• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 The foreview
 Fairyland
 Prelude
 The fairy family
 Chronicles of Fairyland
 Travels in Fairyland
 Men and fairies
 Miscellaneous
 Epilogue
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Songs and poems of fairyland : an anthology of English fairy poetry
Title: Songs and poems of fairyland
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055498/00001
 Material Information
Title: Songs and poems of fairyland an anthology of English fairy poetry
Physical Description: 420 p. : ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Waite, Arthur Edward, 1857-1942
Scott, Walter ( Publisher )
Unwin Brothers (Firm) ( Printer )
Gresham Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Walter Scott
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Unwin Brothers ; Gresham Press
Publication Date: 1888
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Fairies -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1888   ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1888   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1888
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Chilworth
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: selected and arranged, with an introduction, by Arthur Edward Waite.
General Note: Title page printed in red and black ink.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055498
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237723
notis - ALH8215
oclc - 06537149

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
        Cover 3
    Half Title
        Title
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Introduction
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    The foreview
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Fairyland
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Prelude
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Fairies' recall
            Page 39
            Page 40
    The fairy family
        Page 41
        Page 42
        The rolls of Elfin Emperours
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
        The faery king
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
        Queen Mab
            Page 49
        The fairy queen
            Page 50
            Page 51
        The fairies
            Page 52
        Queen Mab
            Page 53
        Lullaby for Titiania
            Page 54
        The fairy queen sleeping
            Page 55
            Page 56
        Robin Good-fellow
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
        Puck's song
            Page 62
        The legend of Puck the fairy
            Page 63
        The fair temple
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
        Oberon's feast
            Page 69
            Page 70
        Oberon's palace
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
        The water lady
            Page 75
            Page 76
        The pixies
            Page 77
            Page 78
        Song of the water sprite
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
        The Nix
            Page 82
        A legend of the water-spirit, called Neckan
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
        The mermaid
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
        Song of the water nixies
            Page 91
        Flower fairies
            Page 92
            Page 93
        Song of the twilight fairies
            Page 94
            Page 95
        Fairies on the sea-shore
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
    Chronicles of Fairyland
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Nymphidia: The court of fairy
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
        Prince Brightkin
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
        The culprit Fay
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
            Page 162
            Page 163
            Page 164
            Page 165
            Page 166
    Travels in Fairyland
        Page 167
        Page 168
        The rime of Sire Thopas
            Page 169
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
            Page 175
            Page 176
        Thomas the rhymer
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
            Page 184
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 187
            Page 188
            Page 189
        Kilmeny
            Page 190
            Page 191
            Page 192
            Page 193
            Page 194
            Page 195
            Page 196
            Page 197
            Page 198
            Page 199
            Page 200
        A fairy tale
            Page 201
            Page 202
            Page 203
            Page 204
            Page 205
            Page 206
            Page 207
            Page 208
            Page 209
            Page 210
            Page 211
            Page 212
            Page 213
            Page 214
        The conquest of Fairyland
            Page 215
            Page 216
            Page 217
            Page 218
            Page 219
            Page 220
            Page 221
            Page 222
            Page 223
        A fairy voyage
            Page 224
            Page 225
            Page 226
    Men and fairies
        Page 227
        Page 228
        The approach of Titania
            Page 229
            Page 230
            Page 231
        A fairy tale
            Page 232
            Page 233
            Page 234
            Page 235
            Page 236
            Page 237
            Page 238
        The Elfin king
            Page 239
            Page 240
            Page 241
            Page 242
            Page 243
            Page 244
            Page 245
            Page 246
        The young Tamlane
            Page 247
            Page 248
            Page 249
            Page 250
            Page 251
            Page 252
            Page 253
            Page 254
            Page 255
            Page 256
            Page 257
        Lord Soulis
            Page 258
            Page 259
            Page 260
            Page 261
            Page 262
            Page 263
            Page 264
            Page 265
            Page 266
            Page 267
        The court of Keeldar
            Page 268
            Page 269
            Page 270
            Page 271
            Page 272
            Page 273
            Page 274
            Page 275
            Page 276
        The brownie of Blednoch
            Page 277
            Page 278
            Page 279
            Page 280
            Page 281
        La Belle Dame Sans Merci
            Page 282
            Page 283
            Page 284
        The Mountain Sprite
            Page 285
            Page 286
        The fairy boy
            Page 287
            Page 288
        The fairy child
            Page 289
            Page 290
        The fairy tempter
            Page 291
        The fairies of the Caldon-Low
            Page 292
            Page 293
            Page 294
            Page 295
        The green gnome
            Page 296
            Page 297
            Page 298
        The "Midian-Mara"
            Page 299
            Page 300
            Page 301
            Page 302
            Page 303
            Page 304
            Page 305
        Thubber-na-Shie; or, The fairy well
            Page 306
            Page 307
            Page 308
            Page 309
        The fairies' passage
            Page 310
            Page 311
            Page 312
            Page 313
        The haunted spring
            Page 314
            Page 315
        The romance of the fairy cure
            Page 316
            Page 317
            Page 318
        The fairy nurse
            Page 319
            Page 320
        The fairy thorn
            Page 321
            Page 322
            Page 323
        The fairy well of Lagnanay
            Page 324
            Page 325
            Page 326
            Page 327
        Queen Mab
            Page 328
            Page 329
        The Kelpie of Corrievreckan
            Page 330
            Page 331
            Page 332
            Page 333
            Page 334
            Page 335
        The elf of the woodlands
            Page 336
            Page 337
            Page 338
            Page 339
            Page 340
            Page 341
            Page 342
            Page 343
            Page 344
            Page 345
            Page 346
            Page 347
            Page 348
            Page 349
            Page 350
            Page 351
            Page 352
            Page 353
            Page 354
            Page 355
        Two fairies in a garden
            Page 356
            Page 357
            Page 358
            Page 359
            Page 360
            Page 361
        Elfin song
            Page 362
            Page 363
            Page 364
            Page 365
        The ferlie
            Page 366
    Miscellaneous
        Page 367
        Page 368
        The fountain of the fairies
            Page 369
        Songs of the pixies
            Page 370
            Page 371
            Page 372
            Page 373
            Page 374
        Fairy revels
            Page 375
        Fairy favours
            Page 376
            Page 377
        Water lilies: A fairy song
            Page 378
        The three knights of Camelott
            Page 379
            Page 380
            Page 381
            Page 382
            Page 383
            Page 384
            Page 385
            Page 386
            Page 387
            Page 388
            Page 389
            Page 390
            Page 391
            Page 392
            Page 393
            Page 394
            Page 395
            Page 396
            Page 397
        Fantasies
            Page 398
            Page 399
        The City of Gold
            Page 400
            Page 401
        The weird lady
            Page 402
            Page 403
        The fairies
            Page 404
            Page 405
            Page 406
        The maids of Elfin-Mere
            Page 407
            Page 408
        Ballade of Fairy Gold
            Page 409
            Page 410
        In a fairy boat
            Page 411
            Page 412
    Epilogue
        Page 413
        Page 414
        Farewell to the fairies
            Page 415
            Page 416
        Fairy song
            Page 417
        An invocation
            Page 418
            Page 419
            Page 420
            Page 421
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND









SONGS AND POEMS

OF


FAIRYLAND




AN ANTHOLOGY OF ENGLISH FAIRY POETRY




SELECTED AND ARRANGED, WITH AN INTRODUCTION,
BY

ARTHUR EDWARD WAITE
Author of Israfe and A Soul's Comedy"




O, list the mystic lore sublime
Of fairy tales of ancient time."
The Ettrick Shcher'd.




LONDON
WALTER SCOTT
24 WARWICK LANE, PATERNOSTER ROW

1888












SONGS AND POEMS

OF


FAIRYLAND




AN ANTHOLOGY Y OF ENGLISH FAIRY POETRY




SELECTED AND ARRANGED, WITI AN INTRODUCTION,
BY

ARTHUR EDWARD WAITE
A/ uhr of Israfel and "A Soul's Comedy"




O, list the mystic lore sublime
Of fairy tales of ancient time."
The Elttrck SheIherd.




LONDON
WALTER SCOTT
24 WARWICK LANE, PATERNOSTER ROW
1888


































































i

















CONTENTS.


INTRODUCTION- PAGE
Revival of the Romantic element in modern poetry-Origin
of the term "Fairy "-Fays of early French literature
-Source of the conceptions at the base of English fairy
poetry--Huon de Bordeaux-Oberon-Spiritual tradi-
tions of Gothic and Celtic nations-Lineage of the
fairies-Romance of Orfeo and Heurodis-Stature of
the fairies-Their religious faith-The Fairy Queen-
Robin Goodfellow-The elfin hierarchies-Romaunt of
the Knight Launfal-Value of English fairy poetry-
Plan of the present anthology I1

THE FOREVIEW.
E. A. POE-
Fairyland 35

PRELUDE.
MRS. HEMANS--
Fairies' Recall 39

THE FAIRY FAMILY.
EDMUND SPENSER-
The Rolls of Elfin Emperours 43

SIR SIMEON STEWARD-
The Faery King 46

BEN JONSON-
Queen Mab 49

OLD POEM-
The Fairy Queen 5

ROBERT HERRICK-
The Fairies .52










6 CONTENTS.
PAGE
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE-
Queen Mab 53
Lullaby for Titania 54

L. E. L.-
The Fairy Queen Sleeping 55

OLD POEM-
Robin Good-fellow 57

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE-
Puck's Song 62

THOMAS MOORE-
The Legend of Puck the Fairy 63

ROBERT HERRICK-
The Fair Temple 64
Oberon's Feast 69
Oberon's Palace 71

THOMAS HOOD-
The Water Lady 75

S. M. PECK-
The Pixies 77

ANDREW JAMES SYMINGTON-
Song of the Water Sprite 79

R. GARNETT-
The Nix 82

MARGARET DIXON-
A Legend of the Water-Spirit, called Neckan 83

JAMES HOGG-
The Mermaid 86

SARAH WILLIAMS-
Song of the Water Nixies 9

P. B. MARSTON---
Flower Fairies 92










CONTENTS. 7

I'ASE
THOMAS LAKE HARRIS-
Song of the Twilight Fairies 94

L. E. L.-
Fairies on the Sea-shore 96


CHRONICLES OF FAIRYLAND.

MICHAEL DRAYTON-
Nymphidia: The Court of Fairy 101

WILLIAM ALLINGHAM-
Prince Brightkin 127

J. RODMAN DRAKE-
The Culprit Fay 144


TRAVELS IN FAIRYLAND.

