• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The toyman
 The traveller and the lark
 What a child has
 The discovery
 The cuckoo and the nightingale
 Spring is come
 The clucking hen
 I like little pussy
 Birds' nests
 Little rain-drops
 Winter and the children
 The bird's funeral
 The fox and the goose
 Now listen to a sportsman's funny...
 What I should not like
 Growler
 The obstinate chicken whose fate...
 The wagoner
 Cradle song
 My little doll rose
 Come hither and listen, I'll tell...
 A visit to the lambs
 When the snail in its shell keeps...
 The present
 Come here, little Robin
 The rocking horse
 Jacky and dolly you here may see,...
 The archer
 If any boy for a soldier would...
 Now, maidens we press on your notice...
 Morning song
 Walking song
 The fisherman
 The bee
 Little bird! Little bird!
 All have a work to do
 Now, my dears, I'd have you know...
 Sit down on the turf with me, our...
 The little boy and the sheep
 The farm-yard
 Butterflies are pretty things
 The cherry-tree
 Annie's garden
 The fairies
 Back Cover






Title: Illustrated book of songs for children
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055512/00001
 Material Information
Title: Illustrated book of songs for children
Alternate Title: Illustrated book of songs for little boys and girls
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill., music ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Alvord, Corydon A., ca. 1812-1874 ( Printer , Electrotyper )
Filmer, John ( Engraver )
James G. Gregory (Firm) ( Publisher )
Short and Loring ( Binder )
Publisher: James G. Gregory
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: C.A. Alvord, electrotyper and printer
Publication Date: [1870]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1870   ( lcsh )
Short and Loring -- Binder's ticket (binding) -- 1870   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Binder's ticket (binding)   ( rbbin )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: the illustrations engraved on wood by John Filmer.
General Note: Ill. engraved on wood by John Filmer.
General Note: Binder's ticket for Short and Loring.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055512
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002231996
notis - ALH2384
oclc - 11203664

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The toyman
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The traveller and the lark
        Page 12
    What a child has
        Page 13
    The discovery
        Page 14
    The cuckoo and the nightingale
        Page 15
    Spring is come
        Page 16
        Page 17
    The clucking hen
        Page 18
    I like little pussy
        Page 19
    Birds' nests
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Little rain-drops
        Page 22
    Winter and the children
        Page 23
    The bird's funeral
        Page 24
    The fox and the goose
        Page 25
    Now listen to a sportsman's funny tale, how once its lot a rabbit did bewail
        Page 26
    What I should not like
        Page 27
    Growler
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The obstinate chicken whose fate so gory
        Page 30
        Page 31
    The wagoner
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Cradle song
        Page 35
        Page 36
    My little doll rose
        Page 37
    Come hither and listen, I'll tell you a tale of a horseman who rides over mountain and vale
        Page 38
        Page 39
    A visit to the lambs
        Page 40
    When the snail in its shell keeps still its head, little boy, you also must go to bed
        Page 41
    The present
        Page 42
    Come here, little Robin
        Page 43
    The rocking horse
        Page 44
    Jacky and dolly you here may see, shaking pears from off the tree
        Page 45
    The archer
        Page 46
    If any boy for a soldier would go, what he must look for this song will show
        Page 47
    Now, maidens we press on your notice a lesson
        Page 48
    Morning song
        Page 49
    Walking song
        Page 50
    The fisherman
        Page 51
    The bee
        Page 52
    Little bird! Little bird!
        Page 53
    All have a work to do
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Now, my dears, I'd have you know what was said by little Joe
        Page 56
    Sit down on the turf with me, our pet lambs wild pranks to see
        Page 57
    The little boy and the sheep
        Page 58
    The farm-yard
        Page 59
    Butterflies are pretty things
        Page 60
    The cherry-tree
        Page 61
    Annie's garden
        Page 62
    The fairies
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text





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The Balduin Lorin I
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THE TOYMAN.






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SFOR CHILDREN.










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Thie Illhstati'aions ~ Ingraved 01o T-Vood l)y
JOIN FIL MER.



JAMES 0. GREGORY, PUBLISITER.



































































C. A. ALVORKI

EiLFCTR1OTY'PER AND PRINTER.



















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THE TOYMAN

TIlIE TRAVELIAEIt AND TIHE L1 RI 12

VII'AT' A (CHILD) IIAS 1
IEISCOVIEY 14

TIl CUCKOO AND TIl NIH NI;AI'

SPRING IS (0) E 16I

T I1I, C(LUCKING lIEN ..

1 LIK. LITTLE PUSS.. ... .

11Il1I)S' N ESI'S {
LITTLE I AIN-I R11 PS ..

