiness of the visitors
they are so glad to welcome.
Besides the entertainments already mentioned, saddle horses may be
obtained on which one may explore delightful bridle paths, water excur-
sions to nearby interesting points are conducted and band concerts are
held daily at the open air auditorium. Lovers of sport thrill to the horse
and greyhound racing conducted here during the season.
On the outskirts of Miami lie several alligator farms and Seminole
Indian villages. Fifteen miles out is OPALOCKA with blimp and naval
hangar, radio tower and airport.
Miami is the southern terminus of the air mail route from Jackson-
ville. Commercial planes are
available for short flights or
for trips to the Bahamas,
Cuba or South America.
The average annual temper-
ature is 74.4 degrees. A heat
prostration is unknown here-
or elsewhere in Florida. In
common with other Florida
communities, Miami has ex-
cellent schools and most desir-
able residential districts.
HOMESTEAD is the chief
town of the Redland District,
south of Miami. In addition to
the interesting and profitable
agricultural and fruit-growing
industries, there is a natural
beauty that entrances the
visitor. A MIAMI RESIDENCE


Pace Twenuy-ao



























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POLO AT MIAMI







BIG FELLOWS CAUGHT IN
WATERS OFF MIAMI


"DOWN THE STRETCH" AT MIAMI JOCKEY CLUB TRACK


Pge T-ety-two






Royal Palm State Park is at the southern edge of this district-where
the royal palms grow wild and beautiful tropical growth is to be found.
This region, south to CAPE SABLE, the nethermost point of continental
United States, has been converted into a national park in order that the
flora and fauna may be preserved for posterity.
THE KEYS-Emerald isles dropped in a turquoise sea! Marvels of
tropic loveliness, with fringes of white coral sand and rainbow-hued
breakers and with centers of living green, these isles are decked with
swaying cocoanut palms, bananas and other far-southern vegetation.
Here, at our very door, are South-Sea-Island spots that defy adequate
description. Pineapples and other tropic fruits and vegetables grow
abundantly and, in a never ending summer, time passes unheeded.
Fishing such as you never even dreamed of awaits you. The glamour
of romance cast on these coral keys by Spaniard and pirate lingers still.
Tales of battle and revel; colorful characters and hidden pirate gold
come to mind as one traverses these scenes of their activities. The very
names-Key Largo, Upper and Lower Matecumbe, Long Key, Boot Key,
Big Pine Key, Cudjoe Key, Ramrod Key, No Name Key-what do they
not recall of "Treasure Island" and other tales of your childhood. Every
now and then up crops some real treasure trove to remind us that this is
the scene of actual and not imaginary romance.
The Over-Sea Routes. Two wonders of the world are encountered in
journeying south over the keys from the Florida Mainland to Key West.
These are the over-sea extension of the Florida East Coast Railway and
the newly built over-sea high-
way. Winding over the keys
and spanning the stretches of
open water between them,
both railway and highway
provide an experience in
transportation not met with
elsewhere. The railway con-
tinues its unbroken course
for 125 miles to its terminal at
the steamship docks in Key
West. The highway spans the
distance from the mainland
to Key West except for one
ferry which will some day be
bridged. Monroe County
maintains a regular ferry
service across this gap. There
is space on the boat for about
18 cars, besides numerous ROYAL PALMS IN DADE COUNTY


PaWe Twevay-three












4-1~


AFROMOBILING AT PALM BEACH


A POOL AT PALM BEACH


LONG KEY FISHING CAMP


SEMINOLE INDIAN FAMILY


YACHT BASIN AT WEST PALM BEACH


Pago Twety-four























OVER-SEAS HIGHWAY ON KEY LARGO


passengers on the upper decks. Meals are served on these boats and
the trip affords a pleasant and unusual experience.
KEY WEST, the insular city, 125 miles out at sea, occupies a unique
place among the communities of America. Its location, history, popula-
tion, traffic, the fact that it is the only absolutely frostproof city in the
United States, all add interest to its name.
Fishing here, as on the other keys, surpasses description. Tarpon,
amber jack, baracuda, sail-fish and sawfish abound, besides innumerable
others. The fact that four million pounds of fish are shipped annually
and that there are six hundred and fifty known varieties of fish here will
help to convey the impression that a visit will confirm.
This is also the center of a large sponge industry, and a glimpse of the
sponge fleet and its catch on a market day is a thing worth while. Immense
sea turtles are caught and kept in concrete pools until killed. Turtle soup
and meat are canned and large fresh turtle steaks are served at all the
restaurants. Glass-bottomed boats afford visions of under-sea beauty
and marvels.
Key West is the site of coast defense fortifications, a naval and an
aviation station, and here is a monument to the heroes of the ill-fated
"Maine." An immense lighthouse arises from among the palms.
Spanish is heard on every hand and most of the populace speak both that
language and English. Key West is the point of departure nearest
Havana and regular boat connections are maintained.
Now that we have traveled farthest south in the United States and have
viewed this island city, let us return to the mainland and explore the re-
mainder of the Sunshine State.


Page Twenty-jfve




















PARK AT LAKE CITY


Central Section
IN the central section of Florida we include all the strip of ridge land,
with its hills and lakes, extending from the Georgia border south
to Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades and bounded on the west
by the Suwannee River and the West Coast counties, and on the east by
the East Coast counties already described.
It is a delightful region, presenting great variety in appearance and
products, from the cotton and tobacco fields of the northern counties
down through the citrus region to the tropic edge of the Everglades. Its
lakes, numbering some two thousand, abound with fish and water-bird
life. The last haunt of the flamingo in America is here.
Over some of our country's finest highways we meander through cities
and groves, winding among lakes and along streams, seeing the beauties
and wonders of this land-the heart of Florida.
Entering Central Florida from the west over the Old Spanish Trail
one crosses the Suwannee River, made famous the world over by Stephen
J. Foster's song. The first stop will be at LIVE OAK, a pretty little city
whose name is most appropriate. Entering by Route 2 from Valdosta,
Georgia, one crosses the beautiful Suwannee further upstream. On the
latter road we pass through WHITE SPRINGS, a health and summer resort
near the Suwannee.
LAKE CITY is the junction point of the Old Spanish Trail and Route 2,
leading south. This city vies with Jacksonville as a point of contact for


PA TIr-My-di


I~n;V, --M 400 MV






tourists entering the state. It is an enterprising town in the midst of an
agricultural region, 62 miles west of Jacksonville. Many pecans are
grown in this district.
On the road to Jacksonville we pass the Olustee battlefield of Civil
War days, with its monument. Another monument to the soldiers who
fell here is in the plaza at Lake City.
Bass fishing in lake and stream is good and much small game is to
be found.
At HIGH SPRINGS, 26 miles south, the roads divide, Route 5 leading
to the West Coast and Route 2 to the central ridge region.
At GAINESVILLE, metropolis of Alachua County, is the University of
Florida. It is quite a historic town, having been a center during the
Indian wars and a field of battle during the war between the states, in
memory of which a statue stands in the courthouse square.
Alachua is an Indian term, meaning "water jug," from the great sink
south of town where the waters of Newnan's Lake and Prairie Creek dis-
appear underground to reappear no man knows where.
Fifteen miles west are rich phosphate mines.
Alachua is one of the richest agricultural counties of Florida. It has
excellent drainage, parts of the land being 200 feet above sea level.
There are natural wells in the limestone of this section, being perfectly
round and as smooth as if carved by hand, about 21/2 feet in diameter
and an average of thirty feet deep. The water is pure and cool. In one
dry well it is possible to descend 38 feet, travel an underground tunnel
and come up in another dry well a mile away.
Another natural wonder is
the "Devil's Millhopper," a
great bowl 100 feet deep into
which some twenty streams
pour continuously without
raising the level of the pool in
the bottom. No outlet has ever
been discovered.
OcALA is in Marion County,
"Kingdom of the Sun" of the
nature worshipping Timuquan
Indians, whose robust phy-
sique stimulated the Span-
iard's belief in fountains of
youth and health. It is a region
of rich agricultural products
and citrus fruits as well as
phosphate mines and limerock
quarries. The city is a pro-
gressive commercial center oLuSTER SATTLE MONUMENT. LAKE CITY


Pag Tafry-seem















































ROAD NEAR LAKE WEIR
IN MARION COUNTY


HIGHLANDS GOLF CLUB
AT OCALA


SILVER SPRINGS. MARION COUNTY


Page Twenty-eight






and has beautiful homes, splendid water and a delightful climate.
SILVER SPRINGS, near Ocala, is a marvel defying adequate description.
A great punchbowl of rock 300 feet in diameter has, gushing up from
orifices in its bottom, mighty springs which fill the bowl and flow away
as the Silver River. Through glass-bottomed boats one sees canyons
with multi-colored walls, geyser-like and boiling paint-pots, Niagara
Falls in miniature, great and small fish and huge turtles-all seemingly
within arm's reach, but really in 89 feet of crystal water. The hues
and shades of this vision are beyond description.
This water is excellent for bathing, its temperature of 72 degrees
never varying throughout the year. Yachts may come here from the
sea through the St. Johns, Ocklawaha and Silver Rivers.
Blue Springs and Salt Springs are other natural wonders in this section.
Southward, amid the slopes and waters of beautiful Lake County are
LEESBURG, EUSTIS, TAVARES and MT. DORA, all possessed of excellent
tourist accommodations and such natural and man-made beauty, combined
with all sorts of sport advantages, that the sport-loving visitor is thrilled.
Bass fishing surpasses anything you have ever known in that line.
Citrus fruits and other products abound. Golf courses are found in every
community. As an all-year resort section this is hard to equal. The Wash-
ington's Birthday Festival of Eustis is an elaborate and gorgeous fete
attracting many visitors.
UMATILLA and other towns partake of the same advantages as the Lake
County communities already mentioned. Leesburg has its annual
National Fresh-Water Bass Tournament January 10 to March 10.
West of Lake County lies
Sumter County, a pleasing bit
of country. In this county the
historian will find the site of
the Dade Massacre in the
Indian wars. There is the ruin
of the fort and monuments to
the brave soldiers and to
Major Dade at the spot where
he fell.
ORLANDO, chief city of
Central Florida, is in the heart
of Orange County, whose very
name suggests the beauties
and delights of this section.
Luxuriant semitropical foli-
age and flowers surround
beautiful homes. Good fishing
and much game, big and small, BIG cYPRDS NEAR LONCWOOD.
is easily found. Orlando is -. WMINOLE COUNTY
Pege Twefy-aiae




