GEOFFREY CHAUCER-
The Rime of Sire Thopas 169

SIR WALTER SCOTT -
Thomas the Rhymer 177

JAMES HOGG-
Kilmeny 19

PHILIP JAMES BAILEY-
A Fairy Tale 2

A. MARY F. ROBINSON-
The Conquest of Fairyland 215

THOMAS LAKE HARRIS-
A Fairy Voyage 224


MEN AND FAIRIES.
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE-
The Approach of Titania 229










8 CONTENTS.

PAGE
THOMAS PARNELL-
A Fairy Tale 232


JOHN LEYDEN-
The Elfin King 239


OLD BALLAD-
The Young Tamlane 247


JOHN LEYDEN-
Lord Soulis 258
The Court of Keeldar 268


WILLIAM NICHOLSON--
The Brownie of Blednoch 277


JOHN KEATS-
La Belle Dame Sans Merci 282


THOMAS MOORE-
The Mountain Sprite 285

SAMUEL LOVER-
The Fairy Boy 287

DR. ANSTER-
The Fairy Child 289

SAMUEL LOVER-
The Fairy Tempter 291

MARY HOWITT-
The Fairies of the Caldon-Low 292

ROBERT BUCHANAN-
The Green Gnome 296
The "Midian-Mara" 299










CONTENTS. 9

PAGE
JAMES TEELING-
Thubber-na-Shie; or, The Fairy Well 306

CLARENCE MANGAN-
The Fairies' Passage 310

SAMUEL LOVER-
The Haunted Spring 314

JAMES CLARENCE MANGAN--
The Romance of the Fairy Cure 316

EDWARD WALSH-
The Fairy Nurse 319

SAMUEL FERGUSON-
The Fairy Thorn 321
The Fairy Well of Lagnanay 324

THOMAS HOOD-
Queen Mab 328

CHARLES MACKAY-
The Kelpie of Corrievreckan 330

R. H. HORNE-
The Elf of the Woodlands 336

WILLIAM ALLINGHAM-
Two Fairies in a Garden 356

EDMUND CLARENCE STEDMAN-
Elfin Song 362

GRAHAM R. TOMSON-
The Ferlie 366


MISCELLANEOUS.

ROBERT SOUTHEY-
The Fountain of the Fairies. 369










10 CONTENTS.
PAGE

S. T. COLERIDGE-
Songs of the Pixies .. 370

ANONYMOUS-
Fairy Revels 75

MRS. H-EMANS-
Fairy Favours .376
Water Lilies : A Fairy Song 378

R. H. HORNE-
The Three Knights of Camelot 379

L. E. L.-
Fantasies 398

ANONYMOUS-
The City of Gold 400

CHARLES KINGSLEY-
The Weird Lady 402

WILLIAM ALLINGHAM-
The Fairies 404
The Maids of Elfin Mere 407

GRAHAM R. TOMSON-
Ballade of Fairy Gold 409

BERNARD WELLER-
In a Fairy Boat 411


EPILOGUE.
RICHARD CORBET-
Farewell to the Fairies 415

MRS. HEMANS-
Fairy Song 417

PHILIP DAYRE-
An Invocation 418
















INTRODUCTION.



T HIS volume appears, I trust opportunely, during the
initial signs of a revival of that romantic or super-
natural element which is the first characteristic of primitive
song-craft in every nation, and is, by a select section of
discriminating literary critics, now welcomed as the salvation
of modern poetry. Independently of this fact, there can be
no need for apology in presenting for the first time to the
lovers of phantasy an anthology of the fairy poetry which
during six centuries has made beautiful by its gracious
melody the minor paths of English song. I propose in this
brief introduction, to consider the Elfin mythology in its
connection with poetry, without attempting an actually
critical estimate of the literary value of the fairy flights
which follow it; their poetic merit is, for the most part, suffi-
ciently guaranteed by the names which are attached to them
-Chaucer and Spenser in the aurora or day-spring of our
literature; Shakespeare, Drayton, Herrick, and other masters
of melody in the splendour of its meridian light; Hogg,
Home, and Allingham at our own epoch of inspired ima-
ginings.
From the days of Casaubon to Keightley, many conflicting
derivations of the word fairy have been proposed by rival
etymologists. It is now fairly established that it has come
to us from the Latinfalum, through the Romance languages.








12 INTRODUCTION

A debased Latin verb, fatere, to enchant, was common in
medieval times, and was naturalized in Spain, Italy, and
Provence. The French form was faer, fier. Of this verb,
says Keightley, in his masterly Fairy Mythology," the past
participle is fat, fe; hence in the romances we continually
meet with les chevaliers fa's, les dames fajes, &c. From the
verb fair, fier, to enchant, we are told by the same authority
that the French made a substantive, faerie, flerie, illusion,
enchantment, a word which was considerably extended in its
meaning both before and after its assimilation into the
English language, and which came to be employed, not only
for illusion, but for the land which was par excellence the
home of all gramary, illusion, and envoutement, namely, the
Land of the Fairies, for the people who dwell therein, and
for every individual member of the elfin tribe.
It is also established, and by this etymology itself, that
the original fairy of Frankish poetry and fiction was simply
a female initiated into the mysteries and marvels of magic.
Such was the mighty Morgue la Fay, the mystic sister of
King Arthur, and such, in unconscious accordance with the
original tradition, were those fairies of later French romance
who delighted our childhood in the graceful and beautiful
stories of Perrault and the Countess d'Aulnoy.
The immediate source of the conceptions which are at the
base of English fairy poetry must be evidently sought in the
romances and legends of early French chivalry, in such
delightful, though comparatively unknown, stories as that of
the Paladin Huon de Bordeaux, who was protected in direst
extremity, and assisted in the successful prosecution of an
almost impossible quest by the divine child Oberon, and
then in a glade of dews and sunshine, fenced by the mystic
darkness of a Syrian forest, was anointed with supernatural
chrism, and instructed in the magical sentences which com-








INTRODUCTION. 13

pel the obedience of elf and gnome and lufin, and crowned
King of all Faerie."
Oberon himself, it is true, has a Teutonic origin, and is
known to the early Germanic folk-lore by the name of
Alberich, Alberon, &c., but the original inspiration of English
fairy poetry is derived, as I have said, through the fairy
imaginings of the French metrical romancers. By these,
the supreme monarch of Elfland, who, despite the supposi-
tious succession of Huon and his own translation to Para-
dise, continued to spread wide his golden rule as in pre-
Provenlal days, is represented as a child of four to five
years, indescribable in his beauty, sirenian in voice and
manner, clothed in a robe which sparkled with all manner of
precious stones, and aerially conveyed in a superb, swan-
drawn chariot. His palace, with its golden roof and
diamond spires, seems to have followed him in his travels,
and thus the Land of Faerie was substantially and for the
time being in that spot wheresoever which was the tarrying-
place of the Grand Master of the Elfin World.
Side by side with the fays of poetry and chivalrous history
there persisted, in spite of the general diffusion of Chris-
tianity, the old spiritual traditions of the Gothic and Celtic
nations, concerning the Elves, Trolls, Brownies, malignant or
benevolent dwarfs, gnomes, and generally diminutive beings
gifted with supernatural powers and of an other than mortal
origin. These two hierarchies of supernal beings were con-
fused in the popular imagination, the magical abilities which
could only be painfully acquired by humanity were identified
with the magical prerogatives which were inherent in the
natures of Kelpie, Elf, and Ghoul, and the mystical com-
bination produced that new, glorious, and beautiful hierarchy
of semi-spiritual essences which was governed by the elfin
Oberon.








14 INTRODUCTION

The discrepancies in fairy traditions, as preserved in
English poetry, may be partly accounted for by the fact of
this confusion. We find the most eminent fairy authorities
in distinct disagreement on several important points. Spenser,
the poet of the elfin world par excellence, in his account of
the Rolls of Elfin Emperours," deduces all Faerie from the
man-monster created by Prometheus. Shakespeare, on the
other hand, refers them to an Indian origin, and the dic-
tionaries of Fairy Mythology, in accordance with this
supposition, fix his abode in India, and represent him
nightly crossing the intervening seas with inconceivable
rapidity to dance in the western moonlight. The oriental
origin of magic was generally recognized at a very early
period of European gramary; the original fairies of romance
received their wisdom from Persia and from India, and after
the transfiguration of the elfin world by the confusion of
the several spiritual conceptions already noticed, it is easy to
see how an eastern source was attributed to the later fairy
lineage. But on this point it must also be remembered that
the Crusades were undoubtedly the means of acquainting
western poets with the rich fountains of oriental romance,
and that the general similarity between the Persian Peri and
our own fairy, as well as the substantial identity of many
supernatural fictions which are popular both in the West and
the East, are a sufficient warrant for attributing a part of this
very transformation to the glamorous influence of Arabian
imaginations.
The classical alternative which is offered by the poet-
chronicler of Fairydom has also a base in fact. The
Elizabethan age commonly identified the fairies of Gothic
superstition with the classic nymphs who attended Diana,
while the elfin queen was Diana herself, and was called by
one of the names of that goddess, that is, Titania, which is








INTR ODUCTION. 15

found in the metamorphoses of Ovid as a title of the uranian
queen. This opinion also originated with the romance-
writers. Chaucer identifies the fairies with the inhabitants
of the Latin Infernus-

Pluto that is King of fayrie .
Proserpine and all her fayrie, &c.

The tradition spread widely, and found during the early part
of the fourteenth century a voice of poetic beauty in the
lovely Scotch fairy-tale of Orfeo and Heurodis," which
represents the Greek master of mystical song-craft as a
" Kinge in Inglond, who abode in Traciens, or Winchester"-
The King hadde a quen of priis
That was y cleped dame Herodis,
The finest leuedi for the nones
That might gon on bodi and bones,
Full of love and of godinesse
Ac no man may tell hir fairness.

On a certain morn of May, Heurodis, Eurodis, or Eurydice
repaired with two of her maidens "to play bi an orchard
side," in the neighbourhood of the palace-
To se the floures sprede and spring,
And to hear the foules sing.