WI NTE'R AND THE CFH (IIIIDREN 2:



TIHE ILOX AND TIHE GOOSE .. "1

NOW LISTEN TO A SPORTSMAN'S FUNNY TALE,


WHATT I SIIOLD NOT LIKE 27

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P--F



ROWLER .. 28

THIE I01STIFNATE CHICKEN WIOSE FAE FATE SO GORY, 0

MAKES T'IlS A AELAINCHIOLY STORY .

TIEl '_ WAE ONEIR ..

CRADLE SON .

MY .TTLE DOLL ROSIE .

COMEE: EITHER AND LISTEN, I'lF.L, TELL YOFF A TALE
OFF A FIHOUSEMIAN WHO RIt)DES FOVER -MOUNTAIN AND VAI, F

A1 VISIT TO THE LAMBS .

WHEN THIC SNAIL IN ITS SHELL KEEPS ST[H., I'ITS' HEA, f 41
IITT'LE iHOY, YOU ALSO -M'ST OG0 TO Biil)

ATHFE M 'R..ESENT .. 42

COTME FIRE, LITTLE RO]IN .

STICH ROCKING HORSE' .44

F JACKY AND DOLLY YOU THERE' MAY SEE,
SHAKING; PEARS FRO'M OFF THE TREE:

THE ARCHER .

IF ANY BOY FOR A SOLDIERIII \O'I) GO, 17

WHIIAT 'E 3UmST LOOK FOR THIS SONG WILL SHOW )

NOFW, MAIDENS VWE PRESS ON 48

'FYUF'R NOTICE A LESSON

MORNING SONG; 40

WALKIxG SON .. 50

'TilE FISHERMAN 51.

THE JiEE .2

LITTLE IIRID! LITTLE B1F..IRD.l)!.

ALL HAVE A 1WORK TO 1Il .- .

NOW', 31Y DEARS, '1.VIT YOE I KNOVCNW 5

WHAT WAS SAID FIY LITTLE JOE )

SIT ]OWN ON TIHE TI'R WITH AE, l

OUlR PET LAMI1S WILD IPRANKS TO SEE )
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ITHE LITTLE BOY AND THE SIIEEP .
THE FARM-YARD .
BI'TTERFLIES ARE PRETTY TINGS .
I THE CHERRY-TREE .
ANNIE'S GARDEN j2..
THE FAIRIES

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THE TO)YMAN.





I l Toyman comes from Germany,
His shop contains rich stores;
Both dwarfs and giants there you see.
i. j' \\ 9And Turks, and Jews, and Moors.

A, nd there a prancing steed I 'spy
Bearing a haughty knight,
Whose castle crowns the rock on high,
With grate and drawbridge bright.

A curious wooden figure begs
A nut to crack beneath;
He spreads his arms and sprawls his legs,
And shows his monstrous teeth.
! ;)

.4 i







Seeking his prey, his very glance
Has something savage in it:
" Io nuts from England, Spain, and France,
I'll crack you in a minute."

And here a regiment appears
Of lancers and hussars;
And there a file of grenadiers,
With banners from the wars.

Drums, trumpets, pistols, swords, and guns,
With fifes and marching band;
The boy who to the Toyman runs
May have all from his hand.

Rocking and hobby horses stand
Hard by for boys to ride;
And there, for girls, dolls' houses grand,
And furniture beside.

With jointed dolls, so slim and spruce,
And sofas, chairs, and settles;
And tea-things bright, for Dolly's use,
And tubs, and pails, and kettles.

And near a sheepfold all complete,
With shepherd, dog, and flock,
A Merry Andrew stands, whose feet
Can give his head a knock.
10






\.-o---_ ^ ^ -

'The Toyman makes him scratch his ear,
And preach a sermon after
VWhile he a roguish look doth wear
As if he'd burst with laughter.

Seeing such things, the children joinl
To raise a. joyous cry;
But they whose purse is bare of coin
Can no fine playthings buy.

Oh, happy Toyman if I had
The wealth which in this place is,
I would not stand and look so sad,
And make such queer grimaces.

If I had every pretty thing
That you see round you daily.
Like to the merry lark I'd sing,
And snap my fingers gayly.











1 1







'^- --- ------ -- -- -








TIE TRAVELLER AND THE LARK.





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I 12
: .-. .,-. . ... .























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I. A RI.

" I sing God's praise for life renew'd,
And thus I show my gratitude.
Always has this sweet taste been mine;
Is it not, Traveller, also thine?"

And ever so loud in the air sang she,
And ever so glad on the earth went he;
IIer wing was strong and his step was light,
In the lovely morn, with its sun so bright:
And God in heaven deign'd to bless
Their offering of thankfulness.





WHAT A CHILD HAS.

THE snail, see, has a house;
A fur coat has the mouse;
The sparrow has its feathers brown:
The butterfly its wings of down.

Now tell me, 1;.I.n, what have you ?
I have clothes, and on each foot a shock;
Father and mother, life and glee;
So good has God been unto me."
13
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ -- ^ ^ V












THE DISCOVERY.