DONNELLY PARK AT
MT. DORA




I


AZALEA GARDENS AT WINTER PARK


a


LAKE OSCEOLA AT WINTER PARK


BAND SHELL ON ST. JOHNS--SANFORD


1.--3 i-i -


CITY PARK. KISSIMMEE


Po Thirty


":.).
dr























A TARPON IN ACTION AT SARA6OTA

built among 31 lakes. Golf, lawn bowling, roque, horseshoe pitching,
fishing and major league baseball are among the amusements found here.
WINTER PARK is another fine Orange County community just north of
Orlando on Route 3. In Winter Park is Rollins College.
Proceeding farther north this highway brings one to the shores of
Lake Monroe, one of the headwaters of the mighty St. Johns, and to
SANFORD, chief city of Seminole County and the center of a most pros-
perous trucking section. Hunting, fishing and golf in this section are
worthwhile. All sorts of big game native to this state are plentiful, while
small game and many varieties of fish await your quest.
Sanford offers the tourist a great variety of entertainment and
excellent accommodations. The municipal pier and bandshell is a thing
of beauty and the yacht basin is superb. There is a well-stocked zoo.
North from Sanford, through DeLand (already described in the East
Coast section) and PALATKA, a thriving commercial city and St. Johns
River port, Route 3 brings us to GREEN COVE SPRINGS. Here is a quiet
little city with comfortable hotels and a marvelous flowing spring and
bathing pool. Boating and fishing on the St. Johns River is a most
pleasing experience.
Just west of Green Cove Springs lies the Penney Memorial Com-
munity, which visitors to Florida should see. It is a beautiful and com-
fortable community for retired ministers and religious workers.
Farther west are thte agricultural centers, STARKE and LAKE BUTLER.
Berries, fruit and pecans, besides garden crops, are produced here in
great quantities.
KISSIMMEE is the seat of Osceola County, south of Orlando on Route
3, and is a charming place for tourists who desire quiet beauty and rest-


Peg rThiny.







































MEMORIAL BRIDGE OVER ST. JOHNS RIVER AT PALATKA
.- T^^ f'.^"^ynT-


BIG BASS FROM LEESBURG SHUFFLE BOARDS AT CIVIC
CENTER. LAKELAND


*i




2s.


-.


HALF-CENTURY OLD ORANGE TREES


Pop Thirty-sa


*?






ful recreation. Golf, hunting, fishing and boating are offered, as well as
many tourist games in the town.
Polk County, next to the southwest, has a group of pleasing cities, all
of which offer the traveler excellent entertainment amid scenes of beauty.
HAINES CITY, AUBURNDALE, POLK CITY, WINTER HAVEN, LAKELAND,
MULBERRY, FT. MEADE and FROSTPROOF all have their charm and their
many.attractions. The Orange Festival at Winter Haven is an annual
event of much interest. This section id the very heart of the citrus fruit
country.
BARTOW, county seat of Polk County, had its beginning in a fort back
in Indian days and is now a pleasing community of beautiful homes,
,with tourist sports and recreations. Nearby are large phosphate mines.
LAiE WALES, an enterprising town seated on hills and amid a won-
drous landscape of lakes and groves, has good hotels and entertainments.
MOUNTAIN LAKE, a suburb, is one of the highest points in Florida and the
site of the world-famous "Singing Tower". This tower with its bird
sanctuary round about and its architectural beauty mirrored in the sur-
rounding lake, is a new wonder of the world. Edward William Bok
has given this to the people as a memorial to his beauty-loving grand-
parents. The total weight of the carillon bells is 123,164 pounds.
Anton Brees, of Antwerp, Belgium, is the carillonneur. Thousands have
made pilgrimage here.
The Scenic Highlands or Ridge. From Davenport to Childs stretches
a dune or ridge about one hundred miles long and from one to four miles
wide and includes the most elevated spot in Florida-Mountain Lake,
just referred to as the site of Bok Tower.
On this Ridge the following
towns occur: DAVENPORT,
HAINES CITY, LAKE HAMIL-
TON, DUNDEE, BABSON PARK,
FROSTPROOF, HIGHLAND
LAKES, AVON PARx, SEBRING,
DESOTO CITY and LAKE
PLACID.
At AVON PARK is a lookout
tower from which 4,000 acres
of citrus can be seen. Lake
Placid is the home of the Lake
Placid Club.
Much attention has been
paid to development along
lines of beauty and this, to-
gether with the natural fea-
tures of the Ridge, always
arouses exclamations of de-
light on the part of visitors. GOLF' NEATH ORANGE TREES. LAKELAND
Pew Tirry-tren































,.. a-



MEMORIAL BRIDGE OVER ST. JOHNS RIVER AT PALATKA



I, ^ .


BIG BASS FROM LEESBURG


SHUFFLE BOARDS AT CIVIC
CENTER. LAKELAND


HALF-CENTURY OLD ORANGE TREES


Page Thirty-wo






ful recreation. Golf, hunting, fishing and boating are offered, as well as
many tourist games in the town.
Polk County, next to the southwest, has a group of pleasing cities, all
of which offer the traveler excellent entertainment amid scenes of beauty.
HAINES CITY, AUBURNDALE, POLK CITY, WINTER HAVEN, LAKELAND,
MULBERRY, FT. MEADE and FROSTPROOF all have their charm and their
many attractions. The Orange Festival at Winter Haven is an annual
event of much interest. This section is the very heart of the citrus fruit
country.
BARTOW, county seat of Polk County, had its beginning in a fort back
in Indian days and is now a pleasing community of beautiful homes.
with' tourist sports and recreations. Nearby are large phosphate mines.
LAKE WALES, an enterprising town seated on hills and amid a won-
drous landscape of lakes and groves, has good hotels and entertainments.
MOUNTAIN LAKE, a suburb, is one of the highest points in Florida and the
site of the world-famous "Singing Tower". This tower with its bird
sanctuary round about and its architectural beauty mirrored in the sur-
rounding lake, is a new wonder of the world. Edward William Bok
has given this to the people as a memorial to his beauty-loving grand-
parents. The total weight of the carillon bells is 123,164 pounds.
Anton Brees, of Antwerp, Belgium, is the carillonneur. Thousands have
made pilgrimage here.
The Scenic Highlands or Ridge. From Davenport to Childs stretches
a dune or ridge about one hundred miles long and from one to four miles
wide and includes the most elevated spot in Florida-Mountain Lake,
just referred to as the site of Bok Tower.
On this Ridge the following
towns occur: DAVENPORT,
HAINES CITY, LAKE HAMIL-
TON, DUNDEE, BABSON PARK,
FROSTPROOF, HIGHLAND
LAKES, AVON PARK, SEBRING,
DESOTO CITY and LAKE
PLACID.
At AVON PARK is a lookout
tower from which 4,000 acres
of citrus can be seen. Lake
Placid is the home of the Lake
Placid Club.
Much attention has been
paid to development along
lines of beauty and this, to-
gether with the natural fea-
tures of the Ridge, always
arouses exclamations of de-
light on the part of visitors. GOLF NEATH ORANGE TREES. LAKELAND
Page Thirty-thrtee











































HIGHWAY IN LUCERNE
PARK. POLK COUNTY


CITRUS GROVE IN FULL BEARING AT WINTER HAVEN


rPg Tsh~ry-






SEBRING is a citrus center, with beautiful drives along lake shores,
excellent golf, playgrounds, municipal pier and beaches. Good hotels
in and near this city, with its surroundings of hills and sparkling lakes,
make it exceedingly attractive to the tourist.
Highlands Hammock, near Sebring, is one of Florida's greatest
attractions.
WAUCHULA, in Hardee County, is an inland resort with good hotels
and excellent hunting and fishing.
ARCADIA, in DeSoto County, is south of Wauchula. It is the home of
the new Chautauqua Assembly of Florida, with splendid programs. Golf,
bathing and other amusements are offered.
OKEECHOBEE is at the upper edge of the great lake of that name. Fol-
lowing Route 8 on to FT. PIERCE on the East Coast takes one through
typical Everglades country. Lake Okeechobee, is an immense body of
water, but so shallow that wading birds may be seen standing in the water
a mile from shore. The soil surrounding this lake is a muck which
produces abundantly when planted to truck or sugar cane.
Brighten Valley Dude Ranch is located 12 miles west of Okeechobee.
It offers roundups and rodeos, pack trips, outdoor camping and other
features common to western ranch life. The surrounding country yields
excellent fishing and hunting. There is a good hotel and comfortable
cabins.
And here, at the Everglades' edge, ends Central Florida. We may
turn east or west to the Atlantic or Gulf coasts. To the south lies the
primeval fastness of the Everglades, known only to the roving Indian.
Little towns on Lake Okeecho-
bee's margin are civilization's
only evidence, save the Ta-
miami Trail far to the south.