She fell asleep on the green, and when she awoke it was in
a state of frenzy which frightened her virgins away, and they
ran back to alarm the whole palace.
She was borne from the orchard to her bed by a long train
of knights and ladies, and was visited by the distressed king,
whom she informed, amidst great lamentations, that she must
go from him-
As Ich lay this under tide,
And slepe under an orchard side,









16 INTRODUCTION.

There come to me to fair knights
Wele y armed al to rights,
And bad me comen an heighing,
And speke with her lord the king ;
And Ich answered at words bold,
Y durst nought, no y nold :
Thai pinkd oghain as thai might driue,
Ther com her king also blue,
With an hundred knights and mo,
And damissels an hundred al so;
Al on snowe white stedes,
As white as milke were her wedes,
Y no seighe yete before
So fair creatours y core !
The king hadde a crown on hed,
It nas of silver, no of gold red,
Ac it was of a precious ston ;
As bright as the sonne it schon :
And as son as he to me cam,
Wold Ich, nold Ich, he me nam,
And made me with him ride,
Opon a palfrey by his side,
And brought me to his pallays,
Wele attired in ich ways;
And schewd me castels and tours,
Rivers, forests, frith with flours;
And his riche stedes ichon,
And sith then me brought oghain horn,
Into an when orchard,
And said to me afterward:
Loke dame to morowe that av be
Right here under this ympe tree;
And than thou schalt with ous go,
And live with us ever mo,
And yif thou makest ous y let,
Where thou be, thou worst y set,
And to tore thine limes al,
That nothing help the no schal,
And thei thou best so torn,
Yete thou worst with ous y born,








INTRODUCTION. 17

The power of the Fairy King over the royal lady of
earth appears to have been given him in virtue of her
slumber beneath an elvish tree, which, though growing in
her husband's orchard, made the surrounding grass-plot the
property of the elvish world. Orfeo repaired on the morrow
to the "ympe-tree," accompanied by a thousand knights,
resolved one and all to die, if it were necessary, ere the
queen should go from home; but on reaching the fay-bound
place Heurodis, in the midst of the whole company, was
spirited suddenly away. The king in his misery vowed
never again to look upon the face of a woman, and retired
into the wilderness with his harp, which subdued by its magi-
cal melody the fierce beasts that abounded on every side.
This wilderness eventually proves to be a summer resort of
the Fairy King. Orfeo beholds distant visions of elfin hunters,
elfin knights and ladies at the dance, and then on a certain
day of supreme election he falls into the hands of a joyous
bevy of elfin damsels, among whom he recognizes his own
Heurodis. Their mutual emotion betrays him, and she is
carried swiftly away by her companions. Orfeo pursues the
bright band with lyre and lamentations ; a rock opens before
them; he follows them into it, and thus reaches Fairy Land.

lie corn into a fair country,
As bright soonne somers day,
Smothe and plain and al grene,
Hill no dale was none ysene.
Middle the lond a castel he seighe,
Rich and reale and wonder heighe;
Al the utmust wal ,.
Was cler and schine of cristal;
An hundred tours their were about,
Degiselich and bataild stout;
The butrass come out of the diche
Of rede gold y arched riche;
2









18 INTRODUCTION.

The housour was anowed al,
Of ich maner divers animal;
Within there wer wide wones
Al of precious stones,
The worss piles on to biholde,
Was al of burnist gold :
Al that lond was ever light,
For when it schuld be therk and night,
The riche stones light gonne,
Bright as doth at none the sonne :
No man may tel no thenke in thought
Theeriche werk that their was wrought.

This description corresponds on the whole with the
general drift of legend, which represents the Land of Faerie
to be situated beneath the ground, so that the true elfin
court is a subterranean pageantry-a point which is com-
monly ignored by modern fanciful writers.
The castle which Orfeo entered appears to have been a
general receptacle for things and persons who had been
spirited away from earth, or had in any way suddenly dis-
appeared.
Ther he seize his when wiif,
Dame Heurodis, his liif liif,
Slepe under an ympe-trce ;
Bi her clothes he knewe that it was sche.

He did not, however, at once claim his bride, but repaired
to the royal hall where the king and queen of fairyland
were seated in a bright and blissful tabernacle, their crowns
and vestures almost blinding him by their splendour.
Orfeo performs in their presence on his harp, and wins such
admiration from the king, that, with Herodian prodigality,
he is promised whatever he may demand. The restitution
of Heurodis is, of course, the favour in question, and the
musician-monarch returns out of Fairyland with a wife









INTRODUCTION. 9

beautified more than ever by the gramary of the elfin at-
mosphere, and, unlike the classical hero, successfully closes
his quest by resuming his royal authority.

The entrance of several elements all foreign to each
other into the later conception of Fairyland has assisted in
the creation of other confusions besides the conflicting
accounts of the elfin lineage. Most spirits," says a writer
in C/ialnbers'sJoutrnal, could contract and diminish their
bulk at will, but the fairy alone seems to have been regarded
as essentially small in size. The majority of other spirits,
such as dwarfs, genii, &c., are represented as deformed
creatures, whereas the fairy has almost uniformly been de-
scribed as a beautiful miniature of the human being, perfect
in face and form." This statement, however, is not even
generally correct; it is contradicted continually in legends and
poetry alike. It is evident, for instance, that the Queene
of Faire Elfland,"with whom the immortal Rhymer of "bonny
Ercildoune" performed his mirk night" journey into
Fairyland, was a spirit, at any rate, approaching the common
stature of humanity. Such also were the elfin emperors of
Spenser, and such the fay ladies whom Dryden celebrates
in his magnificent modernized version of Chaucer's Flower
and the Leaf," and who were simply departed human beings
in a certain state of bondage. The inhabitants of the
Elfin World, and generally all classes of nature-spirits, are
poetically depicted in all forms and sizes at the will of the
bard or romancer, and are sometimes identical with the
original human fairy of the Arthurian and Charlemagne
cycles, sometimes with the diminutive good people of Gothic
lore. These formal discrepancies originated in time a
harmonizing tradition which well enters into the spirit of
fairy mythology. In Lhe fine ballad of "The Young Tamz









20 INTRODUCTION

lane," that elfin knight, who had passed from mortality into
fairyhood, informs his mistress that he can quit his body
when he pleases, and inhabit either earth or air.

Our shapes and size we can convert
To either large or small;
An old nut-shell's the same to us
As is the lofty hall.

The religion professed in the elfin world is another de-
bated point. According to Chaucer, the book, and bell,
and holy water, the matins and other prayers of monks and
limitours, had, even in his day, thoroughly exorcised the
fairies, and improved them off the face of the earth, a
statement which may be true enough in the case of the
trolls and the brownies, and other survivals of heathen
times.

In olde dayes of the King Artour,
Of which that Bretons speken gret honour,
All was this lond fulfilled of faerie;
The elf-quene, with hire joly compagnie
Danced ful oft in many a grene mede.
This was the old opinion as I rede ;
I speke of many hundred yeres ago;
But now can no man see non elves mo,
For now the grete charitee and prayers
Of limitoures and other holy freres,
That serchen every land and every streme,
As thikke as motes in the sonne beme,
I I. i'. halles, chambres, kichenes, and boures,
Citees and burghes, castles high, and toures,
Shropes and bernes, shepenes and dairies,
This maketh that their ben no faeries :
For their as wont to walken was an elf,
Ther walketh now the limitour himself,
In undermeles and in morweninges,









INTRODUCTION 21

And sayth his matines and his holy things,
As he goth in his limitation.
Women may now go safely up and doun,
In every bush, and under every tree,
Ther is non other incubus but he,
And he ne will don hern no dishonour.

But Bishop Corbet, writing in the days of the Restoration,
testified that the fairies "were of the old religion," and
that since the advent of Protestantism and Elizabethan
glories they had departed hence. Herrick, however, adopts
a middle course.

Now, this the fairies would have known,
Theirs is a mixed religion :
And some have heard the elves it call
Part Pagan, part Papisticall.

Intimately associated with the reigning Potentate of Fairy-
land, the monarch Oberon, and a person of, in some
respects, more considerable importance, was the moonlight
queen of elves, who is more or less identified by Chaucer,
Shakespeare, and the romance of "Orfeo and Heurodis"
with the queen of the classical Avernus, Prosperine, but
who is distinguished by Drayton from that goddess in his
poetic romance of Nymphidia," and who, as a matter of
actual fact, is a combination of several mythological ele-
ments.
In the most ancient traditions we have glimpses of a time
when this fair and glorious lady alone occupied the faery
throne, and, as in the case of Sire Thopas, was occasionally
sought by human lovers. Shakespeare gives her the classical
name of Titania, who is commonly identified with Mab,
but their characters are sufficiently distinct. The latter,
according to Keightley, has completely dethroned Titania, a








22 INTRODUCTION

statement which is scarcely borne out by the facts, for Mab
was a person of general celebrity long before the appearance
of the Midsummer Night's Dream," which contains the first
mention of the rival sovereign. The herald and messenger
of the royal pair was the tricksy sprite indifferently known as
Puck, Hobgoblin, and Robin Goodfellow, and who must
also perhaps be identified with "the illusory candle-holder,"
Jack o' Lantern, or Will o' the Wisp, whose fatal phosphor-
escent light is, in Paradise Lost," described as

A wandering fire,
Compact of unctuous vapour, which the night
Condenses, and the cold environs round,
Kindled through agitation to a flame,
Which oft, they say, some evil spirit attends,
Hovering and blazing with delusive light,
Misleads the amazed night-wanderer from his way
To bogs, and mires, and oft through pond and pool.
Book the Ninth.

The different hierarchies of fairy spirits who are supposed
to be in relation with man may be grouped broadly into
three general divisions :-r. Land Fairies. 2. Sea Fairies.
3. Elfin dwellers of the underworld. In the first class will
be included such inhabitants of grove and forest as the
lovely Korrigan of Brittany, the Moss Folk of Germany,
and the Elves proper of English traditional poetry. It will
include the fairies of field and meadow, such as the Lutin of
Normandy, the Little Monk of Neapolitan legends, the
Good Neighbours of Scottish lore. It will comprise the
domestic faires who, under the name of Pixies, haunt our
Cornish farms and homesteads, the Caledonian Brownie,
the Germanic Kobold, and the Niss of Scandinavian
legend. The Neckan and Merman are familiar instances
of the nature-spirits included in the second division. The








INTR ODUCTION_ 23

elves of the underworld-the trolls, dwarfs, wild-women,
and still-folk of Germany, Scandinavia, and Switzerland-
are unrepresented in English tradition and poetry, though
in most of our early romances the Land of Faerie is sup-
posed to be underground. Modern imagination has added
many supernatural characters to those of ancient legend.
Some of its most graceful conceptions-its flower fairies,
and sprites of the twilight-are included in this volume.


Besides the story of Orfeo and Heurodis, there are several
ancient English metrical romances which are concerned
with adventurous quests and travels into Fairyland. Their
archaic form and considerable length naturally exclude
them from a popular anthology, but this introduction may
fitly close with an abstract of one which is singularly beau-
tiful in conception and in high repute among discerning
students of our early poetical literature.
The Romaunt of the Knight Launfal," by Thomas
Chestre, is an amplified version of an antique Lay by Marie
de France, a Norman poetess, who flourished in the thir-
teenth century. It is concerned with a bacheler" named
Launfal, who for generosity and largesse was made steward
at the court of King Arthur, and was chosen by Merlin to
bring home the king's bride, Gwennere. The mission was
undertaken by the knight-

But syr Launfal lyked her noght .
For the lady bar bos of swych word,
That sche hadde clmannyc under her lord,
So fele there was noon ende.

After the marriage of Arthur, Launfal took leave of the









24 INTRODUCTION

court and repaired with two knights to Karlyoun, where he
tarried, making good cheer for a year's space, till he came
to the end of his resources. His boon companions then
forsook him, and he fell into great poverty. In this strait
he borrowed a saddle and bridle from the mayor's daughter,
and rode away westward.
The weather was hot; he dismounted in a fair forest,
and sat in the shadow of a tree, covering his worn garments.
with his mantle. After a space, two gentyll maydenes,"
wearing kirtles of Indian sandel and green mantles bordered
with gold, appeared before him.

Har faces wer whyt as snow on down,
Hiar rode was red, hem ey were browne,
I sawe never non swyche;
That oon bar of gold a basyn,
That other a towayle whyt and fyn,
Of selk that was good and ryche.