- l -o- t ^_ -i
,2o o ^ a' 1

A wn lo lin wild wood A lone I went, A nd

__ --
.L--_ _____ _L----_I----- -- ...




AwAY to the wild wood
Alone I went;.
Aiid nilughit to seek for
Was my intenllt.

I saw 'mid its shadows
A fower rare--
No star more c1glamin,
No 'eye more Jir.

I thought to plukc it,
Then softly it said,
A' Must I lie broken
And withered c''
1-
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Its roots far spreading
I raised with care,
And home I brought it,
That 1I rare.

In my1 quiet garden
I found it room;
Where now it growth
In beauteous bloom.





THE CUCKOO AND THE NIGITTINGALE.

TIIE Cuckoo he has dropped down dead,
From the hollow willow tree ;
Who shall the summer hours beguile,
With pleasant minstrelsy ?


To the slender twig in the thicket green,
Iame Nightingale shall come;
And merrily will she hop and sing,
When other birds are dumb.



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Arc singingg ftr delight;
The yonug grass looks so fresh and green,
The hlambkins sport and play,
And I can skip and run about
As merrily as they.
16
I







I like to see the daisy
And buttercups once more,
The primrose, and the cowslip too,
And every pretty flower;
I like to see the i. i
Extend her painted wing,
And all things seem, just like myself,
So pleased to see the Spring.


The fishes in the little brook
Are jumping up so high,
The lark is singing sweetly
As mounting io the sky;
The rooks are building up their nests
Upon the great oak-tree,
And every thing's as busy
And happy as can be.

There's not a cloud upon the sky,
There's nothing dark or sad;
I jump, and scarce know what to do,
I feel so very glad.
God must be very good, indeed,
Who made each pretty thing;
I'm sure we ought to love Iimn much
12For bringing back the Spring.
^17









THE CLUCKING HEN.


" WILL you take a walk with me,
My little wife, to-day ?
There's barley in the barley field,
And hayseed in the hay."

"Thank you," said the clucking hen,
"I've something else to do.
I'm busy sitting on my eggs,
I cannot walk with you."

" Cluck, cluck, cluck, cluck,"
Said the clucking hen;
" My little chicks will soon be hatched,
"I'll think about it then."

The clucking hen sat on her nest,
She made it in the hay;
And warm and snug beneath her breast,
A dozen white eggs lay.

Crack, crack, went all the eggs,
Out dropped the chickens small;
Cluck," said the clucking hen,
"Now I have you all."
18








SCome along, my little chicks,
I'll take a walk with you;"
" Ialloo," said the barn-door cock,
Cock-a-doodle-do."






I LIKE LITTLE PUSSY.


I LIKE little pussy,
Hler coat is so warm,
And if I don't hurt her,
She'll do me no harm.

So I'll not pull her tail,
Or drive her away,
But pussy and I
Very gently will play.

She will sit by my side,
And I'll give her her food,
And she'll like me because
I am gentle and good.



19






S- -_-1 --.- -- __ _____ __ ^iY



BIRDS' NESTS.


I 1f' l skylark's nest among the grass
T jAnd waving corn is found ;
The robin's on a shady bank,
With oak-leaves strow'd around.

The wren bu ilds in an ivied thorn,
()r old and ruin'd wall;
,The mossy nest so covered in,
You scarce can see at all.

The martins build their nests of clay,
In rows beneath the eaves;
The silvery lichens, moss, and hair,
The <,, 1i1,.. interweaves.

The cekoo makes no nest at all,
But through the woods she strays,
Until slie finds one snug and warm,
And there her --, sihe lays.

The sparrow has a nest of hay,
With feathers warmly lined;
The ring-dlove's careless nest of sticks,
On lofty trees we find.

`0_







Rooks build together in a wood,
And often disagree;
The owl will build inside a barn,
Or in a hollow tree.

The blackbird's nest of grass and mud
In bush and bank is found:
The lapwing's darkly spotted eggs
Are laid upon the ground.

The magpie's nest is made with thorns,
In leafless tree or hedge;
The wild-duck and the water-hen
Build by the water's edge.

Birds build their nests from year to year,
According to their kind ;
Some very neat and beautiful.--
Some simpler ones we find.










01
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LITTLE RATN-DROPS.

OH where do you come from,
You little drops of rain,
Pitter patter, pitter patter,
Down the window-pane ?

They won't let me walk,
And they won't let me play,
And they won't let me go
Out of doors at all to-day.

They put away my playthings
Because I broke them all,
And then they lock'd up all my bricks
And took away my ball.

Tell me, little rain-drops,
Is that the way you play,
Pitter patter, pitter patter,
All the rainy day ?