THE EVERGLADES

South of Lake Okeechobee
lies the great Florida Ever-
glades, a mighty saw-grassed
morass, fringed by vast
cypress swamps and broad
savannas intermingled with
pine and palm hammocks, salt
meadows and, on the lower
coasts, with mangrove
thickets.
The highest of this land is
but a few feet above sea level. TURP'NTINE OPICR TIONIN FOREST


0 PON ThInk-,









V


.V1


HIGHWAY IN LUCERNE
PARK. POLK COUNTY


AIRPLANE VIEW OF
WINTER HAVEN


CITRUS GROVE IN FULL BEARING AT WINTER HAVEN


Page Thirty-for


1"
" B






SEBRING is a citrus center, with beautiful drives along lake shores,
excellent golf, playgrounds, municipal pier and beaches. Good hotels
in and near this city, with its surroundings of hills and sparkling lakes,
make it exceedingly attractive to the tourist.
Highlands Hammock, near Sebring, is one of Florida's greatest
attractions.
WAUCHULA, in Hardee County, is an inland resort with good hotels
and excellent hunting and fishing.
ARCADIA, in DeSoto County, is south of Wauchula. It is the home of
the new Chautauqua Assembly of Florida, with splendid programs. Golf,
bathing and other amusements are offered.
OKEECHOBEE is at the upper edge of the great lake of that name. Fol-
lowing Route 8 on to FT. PIERCE on the East Coast takes one through
typical Everglades country. Lake Okeechobee, is an immense body of
water, but so shallow that wading birds may be seen standing in the water
a mile from shore. The soil surrounding this lake is a muck which
produces abundantly when planted to truck or sugar cane.
Brighten Valley Dude Ranch is located 12 miles west of Okeechobee.
It offers roundups and rodeos, pack trips, outdoor camping and other
features common to western ranch life. The surrounding country yields
excellent fishing and hunting. There is a good hotel and comfortable
cabins.
And here, at the Everglades' edge, ends Central Florida. We may
turn east or west to the Atlantic or Gulf coasts. To the south lies the
primeval fastness of the Everglades, known only to the roving Indian.
Little towns on Lake Okeecho-
bee's margin are civilization's
only evidence, save the Ta-
miami Trail far to the south.

THE EVERGLADES

South of Lake Okeechobee
lies the great Florida Ever-
glades, a mighty saw-grassed -.
morass, fringed by vast
cypress swamps and broad
savannas intermingled with
pine and palm hammocks, salt
meadows and, on the lower
coasts, with mangrove
thickets.
The highest of this land is
but a few feet above sea level TURPENTINE OPERATION IN FOREST


Page Thirty-JI






















































STREET IN WAUCHULA Il AVON PARK


11~


SNBRING MUNICIPAL PIER AND *ANDSTAND


Pae TkiUy-.f






and when rainy seasons come even the dry spots become swamp land,
save only the higher hammocks.
Along both east and west coasts extend strips of higher land bordering
the ocean and the gulf. Between these strips and south of the great lake
all is everglades. This territory averages 50 miles in width and contains
over 5,000 square miles.
In the cypress swamps stand some of the mightiest trees in Florida,
trees second only to the giant Redwood of the Pacific Coast in size.
Through these swamps and hammocks wind innumerable creeks and
streams-a veritable labyrinth of waterways known only to the bronze-
skinned inhabitants of the glades.
These Indians, remnants of the Seminole nation, have their towns in
the remote fastnesses of the Everglades. They did not always live in this
section, but were driven here from their homes in North Florida at the
close of the long and bloody Seminole war. Refusing to surrender or to
acknowledge the authority of the United States, they retreated into these
wilds where the soldiers could not follow. Today they live at peace with
the white man but under their own tribal laws. They have never formally
submitted to the government.
As guides and hunters they are unsurpassed. Their living comes from
theish and game they catch and kill and from the hides they trade to
the white man.
Fish abound in the swamps and streams and game, large and small, is
plentiful. Deer, bear, wildcats and panthers are to be found, besides
mink, otter, muskrats, squirrels and rabbits. Many birds, including
quail, are in the hammocks,
while water birds abound. :
Here are found the beautiful
egret and the flamingo.
In the waters, besides count-
less varieties of fish, are croco-
diles and alligators in abun-
dance. Snakes are plentiful
and snake-skins form a part
of the primitive barter.
The Seminoles navigate the
winding streams in shallow-
draft dug out canoes, pro-
pelled by push poles. Occa-
sionally white hunters, guided
by Seminoles, invade the dis-
trict and are richly rewarded
in game and in the thrill of
exploring. SMtMOLK INDIAN VILLAGE


Pqp Thirty-ms.













Er K^I


BOWLING ON THE GREEN.
WINTER HAVEN


SCENE IN ARCADIA


STREET IN WAUCHULA


IN AVON PARK


SEBRING MUNICIPAL PIER AND BANDSTAND


Pase Thirty-.ix


100~






and when rainy seasons come even the dry spots become swamp land,
save only the higher hammocks.
Along both east and west coasts extend strips of higher land bordering
the ocean and the gulf. Between these strips and south of the great lake
all is everglades. This territory averages 50 miles in width and contains
over 5,000 square miles.
In the cypress swamps stand some of the mightiest trees in Florida,
trees second only to the giant Redwood of the Pacific Coast in size.
Through these swamps and hammocks wind innumerable creeks and
streams-a veritable labyrinth of waterways known only to the bronze-
skinned inhabitants of the glades.
These Indians, remnants of the Seminole nation, have their towns in
the remote fastnesses of the Everglades. They did not always live in this
section, but were driven here from their homes in North Florida at the
close of the long and bloody Seminole war. Refusing to surrender or to
acknowledge the authority of the United States, they retreated into these
wilds where the soldiers could not follow. Today they live at peace with
the white man but under their own tribal laws. They have never formally
submitted to the government.
As guides and hunters they are unsurpassed. Their living comes from
the fish and game they catch and kill and from the hides they trade to
the white man.
Fish abound in the swamps and streams and game, large and small, is
plentiful. Deer, bear, wildcats and panthers are to be found, besides
mink, otter, muskrats, squirrels and rabbits. Many birds, including
quail, are in the hammocks,
while water birds abound.
Here are found the beautiful
egret and the flamingo.
In the waters, besides count-
less varieties of fish, are croco-
diles and alligators in abun-
dance. Snakes are plentiful
and snake-skins form a part
of the primitive barter.
The Seminoles navigate the
winding streams in shallow-
draft dug out canoes, pro-
pelled by push poles. Occa-
sionally white hunters, guided
by Seminoles, invade the dis-
trict and are richly rewarded
in game and in the thrill of
exploring. SEMINOLE INDIAN VILLAGE


Page Thirty-seven


































BEAUTIFUL DRIVE AT'MOUNT DORA






tVA7


BANANA TREKS


TRAVELER'S PALM


("

4,







C1


BANYAN TREL WEST PALM BRACH


Pq. trhuy.dik







)est Coast Section

NTERING the West Coast Section from the north, one drives down
Route 5 from Lake City and High Springs, or down Route 23
from OCALA to PLANT CITY. Side roads lead to the Gulf Coast
and to CEDAR KEYS, YANKEETOWN, CRYSTAL RIVER and HOMOSASSA. The
first three towns offer excellent sport in hunting and fishing and have
good hotels. Homosassa is a rapidly developing resort town, home of
the famous orange of that name. Nearby is a historic sugarmill ruin.
Besides the hunting, fishing, boating and motoring, there is a good
golf course.
INVERNESS, BROOKSVILLE and DADE CITY are inland towns of these
coast counties offering good accommodations to travelers. Much citrus
fruit is raised in this section, Japanese persimmons, grapes and others.
Truck gardening is one of the principal occupations. The water of this
region is exceptionally fine. The land is mostly rolling.
TARPON SPRINGS is known for its extensive sponge fisheries, mostly
operated by Greeks. Their quaint religious festival attracts large
crowds at the time of the blessing of the waters. Quite a Mediterranean
air is imparted by these gaily colored boats and their owners.
Horseshoe courts, tennis courts, checker tables, baseball games by the
St. Louis Browns, golf courses, swimming, fishing, boating and hunting
are some of the entertainments provided.
The Tourist Club holds
weekly programs.
On the Gulf Coast, with its
beautiful springs and bayous
and lagoons, Tarpon Springs
is a most charming place to
spend a vacation.
No description of this city
would be complete without
references to the paintings of
the great landscape artist,
George Inness, which are on
display in the Church of the
Good Shepherd. Those who
love art will be repaid for a
journey here.
CLEARWATER, on Clear-
water Bay, is known to all
radio fans as WFLA. It is A CH aM.INIWCST COAATan C


Pp rt7by-niM


































BEAUTIFUL DRIVE AT MOUNT DORA


BANANA TREES TRAVELER'S PALM


BANYAN TREE. WEST PALM BEACH


Po Thirty-figl







Vest Coast Section

ENTERING the West Coast Section from the north, one drives down
Route 5 from Lake City and High Springs, or down Route 23
from OCALA to PLANT CITY. Side roads lead to the Gulf Coast
and to CEDAR KEYS, YANKEETOWN, CRYSTAL RIVER and HOMOSASSA. The
first three towns offer excellent sport in hunting and fishing and have
good hotels. Homosassa is a rapidly developing resort town, home of
the famous orange of that name. Nearby is a historic sugarmill ruin.
Besides the hunting, fishing, boating and motoring, there is a good
golf course.
INVERNESS, BROOKSVILLE and DADE CITY are inland towns of these
coast counties offering good accommodations to travelers. Much citrus
fruit is raised in this section, Japanese persimmons, grapes and others.
Truck gardening is one of the principal occupations. The water of this
region is exceptionally fine. The land is mostly rolling.
TARPON SPRINGS is known for its extensive sponge fisheries, mostly
operated by Greeks. Their quaint religious festival attracts large
crowds at the time of the blessing of the waters. Quite a Mediterranean
air is imparted by these gaily colored boats and their owners.
Horseshoe courts, tennis courts, checker tables, baseball games by the
St. Louis Browns, golf courses, swimming, fishing, boating and hunting
are some of the entertainments provided.
The Tourist Club holds
weekly programs.
On the Gulf Coast, with its
beautiful springs and bayous
and lagoons, Tarpon Springs
is a most charming place to
spend a vacation.
No description of this city
would be complete without
references to the paintings of
the great landscape artist,
George Inness, which are on
display in the Church of the
Good Shepherd. Those who
love art will be repaid for a
journey here.
CLEARWATER, on Clear-
water Bay, is known to all
radio fans as WFLA. It is A CHARMING ,NT o WEST COAST


