• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Half Title
 Chapter I: How the first giants...
 Half Title
 Chapter II: Gargantua is born
 Chapter III: Gargantua as...
 Chapter IV: The royal tailor's...
 Chapter V: The year Gargantua had...
 Chapter VI: How Gargantua was taught...
 Chapter VII: The new master found...
 Chapter VIII: Gargantua goes to...
 Chapter IX: The Parisians laugh...
 Chapter X: Ponocrates, the new...
 Chapter XI: The two hundred and...
 Chapter XII: Gargantua is dosed...
 Chapter XIII: How Gargantua was...
 Chapter XIV: How the awful war...
 Chapter XV: How old King Grandgousier...
 Chapter XVI: How Grandgousier tried...
 Chapter XVII: How Gargantua, with...
 Chapter XVIII: How Gargantua combed...
 Chapter XIX: How Friar John comes...
 Chapter XX: Gargantua's mare scores...
 Chapter XXI: Showing what Gargantua...
 Chapter XXII: Grandgousier's death...
 Chapter XXIII: The strange things...
 Chapter XXIV: After studying at...
 Chapter XXV: Pantagruel finds Panurge,...
 Chapter XXVI: Pantagruel beats...
 Chapter XXVII: What sort of man...
 Chapter XXVIII: Showing why the...
 Chapter XXIX: How the cunning of...
 Chapter XXX: How Carpalim went...
 Chapter XXXI: The strange way in...
 Chapter XXXII: The wonderful way...
 Chapter XXXIII: How Pantagruel...
 Chapter XXXIV: Gargantua comes...
 Chapter XXXV: Pantagruel starts...
 Chapter XXXVI: Panurge bargains...
 Chapter XXXVII: The Island...
 Chapter XXXVIII: How Pantagruel...
 Chapter XXXIX: A great storm, in...
 Chapter XL: The Island of the Macreons...
 Chapter XLI: Pantagruel touches...
 Chapter XLII: Pantagruel, with...
 Chapter XLIII: Which tells of several...
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Three good giants : whose famous deeds are recorded in the ancient chronicles of Franc÷ois Rabelais
Title: Three good giants
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055495/00001
 Material Information
Title: Three good giants whose famous deeds are recorded in the ancient chronicles of Franco̦is Rabelais
Physical Description: xxii, 246, xii, 4 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rabelais, François, ca. 1490-1553?
Dimitry, John Bull Smith, 1835-1901 ( Compiler )
Doré, Gustave, 1832-1883 ( Illustrator )
Robida, Albert, 1848-1926 ( Illustrator )
Pannemaker, Adolphe François, b. 1822 ( Engraver )
William D. Ticknor & Co ( Publisher )
Rockwell and Churchill ( Printer )
Publisher: Ticknor and Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: Rockwell and Churchill
Publication Date: 1888, c1887
Copyright Date: 1887
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Giants -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Tailors -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Kings and rulers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Clergy -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
War -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Islands -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1888   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1888   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1888
Genre: Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: compiled from the French by John Dimitry; illustrated by Gustave Doré and A. Robida.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by Pannemaker.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055495
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236393
notis - ALH6864
oclc - 03553095

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Preface
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
    Table of Contents
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Page xvi
    List of Illustrations
        Page xvii
        Page xviii
        Page xix
        Page xx
        Page xxi
        Page Page xxii
    Half Title
        Page xxiii
    Chapter I: How the first giants came into the world
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Half Title
        Page 5
    Chapter II: Gargantua is born
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Chapter III: Gargantua as a baby
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Chapter IV: The royal tailor's bill for Gargantua's suit
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Chapter V: The year Gargantua had wooden horses, and what use he made of them
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Chapter VI: How Gargantua was taught Latin
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Chapter VII: The new master found for Gargantua
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Chapter VIII: Gargantua goes to Paris, and the Big Mare that takes him there
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Chapter IX: The Parisians laugh at Gargantua - He takes his revenge by stealing the great bells of Notre Dame
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Chapter X: Ponocrates, the new teacher, desires Gargantua to show him how he used to study with old master Holofernes
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Chapter XI: The two hundred and fifteen games of cards Gargantua knew how to play
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Chapter XII: Gargantua is dosed by Ponocrates, and forgets all that Holofernes had taught him
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Chapter XIII: How Gargantua was made not to lose one hour of the day
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Chapter XIV: How the awful war between the bunmakers of Lerne and Gargantua's country was begun
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Chapter XV: How old King Grandgousier received the news
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Chapter XVI: How Grandgousier tried to buy peace with five cart-loads of buns
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Chapter XVII: How Gargantua, with a big tree, broke down a castle, and passed the Ford of Vede
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Chapter XVIII: How Gargantua combed cannon-balls out of his hair, and how he ate six pilgrims in a salad before supper
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Chapter XIX: How Friar John comes to the feast, and how King Grandgousier had recruited his army
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Chapter XX: Gargantua's mare scores a victory
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Chapter XXI: Showing what Gargantua did after the battle, and how Grandgousier welcomed him home
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    Chapter XXII: Grandgousier's death - Gargantua's marriage - Pantagruel is born
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    Chapter XXIII: The strange things Pantagruel did as a baby
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Chapter XXIV: After studying at several universities, Pantagruel goes to Paris
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
    Chapter XXV: Pantagruel finds Panurge, whom he loves all his life
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Chapter XXVI: Pantagruel beats the Sorbonne in argument, and Panurge proves that an Englishman's fingers are not so nimble as a Frenchman's
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
    Chapter XXVII: What sort of man Panurge was, and the many tricks he knew
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
    Chapter XXVIII: Showing why the leagues are so much shorter in France than in Germany
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
    Chapter XXIX: How the cunning of Panurge, with the aid of Eusthenes and Carpalim, discomfited six hundred and sixty horsemen
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
    Chapter XXX: How Carpalim went hunting for fresh meat, and how a trophy was set up
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
    Chapter XXXI: The strange way in which Pantagruel obtained a victory over the Thirsty People
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
    Chapter XXXII: The wonderful way in which Pantagruel disposed of the giant Loupgarou and his two hundred and ninety-nine giants
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
    Chapter XXXIII: How Pantagruel finally conquers the Thirsty People, and the strange business Panurge finds for King Anarchus
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
    Chapter XXXIV: Gargantua comes back from Fairy-land, after which Pantagruel prepares for another trip
        Page 178
        Page 179
    Chapter XXXV: Pantagruel starts on his travels, and lands at the Island of Pictures
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
    Chapter XXXVI: Panurge bargains with Dindeno for a ram, and throws his ram overboard
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
    Chapter XXXVII: The Island of Alliances
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
    Chapter XXXVIII: How Pantagruel came to the Islands of Tohu and Bohu
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
    Chapter XXXIX: A great storm, in which Panurge plays the coward
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
    Chapter XL: The Island of the Macreons and its forest, in which the heroes who are tempted by demons die
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
    Chapter XLI: Pantagruel touches at the wonderful Island of Ruach, where giant Widenostrils had found the cocks and hens which killed him
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
    Chapter XLII: Pantagruel, with his darts, kills a monster which cannon-balls could not hurt
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
    Chapter XLIII: Which tells of several islands, and the wonderful people who dwell in them
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
    Advertising
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Page xvi
        Advertising 17
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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GAANTUA ON TE TOWER OF OTRE ME.
Jjl












GARGAITUA ON THIE TOWIV OF NOTE DA-ME.








THREE GOOD GIANTS


WHOSE FAMOUS DEEDS ARE RECORDED IN THE
ANCIENT CHRONICLES

OF

FRANCOIS RABELAIS


COMPILED FROM THE FRENCH


JOHN DIMITRY, A.M.



Ellustrates bq Ottstabr lbre an A. I, 3^oiba











BOSTON
TICKNOR AND COMPANY
211 rricm no t 5ttet
1888

















































Copyright, iSS7

BY TICKNOR AND COMPANY


All rights reserved

































PRESS OF

ROCKIWELL AND CIUIL(CIIILL

liHOTON















AN EXPLANATION BY WAY OF PREFACE.



I FREELY admit what all the
world knows about FRANCOIS
RABELAIS.
L Long before the day when
' .. a Fielding and Smollett beaan to
be read on the sly, and before
'. the comic Muse of Congreve
S and Wycherly began to be
looked at askance, that English
.- moral sentiment, over which Ma-
'' I caulay was to philosophize more
S- than a century later, had solidi-
fied in ignoring Rabelais. Noth-
ing is to be said against the sentiment itself. This has always been
fairly righteous, if just a bit undiscriminating. A great humorist,
showing himself content to grovel in the dirt, is, beyond question,
deserving of black looks and shut doors. But more than most old
masters of a type, strong, albeit coarse, Rabelais--from the dis-
tinctly marked physical attributes of his chief personages may
claim certain good points which, drawn out and grouped together,
ought to fall within the circle of those tales which interest children.
I have read Rabelais twice in my life. Each time, I have read







vi AN EXPLANATION BY WAY OF PREFACE.

him in that old French, which has no master quite so great as he;
and each time in Auguste Desrez's edition, which, in its careful
Table des iMatires, learned glossary, quaint notes, Gallicized Latin
and Greek words, and a complete Rabelaisiana, shows the devotion
of the rare editor, who does not distort, because he understands,
the Master whom he edits. When I first peeped into his pages
I was a lad, altogether too young to be tainted by profanity,
while I skipped, true boy-fashion, whole pages to pick out the
wondrous story of his Giants. When I came back to him, after
many years, I was both older and, I hope, wiser. Being older,
I had learned to gauge him better, both in his strength and in his
weakness. I had come to see wherein an old prejudice was too
just to be safely resisted; and, on the other hand, wherein it had
got to be so deeply set that it had hardened to injustice. As I went
on, it did not take me long to discover that it was quite possible for
my purpose following, indeed, the path unconsciously taken in my
boyhood--to divide Rabelais sharply into incident and philosophy.
That this had not been thought of before surprised, but did not daunt
me. I said to myself: 1 shall limit the incident strictly to his three
Giants; I shall hold these, from grandfather to grandson, well to-
gether; keep all that is sound in them; cut away the impurity which
is not so much of as around them; chisel them out as a sculptor
might, and leave his philosophy with face to the wall. This done,
I turned the scouring hose, full and strong, upon the incidents them-
selves, clearing out both dialectics and profanity thoroughly. I did
not stop until I had left the famous trio, GRANDGOUSIER, GARGANTUA,
and PANTAGRUEL where I had, from the first, hoped to place them, -
high and dry above the scum which had so long clogged their rare
good-fellowship, and which had made men of judgment blind to
the genuine worth that was in them.








AN EXPLANATION BY 1WAY OF PREFACE. vii

In this way I believed that I saw the chance to free Rabelais'
Giants, so long kept in bonds, from a captivity which has dishonored
them. To do this was clearly running against that good old law
which has invariably made all Giants- far back from fairy-time-
thunder-voiced, great-toothed, rude-handed, hard-hearted, bloody-
minded creatures and truculent captors, never, on any account, piti-
ful captives. But, to such, the Rabelaisian Giants are none of kin.
No more are they of blood to that Giant that Jack slew, or that
Giant Despair, in whose garden-court Bunyan dreamt that he saw
the white bones of slaughtered pilgrims.
Public sentiment has hitherto illogically retched at the name of
Rabelais, while it swallows without qualm "Tristram Shandy" and
"Gulliver's Travels." Shall it always retch? The time, I think, is
practically taking the answer into its own hands. Rabelais, through
some cotemporaneous influence, rising subtly in his favor among men
who are neither afraid nor ashamed to judge for themselves, is, in
one sense, slowly becoming a naturalized citizen of our modern Lit-
erary Republic. Literature and Art are joining hands in his reha-
bilitation. Mr. Walter Besant, a novelist, has been so good as to write
his life; to say bright words about him; and to quote clean things
from him. Mrs. Oliphant, a purist, has consented to admit him into
her "Foreign Classics for English Readers." Three years ago M.
Emile H6bert's bronze statue of him was unveiled at that Chinon, his
birthplace, which he lovingly calls "the most ancient city of the
world." And, to crown all, as the latest expression of a tardy recog-
nition, his bust by M. Trupheme was, only the other day, uncovered
at that Meudon of which he was, for a time, the famous, if not
always orthodox, Curk.
Rabelais himself never, it is clear, appreciated his Giants save for
the contrasted jollity which they lent to his satires.








viii AN EXPLANATION BY WAY OF PREFACE.