They say I'm very naughty,
But I've nothing else to do
But sit here at the window ;
I should like to play with you.
^_--------9--- .








The little rain-drops cannot speak,
But pitter patter pat "
Means, We can play on this side,
Why can't you play on that?"



WINTER AND THE CHILDREN.

OLD Winter, in his coat so white,
Is knocking at the door to-night.
CHILDREN.
AI, Mr. Winter, is that you ?
We're not glad to see you,-but how d'ye do?
We thought you a long way off, you know,
And here you are, all covered with snow;
But since you are come, you may just as well
What you have brought for us children tell."
WINTER.
"Oh, I have brought you some presents fine,
A merry Christmas with cakes and wine.
Plenty of nice
Smooth slippery ice,
Now you may slide
And make snowballs beside,
And soon you can
Make up a snow man."
22
-_________- ------














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__ 7





THE BIRD'S FUNERAL.

TTEiE, in theS rosy bowers,
Slep. little bird We crave
A spot bineaith the flowers
To (dig thv early grave.

So charming was thy singing!
'Tho wast to us so dear;
Thy voice has ceased its r; I, ;_.
And we are weeping here.
24








Sweet May waked all her roses
Thy thrilling notes to hear;
And now with mourning posies
We strew thy silent bier.






THE FOX AND THE GOOSE.


FOX.
" MRs. GOOSE, it is such lovely weather;
We ought to take a walk together."

GOOSE.
SMr. Fox, I prefer to remain at home.
Just now 'twas so fine I was tempted to roam;
But since you've been standing near my door,
I don't think it so fine as it was before."

The weather was fine enough, 'twas true,
The sun was shining, the sky was blue;
But the Goose, you must know, was a little afraid,
For she knew what tricks Master Fox had played;
And had she consented with him to roam,
She would certainly never again come home.
25















NOW LISTEN TO A SPORTSMAN'S FFNNY TALE,
IIOW ONCE ITS L](T A RABBIT DID) BEWAIL.








A rab-Li, sil, til n- in a ,ish. I'eep'd t n1e. nmu l tinnin ricd. Inush.-
era , |-- h--ip---- -- --- -w i





're -sunt- IN to mu it ran, Anni its ,to ry thus be gan:








"i" *woods w1]r]e Ceasts can talk,
I went out to tlke a warli.

2S^ .. ..... A ralbbit, silting in I )ush,
Peoped at rne.anI tli en cried, H ushl."
Prsnllthl o in ime it riun,
A nII its storv thus began:-

.-. ...







ou have got a gnn, I see
Perhaps you'll point it soon at me,
And when I am shot, alack!
Pop me in your little sack.
When upon my fate L think
I grow faint-my spirits sink."

"Pretty rabbit, do not eat
Gardener's greens or Farmers' wheat.
If such thieving you begin,
You must pay it with your skin.
Honestly your living get,
And you may be happy yet."




WHAT I SHOULD NOT LIKE.

I WOULD not for a thousand pound
To lose my head consent;
For then I should run round and round.
Not knowing where I went.

The people all who walked about
Would stare, I bet a guinea,
And say, "IIilloa! good folks, look out!
There goes a silly ninny."

^I;- =^~--~-- ~~~2' --- ---- ---~^





i~~----- --- -- j- ----












I I





GROWLER.


Go, naughty Growler, get away,
You shall not have a bit;
Now when I speak how dare you stay?
I can't spare any, sir, I say,
And so you need not sit.


Poor Growler do not make him go,
But recollect, before,
That he has never served you so,
For you have given him many a blow
That patiently he bore.
28







Poor Growler if he could but speak,
IHe'd tell (as well lie might)
How he would bear with many a freak,
And wag his tail, and look so meek,
And neither bark nor bite.

Upon his back he lets you ride,
All round and round the yard;
And now, while sitting by your side,
To have a bit of bread denied,
Is really very hard.

And all your little tricks he'll bear,
And never seem to mind;
And yet you say you cannot spare
One bit of breakfast for his share,
Although he is so kind .












- __2 9


















THE OBSTINATE CHICKEN.

WHOSE FATE SO GORY,

MAKES THIS A MELANCHOLY STORY.






HEN.
| IT.

Go not down that distant walk ;
Yonder flies the savage hawk;
His sharp eyes will quickly meet you,
If you go I'm sure he'll cat you."


CIIICI( EN.

Nasty hawk is far away,
I may safbly go and play;
If he comes, my legs will bring
Me beneath your sheltering wing.'

______ :!D:








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THE WAGONER.


THE clock has struck, the school is up,
The boys and girls run home to sup,
Slate, books, and pens in Land ;
I am not in such haste as they,
My supper will not run away,"
Says lazy Peter Bland.