Page Thirty.-ms























































































UNLOADING SPONGES AT TARPON SPRINGS


Pag F-ry






















APPROACH TO BEACH CAUSEWAY AT CLEARWATER


known to all visitors as a most delightful place to stay "Where it's
springtime all the time."
Beautiful landscape with groves of citrus and pine woods, sparkling
waters of bay and gulf, fringed with inlets, the glorious sun smiling a
benediction over all-this is indeed a favorite section.
With an average annual temperature of 72 degrees, with golf, boat-
ing, fishing, with a splendid million-dollar causeway to delightful Clear-
water Beach, where are playgrounds, boardwalks and amusement park,
with all sorts of games and amusements provided, Clearwater proves its
welcoming spirit by its unsurpassed offering.
The Brooklyn National League team has spring training quarters here
and is a major attraction to visitors. Daily concerts are held in the park.
ST. PETERSBURG, mecca of tourists from the Northern states and
Canada, has a welcome and a place for many more. Its wide sidewalks
with "green benches" in profusion, lend an air of homey comfort and ease,
which is carried out in the cordial spirit of the citizens of St. Petersburg.
"The Sunshine City" is worthy of its name. The waterfront and rec-
reation pier, yacht anchorage, tree-lined boulevard, golf courses, all are
caressed by the warm yet invigorating, sun-washed air. Boating and
bathing, every day, baseball, in training season, by the New York
Yankees and Boston Braves, excellent fishing and every form of tourist
entertainment, roque, shuffleboard, etc., are provided.
The sun shines an average of 360 days each year-play is the spirit
of the place. There is plenty of commercial activity, but this is carried
on with the zest of a game in this marvelous climate.
Hotel accommodations are ample and satisfying. Radio WSUN


Pege Frsy.s






















FISHING NEAR THE
WEST COAST


BEAUTIFUL SPRING
BAYOU AT
TARPON SPRINGS





i i, I. I


III,


;1 lli tJl l, iI


i"


UNLOADING SPONGES AT TARPON SPRINGS


Page Forty























APPROACH TO BEACH CAUSEWAY AT CLEARWATER


known to all visitors as a most delightful place to stay "Where it's
springtime all the time."
Beautiful landscape with groves of citrus and pine woods, sparkling
waters of bay and gulf, fringed with inlets, the glorious sun smiling a
benediction over all-this is indeed a favorite section.
With an average annual temperature of 72 degrees, with golf, boat-
ing, fishing, with a splendid million-dollar causeway to delightful Clear-
water Beach, where are playgrounds, boardwalks and amusement park,
with all sorts of games and amusements provided, Clearwater proves its
welcoming spirit by its unsurpassed offering.
The Brooklyn National League team has spring training quarters here
and is a major attraction to visitors. Daily concerts are held in the park.
ST. PETERSBURG, mecca of tourists from the Northern states and
Canada, has a welcome and a place for many more. Its wide sidewalks
with "green benches" in profusion, lend an airof homey comfort and ease,
which is carried out in the cordial spirit of the citizens of St. Petersburg.
"The Sunshine City" is worthy of its name. The waterfront and rec-
reation pier, yacht anchorage, tree-lined boulevard, golf courses, all are
caressed by the warm yet invigorating, sun-washed air. Boating and
bathing, every day, baseball, in training season, by the New York
Yankees and Boston Braves, excellent fishing and every form of tourist
entertainment, roque, shuffleboard, etc., are provided.
The sun shines an average of 360 days each year-play is the spirit
of the place. There is plenty of commercial activity, but this is carried
on with the zest of a game in this marvelous climate.
Hotel accommodations are ample and satisfying. Radio WSUN


PaRO Fosy-~o























































GANDY BRIDGE OVER OLD TAMPA BAY


ALONG THE TROPICAL MYAKKA RIVER. SARASOTA COUNTY


Pq F~rsy-at


SARASOTA BAY FRONT






broadcasts from St. Petersburg and sunny faces broadcast the spirit of
the community.
TAMPA was first visited by white men in 1528, when Navarez sailed
into the bay. It was at that time an Indian village and bore the same
name as now. DeSoto came in 1539 and held conference with the na-
tive chiefs under the "DeSoto Oak," still standing.
Tampa Bay was the rendezvous of many pirate hordes, of whom
Jose Gasparilla was the most picturesque. Modern Tampa has each year
its colorful Gasparilla Festival, based on these romantic traditions.
The real modern settlement was begun in 1Q23 by an American mili-
tary force from Pensacola. Growth was slow or spasmodic until 1880-
1890, when railroad and cigar industry development gave Tampa the
impetus it has never lost. Today it is the metropolis of the West Coast
and occupies an important place in world commerce. Its excellent
harbor sees the ships of every nation. It leads the world in the manufac-
ture of Havana cigars and the annual commercial exports and imports
run into impressive figures. Besides all this, it has for the tourist many
attractive features.
Here one may indulge the desire to luxuriate in golden sunshine while
the wintry north is freezing. A continuous round of activity for the
visitor has been planned for both social and sporting worlds.
A new golf course to try each day of the week, a bay front just made
for thrilling water sports, bathing or real fishing. Marine speedway,
old world canals with drifting gondolas, yacht basins at each hotel on
Davis Islands, Tampa's tailor-made tropical fairyland in the bay, tennis,
riding, dancing, beautiful winding boulevards bordered with palms and
oleanders-these are some of
the advantages Tampa offers
you.
Hotels are plentiful and the
rates reasonable. Band con-
certs and the quieter games
are at hand daily.
Perhaps the most unique
section of Tampa is Ybor City,
the Latin quarter. Spanish and
Cuban cigarmakers inhabit
this district and in entering it
one steps from modern Amer-
ica to where Castilian stateli-
ness combines with the life
and color of Havana to inter-
est the visitor. The murmur
of an alien tongue, the tinkle
of a guitar, a beautiful face SPANISH CAFE IN YBOR CITY. TAMPA


Po Frsy-str-






















GAMBLE MANSION-CONFEDERATE
MEMORIAL. BRADENTON


SUNSET ON SARABOTA BAY


GANDY BRIDGE OVER OLD TAMPA BAY




r" I


SARASOTA BAY FRONT


ALONG THE TROPICAL MYAKKA RIVER. SARASOTA COUNTY


Pap Forty-wo


f
,I






broadcasts from St. Petersburg and sunny faces broadcast the spirit of
the community.
TAMPA was first visited by white men in 1528, when Navarez sailed
into the bay. It was at that time an Indian village and bore the same
name as now. DeSoto came in 1539 and held conference with the na-
tive chiefs under the "DeSoto Oak," still standing.
Tampa Bay was the rendezvous of many pirate hordes, of whom
Jose Gasparilla was the most picturesque. Modern Tampa has each year
its colorful Gasparilla Festival, based on these romantic traditions.
The real modem settlement was begun in 1823 by an American mili-
tary force from Pensacola. Growth was slow or spasmodic until 1880-
1890, when railroad and cigar industry development gave Tampa the
impetus it has never lost. Today it is the metropolis of the West Coast
and occupies an important place in world commerce. Its excellent
harbor sees the ships of every nation. It leads the world in the manufac-
ture of Havana cigars and the annual commercial exports and imports
run into impressive figures. Besides all this, it has for the tourist many
attractive features.
Here one may indulge the desire to luxuriate in golden sunshine while
the wintry north is freezing. A continuous round of activity for the
visitor has been planned for both social and sporting worlds.
A new golf course to try each day of the week, a hay front just made
for thrilling water sports, bathing or real fishing. Marine speedway,
old world canals with drifting gondolas, yacht basins at each hotel on
Davis Islands, Tampa's tailor-made tropical fairyland in the bay, tennis,
riding, dancing, beautiful winding boulevards bordered with palms and
oleanders-these are some of
the advantages Tampa offers
you.
Hotels are plentiful and the
rates reasonable. Band con-
certs and the quieter games
are at hand daily.
Perhaps the most unique
section of Tampa is Ybor City,
the Latin quarter. Spanish and
Cuban cigarmakers inhabit
this district and in entering it
one steps from modem Amer-
ica to where Castilian stateli-
ness combines with the life
and color of Havana to inter-
est the visitor. The murmur L
of an alien tongue, the tinkle
of a guitar, a beautiful face SPANISH CAFE IN YBOR CITY. TAMPA


Page Furly-three




























RECREATION PIER AT ST. PETERSBURG


YACHT BASIN. TAMPA

Ir"""


GASPARILLA FESTIVAL. TAMPA


ia


IN THE MUNICIPAL SOLARIUM AT ST. PETERSBURG


p. Ferty-I/-






glimpsed at a latticed window--these things experienced at evening and
under a tropic moon waft the beholder out of every-day humdrum life
into romance and old world charm.
Here are theaters and clubs, with swirling crowds and vivid costumes.
Here also are the restaurants, where trained chefs concoct Spanish foods
and beverages that tickle the palate. Americans return again and again
to enjoy arroz con poilu, filet mignon con herbes, pompano papile and
other dishes and to break bread in the hospitable Latin manner.
The carnival spirit of Ybor City will prove to be qpe of Tampa's and
Florida's outstanding attractions to all visitors.
Gandy Bridge, the world's longest bridge, connects Tampa with the
west shore of Tampa Bay and furnishes a short route to St. Petersburg.
Crossing this five-mile span over old Tampa Bay is a most agreeable
experience for the motorist. Many smaller communities in the vicinity
of Tampa and St. Petersburg supply charming scenery and tourist ac-
commodations to those who pass.
Journeying on down the West Coast one follows Route 5, enjoying en
route seductive glimpses of tropic beauty and shimmering waves. Enter-
ing Manatee County, we come to Bradenton, its county seat.
BRADENTON is quite a tourist resort for those seeking health, comfort
and outdoor activity in warm winter sunshine. Beautiful and sporty
golf courses, tennis; in fact, facilities for almost every known outdoor
game and sport are available. Bradenton is the winter home of the St.
Louis Cardinals, World Champion Baseball Club.
The beautiful Green Bridge crossing the Manatee River, the City
Pier and Memorial Building
(home of the Tourist Club),
the Yacht Basin these are
some of the things that make
Bradenton one of the most
interesting and attractive
cities in Florida.
Fishing is a year-round pas-
time. The Manatee River and
many other waters near the
city furnish excellent rod and =
reel fishing. Deep-sea fishing
may be had by a few minutes'
drive over splendid roads to
the Gulf of Mexico.
SARASOTA, a resort town
created by city planning ex-
perts, is built beside a sap-
phire bay with palm fringed RINGLING CIRCUS QUARTERS
~INaa.,a C,,tcos .ARTLR


Pae Fety-E-f


















Af--
,wow.