M3ieIlx est de ris que de larmes escripre,
Pour ce que rire est le propre de lhomme,"


was his maxim. But this maxim never rose to a creed. His Giants
seem, almost against his will, to stride beyond the territory of mere
burlesque. They are as easily free from theology as from science.
They have never been of La Bimctte. They are as far from Mont-
pellier. To these colossal creations, heroes fashioned in ridicule of
the old fantastico-chivalric deeds of 'their age, as they come down
more and more from the clouds, are more and more given the feel-
ings common to this earth's creatures. All three bear, from their
birth, a sturdy human sympathy not natural to their kind, as medi-
reval superstition classed it. Two of them, in being brought to the
level of humanity, join with this a simple Christian manliness and a
childlike faith under all emergencies, not set on their own massive
strength, but fixed on God, whom they had been taught to know,
and honor, and serve-and all this by whom? Forsooth, by the
same Francois Rabelais, laugher, mocker, and insensatee reviler."
From Grandgousier, the good-hearted guzzler, through Gargantua,
with his heady youth and wise old age, to "the noble Pantagruel,"
the gain in purity and Christian manhood is steady. The royal
race of Chalbroth follows no track beaten down by other kingly
lines known to history. While their line descends from father to
son, it ascends in virtue.
One charge a legacy from the narrow times when run-mad com-
mentators spied a plot in every folio -has followed, to this day, Rabe-
lais and his work. Wise men have, to their own satisfaction, proved
the latter to be an enigma filled with hidden meanings, dangerous to
state and morals; with mad attacks directed, from every chapter,
against ordered society with satiric thrusts lurking, in every sentence,








AN EXPLANATION BY WAY OF PREFACE. ix

against Pope, and King, and nobles; in brief, a Malay-muck run with
a pen, instead of a knife, against the moral foundations of the world.
All these, if not true, are certainly like, very like the Rabelais as
he is painted by purists in the gallery of great authors. If true,
they have wrought more subtly than all else in the forging of'those
heavy chains which have been bound, coil upon coil, around his hap-
less big men. It is not to be wondered at that even their mighty
number of cubits should have been smothered under the fine, slow-
settling dust of three centuries. Happily, however, fair play has
been, of old, the standing boast of all English-speaking men.
Francois Rabelais -never once deigning to ask for it at home, when
living -has, in penalty therefore, been ferociously denied it abroad,
when dead. To that sentiment--moved, it may be, by a concur-
rent testimony given, in this age, to the memory of the author
himself--I appeal now in behalf of his Giants. That they have
fared badly through all these centuries, mostly by reason of him,
cannot be gainsaid. That of themselves, however, they have in no
wise merited such ostracism, is what I have ventured to claim in
this compilation. Freed alike from that prejudice which has hunted
them down, and from those formidable

points of ignorance
Pertaining thereunto,"

which have, so far, blocked every avenue to modern sympathy,
I would have them honored, among all stout lovers of fair play,
as I leave them in this "Explanation by way of Preface."

J. D.


















CONTENTS.



PAGE
CHAPTER I.
How the First Giants came into the World 1


CHAPTER II.
Gargantua is Born 6


CHAPTER III.
Gargantua as a Baby 11


CHAPTER IV.
The Royal Tailor's Bill for Gargantua's Suit 15


CHAPTER V.
The Year Gargantua had Wooden Horses, and what Use he
made of them 18


CHAPTER VI.
How Gargantua was taught Latin 24


CHAPTER VII.
The new Master found for Gargantua 29








xii CO TENXTS.

PAGE
CHAPTER VIII.

Gargantua goes to Paris, and the Big Mare that takes him
there .


CHAPTER IX.

The Parisians laugh at Gargantua. He takes his Revenge by
stealing the Great Bells of N6tre Dame 35


CHAPTER X.

Ponocrates, the new Teacher, desires Gargantua to show him
how he used to study with old Master Holofernes 40


CHAPTER XI.

The Two Hundred and Fifteen Games of Cards Gargantua
knew how to play. What it was he said after he had gone
through the List, and what it was Ponocrates remarked 44


CHAPTER XII.

Gargantua is dosed by Ponocrates, and forgets all that Holo-
fernes had taught him 48


CHAPTER XIII.

How Gargantua was made not to lose one Hour of the Day 52


CHAPTER XIV.

How the Awful War between the Bunmakers of Lerne and Gar-
gantua's Country was began 57







CONTENT0. xiii

PAGE
CHAPTER XV.

How old King Grandgousier received the News 67


CHAPTER XVI.

How Grandgousier tried to buy Peace with Five Cart-loads of
Buns 71


CHAPTER XVII.

How Gargantua, with a Big Tree, broke down a Castle, and
passed the Ford of Vede 74


CHAPTER XVIII.

How Gargantua combed Cannon-Balls out of his Hair, and how
he ate Six Pilgrims in a Salad before Supper .


CHAPTER XIX.

How Friar John comes to the Feast, and how King Grandgousier
had recruited his Army 89


CHAPTER XX.

Gargantua's Mare scores a Victory 95


CHAPTER XXI.

Showing what Gargantua did after the Battle, and how Grand-
gousier welcomed him Home 102








xiv CONTTENTS.

PAGE
CHAPTER XXII.

Grandgousier's Death. Gargantua's Marriage. Pantagruel is
Born 10


CHAPTER XXIII.

The Strange Things Pantagruel did as a Baby 11


CHAPTER XXIV.

After studying at several Universities, Pantagruel goes to
Paris 118


CHAPTER XXV.

Pantagruel finds Panurge, whom he loves all his life 127


CHAPTER XXVI.

Pantagruel beats the Sorbonne in Argument, and Panurge
proves that an Englishman's fingers are not so nimble as a
Frenchman's 131


CHAPTER XXVII.

What sort of Man Panurge was, and the many Tricks he
knew .141


CHAPTER XXVIII.

Showing why the Leagues are so much shorter in France than
in Germany 146







CONTENTS. xv

PAGE
CHAPTER XXIX.

How the Cunning of Panurge, with the Aid of Eusthenes and
Carpalim, discomfited Six Hundred and Sixty Horsemen .150


CHAPTER XXX.

How Carpalim went hunting for Fresh Meat, and how a Trophy
was set up 156


CHAPTER XXXI.

The Strange Way in which Pantagruel obtained a Victory over
the Thirsty People 160


CHAPTER XXXII.

The Wonderful Way in which Pantagruel disposed of the Giant
Loupgarou and his Two Hundred and Ninety-Nine Giants 165


CHAPTER XXXIII.

How Pantagruel finally conquers the Thirsty People, and the
strange business Panurge finds for King Anarchus 172


CHAPTER XXXIV.

Gargantua comes back from Fairy-Land, after which Pantagruel
prepares for another Trip 178


CHAPTER XXXV.

Pantagruel starts on his Travels, and lands at the Island of Pict-
ures 180







xvi COUTELTS.

PAGE
CHAPTER XXXVI.
Panurge bargains with Dindeno for a Ram, and throws his Ram
overboard 188

CHAPTER XXXVII.
The Island of Alliances 195

CHAPTER XXXVIII.
How Pantagruel came to the Islands of Tohn and Bohu. The
Strange Death of Widenostrils, the Swallower of Windmills, 199

CHAPTER XXXIX.
A Great Storm, in which Panurge plays the Coward .

CHAPTER XL.
The Island of the Macreons and its Forest, in which the Heroes
who are tempted by Demons die 210

CHAPTER XLI.

Pantagruel touches at the Wonderful Island of Ruach, where
Giant Widenostrils had found the Cocks and Hens which
killed him. How the People lived by Wind 218

CHAPTER XLII.
Pantagruel, with his Darts, kills a Monster which Cannon-Balls
could not hurt. The Power of the Sign of the Cross 223

CHAPTER XLIII.

Which tells of several Islands, and the Wonderful People who
dwell in them 231

















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.




FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS.
PAGE
GARGANTUA ON THE TOWER OF NOTRE DAME FRONTISPIECE
FRIAR JOHN ATTACKS THE BUNMAKEPS 63
GARGANTUA DESTROYS THE CASTLE 79
THE DEFEAT OF PICROCHOLE 99
PANTAGRUEL ENTERS PARIS 123
THE DISPUTATION 137
THE DEATH OF LOUPGAROU 169
PANTAGRUEL IN THE GRAVEYARD 213
THE ISLE OF GANABIM 239
THE QUEEN OF LANTERNS 243


ENGRAVINGS IN THE TEXT.

PORTRAIT OF FRANCOIS RABELAIS .
CASTLE GRANDGOUSIER 1
THE GIANT CHALBROTH 2
THE GIANT HURTALI ON THE ARK. 4
INITIAL K .
KING GRANDGOUSIER KEEPS OPEN HOUSE 7
THE KING AND QUEEN LOVE TRIPES .
INITIAL W 11








xviii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
PAGE
" THE QUEEN LOOKED AT HER BABY" 11
AN UNCO-MON BABY CARRIAGE 12
" THE SERVANTS GOT TO BE SAD TOPERS" 13
INITIAL W 15
MAKING GARGANTUA'S SUIT 16
MEASURING GARGANTUAN FOR HIS SUIT 17
GARGANTUA AT PLAY 18
GARGANTUA'S HORSE 19
GARGANTUAS RIDING-LEssoS 20
" A NOBLE LORD CAME ON A VISIT" 21
" ONLY THREE LITTLE STEPS". 22
INITIAL 0 24
TUBAL HOLOFERNES 25
THE FRIEND WHO KNEW LATIN 26
FLIGHT OF THE TUTOR 28
INITIAL W 29
EUDEON 30
INITIAL T 32
GARGANTUA'S MARE 33
PONOCRATES 34
INITIAL T 35
GARGANTUA ENTERS PARIS 6
THE CITY WAS EXCITED 38
INITIAL G 40
GARGANTUAN GETS UP 41
GAGANTUA BREAKFASTS 42
GARGANTUA GOES TO CHUCH 43
INITIAL T 44
GARGANTUAN LOOKS INTO THE KITCHEN 46
INITIAL W 48
PONOCRATES DOSES GARGANTUA 49







LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. xix
PAGE
GARGANTUA AT HIS LESSONS 50
INITIAL E 52
GARGANTUA LEARNS TO SHOOT 53
GARGANTUA LEARNS TO CLIMB .. 54
GARGANTUA STUDIES ASTRONOMY .55
INITIAL W 57
THE BUNMAKERS OF LERNE 58
THE ANGER OF P1CROCHOLE 59
CAPTAIN SWILLWIND'S CAVALRY 61
SPOILING THE ONKS 62
FRIAR JOHN TO THE RESCUE 66
INITIAL W 67
PICROCHOLE'S ARM.LY 68
GRANDGOUSIER WRITES TO GARGANTUA 69
INITIAL K 71
GRANDGOUSIER'S EMBASSY 72
INITIAL 74
GARGANTUA HURRIES HOME 75
GY3MNASTE WARMS HIMSELF 76
THE CASTLE OF ROCHE-CLERMAUD. 77
CANNONADING GARGANTUA 78
INITIAL G 82
GARGANTUA COMBS HI8 HA 83
AND SUCH A SUPPER!" 85
THE PILGRIMS IN THE GARDEN 87
INITIAL 89
FRIAR JOHN ARRIVES .. 91
THE ADVANCE-GUARD STARTS 93
GRANDGOUSIER'S A 94
INITIAL T 95
MOUNTING FOR THE FRAY 96








xx LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
PAGE
THE ASSAULT 97
PICROCHOLE TAKES COURAGE 98
THE FLIGHT OF PICROCHOLE 101
INITIAL W 102
GARGANTUA'S CAPTIVES 103
GARGANTUA REWARDING THE A 105
THE WONDERFUL WINDING STAIRWAY 107
INITIAL A 109
THE DREADFUL DROUGHT 111
INITIAL G 113
THE FUNERAL OF QUEEN BADEBEC 114
PANTAGRUEL'S PORRINGER 115
PANTAGRtUEL CARRIES HIS CRADLE 117
INITIAL S 118
THE GREAT CROSS-BOW OF CHANTELLE 118
THE GREAT RAISED STONE 119
PANTAGRUEL VISITS HIS ANCESTORS' TOMB 120
PANTAGRUEL SETTLES AT ORLEANS. 121
PANTAGRUEL IN THE LIBRARY. 125
INITIAL 0 127
PANTAGRUEL MEETS PANURGE 129
INITIAL W 131
AT THE GATES OF SORBONNE 133
THAUMASTES VISITS PANTAGRUEL 134
" THE GREAT COLLEGE WAS PACKED" 135
PANURGE REPLIES 139
INITIAL T 141
PANURGE GETS MONEY 142
PANURGE AND THE DIRT-CARTS 143
PANURGE'S FUN 145
INITIAL A 146







LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. xxi
PAGE
PANTAGRUEL MARCHES TO ROUEN 147
INITIAL S ..150
THE VOYAGE BEGINS 151
PANURGE DISCOMFITS THE HRSEMEN 153
INITIAL W .. 156
CARPALIM CATCHES SOME FRESH MEAT 157
THE TROPHY 158
INITIAL W. 160
THE KING OF THE THIRSTY PEOPLE 161
THE SOLDIERS TRY PANTAGRUEL'S PASTE .163
INITIAL A 165
THE FIGHT WITH LOUPGARO 167
INITIAL A 172
WELCOME TO PANTAGRUEL 173
"GRANDER AND \li.-i-i ii.l THAN EVE 175
PANTAGRUEL RETURNS 176
INITIAL 0 178
INITIAL A 180
PANTAGRUEL PICKS HIS SHIPS 181
PANTAGRUEL SETS SAIL 182
LANDING AT THE ISLE OF PICTURES 183
PANTAGRUEL BUYS SOME STRANGE ANIMALS 185
THE LAND OF SATIN 187
INITIAL F 188
PANURGE WANTS A SHEEP 189
PANURGE BUYS A RAM 191
PANURGE THROWS HIS RAM OVERBOARD 193
THE SHEEP AND SHEPHERDS DROWN 194
INITIAL A 195
THE ACE-OF-CLUBS NOSES 197
INITIAL P 199







xxii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
PAGE
GIANT WIDENOSTRILS, THE SHALLOWER OF WINDMILLS 201
INITIAL T 203
A STORM COMES ON 204
PANTAGRUEL HOLDS THE MAST 205
A SEA BREAKS OVER PANURGE 206
LAND IN SIGHT. 207
IT WAS LATE IN THE AFTERNOON 208
INITIAL T 209
PANUREE REVIVES 211
" THE DARK AND GLOOMYI FOREST 212
THE DEMONS AND THE HEROES 215
" WE HAD LOST ANOTHER GOOD HERO. 217
INITIAL A 218
THE LAND OF WIND 19
" WITHOUT WIND WE MUST DIE" 221
INITIAL A 223
PANTAGRUEL SPIES A MONSTER 224
SHOOTING AT THE WHALE 225
PANTAGRUEL TRIES HIS HAND 226
DEATH OF THE MONSTER 227
LANDING THE MONSTER 228
ON WILD ISLAND 229
INITIAL N 231
THE HOSPITABLE FOLK OF PAPIMANY .232
"THE MAYOR RODE UP" 23
ENTERING THE FROZEN SEA 34
A SHOWER OF FROZEN WORDS 235
LANDING ON THE ROCKS 236
MASTER GASTER 237
SHARP ISLAND 241
THE SHORES OF LANTERN-LAND 245















THREE GOOD GIANTS.















iC. El%I.