And slowly, slowly home lie flits,
And with his bread and honey sits
Down near the garden gate;
IIe hears his poor goats' plaintive cry,
Alia you're hungry-so am I,
And you, my friends, must wait."

lie cats his supper at his ease;
Some fruit too would his palate please
If lie knew how to take it;
But ah i it drops not twixtt his teeth,
And weree hard work to stand beneath
The apple tree and shake it.

At length the goats' complaining call
Disturbs his rest, and to their stall








Right slowly strolls the lout:
" All! lazy beasts, you sought fresh food,
You should. have seized it while you could,
Now you must go without."

So says he-and so said, so done,
He harnesses in turn each one,
The black goat and the white:
The wagon's in the court hard by,
Hie yokes the hungry beasts, who try
The very trees to bite.

"See what a wagoner I be !"
IHe cries, and urging rapidly
His weary beasts, they pass
Out through the gate, across the fields,
To where the spacious meadow yields
Its store of new-mown grass.

And while he loads his wagon, lo !
The farming man, who long ago
Came home, now looks about !
Nowhere the wagon can he see,
And so he grumbles moodily,
Who dared to take it out ?"

IHe shuts the gate; but on the road
IHe hears a cracking whip; their load
3 -





___ -_ __-_ ____ -s
The goats can hardly drag on;
Peter the lazy-not the great-
s singing, Open wide the gate,
I'm coming with my wagon."







i |




| |' ., -_. _,__. _.,A.














P~~ -- -- .---- ___-------- --- ____________ A _-













CRADLE SONG.



6- 4- 4- 4-
Sleep, ba ib, sleep Thy fa other watlh s the
-ft--____ N N N \ _.JN._ ^ .^--
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sheep. Thy mn- their is shake -ing the dream-land tree, And

~i-5------ 1-a __ _- -, -. --- ----

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downfalls a hIt- tle dream on thee; Sleep, b l- sleep!

SLEE', baby, sleep !
Thy father watches the sheep,
Thv mother is shaking the dreanmlnd tree,
Arnd down falls a little dream on thee
Sleep, baby, sleep I


Sleep, baby, sleep !
The large stars are the sheep,
The little stars are the lambs, I guess,
The fair moon is the shepherdess;
Sleep, baby, sleep !
:i5







Sleep, baby, sleep !
Our Saviour loves His sheep;
Ile is the Lamb of God on high,
Who for our sakes came down to die.
I. .p, baby, sleep!

Sleep, baby, sleep !
I'll buy for thee a sheep,
With a golden bell so line to see,
And it shall frisk and play with thee;
Sleep, baby, sleep!

Sleep, baby, sleep !
And cry not like a sheep;
Else will the sheep-dog bark and whine,
And bite this naughty child of mine.
Sleep, baby, sleep !

Sleep, baby, sleep!
Away and tend the sheep.
SAway, thou black 1... fierce and wild,
And do not wake my little child.
Sleep, baby, sleep!




I :-- -----









MY LITTLE DOLL ROSE.












.4~










I HAVE a little doll,
I take care of her clothes;
She has soft flaxen hair,
And her name is Rose.

She has pretty blue eyes,
And a very small nose,
And a cunning little mouth;
And her name is Rose.
.... ~._~_~:.._Ii







1 have a little sofa
Where my dolly may repose,
Or sit up like a lady;
And her name is Rose.

My doll can move her arms,
And stand upon her toes,
She can make a pretty courtesy,
My dear little Rose.

How old is your dolly ?
Very young, 1 suppose,
For she cannot ao alone.
My pretty little IRose.

Indeed I cannot tell,
In poetry or prose,
0low beautiful she is,
My darling little Rose.



COME HIITHERI ANI) LISTEN, I'LL TELL YOU A TALE
OF A HORSEMAN WHO RIDES OVER MOUNTAIN AND VALE.

\A GALLANT steed, with a rider tall,
I Halted beneath a castle wall;
To the window did the Lady come,
And said, Mv Lord is not at home.

S _---- -- _-_______ ________-__ -








c" ere there is none to welcome you
Save me alone with my children two."
The horseman cried from out the wood,
SAre your children gentle? Are they good?"

The Lady said, with a heavy sigh,
" Ah! no such happiness have I;
My children follow evil ways,
And heed not what their mother says.'

Then spoke the horseman-and frown'd lie too--
"They shall their naughty conduct rue,
I may not with such children stay
Who their kind parents disobey.

Nor can I give them toys or rings,
Nor make them glad with pretty things ;
Such gifts I keep for children who
Are good, and what they're bidden do."

So spoke the horseman in his wrath,
And spurr'd his horse along the path;
And the gallant steed with his rider tall
Pass'd far away from the castle wall.



39










A VISIT TO THE LAAMS.



















And full offun and play.