RECREATION PIER AT ST. PETERSBURG


YACHT BASIN. TAMPA GASPARILLA FESTIVAL. TAMPA


IN THE MUNICIPAL SOLARIUM AT ST. PETERSBURG


Pag Forty-our






glimpsed at a latticed window-these things experienced at evening and
under a tropic moon waft the beholder out of every-day humdrum life
into romance and old world charm.
Here are theaters and clubs, with swirling crowds and vivid costumes.
Here also are the restaurants, where trained chefs concoct Spanish foods
and beverages that tickle the palate. Americans return again and again
to enjoy arroz con poilu, filet mignon con herbes, pompano papile and
other dishes and to break bread in the hospitable Latin manner.
The carnival spirit of Ybor City will prove, to be one of Tampa's and
Florida's outstanding attractions to all visitors.
Gandy Bridge, the world's longest bridge, connects Tampa with the
west shore of Tampa Bay and furnishes a short route to St. Petersburg.
Crossing this five-mile span over old Tampa Bay is a most agreeable
experience for the motorist. Many smaller communities in the vicinity
of Tampa and St. Petersburg supply charming scenery and tourist ac-
commodations to those who pass.
Journeying on down the West Coast one follows Route 5, enjoying en
route seductive glimpses of tropic beauty and shimmering waves. Enter-
ing Manatee County, we come to Bradenton, its county seat.
BRADENTON is quite a tourist resort for those seeking health, comfort
and outdoor activity in warm winter sunshine. Beautiful and sporty
golf courses, tennis; in fact, facilities for almost every known outdoor
game and sport are available. Bradenton is the winter home of the St.
Louis Cardinals, World Champion Baseball Club.
The beautiful Green Bridge crossing the Manatee River, the City
Pier and Memorial Building
(home of the Tourist Club),
the Yacht Basin these are
some of the things that make
Bradenton one of the most
interesting and attractive
cities in Florida. | II
Fishing is a year-round pas-
time. The Manatee River and
many other waters near the V
city furnish excellent rod and S
reel fishing. Deep-sea fishing .
may be had by'a few minutes'
drive over splendid roads to
the Gulf of Mexico.
SARASOTA, a resort town
created by city planning ex-
perts, is built beside a sap-
phire bay with palm fringedFOREIGN RESIDENTS AT SARASOTA
phire bay with palm fringed RINGLING CIRCUS QUARTERS


Page Forty-five









































SUNKEN GARDENS AT
RINGING ART MUSEUM I


YACHT
TOUR
AT I


MINGLING ART MUSEUM AT SARASOTA


P4p Frty-ds


ISIS


: 1









II


FISHING OFF MUNICIPAL RECREATION PIER. ST. PETERSBURG


shores and key-isles of living green. A glorious climate and all the
bounties of forest, stream and sea which nature has given this coast, are
enhanced by the successful efforts of man to create a tourist paradise.
Fishing, bathing, water sports, baseball, music, good hotels and many
other attractions are here. Golf reigns, as it should in the place where
the first golf course in America was laid out by J; Hamilton Gillispie,
of Dumfrieshire, Scotland.
Sarasota is the winter headquarters of the famous Ringling Circus and
the site of the Ringling Art Museum, with its marvelous collection of
paintings and statuary.
Farther south, on the coast of Sarasota County, lies VENICE, another
beautiful little tourist resort.
PUNTA GORDA, in Charlotte County, is on the south shore of Peace
River, near Charlotte Harbor. Here is the mecca of tarpon fishermen.
Many other sorts of fish are found and the hunting is excellent Tourists
in search of these amusements will find ample satisfaction at Punta
Gorda as well as good accommodations.
FORT MYERS has grown from an army post in 1841 to a goodly city,
with beautiful homes amidst swaying palms and flowers and ample
facilities for the entertainment of visitors.
Golf, bathing at beach and pool, fishing, municipal casino and audito-
rium are among the attractions. The enchanting Caloo'sahatchee River
flows by, wandering through magnificent orange groves to the Gulf of
Mexico. More than fifty varieties of palms grow here and tropical flow-
ers here attain perfection. Rightly is Fort Myers called the "City of
Palms."


Pop Fawly-


~-------














;I


h '"


SUNKEN GARDENS AT
RINGING ART MUSEUM






YACHT BASIN AND
TOURIST CENTER
AT BRADENTON


RINGLING ART MUSEUM AT SARASOTA


Pae Forty-six














1,i.


FISHING OFF MUNICIPAL RECREATION PIER. ST. PETERSBURG


shores and key-isles of living green. A glorious climate and all the
bounties of forest, stream and sea which nature has given this coast, are
enhanced by the successful efforts of man to create a tourist paradise.
Fishing, bathing, water sports, baseball, music, good hotels and many
other attractions are here. Golf reigns, as it should in the place where
the first golf course in America was laid out by J. Hamilton Gillispie,
of Dumfrieshire, Scotland.
Sarasota is the winter headquarters of the famous Ringling Circus and
the site of the Ringling Art Museum, with its marvelous collection of
paintings and statuary.
Farther south, on the coast of Sarasota County, lies VENICE, another
beautiful little tourist resort.
PUNTA GORDA, in Charlotte County, is on the south shore of Peace
River, near Charlotte Harbor. Here is the mecca of tarpon fishermen.
Many other sorts of fish are found and the hunting is excellent. Tourists
in search of these amusements will find ample satisfaction at Punta
Gorda as well as good accommodations.
FORT MYERS has grown from an army post in 1841 to a goodly city,
with beautiful homes amidst swaying palms and flowers and ample
facilities for the entertainment of visitors.
Golf, bathing at beach and pool, fishing, municipal casino and audito-
rium are among the attractions. The enchanting Caloosahatchee River
flows by, wandering through magnificent orange groves to the Gulf of
Mexico. More than fifty varieties of palms grow here and tropical flow-
ers here attain perfection. Rightly is Fort Myers called the "City of
Palms."


Page Forty.-see










t


fr~J


r


SUNKEN GARDENS AT
RINGLING ART MUSEUM

YACHT BASIN AND
TOURIST CENTER
AT BRADENTON


RINGLING ART MUSEUM AT SARASOTA


Peg Forty-six























FISHING OFF MUNICIPAL RECREATION PIER. ST. PETERSBURG

shores and key-isles of living green. A glorious climate and all the
bounties of forest, stream and sea which nature has given this coast, are
enhanced by the successful efforts of man to create a tourist paradise.
Fishing, bathing, water sports, baseball, music, good hotels and many
other attractions are here. Golf reigns, as it should in the place where
the first golf course in America was laid out by J. Hamilton Gillispie,
of Dumfrieshire, Scotland.
Sarasota is the winter headquarters of the famous Ringling Circus and
the site of the Ringling Art Museum, with its marvelous collection of
paintings and statuary.
Farther south, on the coast of Sarasota County, lies VENICE, another
beautiful little tourist resort.
PUNTA GORDA, in Charlotte County, is on the south shore of Peace
River, near Charlotte Harbor. Here is the mecca of tarpon fishermen.
Many other sorts of fish are found and the hunting is excellent. Tourists
in search of these amusements will find ample satisfaction at Punta
Gorda as well as good accommodations.
FORT MYERS has grown from an army post in 1841 to a goodly city,
with beautiful homes amidst swaying palms and flowers and ample
facilities for the entertainment of visitors.
Golf, bathing at beach and pool, fishing, municipal casino and audito-
rium are among the attractions. The enchanting Caloosahatchee River
flows by, wandering through magnificent orange groves to the Gulf of
Mexico. More than fifty varieties of palms grow here and tropical flow-
ers here attain perfection. Rightly is Fort Myers called the "City of
Palms."


Poge Forty.-se'v

























































THOG. A. EDION UEIDG. FT. MYERS


A JUNGLE-BORDERED STREAM ON THE WEST COAST


Parp F-ry-


BOATIWO AT BARTOW
onomo nsud






















A FLORIDA SUNrET


Thomas Edison and Henry Ford established winter homes in this city.
EsTERo, south of Fort Myers, is a religious settlement founded some
years ago by Dr. Cyrus R. Teed. The sect of "Koreshan Unity" was first
established about 1893, one of its principles being the common owner-
ship of property. Estero is one of its strongest centers.
SAmIBEL ISAND, in the Gulf off the mouth of the. Calooshathee
River, is becoming quite a gathering place for tarpon fishermen and is
also the site of many beautiful estates.
NAPrLs, farther south, offers first-class hotel accommodations, pool
and surf bathing, golf, fishing and hunting. Many tourists return year
after year to Naples, with its wonderful setting of plant life and blue
water.
South of COLLuE CrrY, which is located on an island off the coast of
Collier County, lie the Ten Thousand Islands, whose fin-filled waters
and tropical jungles with their plenitude of game, offer temptations to
the yachting party.
Still farther south are the largest of the Seminole Indian Reservations,
whose interesting inhabitants come to the trading stations on the coast
and on the highway which passes through their country. On past this
coast we come again to Cape Sable, southernmost point of continental
United States and the end of the West Coast.
Tamiami Trail across the Everglades-leading from Fort Myers south
along the coast for some distance and then eastward through the great
Everglades swamp to Miami. It is one of the most extraordinary roads
in the world. The roadbed was created by excavating a canal through
the swamp, the spoil bank, when graded and surfaced, becoming a splen-
did highway. Building this road was a stupendous engineering feat.