HOW THE FIRST GIANTS CAME INTO THE WORLD.
his wicked brother Cain, made the soil very rich. Every fruit







at that particular time that the year came to be called the Year
THREE GOOD GIANTS.



CHAPTER I.

HOW THE FIRST GIANTS CAME INTO THE WORLD.


Now, in this "Year of the world the pure blood of Abel, shed by
his wicked botheat Cain, made the soil very rich. Every frait
seemed to grow that year to a dozen times its usual size. But
the fruit that seemed to thrive best, and to taste most toothsome, and
to be most eaten, was the inedlar. So much of that fruit was eaten
at that particular time that the year came to be called the "Year
of Medlars."
Now, in this Year of Medlars," the good men and women who
lived then happened to eat a little too much of this fine fruit. It was







2 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

all very nice while it was being eaten; but, somehow, after a little
time it was found that terrible swellings, but not all in the same place,
came out on those who had shown themselves too fond of the fruit.
Some grew big and twisted in their shoulders, and became what
were afterwards called Hunch-backs.
Some found
themselves with long-
er legs than others,
which, being quite as
thin and bony as they
were long, made ma-
licious people, who
had not eaten of the
fruit, shout, Crane
Crane! Long-legged
Crane!" whenever
one of the poor peo-
ple showed himself.
Some there were
who could boast of a
nose as red as it was
long and knotty,
-- -which made evil-
tongued men say they
had been more among
the grapes than among
the medlars. But this
was, after all, the fault
of the medlars. There
-- was no doubt of that.
Others, having a
special love for pick-
THE GIANT CIALBROTH. ing out everybody's
secrets, found their
medlars running into big ears, which grew so long that they soon







FIRST GIANTS. 3

hung down to their breasts. And those who once had the Big Ear
lost, after that, all desire for other people's secrets, because their ears
were so large they caught everything bad their neighbors were always
saying about them.
Others and now, listen--grew long in legs, but not longer in
legs than they grew stout in body, and it was from these people that
the Giants sprang. When those who grew so long in legs and so
stout in body began to walk on the earth, the neighbors did their best
to please them. You may be sure there was no talk about medlars
then.
The first who became known as a giant was called CHALBROTH.
CHALBnOTH was the father of all the Giants, and the great-grand-
father of Hurtali, who reigned in the time of the Deluge, and who
was lucky enough not to be drowned in the deep waters.
Doubtless, the eyes of some of my young readers are twinkling,
and they are ready to cry out very positively: Oh, no There was
no Giant in Noah's Ark, you know. How could there be? Only
Noah and his family were in the Ark. The Bible says that!"
There was one Wise Man, however, who lived a long time after
the first Giant had appeared, and after many great ones had been
noticed, and who had seen some with his own eyes. This Wise Man
had thought, in a quiet way, a great deal about the Big People, and,
through much study, had found out why it was they were not all
drowned.
This Wise Man makes himself very clear on this point. He says
that Hurtali -the great-grandson of Chalbroth, the first Giant- es-
caped the Deluge, not by getting into the Ark, it was altogether too
small for that, but by getting outside of it. In other words, he used
it as a man strides a horse, riding on top of it, with one huge leg hang-
ing over the right side and the other over the left. If Hurtali was
very heavy, the Blessed Ark was very stout. He got so used to his
seat after a while, that, being on the outside, and able to see everything
around him, he made his long legs do for the Ark just what the rudder
of a ship does for her. He must have saved it from many and many a
rough shock against jutting mountains and sharp rocks as the waters







4 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

were rising, and as, after covering the earth, they began to sink lower
and lower; but it may be relied on since the Wise Man says so -
that, during the forty days and nights, Giant Hurtali was on the best




,Z,














THRE GIANT HURTALI ON THE ARK.

"of terms with Noah and all his family.
. This might look strange; but it appears
.' S that there was on the top of the Ark a
chimney, and it was through this chim-
ney that Hurtali could always, for the
asking, have his share of his favorite pottage handed up to him.
It would really be of no use to tell the names of all the Giants
who came between Hurtali and our merry old King Grandgousier.
Some of them you already know. Long after -Hurtali came Goliath,
the Giant, whom young David slew with his sling and stone; Briareus,
the Greek Giant of a hundred hands; King Porus, the Indian Giant,
who fought with Alexander, and was defeated by him; and the famous
Giant Bruyer, slain by Ogier the Dane, Peer of France. There are so







FIRST GIANTS. 5

many of them that I would soon grow tired of giving, and you of hear-
ing, even their names. All that we care about knowing is that, in a
straight line from Hurtali, the Giant who rode on the Blessed Ark, the
fifty-fourth was GRANDGOUSIER, who was the father of GARGANTUA,
who, in his turn, was the father of PANTAGRUEL.
These are the three Giants whose story I am about to tell, two
of whom will prove more wonderful heroes than are to be read of either
in ancient or modern history.












CHAPTER II.

GARGANTUA S1 BORN.

ING GRANDGOUSIER the fifty-
- ^--- seventh in a straight line from Chal-
-'1 \,- [ 'broth, the first Giant was a jovial
SKing in his day. Although a Giant,
-" \ he was the pink of politeness and kindly
feeling. His whole life was one con-
_l tinual dinner. He was very fond of his
1\ Iown ease, this jovial King, but he also
loved to make those around him happy.
He kept open house, and the sun never
rose on a day when there was not some
-' high lord or some poor pilgrim at his
table, eating and drinking of his best.
He had a great horror of seeing people thirsty around him. "There
is too much good wine flowing in my kingdom for anybody to feel
thirsty. Everybody should drink before he is dry," he was fond of
saying. So one of the main duties of his Chief Butler Turelupin was
to make all the servants, all comers and goers, drink before they were
dry. It was said to take eighteen hundred pipes of wine yearly to do
this. He never was known to look at the clothes a guest wore, -oh,
no, not he, that good, hearty old King Grandgousier And it was a
pretty sight to see, whenever a guest or a friend wished to say any-
thing privately, how tenderly the old Giant would pick him up, and
put him on his knee, and bend his great head and listen ever so care-
fully to try and find out what he had to say. His head was lifted so
far above the ground that, otherwise, one would have had to shout out
loud enough for all in the palace to hear.
King Grandgousier was very fond of his wine, and could drink, -
being a giant, at a single meal, more than a dozen common men could







GARGANTUA IS BORN. 7

manage to swallow at a dozen meals each.' He was also very fond of
salt meat. He never failed to have on hand a good supply of French
hams, from Mayence and Bayonne, the finest known in those days, -





























Bigorre, Longaulnay, and Rouargue, the
Very best in all France. But there was something which
King Grandgousier loved above everything in the way of
!EI

























eating, and that was tripes. So fond was he of them that he had


SChildren must remember that times have changed for the better since the wild days
of these old giants. To drink so hard and long that a man, from too much wine, would

then. Now, in our happier days, we know it to be a virtue for a man to keep himself
sober, and a shame for him to be seen drunk.







8 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

grazing in the royal meadows, three hundred and sixty-seven thousand
and fourteen of them, to be killed, so that there might be plenty of
powdered beef to flavor the royal wine for the season. Then he had
the Royal Herald, with great flourish of trumpets, to name a day on
which all his neighbors brave fellows and good players at nine-pins
-were to join him in a Great Feast of Tripes.




-I%













Yand stately wife named Garga-
- L / ''.-.













melle. She was a daughter of the King of the Parpaillons, and



was herself a giantess, but not quite so tall as her husband.
1King Grandgousier had a fair '' "\
and stately wife named Garga-
melle. She was a daughter of the King of the Parpaillons, and
was herself a giantess, but not quite so tall as her husband.
Grandgousier and Gargamelle dearly loved one another, and all
that they wanted in this world was a son to bear the father's name,
and be King after him. Queen Gargamelle liked to be in the open
air, and see games of ninepins and ball and leap-frog played by
nimble men and women. And Grandgousier, at such games, was
always found seated at her side, like a good husband, seeming to
enjoy them as much as she did.
At last, one fine day, a little boy was born to them.







GARGANTUA IS BORN. 9

He must have been a wonderful baby; because just as soon as he
was born, instead of crying "Mie! mie! mie!" as any other baby
would have done, he shouted out at the top of his lungs, "Drink!
drink drink I" There never were such lungs as his, everybody said.
The old Doctor himself, and the Three Wise Old Women who were
there, all declared that he had the biggest throat ever known, not
even excepting his father's. Now it happened that, of all the days of
the year, the very day the Royal Herald had proclaimed, with flourish
of trumpets, for the famous Feast of Tripes, was the very day on which
the baby Prince was born. When the great news was carried to King
Grandgousier, who was drinking and making merry with his friends,
that he had a son, and that the young Prince was already bawling for
his drink, his joy almost choked him, and he could only find breath to
say in French :-
Que grand tu as!"-meaning "What a big throat thou hast! "
Everybody, including Queen Gargamelle, when she heard of it,
the family Doctor, and the Three Old Wise Women, laughed at this joke
of the King, and declared that it was the very best name that could be
given to the royal babe. From that moment, they began, when talking
to him or speaking of him, to call him little Prince Que-grand-tu-as!
Although they ran these four words trippingly together, and nobody
not in the secret would have thought it more than a very strange
name, yet, somehow, it was too long; and so, little by little, they
kept changing till the very oldest of the Three Old Wise Women,
who had been, one hot day, half-dozing over the cradle, started up
suddenly, crying: -
"I have it!"
"Well, what have you?" called the second oldest, who was wide
awake, sharply.
"The name for our dear little Prince !"
Don't be too sure of that, gossip. But why don't you say what it
is ? she snapped in an awful curiosity, and just the least bit jealous.
"GARGANTUA "
Oh, my said the third oldest, who was a mild sort of old lady.








10 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

Some say that it was the lords and neighbors who were feasting
on the tripes, when the old King cried out, Que grand tu as! who had
shouted back that the young Prince ought to be called Gargantua."
I am rather afraid that the oldest of the Three Wise Old Women had
been listening at the door of the royal banqueting hall, when she
ought to have been in Queen Gargamelle's chamber.






































*












CHAPTER III.

GARGANTUA AS A BABY.

S HEN Father Grandgousier heard that
the name which the very oldest of the
Wise Women had found for his son had
been fixed for all time, he was delighted
beyond measure, and said to Queen
Gargamelle, while rubbing the palms
of his great hands together :-
So the witch has fastened Gargan-
tua' on my boy after all. By my crown!
what we have to do now is never to
let Master Great Throat be empty.
Now, tell me, my dear, where are we
to get milk enough for that throat?"
The Queen looked at her baby; then she looked at her husband;
then -he lnnikd into

- ili .. .. .I i. --ti















THE QUEEN LOOKED AT HER BABY.







12 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

When Father Grandgousier called into the Queen's chamber, for
a secret conference, his Royal Butler, who, first asking permission of
their Majesties, called the Royal Steward, who called the Royal Dairy-




k ..l i i... hi h n a c o i l, ., ,






s' ejCr -'-aeef .h ter'emainder S
A COO BABY CAIA











doors, the whole party filed out of the royal apartments, the Chief
Milkman holding in his band a scroll, showin- a large, red seal, and
tied emany times around with a broad, red ribbon, the Royal Butler
closing the line and looking wise as a privy-councillor.
The Scroll contained an order, authorizing the Chief Milkman -






to keep him alive until he was a year and ten months old. Then the
wise old Doctor thought that the child of ught to be taken more into
the fresh air. In fact, what the Doctor really wanted, and was half
crazy about not finding, was a carriage suited to the young Prince. A







GARGANTUA AS A BABY. 13

common baby carriage would not do at all. At last a youthful page,
who dearly loved the strong oxen he had seen during the frequent visits
he was fond of making to the royal stables, thought a fine large cart,
not too pretty but very strong, and drawn by oxen, might do. The
oxen were ready, but they could not be used until the Royal Carpenter
had measured and made a cart that would hold the young giant.






'fI



















of a baby, both because In body was so big and his
face was so broad that, from much drinking of milk and good wines,
he could boast of several chins, some said nine; others swore there



were ten,everwhich lapped each one over the other, as if they felt
they were good company. Every day he would be taken out to ride.
Tplaed in the was tired he would cry, Drink drink drink
of a baby, both because ]u, body was so big and his-..
face was so broad that, from much drinking of milk and good wines,
he could boast of several chins, some said nine; others swore there
were ten, --which lapped each one over the other, as if they felt
they were good company. Every day he would be taken out to ride.
Then when he was tired he would cry, "Drink! drink drink!"







14 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

Whenever that cry was heard, presto! the cart would come to a
stand-still, the oxen would begin to munch, and everybody would
make a rush to the wine-cellar. Of course, the King's son always
had the best wines, and the lackey who was lucky enough to reach
him first when he cried for drink always had the right to a cup-
ful for himself. So it is quite certain that never was a baby so
well waited on as was Gargantua. He cried "Drink! drink!
drink!" so often that all the servants got to be sad topers from
skipping off to the cellars whenever he called; and it turned out
at last that even the tinkling of an empty glass, as a knife would
strike against it, or the sight of a flagon or a bottle, would make him
jump up and dance with joy, and start him afresh to bawling for
"Drink! drink drink!" and the lackeys to scampering to the wine-
cellar after the wine.













CHAPTER IV.

THE ROYAL TAILOR'S BILL FOR GARGANTUA'S SUIT.