They came to him over the heath; he greeted them in all
gentleness, while on the part of their lady, dame Tryamour,
they returned his salutation, and invited him to follow them
and speak with her. He courteously consented, and was
conducted to an honourable pavilion, enriched with gold
and crystal, as well as radiant carbuncles.

He fond yn the pavyloun
The Kynges daughter of Olyroun,
Dame Tryamour that hyghte,
Her fadyr was Kyng of fayrye,
Of occient fer and nyghe,
A man of mochell myghte.
In the pavyloun he fond a bed of prys
Theled with purpur bys,
That semyle was of syghte,









INTR ODUCTION. 25

Therinne lay that lady gent,
That after Syr Launfal hadde sent,
That lessome lemede bryght.
For hete her clothes down sche dede,
Almest to her gerdyl stede,
Than lay sche uncover,
She was as whyt as lylye yn May,
Or snow that sneweth yn wynterys day,
He seyght never non so pert.
The rede rose, whan sche ys newe,
Ayens her rode nes naught of hewe,
I dare well say yn fert.
Her here schon as gold wyre,
May no man rede her attyre,
Ne naught well thenke yn heart.

This fay lady informed Launfal that there was no man in
all Christente," be he king or emperor, whom she loved as
much as himself, at which words the knight was inflamed
with reciprocal passion,

And liste that swete flour;
And sat adoun her hysyde,
And seyde, Swetyng, what so betyde,
I am to thyn honour.

She tells him that she is acquainted with his present dis-
tress, and that if he will truly forsake all women for love of
her, she will enrich him inexhaustibly-

I wyll the yeve an alner,
Imad of sylk and of gold clear,
Wyth fayre images there;
As oft thou puttest the hond therinne,
A mark of gold thou schalt wynne,
In wat place that thou he.

She also promises him her steed Blaunchard and her squire







26 INTR ODUCTIONA

Gyfre, with the additional advantage of her protection by
magic art from dangers of war or tournament.
Sir Launfal entered into the agreement; they supped and
slept together, and in the morning she dismissed him, warn-
ing him not to boast of his conquest if he wished to retain
her love. He returned to Karlyoun, and was presently
waited on by ten men, riding upon sumpters, and bearing
gold, silver, rich garments, and bright armour. Once more
he kept great cheer, but this time it was the poor and un-
fortunate whom he entertained. His reputation became so
great that a tournament was cried in the town to do him
honour. The knight closed it with a rich and royal feast
which lasted a fortnight. During all this time he was
visited nightly by his elfin mistress, but was destined now to
be divided from her by the challenge of a chevalier in Lom-
bardy, who sent messengers praying him to cross the sea
and take jousts with him for the honour of his lady. The
challenge was accepted by Launfal, who repaired with his
steed and his squire to Lombardy, and achieved'so brilliant
a victory that he was envied by all the lords of Atalye,"
who vowed revenge for the defeat of their comrade, but were
themselves slain in great numbers, and the hero returned
into Britain. The reputation of Launfal reached the ears
of King Arthur, who sent for him. A feast of forty days
took place, during which the queen took occasion to avow
the passion that had long consumed her for the handsome
cavalier who had conducted her to her bridal home; but
the knight Launfal, faithful to his fairy mistress, repelled her
advances, and the unexpected indignity, changing love into
hatred, impelled the false wife to denounce Launfal to her
husband as her attempted seducer. The infuriated monarch
vowed his immediate death, and the unfounded accusa-
tion prompted the knight to boast for the first time of that







INTRODUCTION 27

mysterious mistress whose supernatural beauties he declared
did utterly transcend and eclipse those of the royal lady. On
the intervention of certain illustrious knights-Gawain and
Percivall-a respite of a twelvemonth and a fortnight was
granted Launfal in order that he might produce his mis-
tress, when, if his assertions were seen to be obviously true
with regard to her wonderful charms, he should receive his
pardon. But the unfortunate lover had broken his com-
pact, he had boasted of his elfin lady, his horse and squire
had vanished, the time mentioned drew rapidly to its close;
in truth, the day came when Launfal must pay with his life
the forfeit of his supposed crime, and Triamour apparently
had left him to his fate.
The knights of the round table, who knew well the character
of their queen, began plotting his rescue, and arranging for
his flight across the sea, when "ten maydens bright of
ble came to the royal castle, the avant coureures of a lady
against whose arrival King Arthur courteously appointed
his fairest chamber, and then summoned his barons

For to yeve judgment
Upon that traytour full of prydc.

Other ten maidens at this juncture rode up and, speaking
apart with the monarch, announced the approach of the
Lady Triamour. The queen, coming forward, urged her
spouse to avenge her on Launfal; but

As the quene spak to the kyng,
The baronns seygh come rydynge
A damesele alone,
Upon a whyt comely palfrey,
They saw never non so gay
Upon the ground gone.








28 INTRODUCTION.

As rose on rip her rode was red,
The her schon upon her hed,
As gold wyre that schyneth bryght;
Sche hadde a cronne upon her molde,
Of ryche stones and of gold,
That lossom lemede lyght.
The lady was clad yn purpere palle,
With gentyll body and myddyll small,
That semely was of syght,
Her mantyll was furryth with whyt ermyn,
Ireversyd jolyf and fyn,
No rychere be ne myght.
And when Launfal sawe that lady,
To alle the folk he gon crye an hy,
Both to yonge and olde,
Her, he seyd, comyth my lemman swete,
Sche myghte me of my balys bete,
Yf that lady wold.

The lady rode into the hall, into the presence of the
King, his queen, and all her damsels. The maidens who
had heralded her approach crowded round her, and assisted
her to dismount. Arthur greeted her, and she returned his
salutation with sweet and valorous words. She informed
the monarch of her mission,

To shere Launfal the knyght,
That he never, yn no folye,
Besofte the quene of no drurye,
By days ne by nyght. ...
HIe bad naght her, but sche had hym,
Iere lemman for to be.

The king having confessed that she was fairer and brighter
than his wife-
Wyth that dame Tryamonr to the queue geth,
And blew on her swych a breth,
That never eft myght sche se.







INTROD AUCTION. 29

The lady lep on hyr palfrey
And bade hem alle have good day,
Sche nolde no longer abyde;
Wyth that came Gyfre all so prest,
Wyth Launfal's stede out of the forest,
And stod Launfal besyde.
The knyght to horse began to sprynge,
Anoon without any 1., i,_
Wyth hys lemman away to ryde;
The lady took her maydenys achon,
And went the way that sche hadde er gon,
Wyth solas and wyth pryde.

She carried her lover to a "jolyf ile," called Olyroun,
and on a certain day in every year you may still see the
horse of the knight Launfal, and hear his loud neighing, as
he goes wearily seeking his master, who, in all truth, was
taken into fairyland, and

Seththe saw hym yn thys lond no man,
Ne no more of hym tells y ne can,
For sothe, without lye,

as Thomas Chestre avers in his valedictory lines.


This little volume is devoted to a sweet and delightful
section of poetic fancy, and not to the lofty flights of in-
spired imagination. It is full of felicity and beauty, and
though not a tabernacle enshrining the rarest gems, it is a
storehouse of dainty devices. If individual poems are
occasionally found to fall below the general level of their
writers, as perhaps in the case of Herrick, an explanation
will possibly be seen in the unserious spirit with which the
subject has been too frequently approached by our English








30 INTRODUCTION.

poets, who have generally represented a class superior to
the superstitions and sometimes to the faiths of the time.
In such cases as that of James Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd,
for whom the doctrine of spiritual essences was still true, for
whom those elemental intelligence

Which have their haunts in dale and piny mountain,
Or forests, by slow stream or tingling brook,

still survived in the "faith of reason," we find the concen-
trated strength of a vivid and mature imagination devoted
to the production of a true fairy poem which is not for an
age but for all time."


A word, in conclusion, must be said on the arrangement
of this anthology. The absence of a sufficiently harmonious
development of fairy fancy as it is found in our English
poetry does not warrant a simple chronological plan; I have
adopted another which I trust will contribute towards the
attractiveness and literary value of the book. It opens with
a foreview, or bird's-eye prospect of the fairy country, as it
might be beheld by the traveller from without. A prelude
follows, which implores the return of its inhabitants into the
world of humanity. Then, in the first division there is a parti-
cular account of the court, country, and people of Fairyland,
of its temples, palaces, and festivals. The second division
contains the Chronicles of Fairyland, a series of pleasing
poetic romances, where the scene is laid in the Fairy country
and the actors are exclusively elfin folk. A third division is
devoted to those wonderful and mystical travels or spiritual
pilgrimages into Fairyland, which have been occasionally
undertaken by favoured and adventurous mortals. The
section entitled Men and Fairies comprises those poems and







IN T OD UCTION. 31

romances in which the different orders of elfin spirits enter
into communication with man and mingle in the life of earth,
dispensing supernatural benevolence, or working unheard-of
woe, according to their various dispositions. Some poems
which cannot be included in the foregoing divisions, but
deserve by their merits a place in this elfin anthology, are
comprised in a miscellaneous section. The work closes
with an epilogue, which shows why the fairies have departed,
and what are the conditions of their return.
My best thanks are due to Mr. Robert Buchanan and to
Mr. William Allingham for their permission to insert several
graceful poems; to Mr. Philip James Bailey for the use
of his mystical Fairy Tale "; to Dr. Charles Mackay for
similar kindness in respect of his Kelpie of Corrievreckan,"
and to a number of recent writers who have generously
contributed to the adornment of this collection. The
omission of several poems by illustrious contemporary
writers, whose copyrights are vigilantly protected by their
publishers, will be viewed by indulgent readers as a matter
of necessity, however much it may be regretted.

ARTHUR EDWARD AVAIT'E.



























THE "FoqEVIEW.
















3










FAIRYLAND. 35





FAIRYLAND.

DIa vales, and shadowy floods,
And cloudy-looking woods;
Whose forms we can't discover
For the tears that drip all over;
Huge moons there wax and wane-
Again, again, again-
Every moment of the night,
For ever changing places;
And they put out the star-light
With the breath from their pale faces.
About twelve by the moon-dial,
One more filmy than the rest
(A kind which, upon trial
They have found to be the best)
Comes down-still down-and down
With its centre on the crown
Of a mountain's eminence;
While its wide circumference
In easy drapery falls
Over hamlets, over halls,
Wherever they may be-
O'er the strange woods, o'er the sea,
Over spirits on the wing,
Over every drowsy thing-
And buries them up quite
In a labyrinth of light;
And then, how deep !-O, deep,
Is the passion of their sleep !







36 SONGS AND. POEMS OF FAIR LAND.

In the morning they arise,
And their moony covering
Is soaring in the skies,
With the tempests as they toss,
Like-almost anything,
Or a yellow albatross.
They use that moon no more
For the same end as before-
Videlicet a tent-
Which I think extravagant:
Its atomies, however,
Into a shower dissever,
Of which those butterflies
Of earth, who seek the skies,
And so come down again,
(Never contented things !)
Have brought a specimen
Upon their quivering wings.
EDGAR ALLAN POE.
