Ah, there their are. You pretty things
Now, don't you run- away






I'm come on purpose, with Mamma,
To se,ou this o an see the lay.
This wsrnn t nd sunny day





I at pretty little heads you've got,





And such oood-natured cyes!
And rull of wool all round your necks-
Ahl, there thCjy arc. Youl pretty things !
; Tow, don't you run away;
I'm come on purpose, with Mamma,

To sec you this fine day.

W hat prctty little heads you've got,
!iind sucl good-natured eyes !
And rulI' of wool all round your necks--
Hlow nicely curl'd it lies
40
_3 s .. .







Come here, my little lambkin, come,
And lick my hand-niow do
How silly to be so afraid
Indeed I won't hurt you.

Just put your hand upon its back
Mamma, how nice and warm
There, pretty lamb, you see I don't
Intend to do you harm.





WHEN TIE SNAIL IN ITS SELL KEEPS STILL ITS HEAD,
LITTLE BOY, YOU ALSO MUST GO TO BED.

SNAIL, put your horns out quick, I say,
Or I will crack your shell so gay;
Or I will throw you in yon ditch,
Where you may hear the raven screech ,
Or I will fling you behind the house,
To be nibbled at by a hungry mouse,
Or I will seek the deepest of bogs,
And leave you to fatten the toads and frogs.
Out with your horns, snail, quick, I say,
Out with your horns, snail, while yon may.













THE PRESENT.













I've walking in th" wood;' -




STake Jessie, kindly take









It will ever sin- a pleasant,
r' y .











hTEAVEN bless my little Jessie!
I've lbcen walking in tbe wood
For you I've found a bird, Jessie;
It would leave nme if it could.

Will you then accept a present ?
Take it, Jessie, kindly take i
It will ever sing a pleas:mt,
Cheerful song for thy dear sake.
42_





--_ _- i_ _. _

With one favor may I task you ?
Yes-you'll grant it, I'll engage.
For the little bird I ask you
Just to buy a little cage.

And don't forget, now that 'tis caught, a
Little trough to hold its seed,
Another little trough for water,
And a happy life 'twill lead.



COME HERE, LITTLE ROBIN.

COME here, little Robin, and don't be afraid,
I would not hurt even a feather;
Come here, little Robin, and pick up some bread,
To feed you this very cold weather.

I don't mean to hurt you, you poor little thing,
And pussy-cat is not behind me;
So hop about pretty, and put down your wing,
And pick up the crumbs, and don't mind me!

Cold Winter is come, but it will not last long,
And Summer we soon shall be greeting;
Then remember, sweet Robin, to sing me a song,
In return for the breakfast you're eating !
4 3











THE ROCKING IIORSE.




11a, ha, lie! My fine ,po n see !










My fine pony see 1
-s---l,- --,--~ 1~- F F-'1










W iti h his rrider rearing, step -:c -
AZ21zL-~--I ____ --








Not a single step advancing.
l ia, lia, ha, l he
My fine pony see.

Skip, jump, hop!
Stop, my pony, stop !
Ere again n so gayly spring we,
We a feed of corn will bring thee.
Skip, and jump, and hop,
Stop, my pony, stop.
44







SWell-a-day !
Pony eats no hay;
We will buy some oats or borrow,
Then he'll trot right well to-morrow.
Ohone! well-a-day !
Pony eats no hay.





JACK AND DOLLY YOU IERE MAY SEE
SHAKING PEARS FROM OFF THE TREE.

LITTLE Jacky Sprat to
Dolly Dumpling said-
We'll go in the garden,
'Neath the pear-tree's shade.

I'll shake down the big pears,
You shake down the small,
And then we'll run back home, with
Pears and bags and all."








$5 -Irl_ 4" ------









THE ARCHER.


---- -- er -~ .-
Bow and ar row bear' ing, 0 vr nill and dale,

-- ... --+ U---- ---.-- -


Lo, the ar cher dar in, Bids the morning hail.

~ -4
/ r? -
La la la, la la la, l; ]a la,.. a la ia, ]a a la!

Bow and arrow
Over hill and dale,
Lo, the archer I1 1,, ; ._
B ids the morning hail.

As the eagle soaring
Seems a king to be,
To the wilds exploring,
Like a king goes he.

lie rules o'er the distance,
Where his arrows fly;
Vain is all resistance,
Beast or bird must die.











IF ANY BOY FOR A SOLDIER WOULD GO,
WIIAT lHE MUST LOOK FOR THIS SONG WILL SHOW.

THE lad who would a soldier be
Must have a mulsket tall,
And learn to load it cleverly
With powder and with ball.

By his left side, in leather band,
A sword he must not lack;
So both far .1i' and hand to hand
The foe he may attack.

A l orse he'll want to ride a-lield,
With spurs of silver bright,
And bit and rein, to make it yield,
When restive in the fight.

A fine moustache beneath his nose,
A helmet on his head;
Else, when the martial trumpet blows,
I-e were as good as dead.