HEN Gargantua had outgrown the age
for riding in his ox-cart, and was just
S beginning to toddle round the palace-
walks, it occurred to Father Grand-
Sgousier that he was getting to be a big
boy. So he ordered the Royal Tailor
into his Royal Presence.
S"So ho Thou art the clothes-
maker, art thou? Now, measure my
ij'5 ~son, and make a suit for him. His
Smother says he looks best in blue and
white," was all he said.
The Royal Tailor bowed humbly,
while all the time he was shivering in his fine velvets and silks, at
the honor of making clothes for a Giant Prince. For the old King,
who simply wanted everything loose and easy-like, it was all well
enough; but how would it be when he began to fit the royal heir?
was what he kept asking himself. A royal tailor believes in his
heart that he is a sort of king-maker, because he makes the clothes
that give to a King that grand, imperial air which compels all men
to kneel before him. He never will appear the least bit ruffled at
the most impossible order given him, provided the order come from
a King; but bows and smiles, no matter how sick and angry he may
be at heart.
To do the Royal Tailor justice, he did his best with the order given
him. He made the clothes and his bill.
That bill is still kept at Montsoreau. It is really a curiosity, and
runs in this way: -








16 THREE GOOD GIANTS.











IS'MOST GRACIou" MAJESTY,


















TO THE ROYAL TAILOR, DR.
Double of white satin 81




















Breeches of white broadcloth 1j.105
Shoes of blue and crimson velvet .
Coat of blue velvet ." .... "1,800"
Cap of velvet, halfwhite and half blue




MAKING GAERGAUTUA'S SUIT. ",



HIS MOST GRACIOUS MAJESTY,
TO TILE ROYAL TAILOR, D.

For His Royal Highness' shirt with gusset 1,100
Doublet of white satin 813
Breeches of white broadcloth 1,105- .
Shoes of blue and crimson velvet 406
Coat of blue velvet 1,800
Girdle of silk serge 300-
Cap of velvet, half white and half blue 300
Gown of blue velvet 9,600

Ells .15,425-

Besides all this quantity of rich cloth for Gargantua's full court-
suit, there was brought from Hyrcania the Wild a bright blue feather
for his plume. This plume was held in place by a handsome enameled








ROYAL TAILOR'S BILL. 17

clasp of gold, weighing sixty-eight marks, which the Crown Jewellers,
by his father's orders, with great care, made for him; also a ring for
the forefinger of his left hand, with a carbuncle in it as large as an
ostrich-egg; and a great chain of gold berries to wear around his neck,
weighing twenty-five thousand and sixty-three marks.























MEASURING GARGANTUA FOR HIS SUIT.
















7-77




1 .









UA T ER V .


THE YEAR GARGANTUA HAD WOODEN HORSES, AND
WHAT USE HE MADE OF THEM.

ROM the time he was three years old to the time he had grown
to he a boy of five, Gargantua was brought up, by the strict com-
mand of his father, just like all the other children of the King-
dom. His education was very simple. It was :
Drinking, eating, and sleeping;
Eating, sleeping, and drinking;
Sleeping, drinking, and eating.
If he loved any one thing more than to play in the mud, that was
to roll and wallow about in the mire. He would go home with his
shoes all run down at the heels, and his face and clothes well
streaked with dirt. Gargantua, therefore, was not more favored
than the other little boys of the kingdom who were not so rich as
thann the other little boys of the kingdom who were not so rieh as






19
WOODEN HORSES.
s her waso in the oal ble that h
was; but therePwa on whi 11 t b 7 ex
earliest ',l,. ,!" he saw so vanlly hours' Ahenever
ot to kno a horse lO as well as h s fagether did. shout at the

we saw horse he would clp his t
p of his lnng. It


s, tfunie, to e/ -
younp one.,,.,t hhat t \

~ me a p r1ine ho
thn.ldh be Jt ,9.V, to
ridewell-t S -o t-hey
moade hec h hhenh ch
was a little fellow ". -
of four years, so
fiae, so strong, and -
sO wonderful a .
wooden horse that ....
-th e e- n e v er. ; "^ : "
been seen its like ."
up to that date,
and there never has
been found in any toy-shop s or ansh
young prices lay.hou.e or toyshop since T a",,,trlU
_T1lS stur.jpong hor se, 1Ut wante it tdoCI auyl 7i
This t' horse ms th e
.a,, whenever its young forwnt rd, au y1-" "" t
was ["'A1 to do it. le could make it leapf
rear .v, :,rd, and waltz, all at one time- te could make.it trot, ,ll,
rack, pa)ce, na'tal. A,. anid amblre, 3ust as the humor took him. But this
was only half of what that horse could do. ay i at a word,
uld e the color of its hair. One day its hde ould be
il-whit; te t day, bay; t, la te nxt, ; the
next, dapple-gr' ; the next, mosec r
a soft brown deer-color might
But this waes not all
(. r:I~ learned to be so.io1tahehugthtle gt








20 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

just as well make a horse to suit himself as to have a horse bought
for him. So he sat knitting his great eyebrows till he finally found
how he could make a hunting-nag out of a big post; one for every
day, out of the beam of a wine-press; one with housings for his
room, out of a great oak-tree; and, out of different kinds of wood
in his father's kingdom, he made ten or twelve spare horses, and had
seven for the mail.








th/nad ..er m bfr" '-.'- .eusi' .n
-'- b -
64






'a-



GARGANTUA'S RIIDING-LESSONS.

It was a rare sight to see all these wooden horses bigger toys
than had ever been made before lying piled up, side by side, near
Gargantua's' bed, and the young Giant sleeping in their midst.
One day, Gargantua had a fine chance for having some sport of
his own making.
It was on the day a noble lord came on a visit to his old friend,
King Grandgousier. The Royal Stables proved rather small for such a
number of horses as came with the noble lord. The Chief Equerry of
the Lord of Breadinhag which was the name of the great nobleman
- was bothered out of his head because he could not find stable-room
for all the horses brought with them. By good luck he and the Grand
Steward happened to meet Gargantua at the foot of the great staircase.







WOODEN HORSES. 21

"Hello, youngster, what is thy name?"
"Prince Gargantua."
"Is that so ?" they cried. Then say, little Giant, tell us where we
are to put our horses. The stables of thy Royal Father are all full."
"Yes, I know they are," said Gargantua, slily; "all you have to
do is to follow me, and I will show you a beautiful stable, where there
are bigger horses than ever yours can grow to be. Where have you
left your horses ?"
^- Out in the court-yard, little
J c t Giant."
S Follow me, then,
S" I' \ and I will show
:'" ". : \ you the stables."
\ The Chief
( I I J -. e ,| 1
4 .--


















tower the steps to which they mounted, along with the Prince, but
athin very heavily indeed. v a
_- *-. .-_ _
'- --' .h% -





\4 1 t. on :. ,
.- ,i ...t'r,.... .. ....
_, ,# .
,. ~-- : ,,":"





staircase of the palace, through the second hall,
into a great stone gallery, by which they entered into a huge stone
tower, the steps to which they mounted, along with the Prince, but
breathing very heavily indeed.







22 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

I am afraid that big child is laugh-
ing at us," whis- pered the Grand Stew-
ard, behind his hand, to the Chief
i. N- body ever puts a stable
"I at the top of a house."
S"You are wrong
.. there," whispered back
... J '. the Chief Equerry;
: because I happen to
.. know of places, in
'-".,. Lyons and elsewhere,
where there t-ic are stables
S'' 'j in the attic. But, to
S".. make sure, let us ask
r .. i...,f'" *him a-ain."
S, Turning to Gar-
gantua, he said:-
My" little Prince,
I"' '-' .I art thou sure thou art
taking us right ?"
S ."Haven't I already told
? Isn't this my father's
i. .- lce, and don't I know the
Sto the stables of my big
S." -i I I -;es ? Don't gasp, so mucl,
: tlemen. Only three little
r P' s I pS and we are there !
"I.. -- Once up the steps, which
S-~a-- -..-e the Chief Equerry and
lt 't ,, 1. Grand Steward blow worse
i ''', I, ever, and passing through
Sk L
.-:'O T--T" L E S..P -. i..her great hall, the mis-
*. .; i,. "vous Prince, opening wide
.a door, that of his own room,
ONTLY TTIlIEE LITTLE STEPS." cried, triumphantly :-








WOODEN HORSES. 23

"Here are the finest horses, gentlemen, in the world. This one
next the door is my favorite riding-horse. That one near the fireplace
is my pacer,-a good one, I assure you. Now, just look at that one
leaning against yonder window. I rode it rather hard yesterday, and
it is tired. That's my hunting-nag. I had it at a great price from
Frankfort; but I am willing to make you a present of it. Don't refuse
me, I beg. Once on it, you can bag all the partridges and hares you
may come across for the whole winter. Now, choose ; which of you
will ride my hunting-nag ?"
The Chief Equerry and the Grand Steward, knowing that all
these fine names of "riding-horse," and "pacer," and "hunting-nag," were
for mere blocks of wood, were, for a moment, stupefied. They looked
at each other slily, and half ashamed; but the joke was too good when
they thought of the long stairs they had toiled up, and of their horses
below waiting all this time to be stabled and fed. They couldn't help
it; it was too rich; so they laughed till they were tired, and then
began to laugh again till they were tired again.
"A rare bird is this young scamp," panted the Chief Equerry,
as he lifted one end of the great beam which Gargantua called his
hunting-nag.
"A prime joker is this young rogue, if he is a Prince," panted the
Grand Steward, in echo, as he stumbled along with the other end into
the hall.
There was no use in being mad at the trick young Gargantua had
played on them. So they left him stroking the fastest horses in the
world, while they went laughing all the way across the first hall; down
the small steps, across the other halls, along the corridors, past the
stone gallery, down the long stairway as far as the great arch, where
they let the famous hunting-nag roll to the bottom.
When they at last reached the great dining-room, where all their
friends were gathered, they made everybody laugh like a swarm of
flies at the trick played on them by the little Prince with his wooden
horses.












CHAPTER VI.

HOW GARGANTUA WAS TAUGHT LATIN.

LD Father Grandgousier had a very
large body of his own; and, after
r 0 the fashion of all good-natured giants
that have ever lived, when he was
pleased he was hugely pleased. So
it happened that, when his friends
S 'came around him to drink his good
wine, and cat his rich dinners, and to
/ a tell him how bright his boy was, he
shook all over with mighty laughter.
"Ho ho ho ho he shouted, till the
S big strong bottles that stood on his
table jingled, and the very rafters of
the dining-hall seemed to laugh with them.
"You say that my little Gargantua is quick? Ho ho! Now,
my good lords, Philip of Macedon had a son who was quick too. Yes,
they said that he was as quick as that," snapping his fingers to-
gether so that they went cric-crac like a pistol shot. "You have heard
of the lad, and that wild Bucephalus of his? Bah I am sure my little
brigand upstairs would never have waited to turn the head of Bu-
cephalus to the sun before riding him, but would have mounted and
ridden him before all the people, with his tail turned straight to the
sun, and his shadow thrown plain before him You have decided me,
my friends. Gargantua is already five years old. He is only a baby;
but he is a Giant's child with more wit than age, -that makes a differ-
ence. I have been thinking seriously lately; and it is high time that
I should give my youngster to some wise man to make him wise
according to his capacity."
And this Father Grandgousier began to do at once. He called,







GARGANTUA TAUGHT LATIN. 25

the very next day,---.
upon one of his sub- -.
jects, worthy Master -' ,
Tubal Holofernes, a "-'r
man famed for wis-
dom the country -
round, to teach Gar-
gantua his A B C's.
I am sorry to say
that Master Holo- :
fernes seemed, from W
the first hour, to be .
just a little afraid of -' --
his small pupil, who,
although only a baby,
could easily have
studied his alphabet ,
on his teacher's bald *
pate, and had to bend
his head even to do TUBAL HOLOFERNES.
that. But Father
Grandgousier was, on the whole, well satisfied with his son. Gar-
gantua could, after five years and three months, actually recite his
alphabet from A to Z; then from Z to A; then catch it sharply
up in the middle, bunching M and N together; naming the letters in
fours, in eights, and in twelves, as quickly as you can think, forward
and back again, and again, till all the old friends whose noses, from
good living, had become very red, and whose paunches were very
big--swore, over their wine, that he was the smartest child of ten
years they ever had seen. Of course, Father Grandgousier thought
all this something wonderful. He ho-ho'ed and he ha-ha'ed! with
great swelling laughter, after the fashion of Giants, until he was all
out of breath, and his friends had to beg him to stop for fear of
choking.
But Father Grandgousier could not rest here. He declared that








26 THREE GOOD GLINTS.

Gargantua must now learn Latin. The young Giant was made, not
only to study Latin, but to write, besides that, his own books of study
in Gothic letters, there being no printing-presses in those days.
To learn all this took him thirteen years, six months, and two
weeks.
By this time, Gargantua had
grown so tall that, when called
Y .' i upon to recite, he

I'cW "11/:[ k,-o his an-

--i ,. ,, -' ,,. .r h e a r d
W ''





















his ordinary tone would have, at that close distance, broken the
drums of the old man's ears. What he thought he needed, there-
r ol II d '.i I ',







fore, was a writing-desk t was very hard to find a desk quite
suited to him for writing down what he had to say. They hunted
suited to him for writing down what he had to say. They hunted








GARGANTUA TAUGHT LATIN. 27

near and far for one. At last one was found in the possession of a
stunted old giant, living in a cave near by, who all his life had
been hoping to grow as tall as King Grandgousier himself. This
poor giant had, however, been thrown into despair because he had
suddenly stopped growing, and still lacked a dozen feet or so of
being as tall as he wanted to be. He gave up the desk he had used so
long, with a great sob that shook the mountain in the caves of which he
lived. Gargantua, although not full-grown, did not find a desk of
seven hundred thousand pounds' weight at all in his way, for it was
just suited to his size.
His ink-horn, weighing as much as a ton of merchandise, swung by
heavy iron chains from the side of the desk. From it Gargantua, with
a pen-holder as large as the great Pillar of Enay, used to write his
Latin exercises. Master Holofernes kept him at all this for
eighteen years and eleven months, and so thorough did he become
that he could recite his Latin exercises by heart, backwards.
He went on studying after this some of the harder books for sixteen
years and two months, when he had the misfortune of losing his old
teacher very suddenly.
One day, unexpectedly, Father Grandgousier called his friends
around him,--who had, by this time, gained redder noses and
bigger paunches than ever, -to see how strong his son was in
Latin. IIe also invited a friend of his who, he was sure, did know
Latin.
Then he shouted out, Come, my little one, and show these friends
of thy father.what thou hast learned of Latin. See, here is a gentle-
man who knows it as he does his breviary. He shall examine thee, and
tell us how much thou hast learned under faithful Master Holofernes,
whom we all honor."
And the learned friend began on poor Gargantua, and poured on
him question after question for six mortal hours. Father Grand-
gousier, who, by the way, had understood not one word of it all, turned
to him at the end triumphantly:-
"Now, good sir, art thou not convinced that my boy knows
his Latin ?"








28 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

Then, that learned friend, although just a little trembling, to be
sure, answered quietly enough: -
With my Liege's permission, Prince Gargantua does not know
any more Latin than Your own Gracious Majesty."
What!
WYHAT
WHAT !












-_.. ----- -

A .- ..


FLIGHT OF TUE TUTOR. '


roared Father Grandgousier, each time making that very short word
longer and louder and fiercer, and jumping to his feet he fairly kicked
learned Master Holofernes out of the palace; meanwhile, rolling his
eyes around in his rage, and gnashing his teeth in so horrible a way
that the noses of his old friends who had sat at his table for sixty
years, and more, turned pale for once, through fright; and there were
those of the household who said that, as they fled from the dining-
room, in terror, even the paunches of these old friends seemed, some-
how, to have grown as flat as the royal pancakes they had just been
eating.












CHAPTER VII.

THE NEW MASTER FOUND FOR GARGANTUA.

iI HAT not know thy Latin After forty-
eight years, seven months, and two
days Then, my little rogue, it is to
Paris thou must go."
SThis is what Grandgousier said to
Gargantua just one week after that luck-
less dinner. I will tell you how it all
happened. The first thing the old
King did the next morning was to send,
post-haste, to his good friend, Don Philip
of the Marshes, Viceroy of Papeligosse,
who knew Latin, and who had told him,
years and years before, that poor Master
IIolofernes was nothing but a bit of an old humbug (humbug was
not quite the word used at that time, but the meaning was all the
same). "Come to me, my friend," he wrote, "thou art always
prating of thy Latin scholars. Now bring one of thy wonders along
with thee."
So Don Philip came in great state, as befitted a visit to his King,
accompanied by the prettiest, the jauntiest, the sharpest, the politest,
the sweetest-voiced little fellow ever seen. Don Philip introduced the
curled darling as Master Eudemon, his page.
Your Majesty sees this child ? he asked. He is not yet twelve
years old; yet I dare promise that he will prove to Your Majesty, if it
be your pleasure, what difference there really is between the old
dreamers of the past and the lads of the present."
So be it," cried the old Giant, gaily, as he put on his glasses,
to see the better.
When his eyes first fell on the young page, he swore under his







30 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

breath--which sounded for all the world like stifled thunder that
he resembled rather "a little angel than a human child." As soon as
Eudemon was called to show what he knew, he rose with youthful
modesty, and bowed with charming grace to the King, then to his
master, and then to Gargantua, who was frowning at him, and
wondering within himself what all those pretty ways meant. Then
the young page opened in a Latin so good, so pure, and so musical
that what he said sounded rather like a speech
/7 made by a Gracchus, or a Cicero, or an Emilius,
in the old days of Roman glory, than one made
S ,Q 0 by a youth of that day. After a little,
En Eudemon cunning rogue that he
P w was began to praise Gargantua to
Y 'the skies. He spoke first of his young
1Prince's virtue and good manners;
secondly, of his knowledge; thirdly,
of his noble birth; fourthly, of his
personal beauty; and fifthly, the
/ little fellow exhorted him so
Smovingly to revere his great
father in all things that Gar-
S' gantua was so ashamed at not
S' understanding a word of what
he was saying, and at not be-
Sing able to Latin away as he
did, forgetting that a dwarf had
no business whatever to criti-
BUDEMON.
cise a young Giant, that he be-
gan to moo-moo like a cow, and to hide his face in his cap without
having ever a word to say for himself.
Here it was that Father Grandgousier grew really angry. He
praised Eudemon and scolded Gargantua by turns, until at last he fell
asleep among all the big bottles that had been emptied during the
pretty tale of the learned little angel, which nobody around the table
understood but Don Philip of the Marshes and the pretty little angel







NEW 1 MA4STER FOR GARlGANTUA. 31

himself. It is a bold thing at all times to awake a King without his
own orders; but when that King is a Giant, it is a bolder thing to do
than ever. No one dares, for his head, disturb him, and yet, he has to
be waked, or else the next morning his sneezes will make all the houses
around tumble down, as Giant's colds in the head are just about as big
as their bodies. Now, Gargantua being a young Giant himself, was
the only one who could venture upon the liberty of waking his Father,
and I have already said what he got for his pains : -
What! not know thy Latin After forty-eight years, seven
months, and two days, too Then, my little rogue, it is to Paris thou
shalt go."



















a












CHAPTER VIII.

GARGANTUA GOES TO PARIS, AND THE BIG MARE THAT TAKES HIM
THERE.

K HE trip to Paris being settled, the first
thing to be agreed on was a horse large
S' enough to carry Gargantua at his ease.
: There was no trouble here ; for, by good
luck, it happened that there had arrived,
I only a few days before, the most gigan-
tic Mare that had ever eaten hay in the
Royal Stables. She had come all the
way from Africa, a present from Fay-
olles, the fourth king of Numidia. When
Father Grandgousier went to look at the
.. -_______ Mare, he found her a marvellous animal,
indeed. She was as big as six elephants,
with her hoofs split into toes. Her ears hung downward like the great
ears of the goats of Languedoc. The mare was not alone in her split
toes, because history tells us that the steed of Julius Cesar had the
self-same toes if he hadn't the ears. But she was alone in her tail!
Oh, how mighty that tail was It was as big as the Pillar of Saint-
Mars near Langes, and just as square. If the boys and girls who are
reading this are surprised, they will only have to think of what they
have already read of the tails of those Scythian rams which weighed
more than thirty pounds each; and of the sheep of Syria, the tails of
which were so long and so heavy that they had to be rested on a cart
to be carried in comfort. The Mare, in short, was so extraordinary a
creature that, on seeing her for the first time, Father Grandgousier
could only whistle beneath his breath.
"That's the very beast to carry my son to Paris With her, all
things will go well. He will be a great scholar one of these days."







GARGANTUA GOES TO PARIS. 33

The next day, after breakfast, the party started on their journey.
First, there was Gargantua on his gigantic mare, and wearing boots
which his father had just given him, made out of the skin of the red
deer; then his new teacher, Ponocrates; then his servants, among
whom was the young page, Eudemon. There never was a gayer
party. In the highest spirits,
and laughing loudly y, they
Jogged on, day af-
ter day, until they
/' reached a point
/.;I ''just above the
City of Orleans.
VI. "At this point,
SI' / they found a



I, ;








GARGANTTUA'S fARE.

great forest thirty-five leagues long and seventeen wide, or there-
about. The forest was very fertile in some ugly insects, known as gad-
flies and hornets. These flies were so large and so fierce, and so sharp-
tongued and so poisonous besides, that they were the terror of all the
poor horses and asses which had to pass through the forest. But
Gargantua's Mare was equal to both flies and hornets. She resolved
to avenge all her kindred, even though they were mere dwarfs,
which had ever suffered from gadflies and hornets, and which, if she







34 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

did not help them, would continue to suffer from them. The
moment she got well into the forest, and the gadflies began to
plague her, she first shook her tail slowly and lazily to see
whether or not it was in good working order. This did not in the
least frighten the insects, which
S_ _kept on plaguing and stinging her
more than ever. Then it was
That she loosed that tail of hers
to the right and the left. So
well did she do this, whisking
it wildly here and there, far up
in the air and low down on the
ground, that she whipped down
., athe gLl t t.t trees, one after the
S'. .1 other, with a crash that made
S'' the hearts of the others tremble
S "' within their very bark, with all
the ease that a mower cuts down
the grass. So well did she do
her work that, since she passed
through that forest, there never
i t has been seen in it a single tree or
a single gadfly, or a single hornet,
Sfor the whole wood on tht day
'i t fl became the open country, and has
been open country ever since.
When Gargantua, who hadn't
noticed what his Mare had been
PONOCRAoTES. doing, saw this, he only laughed,
while he said to Ponocrates in
his old-time French :--
"Je trouve beau-ce !"
which, translated freely into English, would mean ; -
"I find this fine."
And, from that day to this, the country above the City of
Orleans, in France, has been called La Beauce.












CHAPTER IX.

THE PARISIANS LAUGH AT GARGANTUA.--HE TAKES HIS REVENGE BY
STEALING THE GREAT BELLS OF NOTRE-DAME.

S~ '-'' HE first thing Gargantua did, on reach-
S ing- Paris, was to make a resolve that
he and his people should have a gay
I 4I1 time. Some days after, when they had
S all rested well a~nd had feasted until
t"' they were full of good eating and
Drinking, Gargantua started on a stroll
through the town to find what was to
be seen. The Paris Gargantua saw was
Snot the Paris of to-day, not nearly so
S mighty a city as it has since become.
S' But its people then were every bit as
fond of merry-making and of seeing
shows as they are now. One who lived in those days, and who boasted
that he knew the Parisians better than they did themselves, says that
they were so silly and so stupid by nature that it only took a rope-
dancer, dancing on his rope, or a Merry-Andrew playing at his tricks,
or a bawler of old scraps, or a blind fiddler, or a hurdy-gurdy in the
market-place, to appear, to draw a bigger crowd than the holiest and
most eloquent preacher. Now, a Giant like Gargantua was himself
such a show as the people of Paris had never before set their silly eyes
on. Of course they swarmed around him with staring eyes and open
mouths, pushing against him here, and knocking against him there, in
their strong desire to see as much of him as they could. They troubled
him almost as much as the flies and hornets of La Beauce had troubled
his mare. Some, bolder than the rest, even ran in and out between his
legs as he strode along the street. At first, Gargantua took the crowd
good-naturedly enough. By and by, he began to think that all this








36 THREE GOOD GIANTS.





J;




-0
Sq j "n"' .4





A il
















A V
Av-:e: 'AW p,










.e







SA-'-. P R





ARGANT ENTERS PAA S.








PARISIANS LAUGH AT GARGANTUA. 37

squeezing and tickling were getting just a little tiresome. He looked
around in a helpless sort of way, until, by good luck, his eyes fell on the
tall towers of Vdtre Ddme Cathedral, near by. Ha ha that's the very
place for me," he cried, and, without further ado, resting one hand on
the top of the roof to steady himself, he went whizzing with a great
leap past the statues of Adam and Eve, that looked wonderingly out
from their stony niches. The idle crowd was afraid to follow Gar-
gantua; but it stood packed up close together in the open space which
surrounded the old church, gazing at him as he went through the air,
and wondering all the time what the Giant was going to do with their
famous towers. It was not long before they found out. No sooner
was he on the roof than Gargantua caught sight of the great tanks
filled with water which were then to be found there. Chuckling to
himself, he cried : "Now for some fun I shall pledge this good people
of Paris in a glass of wine." Up he caught one of the tanks, poised it
for a moment in the air, and then shouting out: To your health, good
folks!" tipped it just a bit. Down poured its water in a full stream.
Then he threw the tank after it. Quick, before one could think or
breathe, the others followed. So sudden was the down-pour of water
that the people thought a tremendous water-spout, in passing over their
city, had burst upon them. Two hundred and sixty thousand, four
hundred and eighteen persons were drowned on that day by the water,
or crushed by the tanks, or killed by being run over by those seeking
to escape. Those who were lucky got away as fast as they could. In
less than three minutes the square was empty, for the water, as it rolled
out into the streets, washed all the dead away.
Gargantua, who was a good-hearted Giant, little knew what mis-
chief he had done. After he had emptied all the tanks, and thrown them
away, he ceased to think about the people. He had only gone on the
roof to rid himself of the buzzing and nudging of the crowd; and, not
hearing any more from them, he set about amusing himself. When he
caught sight of the great bells of N;ftre Ddme, a happy idea struck him.
He would set them to ringing and pealing Ah, how he was charmed !
their notes were so soft, so rich, so mellow, so tender, so golden !
He wanted to have the bells about him all the time. Just then he








38 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

thought: These Parisians deserve a lesson for their bad manners, and
I am going to revenge myself." So he at once began to pick up the
bells, one after the other, as if they were so many buckets. When he had
gathered them all, he leaped down from the roof and strode across the
city in the direction of his hotel. Once
there, a merry thnfloht ncme tn him.
-Lab Lui lr t: h1'in1 l di t[li, ll- :'i l -






Sso
._ -..

'-- "1--- '', t








,1 : -..of.Paris -- orthose that r.-,








ainedl after the affair of
-the tanks to their windows.



Every little donkey nowadays wears a collar with jia sound thatbells.
*''.'"t- 1 ~.-s broug t all the (ood wives

".- -mained after the affair of
II shall keep my beautiful bells to please my father, and pay the










Miy Mare shall carry at her neck the bells of Nitre Dame !"
Gargantua went straight to the stable where his Mare had already
found her fodder, and, with grcat care, while Gymnaste, his squire, held
,-- .. ".















tbund her fodder, and, with great care, while Gymnalste, his sqcuire, held








PARISIANS LAUGH AT GARGANTUA. 39

the candle, placed the bells of N6tre Ddme, one by one, around her
neck. The city was greatly excited at the loss of the bells; and, the
next day, there came a long line of grave, black-robed men who proved
to him in learned speeches that the holy church of .ATtre Ddme had a
right to her own bells. Gargantua, now that all the excitement had
passed, felt that he had done a very silly thing, and could only say that
the bells were not lost; but that if their worships would go to the stable,
they would find them still hanging from the neck of his great Mare.
After further talk, and much good drinking, the grave, black-robed
men -who, if the whole truth were to be told, were not a little afraid
of the Giant picked up heart to say: Give us back our bells, and
we shall bind ourselves to give your Mare free grazing in the forest of
BiBre, so long as Your Highness honors us with your presence."
Gargantua was very willing to accept this offer. The bells were
taken back in great state to _Ntre Dame, where God bless them i -
they may be seen, and heard too, when the sun shines and when the
rain falls, to this very day.













CHAPTER X.

PONOCRATES, THE NEW TEACHER, DESIRES GARGANTUA TO SHOW HIM
HOW HE USED TO STUDY WITH OLD MASTER HOLOFERNES.

S.ARGANTUA was a good son, as we
have already seen. He knew that he
had been sent to Paris to learn Latin.
So, after a few days of pleasure, he
dutifully offered to begin a course
of study with his new teacher, Po-
nocrates. But Ponocrates himself
was just a little curious to know how
old Master Holofernes had managed
Sto teach his big pupil so as to leave
S7 him, after fifty-three years, ten months,
and ten days, just as much a booby as
he had found him. Let Your High-
ness," Ponocrates said, "do precisely as you used to do with your
old master." And Gargantua, greatly relieved, as you may imagine,
began to live in Paris the very life he used to live at home. And this
is the way he lived. He woke up between eight and nine o'clock every
morning, whether it was light or not. The first thing he did after
waking was to make a tent of the sheets of the bed, raising one of his
tall legs as the centre-pole and watching how the big sheet fell on
either side. After the tent was brought down, Gargantua would
begin to gambol and roll around in his bed, to stand on his head,
to twist his huge limbs in every sort of twirl, and to turn any
number of somersaults, single, double, treble, and quadruple, in
a way that would make one of our modern acrobats turn green
with envy. After that he would rise and dress himself according
to the season. But, in the old home days, he generally wore a
large robe of rough cloth, lined with fox-skins, and so he brought








THE YNEW TEACHER. 41

out of his trunk the very garment itself, looking rather worn and shab-
by. The next thing was to comb his head with a German comb,"
which was the name given in those days to the easiest way of combing,
since it meant a comb made by the four fingers and the thumb. For
old Master Holofernes had always en-
joined this habit on him, saying that it
was a waste of time for him to smooth
his hair in any other way,
and with any better comb.
Being now
dressed, Gargantia -
went through a seri,-s .,
of performance- I'
which considering 2
that they came
from a Giant--
must have been '
very startling, se I a
indeed. He
gaped, stretched,
coughed, spit,
groaned, sneezed,
hiccoughed, and
then, with a --
broad smile, de-
clared himself
ready to break- GARGANTUA GETS UP.
fast on fried
tripe, grilled steaks, colossal hams, magnificent roast, and a noble soup.
All this feast was made hot with mustard, shovelled down his throat
by four of his servants.
Master Ponocrates, one day, thought it his duty, as the teacher
charged with the education of hi$royal pupil, to -,-_,l that it was
hardly right for him to eat so heavy a breakfast without having already
taken some exercise. Gargantua was ready with his answer.
"I-ow can you say so, Master?" he asked ; "have I not exercised








42 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

enough? Have I not stretched myself on the bed in all sorts of ways
until my muscles are sore? Isn't that enough? Pope Alexander the
V. used to do the same, by the advice of his Jewish doctor, and he
lived, as you know,
'=' -. until he died. I feel
1







with this little speech of his pupil; for,
i.. ., .,











after grumbling a bit under his breath, all that he did was to stroke

"How did the Prince ever happen to hear about Pope Alexander?"
andi let the young Giant continue his course, while he himself con-
tinued to wonder.
After r breakfast arantua went to church,you may be sure he
with this little speech of his pupil; for,



kept awaygru ling a bit under his breath, him, on he did wa to church,
went nine of the stoutest lackeys, who bore, ask if they would have
like did the doing anything rather than that, a big basket, which con- Alexaner?
tained let the young Giant continue his course, was so heavy that, bycon-
tinued to wonder.
After breakfast Gargantua went to church, --you may be sure he
kept away from _17dtre Ddqne! Behind him, on his way to church,
went nine of the stoutest lackeys, who bore, as if they would have
liked to be doing anything rather than that, a big basket, which con-
tained a breviary worthy of a Giant, since it was so heavy that, by
actual weight, it was found to weigh just eleven hundred and six
pounds. With that breviary, the devout young Prince entered the
church and heard the Holy Mass from beginning to end. On leaving








THE VE W TEACHER. 43


the church, he always thought it the proper thing for his breviary to
be carried by oxen to his hotel. Once there, Gargantua began to
study during a short half hour, with his
eyes like good Saint Anthony's in the story,
"Firmly fixed upon his book; "
while all the time, "his soul," as the
clown of Paris, in his day, used to say,
" was down in the kitchen."
The dinner came
soon enough after his
return home to satisfy
even Gargantua, who V
was a great. glutton. /
He used to smile as
he saw the table at
his new lodging-house
laden with
a dozen rich
hams, with the
best of smoked gl
tongues, with
puddings, with /
fine chitter-
linos; and his
great throat
took them all
down one after
the other.
Every day, af- 0
ter the meals, it 6!
was his practice GARGANTUA GOES TO CHURCH.
to wash his
hands with fresh wine, and to pick his teeth with a dry pig-bone.
After that he declared himself ready for his games.













CHAPTER XI.

THE TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTEEN GAMES OF CARDS GARGANTUA KNEW
HOW TO PLAY. WHAT IT WAS HE SAID AFTER HE HAD GONE
THROUGH THE LIST, AND WHAT IT WAS PONOCRATES REMARKED.

SH first thing Gargantua did, on rising
from the dinner table, would be to call
/ out in a cheery voice:-
SPREAD THE CARPET !"
The servants understood what that
meant very well. Gaily they would un-
roll a large carpet, stretch it free from
wrinkles, and then, in a twinkling, lay a
pack of cards in the very middle of it.
Then the Giant and his friends would sit
down on the carpet, and begin playing
cards. There were just two hundred
and fifteen of these games which Gargan-
tua knew how to play. Their names would sound odd to the card-
players of this day, and I give some of the oddest on the list, so that
you may know what queer games were then the fashion with the Giant
and his fiiends:-
The Bamboozler. The Combs.
The Potatoes. The Coat-brush.
Scotch Hoppens. Nine Hands.
The Cows. Partridges.
The Tables. The Keys.
To Steal Mustard. The Birch Tree.
Skin the Fox. Ninepins.
Sow the Hay. I pinch thee without laughing.
Sell the Hay. Figs of Marseilles.
The Monkey. Draw the Spit.







GAMES OF CARDS. 45

Each of these games took a whole day, lasting between dinner and the
time to enjoy a nap. Gargantua always thought it necessary to pre-
pare for his afternoon sleep by taking a little drink. His companions
must have been heavy drinkers, regular old topers of the jolly order,
- because the allowance every day called for eleven pots of wine for
each man. After drinking such a quantity they would naturally feel
drowsy. They would then stretch themselves on the carpet, and snore
away, each snorer playing a different tune through his nose, in the
midst of the cards lying loosely around, and the emptied pots, all ex-
cept Gargantua, whose breathing on such occasions was always of
the hurricane fashion, whether awake or asleep. He would sleep for
two or three hours like a good Christian, without thinking of any evil
thing, and without muttering a single bad word in his dreams. On
waking, he had a trick of giving his great ears a half-dozen shakes,
- why, I don't know, and then bawling out for fresh wine, which
he drank down in one great gulp. Then came the only study for
the day, which was rather a mystery for all parties. Nobody could
say exactly what it was, and Master Ponocrates only smiled when asked
about it. It lasted for a few minutes only, after which Gargantua
would mount, in high state, an old mule which had already served nine
kings, and briskly ride away to see where the good people of Paris
caught their rabbits.
On his return, he had a habit of running in and out of the kitchen,
with his broad nostrils swollen out like balloons, to find out what partic-
ular roast was on the spit, until the cook, already in a stew, was ready
to tear his hair in despair. But cooks may be ever so vexed, the meat
will roast on the spit all the same, and at last get done to a turn. All
things being ready, Gargantua would sit down at table. He always
managed to have a large company of gentlemen present, who were only
too willing, for the honor of being invited to dinner by a Prince, to
serve as his attendants, should he ever need their services. Among
those of high birth who usually dined with him at this time were the
Lords De Fou, De Gourville, De Grignaut, and De Marigny.
After supper, Gargantua being in the liveliest humor, and dis-
posed to look on the world with a broad laugh, showing the largest







46 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

'' .. ... .

"1W -
































OARGANTUA LOOKS INTO THE KITCHEN.

and whitest of teeth -would play a little, or else pay an open-air visit
to some of the many pretty young ladies living in the neighborhood, -
their houses being too small for him to enter, and, on such nights, he
,' '[-,i','.-.o






ylLITU iOOK INOTH ITHN
and whiest of eeth--wuld ply altlo lepa noe-i ii







GAMES OF CARDS. 47

would not get home until midnight. Sometimes, when he did not go out,
he would take another little supper about eight o'clock, and still another
before midnight. Then he would sleep without snoring until eight
o'clock next morning.
It was a great day for Gargantua when he reached the end of his
two hundred and fifteen games; or, rather, he intended that it should
be a great day. He had said nothing to any one; but, when he woke
that particular morning, he was noticed to be in a gayer mood than
usual while he was dressing himself, and after he had gamboled
and rolled around his bed, and stretched his limbs on it, and made his
own great tent with one leg and the sheet, and given a neat turn to his
long locks with his German comb, and gone through his usual gaping,
coughing, spitting, groaning, sneezing, and hiccoughing. But, being in
some things a very simple Giant, indeed, he had not noticed that his
teacher, Ponocrates, had very keen eyes, and could use them too. Why,
Ponocrates knew when the last game was to be played just as well as Gar-
gantua himself did, and he had made up his mind to be somewhere in
the room when it closed. Sure enough, listening in a corner of the big
chamber, he heard some one say : Here ioe are on our last game!" To
which Gargantua shouted in reply : Ho ho The last game Don't
be too sure of that. Gentlemen, to-morrow we shall play just as well
as to-day."
"How, Prince?" asked Ponocrates, softly, coming out of his
corner.
"How, good Master? Why, by beginning our games over again."
Not so fast; not so fast, Prince. To-morrow Your Highness will
begin with ME "












CHAPTER XII.

GARGANTUA IS DOSED BY PONOCRATES, AND FORGETS ALL THAT
HOLOFERNES HAD TAUGHT HIM.

HILE the two hundred and fifteen games,
taking up just that number of days,
were being played, Master Ponocrates
had not been at all idle. He had already
consulted with Master Theodore a
wise physician of that time- and knew
just what he was going to do when he
had said:-
To-morrow Your Highness will
begin with ME."
The first thing was to dose Gargan-
tua with a mysterious herb, which made
him forget all that he had ever learned
under his old teacher. This was not an original idea at all with either
Theodore or Ponocrates, for Thimotes, the music-master of Miletus, had
long before dosed, in the same way, such disciples of his as had been
unlucky enough to have first learned their notes under other musicians.
Gargantua, when asked by Ponocrates to meet certain scientific gentlemen
of Paris who had been specially invited to inspire the royal Giant with
love of knowledge, was so weak and pale after his dose that he could
only bow his head, while wondering lazily to himself what all these
heavy talks about Science had to do with the Latin, which his good old
Father Grandgousier had been so anxious for him to learn.
When he had been dosed enough to forget his old studies, and
even to look up with a mild surprise when his dearly-loved Master
Holofernes was mentioned, Gargantua was put through a course of
study, in which he did not lose a single hour of the day. Only think
how much he must have learned each day i First, he was roused up,







GAlGANTUA DOSED BY PONOCRATES. 49

whether he wanted or not, at four o'clock every morning, when he
said his prayers. While the attendants were rubbing his body down,
a young page would read, in a loud voice, so as to be heard above the
scrubbing, some extracts from a book of good doctrine. After this,
being not more than half-dressed yet, his practice was to visit each of
his companions in his room, and with a gentle Get thee up, my boy !
get thee up awake the lazy fellow from his slumbers. Then he re-
turned to his room, where he found Ponocrates always ready to explain
what was doubtful in the chapters that had been
read to him, and to ask him whether he had







1k

noted, ,-
he should, ".' .
what signs the sun was entering that
morning, and what PONOCATES DOSES GARGANTU. aspect he thought the
moon would have that night.
It was only after this that his attendants began to dress him, to per-
fume him, to curl him, and to powder him Gargantua all the while
not once venturing to use that large, well-thumbed German comb of
which he had once been so proud. While all this was going on, the
same page would repeat the lesson of the day. Gargantua, thoroughly
dosed and brought down to a most anxious desire for study, learned
after two or three days to repeat the lessons by heart. Everybody
looked glad at this none more so than good Master Ponocrates him-
self-especially when the debate touched on such a question as the
" Human State," which was made the special lesson for two or three
hours. While Gargantua was still puzzling over the reading of the








50 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

" Human State," and learning all around the best talk about it, the big
clock would strike eleven; and then he would, with all his friends,
walk soberly to the ground where they would play at the good old
game of ball, exercising their bodies till all their muscles grew tired.
From the field it was an easy way to the house, where Gargantua,
being first rubbed down and after a change of shirt, would walk meekly,
surrounded by his friends, towards the kitchen to ask if the dinner was
ready. While waiting for the cook-now no longer in a stew, and










GAANTA AT HIS LESSONS.








therefore growing fatter and greasier than ever to send up the
_-





& N-
,.U ..,





GARGANTUA AT HIS LESSONS.

therefore growing fatter and greasier than ever--to send up the
meal, they would recite clearly and eloquently such sentences as had
been retained from the morning-lecture. However, Mister Appetite is
stronger than Knowledge; and when dinner was ready, they soon
dropped their wise talk and began to look with eyes as big as their
stomachs towards the dining-room. Once seated at table some one
would begin to read a pleasant history of ancient heroism, and continue
reading until the wine was served. Then, if the party seemed in a
mood for it, Ponocrates would set them to chatting merrily about the
nature of all that they had before them on the table, the bread, the
wine, the water, the salt, the meats, the fish, the fruits, herbs, roots,








GARGANTUA DOSED BY PONOCRATES. 51

and the mode of preparing all these. Doing this every day, Gar-
gantua soon learned all the passages relating to them to be found in
old classic writers, who were as dry as they were wise. Sometimes,
when the quotation did not run smooth, the old, musty, yellow parch-
ment itself, with its nearly rubbed-out Gothic letters, would be brought
in to settle the question; and the result was that, in a marvelously
short time, no learned doctor was Gargantua's .equal in all this no,
not by one-half.
They would once more take up in an easy talk the lessons read
during the morning, and, after finishing their dinner with some well-
made marmalade of quinces, would clean their teeth with a twig of the
mastic tree, and wash their hands and eyes with fresh water. Which
being done, cards were brought, not to play with, but to teach a thou-
sand fresh tricks and inventions which sprang directly, not only from
Architecture, but from Geometry, Astronomy, and Music. After that,
with a word from the good Master, Gargantua would make himself
merry in singing with his comrades some songs selected by himself,
accompanied by such instruments as the lute, the spinet, the harp, the
German nine-holed flute, the viol, and the sackbut, when would come
three hours given to exercises in writing antique and Roman letters,
and, lastly, to the main study, which would have made old Father
Grandgousier's heart swell with gladness if he could only have
known it.












CHAPTER XIII.

HOW GARGANTUA WAS MADE NOT TO LOSE ONE HOUR OF THE DAY.

SVERYBODY knows that Giants are very
Squeer people and require a great deal
K of care, even when they are the mildest,
Sand Gargantua was such a Giant that
the measures of all the Tailors of Paris
at that time couldn't have told him how
tall he was, and all the weights known
in his day couldn't possibly have bal-
anced his big body.
SMaster Ponocrates, who had no
idea of making the Prince's mind strong
_, at the expense of his body, being
too good a teacher for that, arranged
it in such a way that, every day after the Latin lesson, Gargantua was
allowed, after changing his clothes, to leave his hotel with his Squire
Gymnaste, who had been chosen specially to teach him the noble art
of horsemanship. Once on horseback, Gargantua would first give his
steed full rein ; then make him leap high in air; then jump a ditch; then
scale a fence; then turn quickly in one half of a circle, and back
again around the other half, before one could count thirty seconds.
Then calling for a lance --the keenest, the sharpest, and the strongest
that could be had-he would ride full-tilt against the heaviest door
or the stoutest oak, piercing the one through and through, or uprooting
the other by sheer force with as much ease as a common man would
tear up a sapling. As for the flourishes on horseback, no one could
compete with Gargantua. The great acrobat of Ferrara was only a
monkey in comparison with him. Gargantua was taught to leap from
one horse to another while both were at full gallop, without touching
the ground, or, V'ith lance at rest, mounting each horse without








ONE HOUR OF THE DAY. 53

stirrup or bridle, and guiding it as he pleased. As Ponocrates said,
"all these things help to make a good soldier."
Yet this was only a trifle. Every fine day the Prince
would go hunt-
ing. He would
shine as brightly
there as he had
done in horseman-
ship. He
wouldal-
ways be
the first
when the
stag was
brought t
to bay. o
He j
would --.
be fore- GARGANTUAN LEARNS TO SNOOT.
most in
chasing the deer, the doe, the boar, the partridge, the pheasant, and
the bustard.
Next to hunting came swimming. Gargantua, being so bulky,
never would strike a stroke unless he was in deep waters. He would
play such tricks in the water as only good swimmers know swim-
ming on his back, or sideways, or with all his body, or sometimes with
his feet only. He laughed at the idea of crossing the Seine. It was
his daily pastime, holding a book with one hand high above the water,
to reach the other side without wetting a single page of it. One day,
Gargantua, being praised for all this, was asked if he had any model.
All he said was :--
Perhaps, Julius Caesar used to do something of the same kind."
On coming out of the water, he would of course feel chilled through,
and then to get well warmed he would run up a hill, and then rush
down, taking the trees on the way, up which he would dart like a cat,








54 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

leaping from one branch to the other like a squirrel, and breaking
down great limbs to the right and left like Milo of old. He would
next pay his attention to the houses which, with the aid of two steel
poniards, he would climb, jumping down from them without ever being
the worse for it. After this he would exercise with the bow, often
breaking the strongest bows in drawing, shooting at
targets from be- low upwards, from above downwards,
then before him, sideways, and at last behind him, like
the Parthians.
SBut there was some-
; thing more. Every day
S after these feats were over,
they would drop a big cable
--1- f from some high tower to the
i ground. Gargantua would
go hand over hand up
this chain, and descend
it with so sure a grip
that, among the active
.men of Paris, there
S-could not be found his
equal. Then came
What Ponocrates called
strengthening his
Serves. For this pur-
pose, two great weights
li of lead had been
i specially made each
one weighing eight
hundred and seventy
GARGANTUA LEARNS TO CLIMB. thousand pounds-
which Gargantua would take up, one in each hand, raise them above
his head, and keep them there, without moving, three quarters of an
hour and more. All who saw this great feat wondered, and swore that
the like of it had not been seen in the world. Being still out in the








ONE HOUR OF THE DAY. 55

open air, he would exercise his throat and his lungs by shouting like a
wild man. Why, he was one day heard calling Eudemon from the Gate
of Saint Victor, by a man who was standing in
the street at Miontmartre, any map of Paris
will show you how far that is. Everybody has
heard about Stentor and his great voice. Well,




















GARGANTUAN STUDIES ASTRONOMY.

Stentor never had such a voice at the siege of Troy as Gargantua
had at the gate of St. Victor.
When the weather was bright, he would play a game in which he
would imitate Milo, the famous strong man, by standing on his feet,
and daring any number of the strongest men to make him move. This
was the last of the hard work for the day. He would be allowed to
rest time enough to be bathed, rubbed down, and given clean clothes.
He and his companions would return very slowly home, stopping on
the way by certain fields or grassy plains, where they examined the
trees and plants, consulting over them with the books of old-time







56 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

greybeards who had written about them, their arms full of specimens
which they would throw to the page Rhizotome, who was charged to
take good care of them, together with the pickaxes, hoes, spades,
scrapers, pruning-knives, and other implements which his master had
used in the work.
Of course this had brought them home, where they had to wait
sometimes for supper. If they happened to wait, they would re-
peat certain passages from what had been read or spoken of at dinner.
At the supper-table, they would continue their wise talk. After supper
they used to sing musically, to play on harmonious instruments, and
to pass the time away in those little games which wise men know how
to play with cards, dice, and goblets. His companions never found
these very interesting. No more did Gargantua.
When bed-time came, Gargantua used to walk with Ponocrates as
far as the lodge, looking upon the open street, whence they could
better see the face of the sky. There he watched the comet-there
happened to be one then and the figure, situation and aspect, op-
position and conjunction of the stars. Then, with his good teacher, he
would briefly sum up in the way of the Pythagoreans all that he had
read, seen, known, thought, and done in the course of the day.
Then the tired young Giant, tucking his bedclothes lazily around
him, would commend himself to Heaven, and stretch his big limbs out
on a bed that I am afraid was rather short for hin..,












CHAPTER XIV.

HOW THE AWFUL WAR BETWEEN THE BUNMAKERS OF LERNE AND
GARGANTUA'S COUNTRY WAS BEGUN.

HILE Gargantua, studying day after day,
was finding out that the tasks he had at
first thought to be so hard were so easy
that they became more a pastime than
anything else, and while he was grow-
ing to be a skilful soldier and a most
learned gentleman, his old father, King
S7 Grandgousier, without his knowing it,
V Vhad got into a terrible muss with cer-
tain Bunmakers of Lerne.
This is how it happened.
S It was vintage-time, when the great
purple grapes, bursting with their ripe-
ness, were to be gathered, and when the Shepherds of Grandgousier's
kingdom used to watch the vines like hawks to prevent the starlings
from pecking at the juicy clusters. This vintage-time always made
business for the Bunmakers of Lerne. Even when in the best of
humor, however, they were always a peppery-touch-me-if-you-dare
sort of fellows. They brought their buns to market along the great
highway, in ten or eleven big carts, which filled the air around them
with the sweetest odors. Of course, trudging along through the white
dust of the road, they were sure to meet King Grandgousier's Shep-
herds watching their vines, who always made it a rule to step out
politely to the edge of the highway, hats in hand, to beg the Bun-
makers to give them some of their fine, smoking buns in exchange for
their money.
I dare say the Shepherds knew what they were doing. Never
were there such buns as the Bunmakers of Lerne had the fame, all







58 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

around that region, of making. Taken at breakfast with ripe grapes
they were a dish fit for a King's table !
By ill luck, this year above all other years, the Bunmakers chose
to show how hot and peppery they could be. Being asked by the
Shepherds in the usual polite way to sell their buns, they not only
refused outright, but they began to call the honest Shepherds all the
bad names they could think of. There was one Shepherd named
Forgier, a good man, and a gay one besides, who, stepping for-
ward, said in a mild voice to the Bunmakers : -
Friends, this is not acting like neighbors. Haven't you always
come by the highway?




"'' 'ir' ,
t )ir j-' t /- '
.r ,' -. t- .

-., ,- ----1"_ ---^'' ,. ,.
.,i -,T, THE BUNMAKERS OF LERNE.

'Haven't you always found us ready to give you good
silver and copper for your buns? And haven't you
always had from us in return our fine cheeses, which give their rich-
ness to your buns ?"
It is an old saying that oil will make troubled waters still. But
old sayings are not always true. This particular saying proved false,
for, when the Bunmakers received Forgier's oil, it only set their water
on fire. Come here, sirrah! shouted Marquet, the chief Bun-
maker, to Forgier, "and I will give you your buns."
Forgier, being a very worthy, unsuspecting fellow, came near
with his money in his hand, like an honest man, thinking all the time
that Marquet really would let him have the buns, in spite of his rough
voice and sneering tones. What did Marquet do but, with his long
whip, cut the good Forgier about his body and legs so as to make him








BUNMAKERS OF LERNE. 59











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60 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

grape-vines to the white, dusty road, holding their poles in their hands
ready to avenge their comrade. The Bunmakers, peppery as they
might be, were just then trying to get off as fast as their horses
could carry their carts away; but they were not fast enough to pre-
vent the Shepherds from taking from them four or five dozen delicious
buns, for which they offered, like honest men, to pay the usual price.
But the Bunmakers were in too great a hurry for that. They laughed
angrily at all these offers, and bore Marquet's body, in a dead faint,
away with them.
And this was how the great and bloody war between the Bun-
makers of Lerne and Gargantua's country began.
The first thing the Bunmakers did, on getting safe home at Lerne,
even before taking a bit of food or a sup of wine, was to hasten to
the palace, where, bowing low before their King Picrochole, they
spread out their broken baskets, torn robes, crushed buns, and, at last,
with a grand flourish, displayed Marquet himself all covered with dry
blood, and groaning dreadfully.
"Who has dared do this ?" shouted King Picrochole, getting very
red in the face.
"The Shepherds and vine-watchers of that old Giant Grand-
gousier, may it please Your Majesty," answered the Bunmakers.
Oh oh oh !" roared Picrochole furiously.
Without asking for further information or a single proof, Picro-
chole ordered the drum to be beat around his city, commanding every-
body, under pain of the halter, to appear at broad noon in the great
square. Then he went to dinner. While he was dining, he gave out
his commissions to his officers in the army, which, when gathered to-
gether, was found to consist of sixteen thousand and fourteen bowmen,
and thirty thousand and eleven infantry. To the great Equerry Toque-
dillon was given the command of the artillery, which, when mustered,
numbered nine hundred and fourteen great brass cannon, culverins,
catapults, and other pieces of artillery.
When the army was all got together, a troop of Light Cavalry, three
hundred strong, under Captain Swillwind, was sent forward to scour
the country of the enemy, and find out what ambuscades had been laid;







BUIVlAKERS OF LEIRNE. 61

but they could find none. Grandgousier's Shepherds were still peace-
fully watching their grape-vines, and looking out only for the bad star-
lings. When the report was made that the land was clear, Picrochole,
all of a sudden bold, ordered a quick advance, each company marching
under its own captain. Without any order or discipline, the army swept
over King Grandgousier's fields, meeting no opposition; laying them
waste ; sparing neither rich nor poor; respecting no holy
place; carrying away the bellowing oxen, mooing cows,
roaring bulls, crying calves,
bleating lambs, ewes, rams

















goats, cackling hens, crowing
cocks, piping chicks, goslings, ganders, geese, grunting swine, and
suckling pigs; beating down the ripe walnuts ; tearing up the vines,
and pulling all the fruit from the trees. Now and then, a frightened
Shepherd would crawl from his hiding-place and beg for mercy, on the
ground that he and the Bunmakers had always been the best neighbors
together, and that it would be a shame to treat him like a foe. All
the Bunmakers did was to laugh at so mean-spirited a fellow, while
shouting that they were bound to teach him how to eat their buns.
So, like a great wave of blood, they rolled on till they reached Seuilly.








62 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

Then the mighty army, after sacking the town, rushed, shouting like
madmen, to the very walls of the great and venerable Abbey of Seuilly,
which they found very thick, and strengthened by a huge gate made
fast against them. The main body marched away towards the Ford of
Vede, leaving seven bodies of infantry with their standards, and two
hundred lancers, to break down the wall, which they did very soon,
with fierce cries of "Let us spoil the monks!"












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FRLIAR JOHN ATTACKS TUE BUNINAKEIMS
I










BUNMAKERS OF LERNE. 65

himself, were singing psalms and getting ready to leave the Chapel, in
rushed a young monk, with flaming eyes, who had seen what was going
on in the vineyard.
That's very well sung, brethren he shouted; very well sung,
indeed But why don't you sing, Good-by, basket, the vintage is
over'? Don't you know that those fellows are breaking down our
vines, and that we shall have no good wine this year?"
Now this young monk, who was called Friar John, was, I am
afraid, looked upon by his pious brethren as rather a black sheep. He
was tall, straight as an arrow, strong as a bull, a little quick of speech,
skilful in all games, and as brave as lion. So, when he looked in
upon the singing monks, and found them ready to give up every-
thing, off came his frock, and catching up a great staff near by, which
was as long as a lance and as big around as the fist, he rushed out and
fell upon the enemy, who were thinking of everything save the pray-
ing monks in the Abbey. The flag-bearers had piled their flags all
along the walls to work the better, the drummers had opened one end
of their drums and stuffed them with grapes, and the very trumpets
were running over with juice.
Then it was that Friar John holding his staff high in the air -
swept down upon the scattered Bunmakers like a hurricane It was
"first come, first served with Friar John. The first thwack crashed
through the crown of a big-headed bun-man, and brought him down.
Then the staff, with just a little blood on it now, went spinning around
to the right and left--up and down, first on one, then another-in
fact, everywhere. It broke the legs of this one, the arms of that one,
and the neck of still another. It gouged the eyes, drove teeth down
throats, smashed in ribs, and made jaws crack. If any one wanted to
hide between the thick vines, Friar John was sure to spy him out and
bring him to the ground with a broken back. If any one wanted to
run away, the terrible staff would reach him, and he would fall, shout-
ing: I surrender When the slaughter had gone on for some time,
Friar John stopped, and for good reason; for, looking around him,
he could no longer see a single Bunmaker standing on his feet,
and he was only giving wild blows in the air. Then he rested,








66 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

and it was found that he had, with his single arm, killed the whole
army which had remained behind in the vineyards of the convent, num-
bering thirteen thousand six hundred and twenty-two men. But
Friar John had struck down some other things besides the army, and
these were the purple vines loaded with the rich and juicy grapes,
which made the delicious convent wine famous throughout all the land.
After all, the rascal Bunmakers had spoiled the vintage !





iI,










FBIA JOHN ,TO THE RESCUE.






FRIAR JOHN TO THE RESCUE.












CHAPTER XV.

HOW OLD KING GRANDGOUSIER RECEIVED THE NEWS.

HILE Friar John was cracking skulls, and
breaking limbs, and flattening noses, and
ramming teeth down throats, Picrochole,
King of Lerne, had, with his Bunmak-
ers and in the greatest haste, crossed the
Ford of Vede and ordered the town of
Roche-Clermaud to surrender, which did
not make him wait long before opening
its gates to him. We shall leave him
SC J there while we see how King Grand-
gousier had received the news of this
sudden war.
One rainy evening, the fine old gen-
tleman happened to be in a very good humor. He was, as usual after
supper, seated warming his knees, which were somewhat rheumatic,
before a blazing fire ; and, while waiting for the chestnuts to be roasted
to a turn, was passing the time by writing on the red hearth with a
burnt stick and making Queen Gargamelle laugh by telling his funny
stories of old times. While he was in the very midst of one of these
funny old stories, and the chestnuts were smelling as if they wanted to
be eaten, here comes a servant to tell King Grandgousier that one of
his Shepherds was down in the court-yard begging to see him.
"What does the varlet want ?" asked the old King. He didn't mean
to be angry, but his surprise made his big voice sound very loud and
very gruff.
To see Your Majesty."
And what does he want to see My Majesty for? But bring him
up. I shan't know any sooner by waiting for thee to tell me."
Who should it be but one of the very Shepherds, who had been








68 THREE GOOD GLINTS.




























PICROCTIOLE'S ARTY.

watching the vines and the rich purple grapes when the trouble began?
He was full of it, so brimming full that he could hardly speak for his
eagerness to tell all he knew. At last, he managed to let the King
know what the bad Bunmakers of Lerne had done with his subjects'
vineyards; how the wicked King Picrochole had been running over his
lands, doing pretty much what he liked in the way of burning houses,
sacking towns, and tramping down vines; and how he was, just at
this time, shutting the gates of Roche-Clermaud against His Majesty.
It was sad to see how the old Giant received this bad news. He
was the kindest and friendliest of neighbors to all the Kings around







GRANDGOUSIER RECEIVES THE NEWS. 69

him. He had never been known to go to war with any of them, and no
neighbor had ever once thought before of going to war with him.
What the good old man liked was peace, so that he could, every day
after supper, eat roasted chestnuts, and tell fine stories of old times,
while writing with a burnt stick on the red hearth.
"Holos! holos!" cried Grandgousier; what is all this, good
people? Am I dreaming? Or is this really true that I hear? Can
Picrochole, the dear friend of my youth, close to me in blood and alli-
ance, mean to war against me and my people?
Who leads him on? Who
has induced j;h!i t .1. -
T i l. '. .:g--- :--------%
this? Ho! I.t
ho !ho ho 1 \ ,, I
he believe me
when I say
that I have
never done
any harm
to him or .IFf
his people !
On the ;
contrary,
I have
helped him
whenever
he wanted __
money ;6
and that
was very
often. Ho! t ""
ho! my good
people, my ep
friends, and all .
my faithful ser-
vants, I cannot GRANDGOUSIER WRITES TO GARGANTUA.







70 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

prevent your coming to my aid. Las! I am getting old. All my
life I have worked for peace. Now I must have war. Las! Las!"
While saying all this, he roared in his despair, without knowing it,
so fiercely that the chestnut-roasters ran away in their fright, leaving
their chestnuts to pop and burn on the griddles. Only the Council re-
mained, who always made it a point to be present at supper. King
Grandgousier at once called the Council together for special delibera-
tion, by inviting them to sit at the supper-table without eating, and
talk about affairs. After three hours of close debate, two points were
fully agreed on: -
1. To send an army to Picrochole to treat about matters.
2. To write to Prince Gargantua.
It was further resolved to send Ulrich Gallet, the very next day,
with five carts full of buns, with instructions to tell Picrochole that the
old King was willing to give these five cart-loads of buns to make
good those five dozen buns which had been taken by his Shepherds.
Then Grandgousier wrote a letter to Gargantua, telling about the
war on his hands, in which he said: "My resolve is not to provoke,
rather to pacify; but, if assailed, to defend myself. Come, my Gar-
gantua, my well-beloved, come Thy Father wants thee !"
By this time the chestnuts were all burnt black, and there wasn't
a single spark to be seen among the ashes.












CHAPTER XVI.

HOW GRANDGOUSIER TRIED TO BUY PEACE WITH FIVE CART-LOADS
OF BUNS.

ING Picrochole must have been a very
mean man. You will begin to think so
When you know how he treated Ulrich
Gallet, who was sent by good old Father
SGrandgousier to make peace. Ulrich
left the palace with five cart-loads of
splendid buns, four of these carts being
for the Bunmakers, and the fifth and last
cart being filled to the brim with buns
S good enough to make any one's mouth
water, being made of the purest butter,
/ the most delicious honey, the freshest
eggs, and the richest saffron and other
spices ever known. As Ulrich went along the high-road, people would
curl up their noses in delight, take two or three long sniffs, and then
cry out: Ah that last cart is the best of all."
"Yes," Ulrich would answer; the buns in that cart are sent
by King Grandgousier to Marquet himself."
Who is Marquet?"
Why, don't you know that he is the man who struck our friend
Forgier across the shins and got beaten by our Shepherds ? His Majesty
has given me seven hundred thousand and three gold crowns for him to
pay the surgeon who nursed his wounds."
Oh how good a King we have "
"Yes, and, what is more, His Majesty offers to give Marquet and
his heirs an apple-orchard forever, so dearly does he love peace."
"Was there ever such a King as ours cried the people on the
road, sending Ulrich on with another cart-load of blessings for each







72 THREE GOOD GIANTS.

mile, so that by the time he reached King Picrochole's Court there
must have'been quite a train of carts.
When Ulrich got near Roche-Clermaud, he began to fear that he
wouldn't be allowed to get into it unless he could first show that he
and his carts were the best of friends. So, just before reaching the
limits, he placed all around his carts a great store
,f i-.1, l i. i :i .l w\\il1l, I .1 l.... hs, .l i d took
S.....1 t,, :','1 ..: i V .. ,' ,.] iv rs deco-

il'. v il l 1i H. l., I ,., lm look:





.... .

















the buns. But, without minding cross words and sour looks, Master
Ulrich Gallet at last reached the gates of King Picrochole's Palace.
Picrochole did not want either to let him come in, or go out
to meet him, but sent word to him, instead, to tell what he had to
say to Captain Touquedillon. Then the good man, clearing his throat,
said : -
IQ-~














said::







FIVE CART-LOADS OF BUNS. 73

"My lord, to take away all cause for any further trouble, and to
remove any excuse for your master and mine not becoming once more
the best of friends, I have brought with me the buns about which all
this trouble began. Our people took from yours five dozen buns.
Good!-your people were well paid for them. We love peace so
dearly that we bring you five carts full of buns for the five dozen which
we took. One of these is for Marquet, and, besides that, here are
seven hundred thousand and three gold crowns for him, and also a deed
to him and his heirs forever of one of our best apple-orchards. Let us
live in peace hereafter, and do you return to your own country and
leave this city, to which you have no right, as you yourself know."
Now, this Captain Touquedillon was a snakish sort of man; and
when he heard honest Ulrich talk he went straight to Picrochole, and
coiled and twisted what he had heard in such a way that poor Ulrich,
could he have heard it, wouldn't have known it to be his own. The
snakish Captain added that they had got into a trap in Roche-Cler-
maud, and that those five carts had come in the very nick of time for
the starving soldiers.
"You say well," cried Picrochole, "seize the buns the rascal has
brought!"
SAnd the money ? "
Seize that too "
Then Captain Touquedillon, without further ado, sent his men out
of the gate to take the money, the buns, the oxen, and the carts.
Good Ulrich returned to Grandgousier, and told him all these
things. This made the gentle old Giant very sad. He stopped telling
stories of old times, and took no more pleasure in roasted chestnuts.
He saw that there must be a war, and a bitter one. He ceased to talk,
and was always sighing. All that he ever would say, after long hours
of silence and sighs, was :-
"Ho, there Has my boy Gargantua come yet?"












CHAPTER XVII.

HOW GARGANTUA, WITH A BIG TREE, BROKE DOWN A CASTLE AND PASSED
THE FORD OF VEDE.

--. _A I:,GQANTUA was a good son if ever there
was one. The minute he read his
s Father's letter begging him to come
-, home, he ordered his great Mare to be
bridled and saddled. It was less than
thirty minutes after this that he was gal-
S/loping on the road along with wise old
) dp Ponocrates, his faithful Squire Gym-
naste, and the pretty little page Eude-
1mon. This certainly was not a very
Strong escort, but Gargantua's single
arm was worth an army.
The servants followed slowly with
his baggage, books, and philosophical instruments.
Having got as far as Parille, they were told how Picrochole had
taken Roche-Clermaud, and how his men had been robbing and pil-
laging everywhere, and had been frightening everybody so much that
nobody was brave enough to tell on them. Another piece of news
Gargantua heard at Parille. This was that one of Picrochole's fiercest
officers, Captain Tripet, had been sent to take possession of several
points near the Ford of Vede.
Ho ho ho !" cried Gargantua. "Let us ride, then, as fast as
we can to the Ford of Vede."
"No, Prince," said Ponocrates; "what I would advise you to do is
to ride on a few miles farther, to the house of the Lord of Vauguyon.
He is an old friend of your royal Father, and can give us better coun-
sel than we can get in this place."
Well, then, so be it." said Gargantua.







THE FORD OF VEDE. 75

The whole party galloped .,-tily to Vauguyon, where they were
received with open gates and a steaming supper. After wine had been
drunk, and the Lord of Vauguyon had settled down to talk, Gargantua
was told that all that had been said was true. Picrochole's soldiers
were both at Roche-Clermaud and the Ford of Vede. On hearing this,
the Prince would not wait to sleep, so anxious was he to rush to.the
help of his good old Father. The Lord of Vauguyon tried to.keep'
him in the Castle until after a great storm, which then threatened,-was
over. It was of no use, Gargantua would hear nothing.
To your sad- dies, gentlemen he
cried. "It is at ;-. the Fnrd we shqll hunt
Picrochole's n,,- d.e, ,i ,. "

[:.' ^ ,. t .-,',t.: -. 1 his












GARGANTUA HURRIES HOME.


great Mare he started for the Ford. His lips were pressed close,
and his eyes glared fiercely down from a height greater than that
of the tallest trees. "His Highness is very angry," Ponocrates
whispered to Gymnaste. (For the first time he was afraid of his
pupil.) His Highness is awful mad," Gymnaste whispered to
Eudemon. On getting near the Ford, what should Gargantua do but
tear up a fine and stately tree which he found growing by the road-
side, stripping its branches and leaves till he made it a bare pole of
ZD7'~




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