PRELUDE.










FAIRIES' RECAZZL. 39





FAIRIES' RECALL.

WHILE the blue is richest
In the starry sky,
While the softest shadows
On the greensward lie,
While the moonlight slumbers
In the lily's urn,
Bright elves of the wild-wood I
Oh return, return !

Round the forest fountain,
On the river shore,
Let your silvery laughter
Echo yet once more;
While the joyous bounding
Of your dewy feet
Rings to that old chorus:
"The daisy is so sweet !"

Oberon, Titania,
Did your starlight mirth
With the song of Avon
Quit this work-day earth ?
Yet while green leaves glisten,
And while bright stars burn,
By that magic memory,
Oh, return, return i
MRS. HEMANS.
























THE FAIRY FAMILY.










THE ROLLS O ELFLIY EM PER OURS. 43





THE ROLLS OF ELFIN EMPEROURS.


PROMETHEUS did create
A man of many parts from beasts deryv'd,
And then stole fire from even to animate
His work, for which he was by Jove depryv'd
Of life himself, and hart-strings of on eagle ryv'd.


That man so made, he called Elfe, to weet
Quick, the first author of all Elfyn kynd;
Who, wand'rin through the world with wearie feet,
Did in the Gardins of Adonis find
A goodly Creature, whom he deemd in mynd
To be no earthly wight, but either spright
Or angell, th' author of all woman kynd;
Therefore a Fay he her according hight,
Of whom all Fayres spring, and fetch their lignage right.


Of these a mighty people shortly grew,
And puissant kinges, which all the world war-rayd,
And to themselves all nations did subdew.
The first and eldest, which that scepter swayd,
Was Elfin; him all India obayd,
And all that now America men call:
Next him was noble Elfinan, who laid
Cleopolis' foundation first of all,
But Elfiline enclosed it with a golden wall.







44 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLtA7D.

His sonne was Elfinelle, who overcame
The wicked Gobbelines in bloody field;
But Elfant was of most renowned fame,
Who all of crystal did Panthea build:
Then Elfar, who two brethren gyaunts kild,
The one of which had two heads, th' other three ;
Then Elfinor, who was in magick skild;
He built by art upon the glassy see
A bridge of bras, whose sound even's thunder
seemed to be.



He left three sonnes, the which in order raynd,
And all their offspring in their dew descents;
Even seven hundred princes, which maintaynd
With mightie deeds their sondry governments,
That were too long their infinite contents
Here to record, ne much material;
Yet should they be most famous moniments,
And have ensample, both of martial
And civil rule to kings and states imperial.



After all these Elficleos did rayne,
The wise Elficleos in great maiestie,
Who mightily that scepter did sustayne,
And with rich spoyles and famous victories
Did high advance the Crown of Faery.
He left two sonnes, of which fayre Elferon,
The eldest brother, did untimely dy,
Whose empty place the mighty Oberon
Doubly supplide in spousall and dominion.







THE ROLLS OF ELFIN EMIPEROURS. 45

Great was his power and glory over all,
Which him before that sacred seate did fill,
That yet remains his wide memorial.
He dying, left the fairest Tanaquill
Him to succeed therein by his last will:
Fairer and nobler liveth none this hour,
Ne like in grace, ne like in learned skill;
Therefore they Glorian call that glorious floure :
Long mayst thou, Glorian live in glory and great powre.

EDMUND SPENSER.








46 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.




THE FAERY KING.

WHEN the monthly horned queene
Grew jealous that the starrs had seene
Her rising from Endymion's arms,
In rage she threw her misty charmes
Into the bosome of the night,
To dimme their curious pryeing sight;
Then did the dwarfish Faery elves,
Having first attyr'd themselves,
Prepare to dresse their Oberon King
In light robes fitt for revelling:
With a cobweb shirt more thinne,
Than ever spider since could spin,
Bleacht to the whiteness of the snow,
By the stormie windes that blow
In the vast and frozen ayre
No shirt half so fine, so fayre.
A rich wastcoat they did bring,
Made of the trout-flies gilded wing:
At which his elveship gan to fret,
Swearing it would make him sweat
Even with its weight: he needs would were
A wastcoat wrought of downy haire,
New shaven from an eunuck's chin,
That pleas'd him well, 'twas wondrous thin,
The outside of his doublet was
Made of the foure-leav'd, true lov'd, grasse
Chang'd into so fine a glosse,
With the oyle of crispie mosse,







THE FAER Y KING. 47

It made a rainbow in the night,
Which gave a lustre passing light:
On every seame there was a lace
Drawne by the unctious snail's slow pace
To which the fin'st, pur'st silver thread
Compar'd, did looke like dull pale lead.
Each button was a sparkling eye
Tane from the speckled adder's frye;
And for cooleness next the skin,
'Twas wt' white poppey linde w"'in.
His breeches of the fleece was wrought,
Which from Cholchos Jason brought;
Spun into so fine a yarne,
"No mortal wight might it discerne,"
Weaved by Arachne on her loome,
Just before she had her doome.
A rich mantle he did were,
Made of tinsell gosameare
Beflowered over with a few
Diamond stars of morning dew;
Dyed crimson in a mayden's blush;
Lin'd with humble-bee's soft plush.
His cap was all of ladies' love,
So wondrous light that it would move,
If any humming gnat or flie
Buzz'd the air in passing by.
About his necke a wreath of pearl
Dropt from the eyes of some poore girle,
Pinched, because she had forgot
To leave clean water in the pot.
And for's feather he did were,
Old Nisus' fatall purple haire,
The sword yygirded to his thigh







48 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.

Was smallest blade of finest rye ;
A payre of buskins they did bring
Of y0 cowladye's corrall winge,
Powdred o'er with spots of jett,
And lin'd w"' purple violett.
His belt was made of myrtle leagues,
Pleyted in small curious threavs,
Besett w"t amber cowslip's studs,
And fringed about with daysey buds,
In w''h his bugle horne was hunge,
Made of the babling Ecchoe's tongue,
Wc' sett vnto his moone-burnt lip
He winds, and then his Faeryes skipp;
At that the lazy drone 'gan sound,
And each did trip a fayrey round.

SIR SIMEON STEWARD.







QUEEN MAAB. 49





QUEEN MAB.

THis is Mab, the mistress Fairy
That doth nightly rob the dairy,
And can help or hurt the cherning
As she please without discerning.

She that pinches country wenches,
If they rub not clean their benches,
And with sharper nails remembers
When they rake not up their embers:
But if so they chance to feast her,
In a shoe she drops a tester.

This is she that empties cradles,
Takes out children, puts in ladles :
Trains forth midwives in their slumber,
With a sieve the holes to number;
And then leads them from her burrows,
Home through ponds and water-furrows.

She can start our Franklin's daughters,
In their sleep, with shrieks and laughters;
And on sweet St. Anna's night,
Feed them with a promised sight,
Some of husbands, some of lovers,
Which an empty dream discovers.

BEN JONSON.
4







50 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.





T.HE FAIRY QUEEN.

COME, follow, follow me,
You, fairy elves that be;
Which circle on the greene,
Come follow Mab, your queene.
Hand in hand let's dance around,
For this place is fairy ground.

When mortals are at rest
And snoring in their nest,
Unheard and unespy'd,
Through key-holes we do glide;
Over tables, stools, and shelves,
We trip it with our fairy elves.

And, if the house be foul
With platter, dish, or bowl.
Upstairs we nimbly creep,
And find the sluts asleep;
Then we pinch their arms and thighs;
None escapes, nor none espies.

But if the house be swept,
And from uncleanness kept,
We praise the household maid,
And duely she is paid :
For we use before we goe
To drop a tester in her shoe.







THE FAIR Y QUEEN. 5'

Upon a mushrooms head
Our table-cloth we spread;
A grain of rye, or wheat,
Is manchet, which we eat;
Pearly drops of dew we drink
In acorn cups filled to the brink.

The brains of nightingales,
With unctuous fat of snailes,
Between two cockles stew'd,
Is meat that's easily chew'd;
Tails of wormes and marrow of mice,
Do make a dish that's wonderous nice.

The grasshopper, gnat, and fly
Serve for our minstrelsie;
Grace said, we dance awhile,
And so the time beguile;
And if the moon doth hide her head,
The gloe-worm lights us homrn to bed.

On tops of dewie grasse
So nimbly do we passe
The young and tender stalk
Ne'er bends when we do walk;
Yet in the morning may be seen
Where we the night before have been.

OLD POEM.







52 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIR LAND.













THE FAIRIES.


IF ye will with Mab find grace,
Set each platter in his place;
Rake the fire up, and get
Water in, ere sun be set.
Wash your pails and cleanse your dairies,
Sluts are loathsome to the fairies :
Sweep your house; who doth not so,
Mab will pinch her by the toe.

ROBERT HERRICK.








QUEEN MIAB. 53









QUEEN MAB.

O THEN, I see, Queen Mab hath been with you.
She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes
In shape no bigger than an agate stone
On the forefinger of an alderman;
Drawn with a team of little atomies
Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep:
Her wagon spokes made of long spinners' legs :
The cover, of the wings of grasshoppers;
The traces, of the smallest spider's web;
The collars, of the moonshine's watery beams
Her whip, of cricket's bone, the lash, of film;
Her wagoner, a small grey-coated gnat,
Not half so big as a round little worm,
Pricked from the lazy finger of a maid :
Her chariot is an empty hazel nut,
Made by the joiner squirrel, or old grub,
Time out of mind the fairies' coachmakers.
And in this state she gallops night by night,
Through lovers' brains, and then they dream of love:
On courtiers' knees that dream on court'sies straight:
O'er lawyers' fingers, who straight dream on fees
O'er ladies' lips, who straight on kisses dream.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.








54 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.




LULLABY FOR TITANIA.

FIRST FAIRY.
You spotted snakes with double tongue,
Thorny hedgehogs, be not seen;
Newts, and blind-worms, do no wrong;
Come not near our fairy queen.

CHORUS.
Philomel with melody
Sing in our sweet lullaby;
Lulla, lulla, lullaby; lulla, lulla, lullaby!
Never harm, nor spell, nor charm,
Come our lovely lady nigh !
So good night, with lullaby.

SECOND FAIRY.
Weaving spiders, come not here;
Hence, you long-legg'd spinners, hence;
Beetles black, approach not near;
Worm, nor snail, do no offence.

CHORUS.
Philomel with melody
Sing in our sweet lullaby;
Lulla, lulla, lullaby; lulla, lulla, lullaby i
Never harm, nor spell, nor charm,
Come our lovely lady nigh !
So good night, with lullaby.
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.







THE FAIRY QUEEN SLEEPING. 55





THE FAIRY QUEEN SLEEPING.

SHE lay upon a bank, the favourite haunt
Of the spring wind in its first sunshine hour,
For the luxuriant strawberry blossoms spread
Like a snow-shower there, and violets
Bow'd down their purple vases of perfume
About her pillow,-link'd in a gay band
Floated fantastic shapes, these were her guards,
Her lithe and rainbow elves.