No i- .ur-f




















"OL' MAN PELICAN"


MAIN STREET FROM MUNICIPAL PIER. SARASOTA
N mw,,;


BOATING AT BARTOW


THOSE. A. EDISON BRIDGE. FT. MYERS


- w vu


A JUNGLE-BORDERED STREAM ON THE WEST COAST


Pog Forty-siks


YA






















A FLORIDA SUNSET


Thomas Edison and Henry Ford established winter homes in this city.
ESTERO, south of Fort Myers, is a religious settlement founded some
years ago by Dr. Cyrus R. Teed. The sect of "Koreshan Unity" was first
established about 1893, one of its principles being the common owner-
ship of property. Estero is one of its strongest centers.
SANNIBEL ISLAND, in the Gulf off the mouth of the Caloosahatchee
River, is becoming quite a gathering place for tarpon fishermen and is
also the site of many beautiful estates.
NAPLES, farther south, offers first-class hotel accommodations, pool
and surf bathing, golf, fishing and hunting. Many tourists return year
after year to Naples, with its wonderful setting of plant life and blue
water.
South of COLLIER CITY, which is located on an island off the coast of
Collier County, lie the Ten Thousand Islands, whose fin-filled waters
and tropical jungles with their plenitude of game, offer temptations to
the yachting party.
Still farther south are the largest of the Seminole Indian Reservations,
whose interesting inhabitants come to the trading stations on the coast
and on the highway which passes through their country. On past this
coast we come again to Cape Sable, southernmost point of continental
United States and the end of the West Coast.
Tamiami Trail across the Everglades-leading from Fort Myers south
along the coast for some distance and then eastward through the great
Everglades swamp to Miami. It is one of the most extraordinary roads
in the world. The roadbed was created by excavating a canal through
the swamp, the spoil bank, when graded and surfaced, becoming a splen-
did highway. Building this road was a stupendous engineering feat


Poq Frty-nui




















BATHING IN THE GULF BY MOONLIGHT
> .-


-^ ,, p


OVERFLOW CHURCH AUDIENCE DRADENTON COUNTRY CLUB
AT UT. PETERSBUR '

m | mSm r A.l


*.
*v A B
ir|^^ ^|


1 ..... .HH


READY FOR A JAUNT ON ONE OF ST. PETEReGURG'
BRIDLE PATHS


pra FW







SNorthwest Section
FEW people realize the vast distances within the boundaries of
Florida. From the Georgia border to Key West is 550 miles and
from Jacksonville to Pensacola is 400 niles. This may not mean
much to you, but when we say that Pensacola is closer to Chicago than
to Key West via Jacksonville, you will get an idea of the magnitude of
the task of roadbuilding in Florida.
In spite of this, few states possess such an excellent highway system.
Fine paved roads extend the length and breadth of the state. A good
example is the "Old Spanish Trail" (Florida Route 1), from the Ala-
bama border through Pensacola to Jacksonville. This 400 miles is well
paved and traverses the pleasing country of north and northwest Florida.
The expression "Northwest Section" embraces all Florida territory
west of the historic Suwannee River, which has its source in Georgia
and flows southwesthard into the Gulf of Mexico.
Along the Gulf coast from Pensacola to the mouth of the Suwannee
are a number of progressive ports and resort towns. In this back coun-
try along this Gulf coast there are sections as primeval as when the
red man roamed its glades and swamps.
Bear, deer, and wild turkey abound and wildcats are numerous. Quail
and dove shooting is excellent and there are many squirrels and other
small game. Fresh-water fishing is superb, while the waters of the Gulf
and its bays furnish many a thrill to the seeker after big fish.
Except for the level reaches
along the Gulf, most of north-
west Florida is rolling land,
with some considerable hills.
Lumber and naval stores
are produced in great quanti-
ties and agricultural products
are many in variety and
quantity. Many berries,
watermelons, grapes, Satsuma
oranges, garden truck, etc.,
are produced. Some counties,
Gadsden in particular, pro-
duce much shade-grown Su-
matra tobacco.
PENSACOLA, metropolis
of the northwest section, is a
deep water sea port and rail-
road center. Shipping, to and GULF coASr H nwAY ,KARn
APAL ACHICOLA
po.e yIIa.-,II





























BATHING IN THE GULF BY MOONLIGHT


OVERFLOW CHURCH AUDIENCE
AT ST. PETERSBURG




'-


BRADENTON COUNTRY CLUB


2 -F -.


READY FOR A JAUNT ON ONE OF ST. PETERSBURG'S
BRIDLE PATHS


Page Fifty








northwest Section

EW people realize the vast distances within the boundaries of
Florida. From the Georgia border to Key West is 550 miles and
from Jacksonville to Pensacola is 400 miles. This may not mean
much to you, but when we say that Pensacola is closer to Chicago than
to Key West via Jacksonville, you will get an idea of the magnitude of
the task of roadbuilding in Florida.
In spite of this, few states possess such an excellent highway system.
Fine paved roads extend the length and breadth of the state. A good
example is the "Old Spanish Trail" (Florida Route 1), from the Ala-
bama border through Pensacola to Jacksonville. This 400 miles is well
paved and traverses the pleasing country of north and northwest Florida.
The expression "Northwest Section" embraces all Florida territory
west of the historic Suwannee River, which has its source in Georgia
and flows southwestward into the Gulf of Mexico.
Along the Gulf coast from Pensacola to the mouth of the Suwannee
are a number of progressive ports and resort towns. In this back coun-
try along this Gulf coast there are sections as primeval as when the
red man roamed its glades and swamps.
Bear, deer, and wild turkey abound and wildcats are numerous. Quail
and dove shooting is excellent and there are many squirrels and other
small game. Fresh-water fishing is superb, while the waters of the Gulf
and its bays furnish many a thrill to the seeker after big fish.
Except for the level reaches
along the Gulf, most of north-
west Florida is rolling land,
with some considerable hills.
Lumber and naval stores
are produced in great quanti-
ties and agricultural products
are many in variety and
quantity. Many berries,
watermelons, grapes, Satsuma
oranges, garden truck, etc.,
are produced. Some counties,
Gadsden in particular, pro-
duce much shade-grown Su-
matra tobacco.
PENSACOLA, metropolis
of the northwest section, is a
deep water sea port and rail-
road center. Shipping, to and GULF COAST HIGHWAY NEAR
SAPALACHICOLA
Paoe Fifty-e










































ORIGINAL OLD SPANISH TRAIL
NEAR TALLAHASSEE


STATE CAPITOL BUILDING AT TALLAHASSEE


pror W r-





















NAVAL AIR STATION AT PENACOLA .


from all parts of the world, moves in its harbor. This harbor is so
sheltered and yet so accessible to the open sea that some of the most out-
standing business concerns of the nation have established docks and
warehouses there. Two trunk lines connect with the North and West,
while rail and road connections to all Florida are good.
In addition to the already existing Spanish Trail, a new Gulf Coast
Highway is under construction which will link Pensacola and this entire
section more closely with Tampa and with Central Florida.
Pensacola harbor was formerly defended by Forts Pickens, McRae
and Barrancas. These forts are not now in use for purpose of defense.
There is a navy yard, a naval aviation station, and here is theirinter
rendezvous of the submarine flotilla and the reserve torpedo fleet. The
larger liners and battleships can enter here.
Pensacola has a fine climate, the average annual temperature being
67.7 degrees, and the water supply is 99 per cent pure.
Here the hills come right down to the shore, and Pensacola is the high-
est seaport in this entire section of the United States. These hills provide
an excellent drainage system for the city.
There are 22 parks, bathing beaches, two golf courses, a yacht club,
good theaters, and the boating and filing is splendid.
Of points of interest we will mention Plaza Ferdinand, where flags of
five nations have flown, the old Spanish Forts San Carlos and San Ber-
nardino and the English Fort St. George captured by Andrew Jackson in
1818. Many other spots of interest and beauty are to be found, as the
city was founded in 1559 and even as far back as 1516 Spaniards had
landed there, you may well imagine that Pensacola vies with St. Augus-


PWre tsrhr













































NEAR TALLAHASSEE






DEER HUNTING IN
WALTON COUNTY


STATE CAPITOL BUILDING AT TALLAHASSEE


Pqo Fify-re























NAVAL AIR STATION AT PENSACOLA


from all parts of the world, moves in its harbor. This harbor is so
sheltered and yet so accessible to the open sea that some of the most out-
standing business concerns of the nation have established docks and
warehouses there. Two trunk lines connect with the North and West,
while rail and road connections to all Florida are good.
In addition to the already existing Spanish Trail, a new Gulf Coast
Highway is under construction which will link Pensacola and this entire
section more closely with Tampa and with Central Florida.
Pensacola harbor was formerly defended by Forts Pickens, McRae
and Barrancas. These forts are not now in use for purpose of defense.
There is a navy yard, a naval aviation station, and here is the winter
rendezvous of the submarine flotilla and the reserve torpedo fleet. The
larger liners and battleships can enter here.
Pensacola has a fine climate, the average annual temperature being
67.7 degrees, and the water supply is 99 per cent pure.
Here the hills come right down to the shore, and Pensacola is the high-
est seaport in this entire section of the United States. These hills provide
an excellent drainage system for the city.
There are 22 parks, bathing beaches, two golf courses, a yacht club,
good theaters, and the boating and fishing is splendid.
Of points of interest we will mention Plaza Ferdinand, where flags of
five nations have flown, the old Spanish Forts San Carlos and San Ber-
nardino and the English Fort St. George, captured by Andrew Jackson in
1818. Many other spots of interest and beauty are to be found, as the
city was founded in 1559 and even as far back as 1516 Spaniards had
landed there, you may well imagine that Pensacola vies with St. Augus-


Pae Fifty-three


















































































A TYPICAL FLORIDA HIGHWAY-THE OCEAN SHORE BOULEVARD


Pp Fiyr-f-r







tine as a point of interest to those interested in history. The French captured it
in 1718 and again in 1719, the English took possession in 1763, the Americans
came in 1814. The Civil War saw much activity here, both North and South
holding the town at various times. Modern Pensacola will well repay the visitor
for the journeying there. Eastward from Pensacola are coast towns, available
by water and by roads connecting with the Old Spanish Trail, as well as by
branch railways. CAnP WALTON and VALPABAIso are among the excellent resort
spots along this coast, with hotels and beaches and other recreational facilities.
PANAmA CITY, on St. Andrews Bay, a body of water which is equaled only by
the famous Bay of Naples, in the opinion of many travelers, has fine hotels,
beaches, casino pool, golf courses, fishing unsurpassed and the fine hunting
common to this section. Florida's first Kraft Pulp Mill is located at Panama
City. It is owned by the Southern Kraft Corporation, a subsidiary of the Inter-
national Paper Company. The estimated capacity of the first two units is 200
tons per day.
PoRT ST. JOE is the site of Florida's first constitutional convention, a monu-
ment to which stands near the main highway.
APALACHCOLA, renowned for its oyster and shrimp fisheries and canning fac-
tories, is located on Apalachicola Bay at the mouth of the mighty Apalachicola
River. It is interesting to note that the rare "tumnon-taxifolium," said to be the
famous Biblical "Cedar of Lebanon," grows plentifully in this river valley.
In Apalachicola is a monument to Dr. Gorrie, inventor of artificial ice.
Between Apalachicola and Panama City the Gulf Coastal Highway is complete
and a more beautiful roadway would be difficult to find.
CARaABELLE is another fishing town and bathing resort east of Apalachicola.
In Wakulla County, south of Tallahassee, the state capital, is PANACEA, where
excellent bathing and fishing are enjoyed. The WAKULLA SPRmG, in Wakulla
County, is one of the wonder springs of the state. It has a flow of 150,000 gal-
lons per minute, and a glass-bottomed boat gives the tourist an opportunity to
look into its cavernous depths. In 1930 the skeleton of a mammoth was found in-
this spring and the state geologist
had it lifted out piece by piece. It
now stands in the Geological
Museum at Tallahassee. This sec-
tion is a paradise of wild life.
NEwPORT SPRINs is in Wakulla
County.
Driving east from Pensacola
along the Spanish Trail, we pass
through the county seat towns of
MILTON and CRESTYIEw to DE-
FUNUA SPRINGS. All these towns
have good accommodations for
travelers and DeFuniak Springs
is the home of the second Chau-
tauqua established in America.
Thousands come here each year
to the Chautauqua site upon the
beautiful round lake, one mile in
circumference, in the heart of the
city.
BONIFAY and CHi MONUMENT TO ODR. GORIK INVENTOR OF
BONIFAY and CHIPEY are n ARTIICIAL. IL AT APALACHICOL Ao


raw iftPy-fa




























VIEW OF A. & M. COLLEGE
GROUNDS. TALLAHASSEE


FLORIDATOWN ON ESCAMBIA BAY


YOUNG TUNG-OIL TREES
PUTNAM COUNTY


BEAR KILLED NEAR MARIANNA


A TYPICAL FLORIDA HIGHWAY-THE OCEAN SHORE BOULEVARD


Page Filty-flo


--- 'I






tine as a point of interest to those interested in history. The French captured it
in 1718 and again in 1719, the English took possession in 1763, the Americans
came in 1814. The Civil War saw much activity here, both North and South
holding the town at various times. Modern Pensacola will well repay the visitor
for the journeying there. Eastward from Pensacola are coast towns, available
by water and by roads connecting with the Old Spanish Trail, as well as by
branch railways. CAMP WALTON and VALPARAISO are among the excellent resort
spots along this coast, with hotels and beaches and other recreational facilities.
PANAMA CITY, on St. Andrews Bay, a body of water which is equaled only by
the famous Bay of Naples, in the opinion of many travelers, has fine hotels,
beaches, casino pool, golf courses, fishing unsurpassed and the fine hunting
common to this section. Florida's first Kraft Pulp Mill is located at Panama
City. It is owned by the Southern Kraft Corporation, a subsidiary of the Inter-
national Paper Company. The estimated capacity of the first two units is 200
tons per day.
PORT ST. JOE is the site of Florida's first constitutional convention, a monu-
ment to which stands near the main highway.
APALACHICOLA, renowned for its oyster and shrimp fisheries and canning fac-
tories, is located on Apalachicola Bay at the mouth of the mighty Apalachicola
River. It is interesting to note that the rare "tumion-taxifolium," said to be the
famous Biblical "Cedar of Lebanon," grows plentifully in this river valley.
In Apalachicola is a monument to Dr. Gorrie, inventor of artificial ice.
Between Apalachicola and Panama City the Gulf Coastal Highway is complete
and a more beautiful roadway would be difficult to find.
CARRABELLE is another fishing town and bathing resort east of Apalachicola.
In Wakulla County, south of Tallahassee, the state capital, is PANACEA, where
excellent bathing and fishing are enjoyed. The WAKULLA SPRING, in Wakulla
County, is one of the wonder springs of the state. It has a flow of 150,000 gal-
lons per minute, and a glass-bottomed boat gives the tourist an opportunity to
look into its cavernous depths. In 1930 the skeleton of a mammoth was found in
this spring and the state geologist
had it lifted out piece by piece. It
now stands in the Geological
Museum at Tallahassee. This sec-
tion is a paradise of wild life.
NEWPORT SPRINGS is in Wakulla
County.
Driving east from Pensacola
along the Spanish Trail, we pass
through the county seat towns of
MILTON and CRESTVIEW to DE-
FUNIAK SPRINGS. All these towns
have good accommodations for
travelers and DeFuniak Springs
is the home of the second Chau-
tauqua established in America.
Thousands come here each year
to the Chautauqua site upon the
beautiful round lake, one mile in
circumference, in the heart of the
city.
MONUMENT TO DR. GORRIE. INVENTOR OF
BONIFAY and CHIPLEY are ARTIFICIAL ICE. AT APALACHICOLA


Pae Fifty-eve









a~A -IIC ~ r

L'. ~3


GOLF COURSE AT VALPARAISO


GULF COAST SPORT





*/'p '


A NICK CATCH


**= .-'. C~?~


VICTORY BRIDGE OVER APALACHICOLA RIVER


r- rFift-i






county seats on the Spanish Trail east of DeFuniak Springs. Chipley is a noted
poultry center, location of the national egg-laying contest. Fine natural scenery
lies roundabout, especially the Fallen Water caves. There is a 9-hole golf course.
South of Route 1 are to be found BLOuNTown and WEWAnrTCHKA, county
towns in a fine region of game and fish. Near both is the famous "Dead Lake,"
where one may row about in deep water amid a standing forest of dead trees and
catch fish in abundance. Big game is plentiful.
MannA, on Route 1 and the Chipola River, is a pleasing town, with good
hotels and a Civil War battlefield monument. Illustrations in this book reveal
the hunting and fishing to be found here. Five miles from Marianna are exten-
sive rock caves.
Passing through Quicy, Sumatra tobacco center and pecan market, productive
center for 80 per cent of America's fuller's earth, and a delightful old town, one
comes to
TALLAHASSEE, the capital of Florida. Seated upon her hills, Tallahassee
retains the old southern charm, both in appearance and in her people. The gov-
ernment buildings and state museum will interest the visitor. Here are located
the Florida State College for Women and the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
College for Negroes. Tallahassee has been the capital of the territory and state
since 1823. The tombs of Prince Murat, son of the King of Naples and nephew
of Napoleon the Great, and his wife, a Virginia girl, are here.
On the St. Marks River in the southeast corner of Leon County is the battle-
field of Natural Bridge. It was here that the cadets from Tallahassee withstood
the Union Army attack and prevented the capture of the capital city-the only
Southern capital east of the Mississippi that was not captured during the Civil
War. A monument commemorating this battle has been erected here.
The St. Marks River is thoiht to have its source in Lake Miccosukee, as the
lake's outlet disappears and rises again a short distance beyond. This running
underground and ris gin i what makes the "Natural Bridge" near which
the battle above referred to was fought.
Numerous lakes and streams nearby furnish first-clas fishing while the forests
yield abundant game. Good hotels
and excellent recreational facili
ties add to Tallahassee's attrac-
tiveness.
East of Tallahassee one passes
through the agricultural centers,
MONTICELLO and Masown,
before reaching the Suwannee
River. These towns furnish good
entertainment to traiets.
Paatr, to the sounh on Route
19, leading to Tamp is an indus-
trial town surro e by forest
and streams. Nearby is the excel-
lent tourist resort of HxnProm
SPNmcs.
The northwest section of Flor-
ida has been the part least known
to visitors from other states, but
more are coming each year and
discovering the delights of this
southland. FAMOUS LUE SPRINGS


Prt Fwy-m"







r- ,


*r2** ^ 3!y;' ^

;p^y, -r


GOLF COURSE AT VALPARAISO


GULF COAST SPORT A NICE CATCH


VICTORY BRIDGE OVER APALACHICOLA RIVER


Pae Filty-.si






county seats on the Spanish Trail east of DeFuniak Springs. Chipley is a noted
poultry center, location of the national egg-laying contest. Fine natural scenery
lies roundabout, especially the Fallen Water caves. There is a 9-hole golf course.
South of Route 1 are to be found BLOUNTSTOWN and WEWAHITCHKA, county
towns in a fine region of game and fish. Near both is the famous "Dead Lake,"
where one may row about ;n deep water amid a standing forest of dead trees and
catch fish in abundance. Big game is plentiful.
MARIANNA, on Route 1 and the Chipola River, is a pleasing town, with good -
hotels and a Civil War battlefield monument. Illustrations in this book reveal
the hunting and fishing to be found here. Five miles from Marianna are exten-
sive rock caves.
Passing through QUINCY, Sumatra tobacco center and pecan market, productive
center for 80 per cent of America's fuller's earth, and a delightful old town, one
comes to
TALLAHASSEE, the capital of Florida. Seated upon her hills, Tallahassee
retains the old southern charm, both in appearance and in her people. The gov-
ernment buildings and state museum will interest the visitor. Here are located
the Florida State College for Women and the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
College for Negroes. Tallahassee has been the capital of the territory and state
since 1823. The tombs of Prince Murat, son of the King of Naples and nephew
of Napoleon the Great, and his wife, a Virginia girl, are here.
On the St. Marks River in the southeast corner of Leon County is the battle-
field of Natural Bridge. It was here that the cadets from Tallahassee withstood
the Union Army attack and prevented the capture of the capital city-the only
Southern capital east of the Mississippi that was not captured during the Civil
War. A monument commemorating this battle has been erected here.
The St. Marks River is thought to have its source in Lake Miccosukee, as the
lake's outlet disappears and rises again a short distance beyond. This running
underground and rising again is what makes the "Natural Bridge" near which
the battle above referred to was fought.
Numerous lakes and streams nearby furnish first-class fishing, while the forests
yield abundant game. Good hotels
and excellent recreational facili-
ties add to Tallahassee's attrac-
tiveness.
East of Tallahassee, one passes
through the agricultural centers,
MONTICELLO and MADISON,
before reaching the Suwannee
River. These towns furnish good
entertainment to transients.
PERRY, to the south on Route
19, leading to Tampa, is an indus-
trial town surrounded by forest
and streams. Nearby is the excel-
lent tourist resort of HAMPTON
SPRINGS.
The northwest section of Flor-
ida has been the part least known
to visitors from other states, but
more are coming each year and
discovering the delights of this
southland. FAMOUS BLUE SPRINGS


Page Fifjy-.seve




























































































AIRPLANE VIEW Or DIPUNIAK SPRINGS


Prw F4*iq#


=~-1 L_





















AMONG TNH LILY PADO ON THE OCKLAWAKA RIVER


Sports
HE fact that out-of-door sports a-plenty may
be had in Florida adds a new zest to enjoy-
ment of the winter months. Outdoor games
can be indulged in here at all seasons of the year,
from bathing in the surf of warm southern seas to
frolicking at dude ranches; all ball games, polo,
bowling, volley ball, shuffleboard, jai alai, etc.
Tournaments of national scope are held annually.
Hunting wild game and fishing in both fresh and salt
water furnish exhilarating sport to- thousands.
Migratory birds long ago set the example of chang-
ing habitation with the change of season. They make
the waters of the state especially attractive to sports-
men during the open seasons.


Pep Flyu*-m


_ ~_^~II_






































WATER THRILLS IN
NORTHWEST FLORIDA






BASIN BAYOU.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS


AIRPLANE VIEW OF DEPUNIAK SPRINGS


Page Fifty-eight


I~


ii;: b- P





















AMONG THE LILY PADS ON THE OCKLAWAHA RIVER


Sports

HE fact that out-of-door sports a-plenty may
be had in Florida adds a new zest to enjoy-
ment of the winter months. Outdoor games
can be indulged in here at all seasons of the year,
from bathing in the surf of warm southern seas to
frolicking at dude ranches; all ball games, polo,
bowling, volley ball, shuffleboard, jai alai, etc.
Tournaments of national scope are held annually.
Hunting wild game and fishing in both fresh and salt
water furnish exhilarating sport to thousands.
Migratory birds long ago set the example of chang-
ing habitation with the change of season. They make
the waters of the state especially attractive to sports-
men during the open seasons.


Page Fifty-.il





























































BISCAYNK BAY. MIAMI


YEAR-ROUND BRACH SCENE AT MIAMI


PAW Sly


~,rrjd
;;r~iBtgl*ns~trr~L~CQI"-P
:~(~Lg$i~2:~;;5tSis~]





















A PARK IN ORLANDO


5 TPlace to Live

THAT Florida is a pleasant place in which to live, is shown by the
hundreds of people from other states, with ample means and the
world to choose from-who have built palatial homes in this state.
A roster of the "Captains of
Industry" of this country, who
have built homes in Florida, ..
would show a remarkable
percentage of the total. This
is the most convincing testi-
mony in behalf of Florida as
a desirable place for a home.
The home is the unit of civili-
ization, when comfort and
happiness abide in a nation's
homes its future is safe.
Florida State Institutions
of Higher Learning are the
State University at Gaines-
ville, the State College for
Women at Tallahassee, the
Agricultural and Mechanical
College for Negroes at Talla. ADMNI'STATION BUILDING FLORIDA STATE
COLLEGs Eon wousn. TALLLLAH


PeV Sby-


j























WINTER POLO GETS UNDER
WAY AT MIAMI


NOT BAD- EH ?


AQUAPLANING PROVIDES NEW
THRILLS AT MIAMI


BISCAYNE BAY. MIAMI


,-S

rt *
A -.
K,- i
.L. 1.


YEAR-ROUND BEACH SCENE AT MIAMI


Pae. Sity


ite^..






















A PARK IN ORLANDO


c 4 Tlace to Live

THAT Florida is a pleasant place in which to live, is shown by the
hundreds of people from other states, with ample means and the
world to choose from-who have built palatial homes in this state.
A roster of the "Captains of
Industry" of this country, who
have built homes in Florida, '
would show a remarkable
percentage of the total. This
is the most convincing testi-
mony in behalf of Florida as
a desirable place for a home.
The home is the unit of civili-
ization, when comfort and
happiness abide in a nation's
homes its future is safe.
Florida State Institutions
of Higher Learning are the
State University at Gaines-
ville, the State College for
Women at Tallahassee, the
Agricultural and Mechanical
College for Negroes at Talla- ADMINISTRATION BUILDING. FLORIDA STATE
College for Negroes at Talla- COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. TALLAHASSEE


Pase Sixty-one






















CIVIC CENTER AND LAKE MIRROR. LAKELAND
hassee and the School for the Deaf and the Blind at St. Augustine.
Independent schools throughout the State include John B. Stetson
University at DeLand, Rollins College at Winter Park, Southern College
at Lakeland, Miami University at Miami, Florida Military Academy at
San Jose near South Jacksonville, Bob Jones College at Lynn Haven and
others.
Florida has a splendid public school system, which is controlled
through a State Board of Education consisting of the Governor, the
Secretary of State, the Attor-
ney General, the State Treas-
urer and the Superintendent
of Public Instruction. The
qualifications required of
teachers are high. Schools
are standardized when they
meet the requirements of the
State Board of Education.
Florida's faith in herself is
exemplified in the extensive
construction of hard-surfaced
highways of which there are
8,631 miles.
Florida has many splendid
airports which are recognized
by the Aeronautic Branch of
the U. S. Department of Com-
ON THE CAMPUS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA. GAINESVILLE merce.


P"M Si*u--




















CRYsTAL PAfE. LAKE WALES


Conclusion
WE have conducted you on the magic
carpet of imagination, aided by these
pictures, through our wonderful and
beautiful state.
Many who read have already seen part or all of
the places and things we have tried to picture, and
they will realize what an impossible task it is to fully
describe them. We have tried to cover as briefly and
completely as possible the most outstanding fea-
tures of this sunshine-land in the hope that those who
read will come and journey along our railways,
highways, bays and rivers and secure for themselves
the pleasures that may be had here. There is such
variety of environment throughout the state that
some section and community)iq sure to be just what
you are seeking for a vacation spot or for a per-
manent home.
We cordially invite and urge you to visit our state
at any season of the year. You will find our sum-
mers delightful as well as our winters.


rap. Si























CIVIC CENTER AND LAKE MIRROR. LAKELAND
hassee and the School for the Deaf and the Blind at St. Augustine.
Independent schools throughout the State include John B. Stetson
University at DeLand, Rollins College at Winter Park, Southern College
at Lakeland, Miami University at Miami, Florida Military Academy at
San Jose near South Jacksonville, Bob Jones College at Lynn Haven and
others.
Florida has a splendid public school system, which is controlled
through a State Board of Education consisting of the Governor, the
Secretary of State, the Attor-
ney General, the State Treas-
urer and the Superintendent
of Public Instruction. The
qualifications required of
teachers are high. Schools
are standardized when they
meet the requirements of the
State Board of Education.
Florida's faith in herself is
exemplified in the extensive
construction of hard-surfaced
highways of which there are
8,631 miles.
Florida has many splendid
airports which are recognized
by the Aeronautic Branch of
the U. S. Department of Com-
ON THE CAMPUS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF mr
FLORIDA. GAINESVILLE mer


Page Sixty-two





















CRYSTAL PARK. LAKE WALES


conclusion

W E have conducted you on the magic
carpet of imagination, aided by these
pictures, through our wonderful and
beautiful state.
Many who read have already seen part or all of
the places and things we have tried to picture, and
they will realize what an impossible task it is to fully
describe them. We have tried to cover as briefly and
completely as possible the most outstanding fea-
tures of this sunshine-land in the hope that those who
read will come and journey along our railways,
highways, bays and rivers and secure for themselves
the pleasures that may be had here. There is such
variety of environment throughout the state that
some section and community is sure to be just what
you are seeking for a vacation spot or for a per-
manent home.
We cordially invite and urge you to visit our state
at any season of the year. You will find our sum-
mers delightful as well as our winters.


Page Sixty-three




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