47
------I_ - _











NOW, MAIDENS, WE PRESS ON
YOUR NOTICE A LESSON.




SI'' TE finest cloth that man can sell

S} Wears out when years are past;
': \ < Tim pitcher oft. fnes t t}hei well


F
|" ,








S- -
| *.. .," -

: "' _ ~~. *








M-". -
. .-K

...a -.-S --



. -

S .--















MORNING SONG.





-N,1
Witli the dawn a wak ing Lord, I ing thy praise



(Guid me to thee, mak ing Me to kw thy ways.


WAITr the dawn awaking,
Lord, I sing thy praise;
Guide me to thee, making
Me to know thy ways.

All thy precepts keeping
Whole and undefiled,
Waking, Lord, or *1.., !;.,
Let me be thy child.




190














WALKING SONG.

COiLE, my children, come away,
For the sun shines bright to-day;
Little children, come with me,
Birds, and brooks, and posies see;
Get your hats and come away,
For it is a pleasant day.

See the laimbkins sport and play,
On tlh meadows fresh and gay;
See the kitten full of fun,
1Frisking in the shining sun;
Children too may run and play,
For it is a pleasant day.

Bring the hoop and bring the ball,
Come with happy faces all,
Let us inake a merry ring,
Talk, and laugh, and dance, and sing;
Quickly, quickly come away,
For it is a pleasant day.
i ._iO






























THE FISHERMAN.

THE fisherman shows his patience good
Afloat or on the strand,
Whether he sails on the clear bright flood,
Or wades 'mid the mud and sand.

Dripping he comes from the running brook,
The breeze his garment dries;
The sea tempts him-and his baited hook
Tempts that which in it lies.
51
.. -.. . -.. ..... ... 7-: --






v-rr ----- --__ ______-

What's that ?--Iush i
A hare in a bush ?
No, no,-well!
A snail in a shell?
No-I guess
A silver-fish.-Yes.




TIHE BEE.

SEE how the laboring honey-bee
Both late amn early flies;
|Each flower she visits carefully,
And every blossom tries.

Busily goes she far and wide,
And, with industrious care,
Dotl in the sunny summer'tide
11er winter I .i Ie prepare.










,52










LITTLE BIRD! LITTLE BIRD!

"LI'rTTE bird little bird! come to me!
I have a green cage ready for thee,-
Beauty-bright flowers I'll bring to you,
And _:i,.-h, ripe cherries, all wet with dew."

' Thanks, little maiden, for all thy care,-
But I dearly love the clear, cool air
And my-snug little nest in the old oak-tree.''
"Little bird little bird! stay with me."

Xay, little danmsel; away ll11 fly
To greener fields and a warmer sky ;
When Spring returns with pattering rain,
You will hear 1my merry song' again."

"Little bird little bird! who'll guide thee
Over the hills, and over the sea ?
Foolish one, come in the house to stave:
For I'm very sure you'll lose your way.'"

"Al, no, little maiden God guides me
Over the hills and over the sea :
I will be free as the rushing air,
Chasing the sunlight everywheree"























-. -

















ALL HAVE A WORK TO DO().

STOP, little stream, and tell me whi
Thon'rt running on so fast,
Forever gliding il by,
And yet thou'rt never past.
54
3W-. _







" I love to look into thy face,
Although I'm but a child,
And watch thy dimpling eddies play,
And hear thy music wild.

" Thou must be very happy here,
With nothing else to do
But running by these mossy banks,
Beneath the green wood too.

SThe pretty robin sings to thee
HiIs cheerful matin-song,
While 'mid the leaves the squirrel peeps,
And frolics all day long."

The little streamlet heeded not
The prattling child's request,
But, while it still ran swiftly on,
The laughing boy address'd:-

"'Tis tire I've squirrels, birds, and flowers,
To cheer me on my way;
And very pleasant is my lot:
But still I must not stay.

"Like Truth, I have my work to do,
My errand to fulfil:
I cool the weary traveller's lips,
And help the sea to fill.
55








f'I should stop, and idly lie
Upon my pebbly bed,
Soon all my freshness would be gone,
My verdant banks be dead.

Our Heavenly Father gives to all
His blessings most profuse,
And, not the least, in wisdom gives
The kindly law of use.

So, little child, your duty do
In cheerfulness all day;
And you, like me, shall then be bless'd
With flowers upon vour way."



NOW, MY DEARS, F'D IAVE YOU KNOW
WIAT WAS SAID BY LITTLE JOE.

Mr name's little Joe,
Very little I know.
Mother, to me a story tell,
And I will try to learn it well;
So when I'm asked another day,
I may then with courage say,
My name's little Joe,
A line story I know."
5_________











SIT DOWN ON THE TURF WTTI- ME,
OUR PET LAMB'S WILD PRANKS TO SEE.

TrHE ]ambkin in the pasture green
Has wool as soft as silken sheen,
And round its neck a bright red band:
It eats crumbs fiom the children's hand.
Merrily, lambkin, plavy

Jump see how high the lambkinhl slings
The bell upon its neck it rings:
That bell which on the brig-ht red bnand
Was fastened by Mamma's owln hand.
Jnmlnp high, my lambkin gay !

Ma! ma it cries for very joy:
No one would dare its peace annoy,
Its innocence all hearts doth warm,
Oh! let me stroke thy pretty form,
My little pet, I pray !







^ "' ^






^ -:-=== -- __^---~-i

TIE LITTLE BOY AND THE SHEEP.
LAY- sheep, pray tell me why
In the pleasant field you lie,
Eating grass and daisies white,
From the morning till the night:
Every thing can something do,
But what kind of use are you?

Nay, my little master, nay,
Do not serve me so, I pray:
Don't you see tile wool that grows
On 1y liack to make your clothes?
Cold, ahl, very cold you'd lie,
If C ou Lid l(not wool from mie.

True, it seems a pleasant thlingi
-ipping daisies in the Spring;
But what chilly nights I pass
iOn the cold and dewy grass,
Or piick my scant diminnecr where
All the ground is brown and Lare.

l'The thl e firmelrr comes at last,
IWhenI tHie merryW Spiring is past,
Cats my ]woolly I ,N away
iFor our coat in wintry ~lday. '
Little master, thi is is why
In tie pleasant ,. '. I lie.

-It,-----______- __ ----_~i5






---- -----






h^ -- -L----.--- ...----_._----------- ------)2.Z-0'-----=- _
S r.' '









TIIE FARM-IYARD.

'L-THI hen sometimes comes out and does
A noisy cackling make,
The lhousewife unlderstainds, ind goes
The new-laid egg' to take.

The cock, at earlv mnorn, the men,
Master, and maids awakes;
They turn and stretch themselves. and then
Snore on till daylight breaks.

The hairns wake 1not: each little p1hiz
Is lhst in snml)ber bound;
Thev think, of all things, good sleep is
The best that can le fondly.
59








Let rest duoe strength and vigor '~lii
Then be your tasks begun;
There is a time for every thing
Beneath the glorious sun.





I-~TTERFLIES ARIE PETTY THINGS.


BrrTTEIiFLIES iare pretty things,
Prettier than you or I;
Se te colors on his wings,-
Who would hurt a -.,ni. ill ?

Softly, softly, girls and boys;
lie'll come near us by-and-by ;
Here lih is, don't make a noise.-
We'll not hurt you, butterfly.

Not to hurt a living thing,
Let all little children try;
See, again ie's on the wing;
Good-by pretty butterfly.





ro
-fi
-^ ( ^ ^ "









TIHE CIIERRY-TREE.

FREDDIE saw olne line ripe cherries
Hanging on a cherry-tree;
And he said, You pretty cherries,
Will vou not come down to me?''

SThank you kindly,' said a cherry,
We would rather stay up here;
If we ventured down this morning,
You would eat us up, I fear."

One, the finest of the cherries,
Dangling from a slender twig;
You are beautiful," said Freddie.
"Red and ripe, and oh, how big "

" Catch mne, said the cherry, "catch me,
Little master, if you can !"
1 would catch you soon," said Freddie,
if I were a grown-up maln."

Freddie jumped and tried to reach it,
Standing high upon his toes;
But the cherry bobbed about,
And laughed, and tickled Freddie's nose.
61







SNever mind," said little Freddie,
SI shall have them when it's right,"
tBut a blackbird whistled boldly,
"I shall eat them all to-night."




ANNIE'S GARDEN.

IN little Annie's garden
Grew all sorts of posies;
There were pinks and mignonette,
And tulips and roses.

Sweet peas and morning glories,
A bed of violets blue,
And marigolds and asters,
In Annie's garden grew.

There the bees went for honey :
There the birds sipp'd the dlew
And there tie pretty butterflies
And the lady-birds I!.

And there among her II .
Every bright and pleasant t day,
In her own pretty garden,
Little Annie went to play.

: --G- -- 2






1I-








TIE FAIRIES.

IN the summer night,
When the moon shines bright.
And the air is cahi and still,
The fhiries wake
By stream andi lake,
InW valley nud on hill.

From the pale blue-lell
In the forest dell,
From the water-lily's cup;
And from sweet repose
In the fragrant rose,
The tiny fays spring up.

With mirth and glee,
And minstrelsy,
Their revels they renew;
The feast they eat
Is honey sweet,
And they if' the glistening dew.

n{9 i








SAnd round anld rould(1,
)On thc Ilossy ground,
They dance with might and mai ;
But at morning's light
They flee from sight,
And hide in the flowers again.










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