We have been o'er land and sea,
Seeking lovely dreams for thee,-
Where is there we have not been
Gathering gifts for our sweet queen ?
We are come with sound and sight
Fit for fairy's sleep to-night ;-
First around thy couch shall sweep
Odours, such as roses weep
When the earliest spring rain
Calls them into life again;
Next upon thine ear shall float
Many a low and silver note,
Stolen from a dark-eyed maid,
When her lover's serenade,
Rising as the stars grew dim,
Waken'd her from thoughts of him ;-
There shall steal o'er lip and cheek
Gales, but all too light to break







56 SOrGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.

Thy soft rest,-such gales as hide
All day orange-flowers inside,
Or that, while hot noontide, dwell
In the purple hyacinth bell;
And before thy sleeping eyes
Shall come glorious pageantries,-
Palaces of gems and gold,
Such as dazzle to behold,-
Gardens, in which every tree
Seems a world of bloom to be,-
Fountains, whose clear waters show
The white pearls that lie below.-
During slumber's magic reign
Other times shall live again;
First thou shalt be young and free
In thy days of liberty,-
Then again be woo'd and won
By thy stately OBERON.
Or thou shalt descend to earth,
And see all of mortal birth.-
No, that world's too full of care
For e'en dreams to linger there.
But, behold, the sun is set,
And the diamond coronet
Of the young moon is on high
Waiting for our revelry;
And the dew is on the flower,
And the stars proclaim our hour;
Long enough thy rest has been,
Wake, TITANIA, wake, our queen !
L. E. L.








ROBIN GOOD-FELLO TF 57





ROBIN GOOD-FELLOW.

FROM Oberon, in fairye land,
The King of ghosts and shadows there,
Mad Robin I, at his command,
Am sent to view the night-sports here.
What revell rout
Is kept about,
In every corner where I go,
I will o'ersee,
And merry bee,
And make good sport, with ho, ho, ho !

More swift than lightning can I flye
About this aery welkin soone,
And, in a minute's space, descrye
Each thing that's done below the moone.
There's not a hag
Or ghost shall wag
Or cry, 'Ware Goblins where I go,
But Robin I
Their feates will spy,
And send them home, with ho, ho, ho I

Whene'er such wanderers I meete,
As from their night-sports they trudge home,
With counterfeiting voice I greete
And call them on with me to roame
Thro' woods, thro' lakes,
Thro' bogs, thro' brakes;








58 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.

Or else, unseene, with them I go,
All in the nicke
To play some tricke
And frolicke it, with ho ho ho !

Sometimes I meete them like a man;
Sometimes, an ox; sometimes, a hound !
And to a horse I turn me can,
To trip and trot about them round.
But if, to ride,
My back they stride,
More swift than wind away I go,
O'er hedge and lands,
Thro' pools and ponds
I whirry, laughing, ho, ho, ho !

When lads and lasses merry be,
With possets and with juncates fine,
Unseene of all the company,
I eat their cakes and sip their wine
And, to make sport
I fart and snort,
And out the candles I do blow;
The maids I kiss;
They shrieke,-" Who's this? "
I answer nought, but ho, ho, ho !

Yet now and then, the maids to please,
At midnight I card up their wooll;
And while they sleepe and take their ease,
With whee to threads their wax I pull.
I grind at mill
Their malt up still;








ROBIN GOOD-FELLO W. 59

I dress their hemp, I spin their tow
If any 'wake
And would me take,
I wend me, laughing, ho, ho, ho !

When house or harth doth sluttish lye,
I pinch the maidens black and blue;
The bed-clothes from the bedd pull I,
And lay them naked all to view.
'Twixt sleepe and wake
I do them take,
And on the key-cold floor them throw.
If out they cry,
Then forth I fly,
And loudly laugh out, ho, ho, ho !

When any need to borrowe ought,
We lend them what they do require,
And for the use demand we nought,
Our owne is all we do desire.
If to repay
They do delay,
Abroad amongst them then I go,
And night by night
I them affright
With pinchings, dreams, and ho, ho, ho!

When lazie queans have nought to do
But study how to cog and lye,
To make debate and mischief too,
'Twixt one another secretly,
I market their gloze,
And it disclose







60 SO!VGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.

To them whom they have wronged so;
When I have done
I get me gone,
And leave them scolding, ho, ho, ho !


When men do traps and engines set
In loop holes, where the vermine creep,
Who from their foldes and houses get
Their ducks and geese, and lambes and sheepe
I spy the gin,
And enter in,
And seeme a vermine taken so;
But when they there
Approach me neare,
I leap out laughing, ho, ho, ho !


By wells and rills, in meadows greene,
We nightly dance our hey-day guise,
And to our fairye king and queene
We chant our moonlight minstrelsies.
When larks 'gin sing,
Away we fling;
And babes new borne steal as we go,
And elfe in bed
We leave instead,
And wend us laughing, ho, ho, ho !


From hag-bred Merlin's time have I
Thus nightly revell'd to and fro,
And for my pranks men call me by
The name of Robin Good-fellow.







ROBIN GOOD-FELLOW 6

Fiends, ghosts, and sprites
Who haunt the nights,
The hags and goblins do me know,
And beldames old
My feats have told,
So vale, vale; ho, ho, ho !
OLD POEM.







62 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.









PUCK'S SONG.


OVER hill, over dale,
Through bush, through brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire,
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moone's sphere;
And I serve the fairy queen,
To dew the orbs upon the green .
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours ;
In those freckles live their savours:
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.







THE LEGEND OF PUCK THE FAIRY 63





THE LEGEND OF PUCK THE FAIRY.

WOULD'ST know what tricks, by the pale moonlight,
Are played by me, the merry little Sprite,
Who wing through air from the camp to the court,
From king to clown, and of all make sport;
Singing, I am the sprite
Of the merry midnight,
Who laugh at weak mortals, and love the moonlight.

To a miser's bed, where he snoring slept
And dreamt of his cash, I slily crept;
Chink, chink o'er his pillow like money I rang,
And he waked to catch-but away I sprang,
Singing, I am the sprite, &c.

I saw through the leaves in a damsel's bower,
She was waiting her love at that starlight hour:
"Hist, hist! quoth I, with an amorous sigh,
And she flew to the door, but away flew I,
Singing, I am the sprite, &c.

While a bard sat inditing an ode to his love,
Like a pair of blue meteors I star'd from above,
And he swoon'd-for he thought 'twas the ghost, poor
man !
Of his lady's eyes, while away I ran,
Singing, I am the sprite, &c.
THOMAS MOORE.







64 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.




THE FAIR TEMPLE;

OR, OBERON'S CHAPEL.

A WAY enchased with glass and beads
There is, that to the chapel leads,
Whose structure, for his holy rest,
Is here the Halcyon's curious nest:
Into the which who looks, shall see
His temple of idolatry,
Where he of godheads has such store,
As Rome's Pantheon had not more.
His house of Rimmon this he calls,
Girt with small bones, instead of walls.
First, in a niche, more black than jet,
His idol-cricket there is set;
Then in a polished oval by,
There stands his idol-beetle-fly :
Next, in an arch, akin to this,
His idol-canker seated is :
Then in a round, is placed by these
His golden god, Cantharides.
So that where'er ye look, ye see
No capital, no cornice free,
Or frieze, from this fine frippery.
Now, this the fairies would have known,
Theirs is a mixed religion :
And some have heard the elves it call
Part Pagan, part Papisticall.
If unto me all tongues were granted,
I could not speak the saints here painted.







THE TEMPLE. 65

Saint Tit, Saint Nit, Saint Is, Saint Itis,
Who againstt Mab's state placed here right is.
Saint Will-o'-th'-Wisp, of no great bigness,
But alias called here fa/uis ignis.
Saint Frip, Saint Trip, Saint Fill, Saint Fillie,
Neither those other saintships will I
Here go about for to recite
Their number, almost infinite,
Which, one by one, here set down are
In this most curious calendar.
First, at the entrance of the gate,
A little puppet-priest doth wait,
Who squeaks to all the comers there,
" Favour your tongues, who enter here,
Pure hands bring hither, without stain."
A second pules, Hence, hence, profane."
Hard by, i' th' shell of half a nut,
The holy water there is put;
A little brush of squirrels hairs,
Composed of odd, not even pairs,
Stands in the platter or close by
To purge the fairy family.
Near to the altar stands the priest,
There offering up the Holy Grist;
Ducking in mood and perfect tense,
With (much good do't him) reverence.
The altar is not here four-square,
Nor in a form triangular;
Nor made of glass, or wood, or stone,
But of a little transverse bone
Which boys and bruckelled children call
(Playing for points and pins) cockall.
Whose linen drapery is a thin,
5







66 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.

Subtile, and ductile codlin's skin :
Which o'er the board is smoothly spread
With little seal-work damasked.
The fringe that circumbinds it, too,
Is spangle work of trembling dew,
Which, gently gleaming, makes a show,
Like frost-work glitt'ring on the snow.
Upon this fetuous board doth stand
Something for shew-bread, and at hand
(Just in the middle of the altar)
Upon an end, the Fairy-psalter,
Graced with the trout-fly's curious wings,
Which serve for watched ribbonings.
Now, we must know, the elves are led
Right by the Rubric, which they read:
And if report of them be true,
They have their text for what they do,
Ay, and their book of canons too.
And, as Sir Thomas Parson tells,
They have their Book of Articles :
And if that Fairy Knight not lies,
They have their Book of Homilies;
And other Scriptures, that design
A short, but righteous discipline.
The basin stands the board upon
To take the Free Oblation,
A little pin-dust, which they hold
More precious than we prize our gold;
Which charity hey give to many
Poor of the parish, if there's any.
Upon the ends of these neat rails,
Hatched with the silver-light of snails,
The elves, in formal manner, fix







THE TEMPLE. 67

Two pure and holy candlesticks,
In either which a small tall bent
Burns for the altar's ornament.
For sanctity, they have, to these,
Their curious copes and surplices
Of cleanest cobweb, hanging by
In their religious vestery.
They have their ash-pans and their brooms,
To purge the chapel and the rooms;
Their many mumbling mass-priests here,
And many a dapper chorister.
Their ushering vergers, here likewise,
Their canons and their chanteries:
Of cloister-monks they have enow,
Ay, and their abbey-lubbers too.
And if their legend do not lie,
They much affect the Papacy;
And since the last is dead, there's hope
Elve Boniface shall next be Pope.
They have their cups and chalices,
Their pardons and indulgences;
Their beads of nuts, bells, books, and wax
Candles, forsooth, and other knacks;
Their holy oil, their fasting spittle,
Their sacred salt here, not a little.
Dry chips, old shoes, rags, grease, and bones,
Beside their fumigations,
To drive the devil from the cod-piece
Of the friar, of work an odd piece,
Many a trifle, too, and trinket,
And for what use, scarce man would think it.
Next then, upon the chanter's side
An apple's core is hung up dried,







68 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.

With rattling kernels, which is rung
To call to morn and even-song.
The saint, to which the most he prays
And offers incense nights and days,
The lady of the lobster is,
Whose foot-pace he doth stroke and kiss,
And humbly chives of saffron brings,
For his most cheerful offerings.
When, after these, he's paid his vows,
He lowly to the altar bows:
And then he dons the silkworms shed,
Like a Turk's turban on his head,
And reverently departeth thence,
Hid in a cloud of frankincense ;
And by the glow-worm's light well-guided,
Goes to the feast that's now provided.

ROBERT HERRICK.







OBER ION'S PEAS. 69





OBERON'S FEAST.

A LITTLE mushroom-table spread,
After short prayers they set on bread,
A moon-parched grain of purest wheat,
With some small glitt'ring grit, to eat
His choice bits with; then in a trice
They make a feast less great than nice.
But all this while his eye is served,
We must not think his ear was starved;
But that there was in place to stir
His spleen, the chirring grasshopper,
The merry cricket, puling fly,
The piping gnat for minstrelsy.
And now, we must imagine first,
The elves present, to quench his thirst,
A pure seed-pearl of infant dew,
Brought and besweetened in a blue
And pregnant violet; which done,
His kitling eyes begin to run
Quite through the table, where he spies
The horns of papery butterflies,
Of which he eats ; and tastes a little
Of that we call the cuckoo's spittle.
A little fuz-ball pudding stands
By, yet not blessed by his hands,
That was too coarse; but then forthwith
He ventures boldly on the pith
Of sugared rush, and eats the sagg
And well bestrutted bee's sweet bag;







70 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.

Gladding his palate with some store
Of emmets' eggs; what would he more,
But beards of mice, a newt's stewed thigh,
A bloated earwig, and a fly;
With the red-capped worm, that's shut
Within the concave of a nut,
Brown as his tooth. A little moth,
Late fattened in a piece of cloth;
With withered cherries, mandrake's ears,
Mole's eyes ; to these the slain stag's tears;
The unctuous dewlaps of a snail,
The broke-heart of a nightingale
O'ercome in music; with a wine
Ne'er ravished from the flattering vine,
But gently pressed from the soft side
Of the most sweet and dainty bride,
Brought in a dainty daisy, which
He fully quaffs up to bewitch
His blood to height; this done, commended
Grace by his priest; the feast is ended.

ROBERT HERRICK.







OBERON S PALACE. 71




OBERON'S PALACE.

FULL as a bee with thyme, and red
As cherry harvest, now high fed
For lust and action on he'll go
To lie with Mab, though all say no.
Lust has no ears; he's sharp as thorn,
And fretful, carries hay in 's horn,
And lightning in his eyes; and flings
Among the elves, if mov'd, the stings
Of pettish wasps; well know his guard,
Kings, though they're hated, will be feared.
Wine led him on. Thus to a grove,
Sometimes devoted unto love,
Tinselled with twilight, he and they
Led by the shine of snails, a way
Beat with their numerous feet, which by
Many a neat perplexity,
Many a turn, and many a cross-
Track, they redeem a bank of moss
Spongy and swelling, and far more
Soft then the finest Lemster ore:
Mildly disparkling, like those fires
Which break from the enjewelled tyres
Of curious brides; or like those mites
Of candied dew in moony nights.
Upon this convex, all the flowers
Nature begets by th' sun and showers,
Are to a wild digestion brought,
As if Love's sampler here was wrought;







72 SONGS AND POEJfS OF FAIRYLANrD.

Or Citherea's ccston, which
All with temptation doth bewitch.
Sweet airs move here, and more divine
Made by the breath of great-eyed kine,
Who, as they low, empearl with milk
The fern-leav'd grass, or moss like silk.
The breath of monkeys met to mix
With musk-flies, are th' aromatics
Which cense this arch; and here and there,
And farther off, and everywhere
Throughout that brave mosaic yard,
Those picks or diamonds in the card,
With pips of hearts, of club and spade,
Are here most neatly interlaid.
Many a counter, many a die,
Half rotten and without an eye,
Lies hereabouts ; and for to pave
The excellency of this cave,
Squirrels' and children's teeth late shed,
Are neatly here enchequered,
With brownest toadstones, and the gum
That shines upon the bluer plum.
The nails fall'n off by whit-flaws : Art's
Wise hand enchasing here those warts
Which we to others (from ourselves)
Sell, and brought hither by the elves.
The tempting mole, stol'n from the neck
Of the shy virgin, seems to deck
The holy entrance ; where within,
The room is hung with the blue skin
Of shifted snake; enfriezed throughout
With eyes of peacocks' trains, and trout-
Flies' curious wings ; and these among







OBERONS PALACE. 73

Those silver-pence, that cut the tongue
Of the red infant, neatly hung.
The glow-worm's eyes, the shining scales
Of silv'ry fish, wheat-straws, the snail's
Soft candle-light, the kitling's eyne,
Corrupted wood, serve here for shine.
No glaring light of bold-faced day,
Or other over-radiant ray,
Ransacks this room ; but what weak beams
Can make reflected from these gems,
And multiply; such is the light,
But ever doubtful, day or night.
By this quaint taper-light, he winds
His errors up; and now he finds
His moon-tanned Mab, as somewhat sick,
And, love knows, tender as a chick.
Upon six plump dandelions, high-
Reared, lies her elvish majesty,
Whose woolly bubbles seemed to drown
Her Mabship in obedient down;
For either sheet was spread the caul
That doth the infant's face enthral,
When it is born, by some enstyled
The lucky omen of the child;
And next to these, two blankets o'er-
Cast of the finest gossamer;
And then a rug of carded wool,
Which, sponge-like, drinking in the dull
Light of the moon, seemed to comply,
Cloud-like, the dainty deity.
Thus soft she lies; and overhead
A spinner's circle is bespread
With cobweb curtains, from the roof







74 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.

So neatly sunk, as that no proof
Of any tackling can declare
What gives it hanging in the air.
The fringe about this, are those threads
Broke at the loss of maidenheads;
And all behung with these pure pearls
Dropt from the eyes of ravished girls
Or writhing brides, when panting they
Give unto love the straighter way.
In music now he has the cries
Of fained-lost virginities;
The which the elves make to excite
A more unconquered appetite.
The king's undressed ; and now upon
The gnat's watchword the elves are gone.
And now the bed, and Mab possessed
Of this great-little kingly quest,
We'll nobly think what's to be done,
He'll do no doubt. This flax is spun.

ROBERT HERRICK.








THE WATER LADY. 75





THE WATER LADY.

ALAS, the moon should ever beam
To show what man should never sec !-
I saw a maiden on a stream,
And fair was she !

I staid awhile, to see her throw
Her tresses back, that all beset
The fair horizon of her brow
With clouds of jet.

I staid a little while to view
Her cheek, that wore in place of red
The bloom of water, tender blue,'
Daintily spread.

I staid to watch, a little space,
Her parted lips if she would sing;
The waters closed above her face
With many a ring.

And still I staid a little more,
Alas she never comes again !
I throw my flowers from the shore,
And watch in vain.

In a little water-colour sketch by Severn, given to Mrs. Hood by
Keats, the nymph's complexion was of a pale blue.







76 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.

I know my life will fade away,
I know that I must vainly pine,
For I am made of mortal clay,
But she's divine.
THOMS HOOD.







THE PIXIES. 77






THE PIXIES.

THE frost hath spread a shining net
Where last the autumn roses blew
On lake and stream a seal is set
Where floating lilies charmed the view ;
So silently the wonder grew
Beneath pale Dian's mystic light,
I know my fancies whisper true,
The Pixies are abroad to-night.

When at the midnight chime are met
Together elves of every hue,
I trow the gazer will regret
That peers upon their retinue;
For limb awry and eye askew
Have oft proclaimed a fairy's spite-
Peep slyly, gallants, lest ye rue,
The Pixies are abroad to-night.

'Tis said their forms are tiny, yet
All human ills they can subdue,
Or with a wand or amulet
Can win a maiden's heart for you;
And many a blessing know to strew
To make the way to wedlock bright;
Give honour to the dainty crew,
The Pixies are abroad to-night.







78 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.

ENVOY.
Prince, e'en a prince might vainly sue,
Unaided by a fairy's might;
Remember Cinderella's shoe,
The Pixies are abroad to-night.

SAMUEL MINTON PECK.







SONG OF THE WATER SPRITE. 79








SONG OF THE WATER SPRITE.

THE weary sun, all golden red,
Sinks in the sea;
All fiery glows his ocean bed-
There seek me;
For there, my floating tresses lave
In the golden fires of the crystal wave,
For ever free !


When Vesper first peers through the sky
O'er wild Tiree,
And twinkling darts her light from high-
There find me;
The clear air nerves my gossamer wing,
And I love to hear the star-sprites sing,
For ever free !


The mildly radiant Queen of Night
Dreams o'er the sea,
And bathes the deep in silv'ry light-
There seek me;
For there I skim her watery glass,
And I merrily watch each spirit pass,
For ever free !







So SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRILAND.

I love the Sun-I love the Moon-
So fair to see;
I love the little twinkling stars,
And they love me ;
I, too, love my emerald home,
With its coral cells neathh the sparkling foam
For ever free !


For there, we lightly trip around
The coral tree,
And quickly beat the pearly ground
All merrily :
While o'er us, as we gaily sing,
All the crystal domes with music ring,
For ever free !


When sun, or stars, are shining bright
Down through the sea,
When pure domes flushed in sunset light
Change gloriously,
We play with murmuring rose-lipp'd shells,
Or we sail a-down clear waterfalls,
For ever free !


We hear, in each cool sparry cave,
Plaint melody
Sung by the mermaids of the wave,
iEolianly !
While ocean's coral groves around,
With the witching syren-notes resound,
For ever free !







SONG OF THE WATER SPRIIE 8r

Hark hark the sweet-voiced choir renew
Their symphony !
All quivering with a rainbow hue
In ecstasy,
Our spangled wings now waft us high,
Through the mazy paths of the starry sky,
For ever free 1
ANDREW JAMES SYMINGTON.





























6







82 SONGS AND POEMfS OF FAIRYLAND.






THE NIX.


THE crafty Nix, more false than fair,
Whose haunt in arrowy Isa lies,
She envied me my golden hair,
She envied me my azure eyes.

The moon with silvery ciphers traced
The leaves, and on the waters played;
She rose, she caught me round the waist,
She said, Come down with me, fair maid."

She led me to her crystal grot,
She set me in her coral chair,
She waved her hand, and I had not
Or azure eyes or golden hair.

Her locks of jet, her eyes of flame
Were mine, and hers my semblance fair;
0 make me, Nix, again the same,
O give me back my golden hair !"

She smiles in scorn, she disappears,
And here I sit and see no sun,
My eyes of fire are quenched in tears,
And all my darksome locks undone.
R. GARNETT.








A LEGEND OF THE VWATER-SPIRIT. 83





A LEGEND OF THE WATER-SPIRIT CALLED
NECKAN.

DARK and deep and calm as night
Flows the stream along;
Quiet in the evening light,
As love's fulness strong
Flowing, flowflowing,flowing on
Swift as sweet days come and gone,
Low murmuring like Eternity,
Softly step two children bright,
Hearkening for the Water-Sprite,
Nigh unto the alder-tree
Where at evening singeth he
As he doth sing to-night,
Floating on the azure tide
Fairer than an earthly bride.
While the river flows along,
Hearken to the spirit's song:
Softly falls the summer
Over all the land,
Softly flows the river
Past its mossy strand,
Over-arched by wild-rose bowers,
Clustered with the woodbine flowers
Hanging down their fragrant tresses
Over shady cool recesses,
Where the water-lilies gleam
Tranquil on the moving stream.







84 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.

Deep beneath, the spirits glide
Who know not sorrow, hate, nor pride;
Loving earth with its fair things,
Mountain and valley and sunny lea,
But most the rivers so pure and free,
Sparkling fountains, secret springs,
Dewy flowers in radiant bloom,
Morning glories, midnight gloom,
Loving all things pure and bright
With unspeakable delight.
Learning from the starry skies
Everlasting mysteries."
Sudden ceased both lyre and song
(Softly flowed the stream along),
For thus spake those children young:
"Oh, Neckan, what availeth thee
To sing and play so gloriously
In perfect exultation ?
What avail the starry skies,
Or the splendour of thine eyes,
Or the unsealed mysteries ?
For thee is no salvation !"
Weeping sore the Spirit threw
Far his golden-stringed lyre,
Piteous wailing, wild and shrill,
Sank he in the waters blue;
In a fairy-ring of fire
Once they flashed and then were still.
Homeward turned the children bright
Through the meadows green and wide,
Soon their father's knee beside
Told they of the Water-Sprite.
Grave he heard them, answering then







A LEGEND OF THE WA TER-SPIRIT. 85

Nay, my children, ye were wrong
Thus to mar the Spirit's song.
Haste to-morrow to the glen
When the light is fair and dim
That the sunset giveth,
Tell the Spirit that for him,
Him too the Saviour liveth."
On the morrow when the sun
To the western gates had run,
Forth there stepped those children bright
Hearkening for the Water-Sprite.
Soon they heard him wailing low
In his sad extreme of woe,
Underneath the alder-tree
Weeping in his misery.
Softly drew the children near,
Softly spake: Oh, Spirit, hear,
Our sire this comfort giveth:
God has sent His Son to be
The World's Redeemer, then for thee
See I the Redeemer liveth !"
Then the Spirit wept no more,
Golden-stringed lyre he strung,
Soon melodious echoes rung
From the farther, wooded shore.
Gloriously he played and sung,
Whilst the sun withdrew his light,
Slowly rose behind the trees
Orion and the Pleiades,
And still went singing on the joyful Water-
Sprite.
1MARGARET DIXON.







86 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.





THE MERMAID.

SOH, where won ye, my bonny lass,
Wi' look sae wild an' cheery?
There's something in that witching face
That I lo'e wonder dearly."

"I live where the harebell never grew,
Where the streamlet never ran,
Where the winds o' Heaven never blew-
Now find me gin you can."

"'Tis but your wild an' wily way,
The gloaming makes you eerie
For ye are the lass o' the Braken-Brae,
An nae lad maun come near ye:

"But I am sick, an' very sick,
Wi' a passion strange and new,
For ae kiss of thy rosy cheeks
And lips o' coral hue."




Go, hie you from this lonely brake,
Nor dare your walk renew;
For I'm the Maid of the Mountain Lake,
An' I come wi' the falling dew."







THE MERM3AIAD. 87

" Be you the maid of the Crystal Wave,
Or she of the Braken Brae;
One tender kiss I mean to have;
You shall not say me nay.

For beauty's like the daisy's vest,
That shrinks from the early dew;
But soon it opes its bonny breast,
An' sae may it fare wi' you."

"Kiss but this hand, I humbly sue,
Ev'n there I'll rue the stain;
For the health of men will dim its hue,
It will ne'er be pure again.

"For passion's like the burning beal
Upon the mountain's brow,
That wastes itself to ashes pale,
And sae will it fare with you.




"Oh, mother, mother, make my bed,
And make it soft and easy;
And with the cold dew bathe my head,
For pains of anguish seize me :

"Or stretch me in the chill blue lake,
To quench this bosom's burning;
An' lay me by yon lonely brake,
For hope there's none returning.







88 SONGS AND POEMiS OF FAIRYLAND.

I've been where man should not have been,
Oft in my lonely roaming;
And seen what man should not have seen
By greenwood in the gloaming.

Oh, passion's deadlier than the grave,
A' human things undoing;
The Maiden of the Mountain Wave
Has lured me to my ruin !"



'Tis now an hundred years an' more,
An' all these scenes are over,
Since rose his grave on yonder shore
Beneath the wild wood cover;

An' late I saw the Maiden there,
Just as the daylight faded,
Braiding her locks o' gowden hair,
And singing as she braided:

MhERMAID'S SONG.

Lie still, my love, lie still and sleep,
Long is thy night of sorrow ;
The Maiden of the Mountain deep
Shall meet you on the morrow.

But oh, when shall that morrow be,
That my true love shall waken?
When shall we meet, refined an' free,
Amid the moorland braken ?







THE MERMAID. 89

Full low and lonely is thy bed,
The worm even flies thy pillow;
Where now the lips, so comely red,
That kissed me neathh the willow ?

Oh, I must laugh, do as I can,
Ev'n, mid my song of mourning,
At all the fuming freaks of man,
To which there's no returning.

Lie still, my love, lie still and sleep-
Hope lingers o'er thy slumber;
What though thy years beneath the steep
Should all its stones outnumber ?

Though moons steal o'er an' seasons fly
On time's swift wing unstaying,
Yet there's a spirit in the sky,
That lives o'er thy decaying.

In domes beneath the water-springs,
No end hath my sojourning;
An' to this land of fading things
Far hence be my returning;

For spirits now have left the deep,
Their long last farewell taken:
Lie still, my love, lie still an' sleep,
The day is near the breaking !

When my loved flood from fading day
No more its gleam shall borrow,
Nor heath-fowl from the moorland grey
Bid the blue dawn good-morrow;







90 SONGS AND POEMS OF F AIRYLAND.

The Mermaid o'er thy grave shall weep,
Without one breath of scorning :
Lie still, my love, lie still an' sleep,
And fare thee well till morning !
JAMES HOGG.







SONG OF THE WATER NIXIES. 91



SONG OF THE WATER NIXIES.

BY the ripple, ripple of the shallow sea,
By the rocky sea,
By the hollow sea,
We have built a giant windmill, with its long arms free,
And it grinds, that we
May not hungry be.
With a rumble and a roar, sounding all along the shore,
We should vanish and should perish if our wheel were heard
no more.

Little hopes of fisher maidens in the far-off town,
In our wheel go down,
Evermore go down,
For the fisher lads that hold them in the deep sea drown;
By our grinding drown,
For our pleasures drown.
Rend the garment from the soul; let it go, we care not
where;
What do mortals want with spirit? 'Tis the bodies that are
fair.

Out beyond the green horizon lurks the vengeful day,
Lurks the fateful day,
Lurks the hateful day.
When the winds shall cease to help us in our shark-like play,
When our calm cold sway
Shall have passed away,
When the wreckers and the wrecked both at peace shall be,-
When the threat shall be fulfilled, and there be no more sea.
SARAH WILLIAMS.







92 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.






FLOWER FAIRIES.


FLOWER Fairies have you found them,
When the summer dusk is falling,
With the glow-worms all around them,
Have you heard them softly calling?


Calling through your garden spaces
Notes like fairy bells set ringing,
Heard from out enchanted places
Whence the fairy bees come winging ?


Silent stand they through the noonlight
In their flower shapes fair and quiet,
But they quit then in the moonlight,
In its beams to sing and riot.


I have heard them, I have seen them,
From their petals light-like raying,
And the trees would fain have been them
The great trees too old for playing.


Hundreds of them altogether,
Flashing flocks of flying fairies,
Crowding through the summer weather,
Seeking where the coolest air is.







FLO 1 VER FAIRIES. 93

And they tell the trees that know them,
As upon their boughs they hover,
Of the things that chance below them,
How the rose has a new lover.

And the roses laugh, protesting
That the lilies are as fickle;
Then they look where birds are nesting,
And their feathers softly tickle.

Then away they all go sweeping,
Having had their fill of gladness,
But the trees, their night-watch keeping,
Feel a tender, loving sadness.

For they know of bleak December,
When each bough to pain left bare is,
When they only shall remember
Those bright visiting of fairies.

When the roses and the lilies
Shall be gone to come back never,
To a land where all so still is
That they sleep and sleep for ever.

PHILIP BOURKE MARSTON.







94 SONGS AND POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.







SONG OF THE TWILIGHT FAIRIES.

VESTAL moon, vestal moon,
Star of Love's delight,
Rise, and gild our'festal noon-
Noon of Fairy-night.
Vestal moon, vestal moon,
Up the golden height,
Thou art rising to thy noon-
We to Love's delight.
Fairies hide in cowslip bells
Through the garish light;
Naiads rest in purple shells,
By the sea-marge bright.

Fairy-Queen, appear, appear,
From thy citron nest;
Wake, 0 wake come, Sweet, for here
Shines the moonlight blest.
Golden Fairies in the sun
Wind their elfin horn,
Where the dancing streamlets run,
And the Day is born.
Silver Fairies haunt the night
When the Sun's asleep;
Azure Fays the heavenly height,
'Mid the starry sheep.







SONG OF THE TWILIGHT FAIRIES. 95

Fays of Silver, Gold, and Blue
Wake to Love's delight;
Drink your fill of sweet May-dew,
Chase the star-flakes bright.
Lo we come, we come, we come,
From the foxglove bells,
Some from golden brake, and some
From the asphodels.
Vestal moon, vestal moon,
From your golden height,
Gaze through all the fairy noon
On our Love's delight.
THOMAS LAKE HARRIS.







96 SOIGS AN)D POEMS OF FAIRYLAND.





FAIRIES ON THE SEA-SHORE.

First Fairy. My home and haunt are in every leaf
Whose life is a summer day bright and brief--
I live in the depths of the tulip's bower,
I wear a wreath of the cistus flower,
I drink the dew of the blue harebell,
I know the breath of the violet well,-
The white and the azure violet;
But I know not which is the sweetest yet,-
I have kiss'd the cheek of the rose,
I have watched the lily unclose,
My silver mine is the almond tree,
Who will come dwell with flower and me?


C/orus of Fairics. Dance we our round, 'tis a summer
night,
And our steps are led by the glow-worm's light.


Second Fairy. My dwelling is in the serpentine
Of the rainbow's colour'd line,-
See how its rose and amber clings
To the many hues of my radiant wings;
Mine is the step that bids the earth
Give to the iris flower its birth,
And mine the golden cup to hide,
Where the last faint hue of the rainbow died.




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Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs