• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The week of wonders; or, making...
 A peep into paradise; or, happy...
 Feasting on forbidden fruit; or,...
 Leaving a happy home; or, from...
 Burning the first fruits; or, a...
 The voice of blood; or, a strange...
 Greater and richer; or, from farm...
 Alone, yet not alone; or, the unseen...
 A hundred years' job; or, a marvelous...
 Too wicked to live; or, the greatest...
 The bow of beauty; or, a token...
 Making fun of his father; or, when...
 Too big a job; or, a sudden change...
 Surprised and delighted; or, the...
 True nobility; or, stooping to...
 Home from the fight; or, royal...
 Lessons from the stars; or, a grand...
 Family troubles; or, the serpent...
 Three wonderful guests; or, entertaining...
 Everything destroyed; or, fleeing...
 A timely rescue; or, the child...
 A queer courtship; or, why supper...
 Sharp practice; or, diamond cut...
 The wonderful ladder; or, a stairway...
 Which he loved best; or, seeking...
 A famous wrestling match; or, the...
 The fruits of envy; or, bartering...
 From prison to power; or, good...
 Hungry and helpless; or, boyhood's...
 Hard times; or, much work and little...
 A waif on the water; or, floating...
 A strange snake story; or, one...
 Flying for freedom; or, a marvelous...
 Hands up; or, how they won the...
 A poor excuse; or, what came out...
 The gorgeous tent; or, worship...
 Life for a look; or, thousands...
 Forty years a general; or, surrendering...
 Water heaped up; or, the wonderful...
 Victory and defeat; or, why they...
 Dividing the inheritance; or, realizing...
 Strength turned to weakness; or,...
 Undying devotion; or, two loving...
 Brave deeds of a shepherd boy;...
 A rugged way to the throne; or,...
 The wayward son; or, troubles and...
 Greatest among kings; or, splendor...
 The rival kings; or, rough roads...
 Miraculous feeding; or, strange...
 The plowman's appointment; or,...
 The little captive; or, what a...
 The mysterious panic; or, abundance...
 Thrown from the window; or, a wicked...
 Good and beautiful; or, a godly...
 Satan let loose; or, suffering...
 Uncomfortable quarters; or, the...
 The disappointed preacher; or,...
 Four noble boys; or, right better...
 Faithful and fearless; or, braving...
 The mysterious message; or, panic...
 Wonderful babes; or, the king and...
 Christmas carols; or, heaven and...
 Led by a star; or, a long way to...
 Puzzling his teachers; or, youth...
 A backwoods preacher; or, crying...
 The wonderful water-jars; or, serving...
 Choosing companions; or, how the...
 A den of thieves; or, the rascals...
 Walking on the waves; or, the lord...
 The great oculist; or, sight for...
 Getting at the doctor; or, odd...
 The children's friend; or, Jesus...
 Called back from the grave; or,...
 The royal shepherd; or, love for...
 Scattering seed; or, evil among...
 Wonders of yeast; or, the power...
 Vines and fruit trees; or, shall...
 Seeking in earnest; or, bound to...
 A royal welcome; or, the wanderer...
 Too late; or, rejected at...
 Generosity abused; or, forgiveness...
 Work and wages; or, settling with...
 Anointing Jesus; or, the work of...
 The triumphal march; or, a worthy...
 Gathering darkness; or, love and...
 Betrayed and bound; or, still deeper...
 Midnight adventures; or, deserted...
 A mockery of justice; or, overawed...
 It is finished; or, the tragedy...
 The opened tomb; or, from death...
 The conqueror's return; or, a marvelous...
 Talking in strange tongues; or,...
 Power in a name; or, a lame man...
 Freed from prison; or, doors opened...
 Picking up a passenger; or, the...
 A bonfire of books; or, strange...
 In the path of duty; or, tears...
 The imperial city; or, at the end...
 Lessons from nature; or, new views...
 The venerable prisoner; or, broad...
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Delightful stories, or, Home talks out of the wonderful book : a series of one hundred delightful fireside stories, in the chatty, conversational style, in which Grandpa Goodwin narrates the most wonderful occurences recorded in the sacred volume in a manner to charm the young folks by the real romance they contain, and at the same time sow the good wheat of divine truth in fertile soil
Title: Delightful stories, or, Home talks out of the wonderful book
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055493/00001
 Material Information
Title: Delightful stories, or, Home talks out of the wonderful book a series of one hundred delightful fireside stories, in the chatty, conversational style, in which Grandpa Goodwin narrates the most wonderful occurences recorded in the sacred volume in a manner to charm the young folks by the real romance they contain, and at the same time sow the good wheat of divine truth in fertile soil
Alternate Title: Home talks out of the wonderful book
Physical Description: 516 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Peltz, George A ( George Alexander )
E. R. Curtis & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: E.R. Curtis & Co.
Place of Publication: Cincinnati Ohio
Publication Date: c1888
 Subjects
Subject: Bible stories, English -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1888
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Ohio -- Cincinnati
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by George A. Peltz ; richly illustrated.
General Note: Title page and frontispiece printed in red and black.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055493
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224443
notis - ALG4707
oclc - 70113997

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Preface
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Page xvi
        Page xvii
        Page xviii
    List of Illustrations
        Page xix
        Page xx
        Page xxi-xxvi
    The week of wonders; or, making great things out of nothing
        Page 27-35
    A peep into paradise; or, happy people in a happy home
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Feasting on forbidden fruit; or, trifling with a serpent
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Leaving a happy home; or, from peace and plenty to toil and tears
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Burning the first fruits; or, a wicked brother's brutal deed
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The voice of blood; or, a strange cry from the ground
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Greater and richer; or, from farm life to city splendor
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Alone, yet not alone; or, the unseen companion of a singular man
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    A hundred years' job; or, a marvelous piece of joiner work
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Too wicked to live; or, the greatest storm on record
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
    The bow of beauty; or, a token of good things to come
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Making fun of his father; or, when wine is in wit is out
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Too big a job; or, a sudden change of plan
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Surprised and delighted; or, the first sight of a splendid inheritance
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    True nobility; or, stooping to conquer
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
    Home from the fight; or, royal honors for victors
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Lessons from the stars; or, a grand future foretold
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    Family troubles; or, the serpent in the home
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Three wonderful guests; or, entertaining angels unawares
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
    Everything destroyed; or, fleeing from the burning city
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
    A timely rescue; or, the child of promise saved
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    A queer courtship; or, why supper was delayed
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
    Sharp practice; or, diamond cut diamond
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    The wonderful ladder; or, a stairway to the skies
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
    Which he loved best; or, seeking one and getting two
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    A famous wrestling match; or, the victorious cripple
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
    The fruits of envy; or, bartering away a brother
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
    From prison to power; or, good brought out of evil
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
    Hungry and helpless; or, boyhood's dreams fulfilled
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
    Hard times; or, much work and little pay
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
    A waif on the water; or, floating into fortune
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
    A strange snake story; or, one swallowing a multitude
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
    Flying for freedom; or, a marvelous deliverance
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
    Hands up; or, how they won the battle
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
    A poor excuse; or, what came out of the fire
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
    The gorgeous tent; or, worship in the wilderness
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
    Life for a look; or, thousands cured though fatally bitten
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
    Forty years a general; or, surrendering a great commission
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
    Water heaped up; or, the wonderful crossing
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
    Victory and defeat; or, why they conquered and how they fled
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
    Dividing the inheritance; or, realizing a great possession
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
    Strength turned to weakness; or, how the mighty fell
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
    Undying devotion; or, two loving hearts
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
    Brave deeds of a shepherd boy; or, fit to become a king
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
    A rugged way to the throne; or, patience and forbearance rewarded
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
    The wayward son; or, troubles and trials about the throne
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
    Greatest among kings; or, splendor dazzling a queen
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
    The rival kings; or, rough roads for royal feet
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
    Miraculous feeding; or, strange supplies in dire distress
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
    The plowman's appointment; or, called to a great office
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
    The little captive; or, what a serving maid may do
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
    The mysterious panic; or, abundance for starvation
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
    Thrown from the window; or, a wicked queen's fearful end
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
    Good and beautiful; or, a godly queen's noble act
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
    Satan let loose; or, suffering without sinning
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
    Uncomfortable quarters; or, the runaway brought back
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
    The disappointed preacher; or, prophecy not fulfilled
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
    Four noble boys; or, right better than royalty
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
    Faithful and fearless; or, braving death for duty's sake
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
    The mysterious message; or, panic at the feast
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
    Wonderful babes; or, the king and his herald
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
    Christmas carols; or, heaven and earth rejoicing
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
    Led by a star; or, a long way to worship
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
    Puzzling his teachers; or, youth wiser than old age
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
    A backwoods preacher; or, crying in the wilderness
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
        Page 327
    The wonderful water-jars; or, serving his friends
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
    Choosing companions; or, how the lord got his helpers
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
    A den of thieves; or, the rascals turned out
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
    Walking on the waves; or, the lord of the seas
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
    The great oculist; or, sight for the blind
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
        Page 350
        Page 351
    Getting at the doctor; or, odd ways of gaining a cure
        Page 352
        Page 353
        Page 354
        Page 355
        Page 356
    The children's friend; or, Jesus among the little ones
        Page 357
        Page 358
        Page 359
        Page 360
        Page 361
        Page 362
    Called back from the grave; or, victories over death
        Page 363
        Page 364
        Page 365
        Page 366
        Page 367
        Page 368
    The royal shepherd; or, love for the lowly
        Page 369
        Page 370
        Page 371
        Page 372
        Page 373
    Scattering seed; or, evil among the good
        Page 374
        Page 375
        Page 376
        Page 377
        Page 378
        Page 379
    Wonders of yeast; or, the power of influence
        Page 380
        Page 381
        Page 382
        Page 383
    Vines and fruit trees; or, shall we cut it down
        Page 384
        Page 385
        Page 386
        Page 387
        Page 388
    Seeking in earnest; or, bound to win
        Page 389
        Page 390
        Page 391
        Page 392
        Page 393
        Page 394
        Page 395
    A royal welcome; or, the wanderer home again
        Page 396
        Page 397
        Page 398
        Page 399
    Too late; or, rejected at the door
        Page 400
        Page 401
        Page 402
        Page 403
        Page 404
    Generosity abused; or, forgiveness for the forgiving
        Page 405
        Page 406
        Page 407
        Page 408
    Work and wages; or, settling with the servants
        Page 409
        Page 410
        Page 411
        Page 412
        Page 413
    Anointing Jesus; or, the work of two women
        Page 414
        Page 415
        Page 416
        Page 417
        Page 418
    The triumphal march; or, a worthy welcome to the king
        Page 419
        Page 420
        Page 421
        Page 422
        Page 423
    Gathering darkness; or, love and sorrow strangely blended
        Page 424
        Page 425
        Page 426
        Page 427
        Page 428
        Page 429
    Betrayed and bound; or, still deeper darkness
        Page 430
        Page 431
        Page 432
        Page 433
        Page 434
    Midnight adventures; or, deserted and denied
        Page 435
        Page 436
        Page 437
        Page 438
        Page 439
    A mockery of justice; or, overawed by a mob
        Page 440
        Page 441
        Page 442
        Page 443
        Page 444
        Page 445
        Page 446
    It is finished; or, the tragedy completed
        Page 447
        Page 448
        Page 449
        Page 450
        Page 451
        Page 452
        Page 453
    The opened tomb; or, from death to life again
        Page 454
        Page 455
        Page 456
        Page 457
        Page 458
        Page 459
        Page 460
    The conqueror's return; or, a marvelous ascension
        Page 461
        Page 462
        Page 463
        Page 464
        Page 465
    Talking in strange tongues; or, power from on high
        Page 466
        Page 467
        Page 468
        Page 469
        Page 470
        Page 471
        Page 472
    Power in a name; or, a lame man caused to leap
        Page 473
        Page 474
        Page 475
        Page 476
        Page 477
    Freed from prison; or, doors opened in a strange way
        Page 478
        Page 479
        Page 480
        Page 481
        Page 482
    Picking up a passenger; or, the right man in the right place
        Page 483
        Page 484
        Page 485
        Page 486
        Page 487
        Page 488
    A bonfire of books; or, strange honors for faithful preachers
        Page 489
        Page 490
        Page 491
        Page 492
        Page 493
        Page 494
    In the path of duty; or, tears and terrors powerless
        Page 495
        Page 496
        Page 497
        Page 498
        Page 499
    The imperial city; or, at the end of the course
        Page 500
        Page 501
        Page 502
        Page 503
        Page 504
        Page 505
    Lessons from nature; or, new views of old subjects
        Page 506
        Page 507
        Page 508
        Page 509
        Page 510
        Page 511
    The venerable prisoner; or, broad views from a narrow island
        Page 512
        Page 513
        Page 514
        Page 515
        Page 516
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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DELIGHTFUL STORIES

OR


HOME TALKS THE WONDERFUL BOOK



A SERIES OF ONE HUNDRED DELIGHTFUL FIRESIDE STORIES, IN THE CHATTY, CONVERT.
NATIONAL STYLE, IN WHICH GRANDPA GOODWIN NARRATES THE MOST WON-
DERFUL OCCURRENCES RECORDED IN THE SACRED VOLUME IN A
MANNER TO CHARM THE YOUNG FOLKS BY THE REAL
ROMANCE THEY CONTAIN, AND AT THE SAME
TIME SOW THE GOOD WHEAT OF DIVINE
TRUTH IN FERTILE SOIL.



BY

REV. GEORGE A. PELTZ, D.D.
FORMERLY ASSOCIATE EDITOR SUNDAY SCHOOL TIMES, ETC., ETC.



RICHLY ILLUSTRATED.



E. R. CURTIS & CO., PUBLISHERS,
CINCINNATI, OHIO.





















































Copyright 1888, by HUBBARD BROTTERS.











PREFACE.



THIS book is unique in some important respects. Bible stories
have been told in the words of the Bible and in the sermonizing or
didactic style, but seldom have they appeared in the real language
of the household and in the sprightly, conversational manner of an
intelligent family group about the home fireside.
This home style is that which childhood craves, which childhood
understands. Not to be read to nor preached at is childhood's de-
light; but to be talked with, to have questions answered and expla-
nations given, to give and take in the bright word battles of the
home circle. For the lack of this attractive, nineteenth-century style,
books of Bible stories and the Bible itself lie neglected and unread
by numbers of well-meaning people. To popularize the rich treas-
ures of the Book of Books is the aim of GRANDPA GoODWIN'S
STORIES.
In developing the fireside conversations of the book representative
characters have been chosen. Grandpa himself, Mrs. Reed, Mary,
Carrie, and Charley are just such people as live everywhere. There
is not an unreal character in the entire group, and the stories are
looked at through the eyes of childhood. They are clothed in the
language of home; they are brightened with the queries and com-
1 v






vi PREFA CE.

ments of a company of wide-awake juveniles; and yet, in them all
there is a scrupulous regard for truth and a constant pursuit of the
profitable. .To children these stories will prove a genuine delight;
to parents or teachers a valuable help.
The source whence these stories are drawn is at once the most
ancient, the most varied, and the most authentic in the world. It
commands a wider and more profound reverence than any other
volume extant. Its narratives diverge widely from the beaten paths
of nineteenth-century life, but they invariably lead to the higher
grounds of a nobler and happier career. To effectively present
these romances of sacred writ in the most attractive form, the reader
is introduced into Grandpa Goodwin's home. Sitting there and
chatting with him and his dear ones, many a happy hour will be
passed and many a precious lesson will be learned.
The power of illustration has also been brought to bear in this
volume. It is adorned with nearly two hundred elegant engravings,
about half of which are full-page size. The value of such a pictorial
presentation of truth will be incalculable to the children and their
maturer friends. Every one of these illustrations throws light upon
the text with which it is used, and the one result of the volume
must be entertainment and profit.






















CONTENTS.






I.
PAGE
THE WEEK OF WONDERS; OR, MAKING GREAT THINGS OUT OF NOTHING, .... 27
Genesis i, I-31; Hebrews xi, 3.


II.

A PEEP INTO PARADISE; OR, HAPPY PEOPLE IN A HAPPY HOME . . ... 36
Genesis ii, 1-25; Revelation ii, 7; xxii, 1-5.


III.

FEASTING ON FORBIDDEN FRUIT; OR, TRIFLING WITH A SERPENT . .... 40
Genesis iii, 1-21.


IV.

LEAVING A HAPPY HOME; OR, FROM PEACE AND PLENTY TO TOIL AND TEARS, 40
Genesis iii, 22-24.


V.

BURNING THE FIRST FRUITS; OR, A WICKED BROTHER'S BRUTAL DEED, . 51
Genesis iv, 1-8; Hebrews xi, 4.


VI.

THE VOICE OF BLOOD; OR, A STRANGE CRY FROM THE GROUND, .......... 56
Genesis iv, 9-16; Matthew xxiii, 35; Hebrews xii, 24.
vii









viii CONTENTS.


VII.
PAGH
GREATER AND RICHER; OR, FROM FARM LIFE TO CITY SPLENDOR, .......... 60
Genesis iv, 16-24.


VIII.
ALONE, YET NOT ALONE; OR, THE UNSEEN COMPANION OF A SINGULAR MAN, .... 64
Genesis v,.21-24; Hebrews xi, 5 5.


IX.
A HUNDRED YEARS' JOB; OR, A MARVELOUS PIECE OF JOINER WORK, ,. . 69
Genesis vi, 1-22; Hebrews xi, 7; I Peter iii, 20; II Peter ii, 5.



X.

TOO WICKED TO LIVE; OR, THE GREATEST STORM ON RECORD, ......... 74
Genesis vii, 1-24; Matthew xxiv, 37-39.


XI.
THE BOW OF BEAUTY; OR, A TOKEN OF GOOD THINGS TO COME, .. . 78
Genesis viii, 1-22; ix, 1-17.


XII.
MAKING FUN OF HIS FATHER; OR, WHEN WINE IS IN WIT IS OUT . 83
Genesis ix, 18-29.


XIII.

TOO BIG A JOB; OR, A SUDDEN CHANGE OF PLAN, .. . . .... .. 87
Genesis xi, --9.


XIV.
SURPRISED AND DELIGHTED; OR, THE FIRST SIGHT OF A SPLENDID INHERITANCE, 91
Genesis xi, 26-32; xii, 1-20.


XV.

TRUE NOBILITY;' OR, STOOPING TO CONQUER . . . ..... 95
Genesis xiii, 1-18.









CONTENTS. ix


XVI.
PAGE
HOME FROM THE FIGHT; OR, ROYAL HONORS FOR VICTORS . . 101
Genesis xiv, 1-24.


XVII.
LESSONS FROM THE STARS; OR, A GRAND FUTURE FORETOLD, ... ....... 104
Genesis xv, 1-6; Hebrews xi, II, 12.


XVIII.
FAMILY TROUBLES; OR, THE SERPENT IN THE HOME, .. ............. 107
Genesis xvi, 1-16; xxi, I-21; xxv, 9-18.


XIX.
THREE WONDERFUL GUESTS; OR, ENTERTAINING ANGELS UNAWARES, ..... .112
Genesis xviii, 1-33.


XX.
EVERYTHING DESTROYED; OR, FLEEING FROM THE BURNING CITY,. . 16
Genesis xix, 1-38; Deuteronomy xxix, 23.


XXI.
A TIMELY RESCUE; OR, THE CHILD OF PROMISE SAVED, .... . .. .120
Genesis xxii, 1-19; Hebrews xi, 17-19.


XXII.
A QUEER COURTSHIP; OR, WHY SUPPER WAS DELAYED, . .. . . 124
Genesis xxiv, I-67.


XXIII.
SHARP PRACTICE; OR, DIAMOND CUT DIAMOND ............... .. 130
Genesis xxvii, 1-45; Hebrews xi, 20.


XXIV.
THE WONDERFUL LADDER; OR, A STAIRWAY TO THE SKIES . . .135
Genesis xxviii, 1-22; John i, 51.








x CONTENTS.

XXV.
PAGE
WHICH HE LOVED BEST; OR, SEEKING ONE AND GETTING Two, ....... .140
Genesis xxix, I-3o; xxx; 25-43; xxxi, 1-55.


XXVI.
A FAMOUS WRESTLING MATCH; OR, THE VICTORIOUS CRIPPLE, . . .144
Genesis, chapters xxxii-xxxiii.


XXVII.
THE FRUITS OF ENVY; OR, BARTERING AWAY A BROTHER, . . . .. 148
Genesis xxxvii, 1-36.


XXVIII.
FROM PRISON TO POWER; OR, GOOD BROUGHT OUT OF EVIL, .......... 152
Genesis, chapters xxxix, xl, xli.


XXIX.
HUNGRY AND HELPLESS; OR, BOYHOOD'S DREAMS FULFILLED . .... 156
Genesis, chapters xlii-lxvii.


XXX.
HARD TIMES; OR, MUCH WORK AND LITTLE PAY, . . . . .162
Genesis, chapters xlviii-1; Exodus i, 1-16.


XXXI.
A WAIF ON THE WATER; OR, FLOATING INTO FORTUNE, . . . 165
Exodus, chapters ii, iii.


XXXII.
A STRANGE SNAKE STORY; OR, ONE SWALLOWING A MULTITUDE, ........ 170
Exodus iv, 1-23; vii, 1-12.


XXXIII.
FLYING FOR FREEDOM; OR, A MARVELOUS DELIVERANCE, .. . . ... .. 73
Exodus vii, 12-25; chapters viii-xv.









CONTENTS. xi

XXXIV.
PAGE
HANDS UP; oR, How THEY WON THE BATTLE, . . . .. ISO
Exodus xvii, 8-16.


XXXV.

A POOR EXCUSE; OR, WHAT CAME OUT OF THE FIRE, . . . ... .'183
Exodus, chapters xix, xxxii.


XXXVI.
THE GORGEOUS TENT; OR, WORSHIP IN THE WILDERNESS, . . ... .188
Exodus, chapters xxv-xxxi, xxxv-xl; Numbers xvii.


XXXVII.
LIFE FOR A LOOK; OR, THOUSANDS CURED THOUGH FATALLY BITTEN, . .193
Numbers xxi, 4-9; II Kings xviii, 4; John iii, 14, 15.


XXXVIII.
FORTY YEARS A GENERAL; OR, SURRENDERING A GREAT COMMISSION, . ... ..197
Numbers xxvii, 15-23; Deuteronomy xxxiv; Joshua i, -i18; v, 13-15.


XXXIX.
WATER HEAPED UP; OR, THE WONDERFUL CROSSING, . . . . 202
Joshua, chapters iii, iv.


XL.
VICTORY AND DEFEAT; OR, WHY THEY CONQUERED AND HOW THEY FLED, . 206
Joshua, chapters vi-viii.


XLI.
DIVIDING THE INHERITANCE; OR, REALIZING A GREAT POSSESSION, . . 210
Joshua, chapters x-xix.


XLI .
STRENGTH TURNED TO WEAKNESS; OR, How THE MIGHTY FELL . ... 214
Judges, chapters xiii-xvi.



4









xii CONTENTS.

XLIII.
PAGE
UNDYING DEVOTION; OR, Two LOVING HEARTS, .................. .219
Ruth, chapters i-iv.


XLIV.
BRAVE DEEDS OF A SHEPHERD BOY; OR, FIT TO BECOME A KING, . ... 224
I Samuel xvii.


XLV.
A RUGGED WAY TO THE THRONE; OR, PATIENCE AND FORBEARANCE REWARDED, 230
I Samuel, chapters xvi-xxxi; II Samuel i.


XLVI.
THE WAYWARD SON; OR, TROUBLES AND TRIALS ABOUT THE THRONE, .. .. ... 236
II Samuel, chapters xiv-xviii.


XLVII.
GREATEST AMONG KINGS; OR, SPLENDOR DAZZLING A QUEEN, . ... 240
I Kings i, 5-53; chapters ii-x; Matthew vi, 28-30.


XLVIII.
THE RIVAL KINGS; OR, ROUGH ROADS FOR ROYAL FEET, . . . .. 245
I Kings xi, 26-43; chapters xii-xiv.


XLIX.
MIRACULOUS FEEDING; OR, STRANGE SUPPLIES IN DIRE DISTRESS, . ... 249
I Kings xvii, 1-24; Luke iv, 25, 26.


L.
THE PLOWMAN'S APPOINTMENT; OR, CALLED TO A GREAT OFFICE, ... . 254
I Kings xix, 15-21; II Kings, chapters ii-iv.



LI.
THE LITTLE CAPTIVE; OR, WHAT A SERVING MAID MAY Do, ..... 259
II Kings v, 1-27.










CONTENTS. xiii

LII.
PAGE
THE MYSTERIOUS PANIC; OR, ABUNDANCE FOR STARVATION, . . 263
II Kings vi, 24-33; vii, 1-20.


LIII.
THROWN FROM THE WINDOW; OR, A WICKED QUEEN'S FEARFUL END, . ... 267
II Kings ix, 30-37.


LIV.

GOOD AND BEAUTIFUL; OR, A GODLY QUEEN'S NOBLE ACT, ..... .... ..... 270
Esther, chapters i-x.


LV.
SATAN LET LOOSE; OR, SUFFERING WITHOUT SINNING, . . ... 275
Job, chapters i, ii, xlii.


LVI.
UNCOMFORTABLE QUARTERS; OR, THE RUNAWAY BROUGHT BACK, . .. 280
Jonah, chapters i, ii; Matthew xii, 40.


LVII.
THE DISAPPOINTED PREACHER; OR, PROPHECY NOT FULFILLED, ... .. .." .. 284
Jonah iii, iv; Matthew xii, 41.


LVIII.
FOUR NOBLE BOYS; OR, RIGHT BETTER THAN ROYALTY,. . . .. 288
Daniel i, 1-21.


LIX.
FAITHFUL AND FEARLESS; OR, BRAVING DEATH FOR DUTY'S SAKE, . .. 293
Daniel, chapters ii, iii, vi.


LX.
THE MYSTERIOUS MESSAGE; oR, PANIC AT THE FEAST . ... .... 298
Daniel v, 1-31.










xiv CONTENTS.

LXI.
PAGE
WONDERFUL BABES; OR, THE KING AND HIS HERALD, ..... .. . .. 303
Luke i, 5-80; ii, 21-40.


LXII.
CHRISTMAS CAROLS; OR, HEAVEN AND EARTH REJOICING, . . . 308
Luke ii, 1-20.


LXIII.
LED BY A STAR; OR, A LONG WAY TO WORSHIP, .. . . . .. 313
Matthew ii, 1-23.


LXIV.
PUZZLING HIS TEACHERS; OR, YOUTH WISER THAN OLD AGE, . . ... 317
Luke ii, 41-52.


LXV.
A BACKWOODS PREACHER; OR, CRYING IN THE WILDERNESS, . . 32
Matthew iii; Luke iii, I-20; John i, 18-37; Matthew xiv, 1-12.


LXVI.
THE WONDERFUL WATER-JARS; OR, SERVING HIS FRIENDS, .. . . .. 32Y
John ii, I-II.


LXVII.
CHOOSING COMPANIONS; OR, How THE LORD GOT His HELPERS, ....... 333
Matthew x; John iii, 1-21.


LXVIII.
A DEN OF THIEVES; OR, TURNING THE RASCALS OUT,. . . .... 338
John ii, 13-17; Matthew xxi, 10-13.


LXIX.

WALKING ON THE WAVES; OR, LORD OF THE SEAS, .. . .... 342
Matthew viii, 23-26; xiv, 22-33; Mark vi, 45-51.









CONTENTS. xv

LXX.
PAGE
THE GREAT OCULIST; OR, SIGHT FOR THE BLIND, .......... ... .. .347
Matthew ix, 27-31; xi, 4, 5; Mark viii, 22-25; x, 46-52; John ix, 1-41.


LXXI.
GETTING AT THE DOCTOR; OR, ODD WAYS OF GAINING A CURE .. . 352
Mark v, 24-34; Luke v, 18-26.


LXXII.
THE CHILDREN'S FRIEND; OR, JESUS AMONG THE LITTLE ONES, ....... 357
Mark v, 21-43; ix, 17-29.


LXXIII.
CALLED BACK FROM THE GRAVE; OR, VICTORIES OVER DEATH, ...... .363
Luke vii, 11-15; John xi, 1-54.


LXXIV.
THE ROYAL SHEPHERD; OR, LOVE FOR THE LOWLY, ..., . 369
John x, 1-18; Luke xv, 1-7,


LXXV.
SCATTERING SEED; OR, EVIL AMONG THE GOOD, . ...... 374
Matthew xiii, 1-30, 36-43.


LXXVI.
WONDERS OF YEAST; OR, THE POWER OF INFLUENCE.. ............ 380
Matthew xiii, 33.


LXXVII.
VINES AND FRUIT TREES; OR, SHALL WE CUT IT DOWN ? ............ 384
John xv, 1-8; Luke xiii, 6-9.


LXXVIII.
SEEKING IN EARNEST; OR, BOUND TO WIN, . . . ... 389
Matthew xiii, 44-46; Luke xv, 8, 9.









xvi CONTENTS.

LXXIX.
p
A ROYAL WELCOME; OR, THE WANDERER HOME AGAIN, .. . . .. 396
Luke xv, 11-24.


LXXX.
TOO LATE; OR, REJECTED AT THE DOOR, .......... .. 40(.
Matthew xxv, 1-13.


LXXXI.
GENEROSITY ABUSED; OR, FORGIVENESS FOR THE FORGIVING, .... ...... 405
Matthew xviii, 23-35.


LXXXII.
WORK AND WAGES; OR, SETTLING WITH THE SERVANTS, .. . . .. 409
Matthew xx, 1-16.


LXXXIII.
ANOINTING JESUS; OR, THE GOOD WORK OF Two WOMEN, ............ 414
Luke vii, 36-50; John xii, 1-7.


LXXXIV.
THE TRIUMPHAL MARCH; OR, A WORTHY WELCOME TO THE KING, . .. 419
John xii, 12-16.


LXXXV.
GATHERING DARKNESS; OR, LOVE AND SORROW STRANGELY BLENDED, ..... 424
John, chapters xiii-xviii; Mark xiv, 26-52.


LXXXVI.
BETRAYED AND BOUND; OR, STILL DEEPER DARKNESS .. . . ... 430
Luke xxii, 39-54; Matthew xxvi, 30-56.
I

LXXXVII.
MIDNIGHT ADVENTURES; OR, DESERTED AND DENIED, .............. 435
Mark xiv, 53-72; Luke xxii, 21-34, 54-62.









CONTENTS. xvii

LXXXVIII.
PAGE
A MOCKERY OF JUSTICE; OR, OVERAWED BY A MOB . . . .. 44
Matthew xxvii, 1-32; Mark xv, 1-21; Luke xxiii, 1-32; John xviii, xix, 1-16.


LXXXIX.

IT IS FINISHED; OR, THE TRAGEDY COMPLETED ............. . 447
Matthew xxvii, 34-66; Mark xv, 22-47; Luke xxiii, 33-56; John xix, 17-42.


XC.
THE OPENED TOMB; OR, FROM DEATH TO LIFE AGAIN .... . .... 454
Matthew xxviii; Mark xvi; Luke xxiv, 1-49; John xx, xxi.


XCI.
THE CONQUEROR'S RETURN; OR, A MARVELOUS ASCENSION, . . .. 461
Luke xxiv, 50-53; Acts i, I--I.


XCII.
TALKING IN STRANGE TONGUES; OR, POWER FROM ON HIGH, . 466
Acts i, 12-26; ii; iv, 32-37; v, I-II.


XCIII.
POWER IN A NAME; OR, A LAME MAN CAUSED TO LEAP, ......... 473
Acts iii, 1-26.


XCIV.
FREED FROM PRISON; OR, DOORs OPENED WITHOUT HANDS, . . .. 478
Acts xii, 1-23.


XCV.
PICKING UP A PASSENGER; OR, THE RIGHT MAN IN THE RIGHT PLACE, . ... 483.
Acts viii, 26-40.


XCVI.
A BONFIRE OF BOOKS; OR, STRANGE HONORS FOR TRUE MEN, ... ...... 489
Acts xiv, 8-18; xix, I-20.









xviii CONTENTS.

XCVII.
PAGE
IN THE PATH OF DUTY; OR, TEARS AND TERRORS POWERLESS, . .. 495
Acts, chapters xx-xxvi.


XCVIII.
THE IMPERIAL CITY; OR, THE END AT HAND . . . .. 500
Acts, chapters xxvii, xxviti.


XCIX.
LESSONS FROM NATURE; OR, NEW VIEWS OF OLD SUBJECTS, .. . . 506
Isaiah xxxii, z; Song of Solomon ii, I; Luke xii, 4.


C.
THE VENERABLE PRISONER; OR, BROAD VIEWS FROM A NARROW ISLAND, ..... 512
Revelation, chapters i-xxii.


















LIST OE ILLUSTRATIONS.





Grandpa's Stories from the Wonderful Book, . . . . FRONTISPIECE.
PAGE
Philip Doddridge Taught by Pictures (full page) . . . . ... 26
Emerging from Chaos, .......... .. . . ...... 31
Expelled from Paradise, .................. . . .. 47
Toiling for Daily Bread, .................. ......... ... 49
Burning the First Fruits, .................. ........ .- 52
Slaying His Brother, .................. ............. 53
Fleeing from the Dead (full page) ....... ...... .... ...... 57
Building a City, ................. . . . 62
Walking Heavenward (full page) ............... .............. 65
The Boatbuilder Taught, .... ............... .. .. .. 71
The.Dove Sent Forth (full page), ................... ..... ... 77
Coming Ashore, .................... . . ..... 79
The Bow of Beauty, ................. . . .. 81
Cursed be Canaan, ............... . . ..... 85
Scattering of the Nations, ............... . . ... 89
A Splendid Outlook, ..... ........... ............. 92
Abram's Magnanimous Offer (full page), ....... . . ..... 97
Blessing the Victors, ......... ......... ... .......... 102
Seeing Stars, ..................... ....... ....... o05
Banished from Home, .......... . . . -.. ... Iog
Entertaining Angels, ..... ........... ........ ... .. 1
A City on Fire, .......... ... ... ......... 117
xix









xx LIST OF ILL USTRATIONS.

PAGB
A Narrow Escape, ... .. ............. . .., .. ... 122
Seeking a Bride, ........ ..... .... . 125
Meeting a Husband, ................. ...... . 127
An Oriental Well-scene (full page), ..... ... 129

The Wrong Man Blessed,. ......... ................ 133
The Wonderful Ladder, .............. .. ... 137
Fixing His Wages, ......... . . ............... 14
Off for Home, ...... .. ....... ........... 143
A Strange Wrestling Match, ... .. .... ....... ... . 146
Reconciliation, ... . . . ........ 147
A Wicked Sale .................. .. ...... .. 150
Beforethe .... ..... .......... .. ............... 154
In the Place of Honor, ..... ......... ......... ..... 157
The Unknown Brother (full page) . . . . . .. 159
A Glad Meeting, .. ......... ..... .. ... .......... 161
Hard Times, .................... ................ 163
'Rescuing a Waif, ... .......... ......... .... ....... 166
Slaying the Tyrant, .............. .................. .67
Burning, yet not Consumed (full page) . . . . ..... 1.69
Sticks Turned to Snakes, ... .... . . . .. . 171
Death in every House, ....... .. .. ... ............... 174
Buried in the Sea (full page) ........ ........... .......... 177
Celebrating Victory (full page) . . . . . . .. 179
Winning the Battle (full page), ...... ........... ......... .. 181
Worshiping a Calf, ............... .. ...... ... ....... 185
The Tent of Worship,. ......... . . . . 89
Carrie's Plan of the Tabernacle . .. . . 19o
Blossoms on a Rod, ................................ 191
The Healing Serpent (full page), ..... ... ............ ........ 195
The New Commander, .................... ........ 198
The Commander-in-Chief, ..... . . . 201
Waters Heaped Up (full page) ..... . . . . .. 203




Pages
xxi xxvi
Missing
From
Original




Pages
27 -35
Missing
From
Original




Page
36
Missing
From
Original







A PEEP INTO PARADISE. 37

Mrs. Reed, on Grandpa's suggestion, turned to her well-used copy
of Milton and read several selections. Among them these:

"In this pleasant soil
His far more pleasant garden God ordain'd;
Out of the fertile ground He caused to grow
All trees of noblest kind for sight, smell, taste-
And all amid them stood the tree of life."

Concerning the stream which watered the garden." continued
Mrs. Reed, Milton speaks thus:"

'Rolling on orient pearl and sands of gold,
With mazy error under pendant shades
Ran Nectar, visiting each plant, and fed
Flow'ers worthy of Paradise, which not nice art
In beds and curious knots, but nature boon
Pour'd forth profuse on hill and dale and plain.'

"Again, in describing the splendid groves of Paradise, Milton
speaks of them as-

"' Groves whose rich trees wept odorous gums and balm,
Others whose fruit burnish'd with golden rind
Hung amiable .
Betwixt them lawns, or level downs, and flocks
Grazing the tender herb, were interposed,
Or palmy hillock, or the flow'ry lap
Of some well-watered valley spread her store,
Flow'rs of all hue, and without thorn the rose.' "

Mrs. Reed laid down her book. The children were all attention,
for she had read so clearly that they could catch the meaning of every
word. Then Grandpa resumed his talk.
"Into this beautiful home Adam and Eve were put, not to live in
idleness, nor yet to work hard, but, as the account says, to dress the
garden and to keep it-a pleasant and beautiful business, I am sure
Nothing could be more delightful."
3







38 A PEEP INTO PARADISE.

"How happy they must have been there with their flowers and
fruits! But it must have been lonesome to have no neighbors and
no children there."
"They had God very near and very kind to them, Carrie," replied
Mrs. Reed, and that was the best of company. They did not know
what it was to miss neighbors and children, never having had them
to enjoy."
"Yes, and God Himself was delighted with the service and society
of Adam and Eve," said Grandpa. Plants were splendid, but they
could not think or feel. Beasts and birds could think and feel, but
they could not love God. Their gorgeous colors, mighty strength.
swift motions, and sweet songs were grand as they could be; but
man was made in God's own grander image; he was as much like
God as a created being can be like the one who made him."
"Adam and Eve were born gown up, weren't they, Grandpa?"
asked Charley, catching at a new idea.
Well, yes; that is, they never were children. They had neither
father nor mother, brothers nor sisters. They ruled over all other
living creatures on the earth, and God brought these creatures to
Adam, and he named them as to him seemed best. Animals were
not fierce and quarrelsome then as many of them now are, but they
dwelt together in peace. Eden was a loving and happy home for
all who were there, whether man or beast."
I wonder Adam and Eve did not stay there forever," said Carrie.
"They must have been so happy."
If they had stayed forever all of us would live there now, wouldn't
we? I'd have had my letters directed to Charley Reed, Paradise.
Garden of Eden; I would."
"That's a great idea," answered Mary. "They did not stay
though, and we are not there, I'm sorry to say. But how long did
they stay there, Grandpa ?"
We do not know; probably wot very long. But there is a Paradise
for us, though that was lost."







A PEEP INTO PARADISE. 39

"Where is our Paradise ? I should like to know," said Charley.
And I too," chimed in Carrie. If any such joyful place can
be found I want to find it, and live there."
"The Bible," answered Grandpa, "often gives this name to the
dwelling place of the saints in heaven. In Revelation ii, 7, it is
called the Paradise of God."
In an instant Mary had turned to the text named, and she read
these words: To him that overcometh will I give to eat of the tree
of life, which is in the midst of the Paradise of God."
Ho, ho," shouted Charley; so there is a tree of life in that
Paradise, too, is there ?"
Yes," answered Grandpa. "Such a tree was in the Garden of
Eden, but after man sinned and was sent out of that beautiful place
an angel kept him from going back to that tree to eat of it. In the
heavenly Paradise, however, all may eat of that tree and live for-
ever."
There are other respects in which the heavenly Paradise is like
that where Adam lived. I wish Grandpa would tell you about
them," added Mrs. Reed, to which her father answered:
Adam's Paraalse nac a'river, and the Paradise of God has its
river of the water of life. God walked in the first Paradise, and
Adam and Eve se-vIr i-ii-; there. In the new Paradise saints see
God's face and serve Him day and night. But the best of all is,
that into the heavenly Paradise nothing shall ever enter that can
harm and defile us. into the Garden of Eden a tempter did enter,
and both Adam and Eve sinned and lost their home; but none shall
sin in heaven nor lose mat precious home. With the Bible's help
we may peep into ine heavenly Paradise, and we also may be the
happy people who shall dwell there and be blessed forever."
That's where i -wnt ,. ^v- S Card_, to which the other
children added their wing ass~1i.







40 FEASTING ON FORBIDDEN FRUIT.




FEASTING ON FORBIDDEN FRUIT;

OR, TRIFLING WITH A SERPENT.


0'' GRANDPA!" began Carrie, as the family came together
after tea; "I have thought so much to-day about Adam
and Eve. What a pity it was they did not stay in their
happy home! Why were they sent out of Eden, anyway? I don't
see what great harm there was in eating that fruit."
Probably no harm at all in merely eating that fruit. I do not
suppose it was poisonous, or unwholesome even. The harm was in
disobeying God. He forbade them to eat that fruit; they disobeyed
and did it deliberately. It was as clear a case of refusal to obey as
ever occurred."
Yes, I know that," replied Carrie; but then it was so little a
thing-just to eat some fruit that looked so nice."
If it was so little a thing, the greater was the folly of not allowing
God to have His way about it. But it was not so little as it seems.
God had said, Do not eat. Adam and Eve each said, I will eat. It
was pure, simple, inexcusable disobedience of God. Wasn't it,
Carrie ?"
Well, yes, Grandpa. I know it was; I must admit that. But
why did God let them .get into so much trouble about so little a
matter ?"
If we really love a person we show it, not by doing things which
are easy and pleasant to ourselves, but by doing things which are
hard, which require self-denial, but which please or help the person
ue love. You show love to your mother, notby eating your food
and enjoying your play, but by leaving your play to serve her, or by







FEASTING ON FORBIDDEN FRUIT. 41

omitting some favorite article of food when she thinks it may do you
harm. So Adam and Eve showed their love to God, not by enjoy-
ing all that they were free to enjoy, but by doing without the one
thing which God forbade. Some test of their love was necessary,
and God made it just one little thing. The result showed that they
did not love and honor Him enough to yield that one little point.
They preferred their own way to God's way."
Well, Grandpa," said Carrie, in more of a submissive manner,
"I think I understand it better. They ought to have obeyed God;
but I am sorry all the same."
"We are all sorry about it, darling. A great deal of trouble has
come to the world from that willful disobedience. It turned the lives
of men into a wrong direction at the very start. It was the pebble
in the brooklet's bed which turns the course of the entire stream.
And all this trouble came from trifling with a serpent."
"Well, I don't understand that," said Mary. "I read about that
serpent in Genesis iii, and I don't know what it means."
To help us understand, suppose Mary reads Revelation xx, 2,"
said Grandpa.
Mary quickly found the place and read: He laid hold on the
dragon, that old serpent, which is the Devil, and Satan, and bound
him a thousand years."
"Here we see who is the serpent that did the harm. It is the
source of all evil and the opposer of all good, known as Satan or
the devil," said Grandpa.
But wasn't there any snake in the business, then ?" asked Charley,
seemingly disappointed at this explanation of the story.
Perhaps not," replied Grandpa. "Satan may have entered into
a genuine snake, and so have quietly glided up to Eve and talked
with her; or he may have made himself look like a snake, and so
have come near her; or he may have come to her in a gliding,
stealthy way simply, as a snake would approach, and so have sug-
gested his evil ideas. This is my own notion of the case. He came







42 FEASTING ON FORBIDDEN FRUIT.

to her as a snake comes to its prey-stealthily, wickedly, with murder
in the heart. When, later in the scene, God pronounced a curse upon
the serpent, it was not meant for snakes; but for the old serpent, the
vile snakelike tempter Satan."
"Then Eve did not really see a snake crawling around and did not
really hear it talk," said Carrie, seemingly much relieved to get rid
of the snake.
Probably not," said Grandpa. The serpent with which she tri-
fled was Satan; and she did trifle with him. He came asking a ques-
tion as to what God had really forbidden. He really was twitting
her on the fact that she could not do all she pleased, because one
thing had been forbidden. Eve answered very well at the start, but
when she was about through she used a little sentence which looks
suspicious. God has said of this tree, Thou shalt not eat of it. Eve
adds, Neither shall ye touch it. God had not said this, and it looks
as though Eve were seeking something to complain of, as if she were
exaggerating what God had forbidden. On hearing this Satan flatly
contradicts what God had said. God's words were, In the day thou
latest thereof thou shalt surely die. But Satan said, Thou shalt not
surely die. It seems strange that Eve would listen to such talk. She
must have known it was wrong; but she did listen and Satan talked
on, telling her how much wiser and better she would become if she
ate the fruit of this tree, and making her think God was not good in
keeping so good a thing from her. Then Satan left her, but the
poison of his talk was working in her mind. Mary may read to us
from the sixth verse, which shows what happened and how it came
to pass."
While all listened eagerly Mary read as follows: "And when the
woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant
to the eyes, and a tree to be desired to make one wise; she took of
the fruit thereof, and did eat; and gave also unto her husband with
her, and he did eat."
That was too bad," said Carrie, with a sigh and a very sad face.







FEASTING ON FORBIDDEN FRUIT. 43

"Yes," said Grandpa; "instead of resisting Satan and driving
away every evil thought, she lingered about the tree, looked on its
fruit, thought of the benefits Satan promised, and at last took and
ate the fruit, then ran off to find Adam and persuade him to do the
same. When they had done the wrong, they felt ashamed. Then
they thought of God and were afraid. So they worried through the
day till the sun began to set and the cool of the day-that pleasantest
of all times in a beautiful garden-drew near. But Adam and Eve
found no pleasure in that lovely evening. Their hearts were filled
with fear and their cheeks were flushed with shame. Tears gathered
in their eyes, the first tears ever shed in the world. They wondered
what God would say and what was the meaning of His threat, thou
shall surely die. At last God came and they heard His voice, but in-
stead of bounding joyfully to meet Him they skulked away to a hiding-
place. Then God called to Adam, Where art thou ? God knew where
Adam was, but He wished by this call to make Adam know his sad and
fallen condition. Then God came near to them in their hiding-place.
There they were among the bushes crouching to the ground, their
heads bowed down, their tears falling, their hearts full of fear, and
the old serpent near by gloating over their unhappy fate. How
wretched to God's pure eyes the" world must then have seemed!
The song of birds, the fragrance of flowers, the glitter of leaves, the
sport of beasts, must to Him have seemed a fearful mockery since
man, the lord and master of them all, was crushed with sin and shame."
O Grandpa!" cried Carrie, why didn't God forgive them on the
spot and let them start over again ?"
God was quite willing to forgive them, and I have no doubt did
freely do so," said Grandpa; "but for them to start over again, as
they were before they disobeyed, was as impossible as for me to start
over again as a boy, or for a cripple to start over again with sound
limbs. They had sinned, and never again could they be innocent.
In some other way they could be saved, I am sure, but not as persons
who had never sinned."







44 FEASTING ON FORBIDDEN FRUIT.

"I see," said Carrie, "that first good chance was lost, and they
could not get it back again."
"Yes; and God must show His disapproval of the wrong they
did," said Grandpa, "just as a kind and loving mother must punish
a child who does wrong, and so, when Adam made an excuse for
hiding himself, God pushed His questions closer, and Adam, seeing
he could not escape, confessed, I did eat; but, said he, the
woman Thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree. In this
way he tried to put the blame first on Eve, and also on God who
gave him Eve. That is the way the wicked do. They seldom confess
themselves at fault; somebody else, or possibly God Himself, is to
blame. God condemns nobody without giving them a chance, so He
asked Eve about it and she blamed the serpent. Then God told
them the results of their wrong doing. On the serpent he pro-
nounced a curse more bitter than that upon any creature in existence.
He was doomed to crawl, to eat dust, to be hated, and-at last to have
his head crushed; which shows the loathing every good man should
have for Satan, much as everybody hates snakes and tries to crush
their heads."
"I wish they were all killed," said Charley, and old Satan, too. I
don't see what they are for, anyhow."
Next God turned to Eve," continued Grandpa. She was in sor-
row enough at thatmoment, but God said He would greatly multiply
it. Not only would He add to it, but He would moultiply it; yes,
multiply it greatly."
"Poor Eve," sighed Mary, "she must have been sorry enough.
And it was her first sorrow, too. She had not been used to it, had
she, Grandpa ?"
No, but she soon came to know enough of it; and as for Adam,
God said that in sorrow and in the sweat of his face he should eat
his bread until he died. The very ground was cursed so that thorns
and thistles would spring up rather than flowers and fruits. Such was
the result of feasting on forbidden fruit and trifling with a serpent."







FEASTING ON FORBIDDEN FRUIT. 45

"Let me add a word in closing, children," said Mrs. Reed.
"You may think Satan very powerful, as he really is, but James, in
his Epistle, says, Resist the devil, and he will flee from you. Which
of you is determined to resist him ?"
"I," shouted all the children in concert, Charley adding, in a
sort of uncertain way, I don't always know Satan when I see him.
I know bad boys; and I.know bad words and bad acts; but I'm not
so sure about Satan."
"Resist all the evil you do know, and you'll be sure to oppose
Satan," answered his mother, with a kindly smile.
"And then will he be scared and run?" asked Charley, with a
glow of enthusiasm.
"That's what the Bible assures us, my boy," was her answer
which brought from Charley an earnest deeiaration:
"Here goes, then, to scare Satan. I'll resist him with all my
might."
"Success to you," called Grandpa, as the happy children left the
room on their way to bed.






16 LEA VING A HAPPY HOME.



LEAVING A HAPPY HOME;

OR, FROM PEACE AND PLENTY TO TOIL AND TEARS.


WHEN the family were again assembled, Carrie began with
the exclamation:
"Poor Eve! I have been so sorry for her. I could
have cried a dozen times to-day. Where did they go after they
sinned? and what did they do ?"
"I am glad," answered Grandpa, that you have thought so much
about her. Let it warn my little girl never to disobey God."
I'm sure I never want to," she answered, in a most serious tone,
Charley adding, Nor do I;" and Mary, Nor I."
And now," said Grandpa, drawing a roll of paper from his
pocket and opening it upon the table, "here is a picture by a fam-
ous illustrator of Bible scenes. I want you to look at it carefully
and then each tell me what seems the most striking thing in it. Let
Mary tell first."
They all look so sorry, Grandpa. See poor Eve! Adam can't
bear to look up at all. And the angel seems grieved. The dog,
even, looks worried and as if he wondered what it meant. Why the
old serpent himself looks sorry, though I guess it's more mean and
ashamed that he looks. But oh! they are so sad !"
Just see the thorns and the thistles outside that gate," said
Carrie, "and the stones. Inside there were none of these, were there,
Grandpa? Now they will have to work among briers and all sorts
of troubles, won't they ?"
See that big bird," said Charley, "he's pecking Eve's head, isn't
he? and there's another flying over them and squalling at them;







LEA VING A HAPPY HOME. 47

and there's a wasp or hornet after them, too. O my! It's too bad
all these things had to happen. And there's that old snake. If I
were Adam I'd pick up a stone and whack him on the head, so I
would. I wouldn't have him crawling near me. But, Grandpa, what














taken."-Genesis iii, 23.













a queer old sword the angel has. It looks as if it was splitting all
That, my boy, is the aming sword which turned every way to
4 It




















keep Adam and Eve from the garden. We read about it in Genesis
iii, 24," said Charley's mother, who was gazing at the picture.
:.-- .-- .... -, -. :_-- ::-








iii, 24,"1 said Charley's mother, who was gazing at the picture.







48 LEA VING A HAPPY HOME.

"The saddest thing Adam and Eve knew up to that time," re-
sumed Grandpa, "was the leaving of their happy home. Within that
place of beauty were peace and plenty; without were toil and tears.
Eve's lament on leaving Paradise, written by Milton, from whom we
have already quoted, is one of the saddest utterances ever spoken.
Your mother will favor us with part of it."
Mrs. Reed took up her Paradise Lost and read as follows:
"0 unexpected stroke, worse than of death!
Must I leave thee, Paradise ? thus leave
Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades,
Fit haunt of God's ? Where I had hoped to spend,
Quiet, though sad, the respite of that day
That must be mortal to us both. O flow'rs,
That never will in other climate grow,
My early visitation, and my last
At ev'n, which I bred up with tender hand
From the first opening bud, and gave ye names,
Who now shall rear ye to the sun, or rank
Your tribes, and water from th' ambrosial fount ?
. . .. From thee
How shall I part, and whither wander down
Into a lower world, to this obscure
And wild ? How shall we breathe in other air
Less pure, accustomed to immortal fruits ?"

"Beautiful! but oh! how sad!" said Mary; Carrie meanwhile
wiping her eyes.
"Well, my dears," said Grandpa, "you have caught at about all
the points of the picture. That was the saddest moving that ever a
family made. They had no furniture or baggage, but they had a
heavy load on their hearts. And now that they are out of Paradise,
I will show you another picture. What is this ?" asked Grandpa, as
he unrolled another engraving and laid it upon the table.
"Why, there are Cain and Abel," exclaimed Charley, in an instant--
"Abel with his mother, playing with lambs; Cain giving an apple to
his father."







LEA VING A HAPPY HOME. 49

"How tired Adam looks," said Carrie, and his hair is all matted
over his face, as if he was sweating dreadfully."
"Notice," said Grandpa, "the work he is at. There is a great
thistle, there a thorny bush, and there a heap of stones. Adam








7 L




,,,f, 1Y












In the sweat of thy face shall thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground."-Genesis iii, 19.

has a poor, roughly-made hoe, with which he has been trying to dig
out the stones and to cultivate the ground. Cain seems to notice
that his father is tired, and offers him fruit to refresh him. Eve
seems sad as she looks upon her little boy, for I suppose she thinks
of where he might have been had she not trifled with the serpent."







50 LEAVING A HAPPY OME.

Why did they need so much fence as I see in this picture ?"
asked Mary. "There was nobody to come and steal, nor any other
person's land into which their sheep might get."
"True, but that fence suggests some other sad truths. Even the
gentle sheep were not disposed to live quietly with them now. And
other animals were not disposed to leave the sheep unharmed. The
peace and plenty of Eden were gone. Fences and force had become
necessary. Toil and tears were the lot of Adam and Eve, and of all
their children,"
0 dear, it does seem too bad that so much trouble should have
come to them," said Carrie, whose sympathies were fully aroused.
"But they ought to have obeyed God, and I guess they often wished
they had done it."
"And that, too, was God's wish," interposed Mrs. Reed. "I have
no doubt He felt about Adam and Eve as He felt about His people
at a later day, when He said, 0 that thou hadst hearkened to my com
mandments then had thy peace been as a river, and thy righteous
ness as the waves of the sea."
And may we have righteousness and peace that way, by heark-
ening to God's command?"
Most certainly, Carrie," answered her mother. That is the
glory of the Lord's gospel, and you may fully enjoy it."
"Before we separate, mother," said Mary, "sing that hymn about
the peace that floweth as a river, please."
"With pleasure, darling," was Mrs. Reed's reply. Then she sang
Mrs. Crewdson's beautiful verses, which begin:
Oh t for the peace that floweth as a river,
Making life's desert places bloom and smile;
Oh I for the faith to grasp heaven's bright forever,
Auid the shadows of earth's little while !"







BURNING THE FIRST FRUITS. 1



BURNING THE FIRST FRUITS;

OR, A WICKED BROTHER'S BRUTAL DEED.



"/\NE of the pictures we looked at last night," said Grandpa,
) after some other conversation had occupied a little of the
evening, showed us the first two boys who ever lived.
Cain, the elder, was with his father, probably trying to help work the
ground. He grew up a farmer-a tiller of the ground, as the Bible
calls him. Abel was with his mother, among the sheep, of which,
probably, she took care, and he grew up a shepherd-a keeper of
sheep. Cain was probably a stronger, rougher, lad than Abel. He
was more like the father; Abel more like his mother."
I never did like Cain," said Carrie. I always thought Abel was
a great deal nicer."
Cain, no doubt, was a very troublesome boy. He was self-willed
and passionate, and his parents knew nothing of the way in which
such a boy should be trained. He became tyrannical and abusive
as he grew older; for nobody suddenly becomes a murderer. The
heart is full of murder long before the hands do the deed. By the
continual indulgence of wicked feelings, Cain was prepared for his
dreadful crime, and killing Abel was only the natural result. Such
a son must have been a great trouble to his parents; he added ter-
ribly to their many other sorrows."
"But did they not teach Cain and Abel to love and serve God ?"
asked Mary.
"I have no doubt of it," responded Grandpa; "for the very occa-
sion of Abel's death was that both he and Cain offered sacrifices,
and Abel's pleased God, while Cain's did not."







52 BURNING THE FIRST FRUITS.

"What are sacrifices ?" asked Charley.
"They are gifts to God," explained Grandpa. Cain brought fruit
from the fields and Abel brought lambs from his flocks. These were
the first results of their work and the best offerings that could be
found by either of them. To show that these gifts were entirely for
-- -.., < -._- -- .--- -- ,. 4











Why did God want such nice thin-- s to be burned ?" asked Car-
P %













t e g o c and of h e n i v 4



the Lord, they were laid on a heap of stones called an altar and were
entirely burned. Solemnly burning the first fruits of a man's ground
or flocks was offering sacrifice to God."
"Why did God want such nice things to be burned?" asked Car.







BURNING THE FIRST FRUITS. 53

rie. "I should think they ought to be saved. The poorer things
might very well be burned."
"Why," replied Mary, God ought to get the best, and unless it
was burned up it would only be a make-believe gift; for the man
would have it for himself after all."

























" t came to pass, when they were in the field, that Cain rose up against Abel his brother, and slew
him."-Genesis iv, 8.

"You have the right idea," said Grandpa. "Adam and Eve had
taught this to their boys, both of whom came to sacrifice to the Lord.
Abel came with a loving desire to please God, and God was pleased
with him and his offering. Cain came in some other spirit. Maybe
4
"Yo have the bright ida" adGrnp. AamadEv a
tagh t is toterbyboho hmcmet arfc t h od
Abl am with a loigdsr opes Gd n a lae
with ~ ~ ~ ~ hi n hsofeig Ci am insm te prt ab

.d







54 BURNING THE FIRST FRUITS.

he was grudging his gift to God and wishing he could keep it for
himself. For some reason, however, God was not pleased with Cain
nor with his offering. How God showed that He was pleased with
Abel we do not know. Perhaps He kindled fire on Abel's altar
by a flash of lightning, or He possibly made the fire burn free and
clear, or He may have appeared in a visible form to Abel, speaking
words of approval which both Cain and Abel could hear. Cain was
not so honored, and on this account he became very angry. The
Bible says his countenance fell-that is, he looked very long-faced
and sullen about it. God saw all this and talked kindly to him,
encouraging him to do right, and promising to accept him if he did
so. But Cain remained sullen and angry and went away plotting
evil against his brother and not trying at all to do as God wished.
And so Cain watched his chance, talking angrily with Abel and bully-
ing him whenever they met. No doubt Abel tried to persuade his
brother to do right; but this made Cain all the more angry. One
day they met out in the field, far away from home. That was Cain's
chance. Full of angry passion, he started up and killed Abel on the
spot."
That was awful !" exclaimed Carrie, as Grandpa paused.
Yes," continued he, "and Cain did it deliberately, having planned
it for days. It was murder in cold blood, not in haste, nor to save
his own life. Abel was the first dead man of the world and Cain
the first murderer. When Abel ceased to breathe, when the color
left his cheek and his eye became set in death, Cain must have suf-
fered more than tongue can tell. What had happened he could
not understand. He had never before seen death. He hurried
from the place, but God was after him, calling, Where is Abel thy
brother? Cain did not hesitate to lie, but answered positively, I
know not; and then, as if to silence God, he asks, Am I my brother's
keeper? So saying, he hurried away from the dead Abel, and tried
to hurry away from God, too."
"It seems to me," said Carrie, that nobody could be more wicked








BURNING THE FIRST FR UIS. 55

than Cain. He killed his own brother, and so good a brother, and
killed him just because he was good."
"It would be hard to find anything more wicked," added Grandpa,
but John, the beloved disciple, seems to be afraid that we may be
as wicked and warns us against being like Cain. Mary, read I John
iii, I I, 12, please."
Mary found the place in a moment and read: "For this is the
message that ye heard from the beginning, that we should love one
another. Not as Cain, who was of that wicked one, and slew his
brother. And wherefore slew he him? Because his own works
were evil, and his brother's righteous."
"If we don't love one another are we like Cain, then, Grandpa?"
asked Charley.
"Assuredly so. And if we prefer evil works to righteous works
we are like Cain. We may never kill a person, much less a brother,
but without love for the holy and the good we are, like Cain, of that
*wicked one, as John says; that is, we are children of Satan."
"Or, as the hymn declares," chimed in Mrs. Reed:
Love is the golden chain that binds
The happy saints above;
And he's an heir of heaven that finds
His bosom glow with love."

"Well, I'm not going to be like Cain," was Charley's emphatic
declaration as he gathered up his books preparatory to going off
to bed.
Nor any of us, I trust," added Carrie. "People who quarrel and
fight, who beat and kill each other, all belong to Satan's family. For
my part, I prefer better company."
"Good girl and Good night!" were Charley's parting shouts.






56 THE VOICE OF BLOOD.




THE VOICE OF BLOOD;

OR, A STRANGE CRY FROM THE GROUND.



VER since last night," began Mary, when the family was
again seated in' the sitting-room, "I have fancied I could
see Abel lying dead in the field where Cain had left him.
It was an awful sin for him to kill Abel, wasn't it?"
"And I," said Mrs. Reed, "have been thinking of his poor mother.
I am sure Abel was a loving boy, who always hurried home when
his day's duties were done, and who always greeted his mother with
a kiss. On the morning of his death he left home alive and well,
full of hope and love, and she had thought of him often as the day
passed by. At last evening approached and she expected him to
s.i.::-r; but he did not come. She looked out from the door, but
could not see him. I can imagine all the worriment of her motherly
heart as darkness came and Abel had not returned. She had long
been afraid that Cain would do harm to Abel; now she is sure of
it, for Cain, too, is away. So she spends the night in anxiety.
A i:-n only half sympathizes with her. He thinks it will come out
all :i.,ht and goes to sleep, but Eve is wide awake. Morning comes,
and out they go to seek the boys. Abel's sheep are wandering
without care; Cain's work lies unfinished; but where are the bro..
others? Eve sees something yonder. It is Abel lying on the ground.
Is he asleep? She hurries to him. Adam follows. They reach
the body. It is battered and bloody. It is cold and dead. Eve.
calls, but Abel does not answer. She lifts his head, but it drops
limp and heavy from her hands. She calls, and calls again, but no
answer comes. Then she weeps, O so bitterly, over her dear, dead









MISMEN-





Il,,

A . --
-5 : - --;:-,' I, "'" I, '



-









-_. "G FROM '" D-:
i' ,' ,':': : .




~?,Y` ---;--~*~kT. C '' "":

i -." ~'~UJgl~~~v ,..

~~~: :i ," '.'"
:I







FLEEING FROM THE DEAD.







58 THE VOICE OF BLOOD.

boy. This is what I have thought of all day, until my own eyes
have been full of tears for that poor bereaved mother."
When Mrs. Reed ceased speaking, the children were in tears.
They sat without a word for a few minutes and then Grandpa broke
the silence by quoting God's words to Eve: "I will greatly multiply
thy sorrow."
Grandpa," asked Charley, as if anxious to change the subject,
"where did they bury Abel?"
I don't know, my boy, but I suppose they did bury him; probably
right where they found his body. It must have been a very sad fu-
neral, and it was the first in the world. They probably straightened
out the cold, stiffened limbs, washed away the blood, wrapped the
body in skins, and then covered it with earth. All around was still,
but from that ground there rose to the ear of God a voice, for He
said to Cain, The voice of thy brother's blood crieth unto me from
the ground."
"What does that mean?" asked Carrie. Blood cannot speak,
Grandpa."
No, my child; but to God's mind there was such a demand that
Cain should be punished that it seemed as if every drop of Abel's
blood had a voice which cried out for vengeance. To kill a human
being is an awful crime, and especially to kill one so pure and good as
Abel, and to do it simply because of his goodness. God heard that
cry of Abel's blood, and, so far as Cain was concerned, God put a
special curse on the ground. Cain was a farmer, but no more was
the earth to yield her strength to him. However skillfully and hard
he might toil, he would not get a full return. And he was to be
restless and unhappy, becoming a fugitive and a vagabond, a
wanderer on the earth, a tramp, a man whom all should hate and
none should love."
"That was a fearful punishment," said Mary, with a shudder.
So Cain felt, for his answer to God was, My punishment is greater
than I can bear. He was afraid, too. that even his kindred would







THE VOICE OF BLOOD. 59

want to kill him, but this God would not permit. For men to go on
killing one another would never do; so God put a mark on Cain
that everybody should know him, and God said that any one killing
Cain should suffer seven times more penalty than was already in-
flicted on this wicked man. Then God sert Cain, the first murderer,
out into the world, away from his own people, to wander alone, and
to be forever full of fears and anxiety."
"I'm glad I.wasn't Cain," said Charley, as Grandpa was called
away by a visiting friend. "I guess he felt like killing himself too,
and it's a pity he didn't do it."
"Possibly not so great a pity," answered Mrs. Reed. "That
would have been to add self-murder to the murder already com-
mitted. Two wrongs never make a right, you know. The true
course for him would have been that of humble repentance and sin-
cere reformation. God would have forgiven him; and while Cain
could never have undone the great crime of his life, he could have
done much to prevent a similar crime in others, and he could have
spent his days in doing good. But we have no account that he did
any such thing. He was full of remorse and dread of penalty for
his sin, but he did not love and practice any better ways."
I don't wonder that John, who was so full of love and so good a
man, warned people against going in the way of Cain. I'm sure I
never want to be like him in any respect."
"Well said, Mary," answered her mother. May we all walk in
the better and nobler ways !"







60 GREAT TER AND RICHER.




GREATER AND RICHER:

OR, FROM FARM LIFE TO CITY SPLENDOR.



WHERE did Cain go after he killed Abel ?" asked Charley,
as Grandpa entered the sitting-room.
He went away toward the East as a lonely wan-
derer, into a strange place called the land of Nod, or the land of the
vagabond, from the fact that he, the chief of vagabonds, went there
to live."
With whom did he live?" asked Mary. Who was there, Grandpa,
in that land ?"
Nobody at that time, so far as we know, but after a while brothers
and sisters of his, with their children, came that way and settled. One
of them Cain afterwards persuaded to share his hard lot and be his
wife."
"I wouldn't have married him," shouted Carrie, with an earnest-
ness that made the others laugh heartily, at which Carrie colored up
and said even more earnestly, "Well, I'm sure I wouldn't want any-
thing to do with such a man, much less to keep house for him."
Cain may have become a far better man," said Mrs. Reed, sooth-
ingly. "Very wicked persons sometimes become very good."
Yes, I know," answered Carrie, "but I'd rather take my chances
with somebody who always had been very good."
"I hope my little daughter will remain as wise when she is grown
up, and when some son of Cain may put her principles to the test."
"Never fear for me," was Carrie's merry reply. But, really,"
continued she, "why did Cain go off? Why didn't he stay just
where he was ?"








GREATER AND RICHER. 61

"We are sure," continued Grandpa, that when Cain started he
wanted to get away from God and from all talk about Him. This
is what he meant in Genesis iv, 16, where it says, Cain went out from
the presence of the Lord. He could not get away from God, for
God is everywhere; but he could get away from his father and
mother and from the other children which they probably had at that
time. By so doing he would have no one to remind him of God and
of his own sin. That was what he then wanted;"
"Ah," said Mrs. Reed, Cain's attempt to get away from God
recalls these verses:

"Is there throughout all worlds one spot,
One lonely wild, where Thou art not ?
The hosts of heaven enjoy Thy care,
And those of hell know Thou art there.
Awake, asleep, where none intrude,
Or 'midst the thronging multitude-
In every land, on every sea,
We are surrounded still with Thee."

"Very true," added Grandpa, "and worthy to be remembered by
us all. After Cain married he roamed about the country, getting
his living by cultivating the ground as best he could. Years went
by, and Cain had children and grandchildren. His family became
very numerous, and he was a great and rich man among them.
Some of his descendants were shepherds and herdsmen, having im-
mense flocks and many cattle. Others were musicians, and some
were mechanics who wrought in brass and iron. With all this growth
about him it is not strange that Cain made up his mind to build a
city, which he did, calling it Enoch, after his eldest son."
"I wouldn't have done that," said Charley. "I think the country
is a heap better than any city."
But, Charley," replied his good teacher, Cain had two special
reasons for doing this. God had sentenced him to be a vagabond
and a fugitive, having no home anywhere; but if by building a city







62 GREATER AND RICHER.

Cain could settle himself and no more wander up and down the
earth, he would be glad enough of it. And then he was a farmer,
but for him the ground was specially cursed. He never prospered
at this work; but if he could get into a real estate business, selling

W.. 777-777


Genesis iv, 7.
-IT














town-ts and houses, he might do a great deal better. So Cain
Sil re fr qiig hi fr-i a ig re i i
,. .. . .


"eri",isiv 17.










splendor. How much he really gained by it nobody knows, for the








Bible says nothing more about his history."
Don't we know anything more about him ?" asked Carrie.
"--- < -










had special reasons for quitting his farm-life and seeking rest in city
splendor. How much he really gained by it nobody knows, for the
Bible says nothing more about his history."
Don't we know anything more about him ?" asked Carrie.







GREATER AND RICHER. 63

Only this," said Grandpa, that from the closing verses of Gen-
esis iv, it is quite certain that Cain himself was killed by Lamech, one
of his own descendants. This Lamech did kill a man, and in speaking
of it he says, If Cain shall be avenged sevenfold (which God had said
should be if any man killed him), truly Lamech seventy-and-seven-
fold. In speaking thus he seems to make himself the one who re-
ceives the penalty for killing Cain, and who may himself expect an
even greater protection because he was in so much greater peril."
"So Cain died a violent death, as Abel did, and by one of his own
kindred, too," said Mary, in a thoughtful way. "Well, I think he
deserved it if ever any one did."
Do you think Cain ever was happy after he killed Abel ?" asked
Carrie.
"I do not think he could have been," replied Grandpa. As the
head of a large family many would honor him. In his work of build-
ing a city he would rule over many men, but no doubt he carried a
sad heart and a cheerless face. Possibly his disposition became
better. He may have learned to control his hasty temper; but the
man that Lamech killed had wounded him, and was killed for that
reason. That man probably was Cain, who, it seems from this, still
struck and beat others when aroused to anger. If Cain was not the
man whom Lamech killed, however, still murder was committed in
the city of Enoch, and a city where murder is, is a city where there are
other fearful crimes. So Cain did not escape from sin and its penalties
by means of his city life. There is but one city where such escape
is possible, that is the heavenly Jerusalem. Amid its splendor sin
is unknown and sorrow never comes."
That is the place of which the hymn tells, isn't it, Grandpa ? I
mean the hymn, Jerusalem the golden."
"Yes, darling, and we will sing a verse or two of that same old
hymn before we say good-night." Then they sang with real earnest-
ness and went to their beds to dream of the holy city.







04 ALONE, YET NOT ALONE.



ALONE, YET NOT ALONE;

OR, THE UNSEEN COMPANION OF A SINGULAR MAN.



" HAVE but a little while to spend with you this evening," said
Grandpa, as he seated himself in his favorite chair; "but I
would feel that something was lacking in the day's work if we
did not have our little talk about a Bible story. I want to tell you
about a very singular man who had a companion whom nobody saw.
Can you guess to whom I refer ?"
Guesses were made by all the children, and holy men of every
period were named, but the correct name was not given. Grandpa
then asked, "What was the name of the city built by Cain ?"
"Enoch," was shouted in reply by the entire group.
After whom did Cain name that city ?"
"After his eldest son."
"Yes," continued Grandpa, "and some years after that there was
another Enoch, and he it is of whom I will now tell you. His father
was Jared and his son was Methuseleh, who is famous for what ?"
For being the oldest man that ever lived," answered Carrie.
How old did he become ?"
"Nine hundred and sixty-nine years," answered both the girls.
"Yes; Methuseleh became very aged and his father was very
godly. Read what was said of him in Genesis v, 24."
The place was quickly found, and Mary read, "And Enoch walked
with God; and he was not, for God took him."
"When you are coming home from school, Carrie, with which girls
do you walk ?" asked Grandpa.
"With those I like."










- _- -

















I ---- --- ---





















WALKING HEAVENWARD.







66 ALONE, YET NOT ALONE.

"With those you like and who go your way," added Mary.
Carrie assented, saying, Of course, I don't walk with girls who go
another way any more than I walk with girls who stand still."
"Well, now," interrupted Grandpa, "just that is the idea I want
you to get about Enoch. As he walked with God, three things are
true of him and God. What are they?"
"They both walked," answered Mary. "They did not stand still."
Yes, they did walk; that is, both of them made progress. Neither
God nor men stand still. Men go on becoming better or worse all
the time. This is their walk. We are-all walking. We are going
on-you children to manhood and womanhood; your father and
mother to old age; I to my end, which is not far off; all of us, I trust,
are going to a better world. What other thing is true since Enoch
walked with God ?"
"God and he loved each other," answered Carrie.
"Yes, they were pleased in each other's society. That Enoch
should be pleased with God's company is not surprising, but it is
strange that God should be pleased with the society of any man;
but in Hebrews xi, 5, it is expressly said that Enoch pleased God,
so we need have no doubt at that point. God and he kept very close
together, for they were well pleased with each other. Now, what
other fact is sure since Enoch walked with God ?"
Why, Enoch went God's way," said Charley. "I guess God
wouldn't walk in any man's way; He's too great for that."
"Correct," said Grandpa. "God has His own perfect way of
thought, feeling, and action, which He could not and would not
change to suit a man or an angel. Enoch shaped his thoughts, feel-
ings, and acts so that they should be like those of God. In this way
they thought alike, felt alike, and acted alike. Enoch would not go into
any way where he could not keep company with God. Wicked peo-
ple might coax him, everything in other ways might look very bright
and pretty, but he walked with God, though he walked alone."
Enoch must have been kind of lonesome,-walking that way."







ALONE, YET NOT ALONE. 67

"Yes, Charley, I presume he was lonesome as men judge of lone-
someness, and yet he never was alone, though he seemed to be.
He always had a companion whom nobody else saw, but who to him
was very real, very near, and very dear. Sometimes he would lift
up his eyes as if charmed by some beautiful vision, but other people
saw nothing; sometimes he would look so glad, but others knew
not why; he often would talk tenderly, but others knew not to
whom; they thought him very queer; they called him a singular
man; but his unseen companion heard his words and spoke tenderly
in reply. So Enoch was happy, though the reason for it the world
did not know."
Grandpa, I should think Enoch would have become tired of so
singular a life, even though God did walk and talk with him. It
seems to me I would want companions whom I could see and talk
with as I see you and talk with you and others."
"But, Mary, he did not tire of it. We are told in Genesis that he
walked with God three hundred years; so he held out pretty well,
didn't he ?"
"I should say so," answered Mary, smiling. But the story also
says, He was not, for God took him. What does that mean ?"
"Turn to Hebrews xi, 5, and you will see precisely what it means."
Mary turned to this verse and read aloud: "By faith Enoch was
translated, that he should not see death, and was not found, because
God had translated him."
Oh !" exclaimed Carrie. He was not found anywhere on the
earth, because God had taken him up to heaven."
"Yes, God had translated him; that is, had taken him out of this
into another world," added Grandpa. But long ,before he was
taken there were places where he was not. Can you name some of
them ?"
"Taverns," began Charley. "In bad company," said Carrie; and
so they rattled in their answers until theatres, horse-races, beer-shops,
ball-rooms, street-corners, and many other evil and doubtful places






68 ALONE, YET NOT ALONE.

had been named. Then Grandpa remarked, He who walks with
God has pleasanter paths than such places afford, and these paths
Enoch found."
How queer it must have seemed to people who knew Enoch
when all of a sudden he disappeared," said Charley.
"Yes, to them his was a mysterious disappearance. They did not
find him where he used to eat and sleep and walk and pray. They
sought him everywhere; they found him nowhere. The reason was,
God had taken him."
"But why did God take him in this unusual way ?" asked Mary.
"The reason given in Hebrews is, that Enoch should not see
death. That terrible experience God determined to spare this dear
companion of his."
That was good," said Carrie. "I wish more of us might be spared
that too. But if we please God as Enoch did we might be spared
as he was, I suppose ?"
"And how may we please God ?" asked Mrs. Reed, looking ten-
derly at the happy young faces before her.
"Walking where God wants us to," said Charley.
"Yes," answered she, "and the Bible tells us where this is. We
must read His word and keep His ways; then will we meet our re-
ward, whether we die or, like Enoch, are translated."
"That reminds me," said Mary, "of two beautiful verses by
Bonar. I learned them because I liked them so much:

"Thy way, not mine, 0 Lord !
However dark it be;
Oh! lead me by Thine own right hand,
Choose out the path for me.
"I dare not choose my lot;
I would not if I might;
But choose Thou for me, 0 my God !
So shall I walk aright."







A HUNDRED YAARS' JOB. 69




A HUNDRED YEARS' JOB;

OR, A MARVELOUS PIECE OF JOINER WORK.

SEVERAL evenings had passed and Grandpa had been unable

to meet the children for their chat on Bible subjects, but at
last he was again with them, and they clamored earnestly for
another story.
Well," said the kind-hearted old gentleman, "of whom shall we
talk to-night ?"
Of anybody you please," said Mary. "Everybody interests me
when you talk about them."
"Thank you, Mary," said he, smiling. "I will tell you about a
man who, at five hundred years of age, began a job which lasted a
century. He was a great-grandson of the oldest man that ever
lived. Who was that man ?"
Methuselah !" shouted they all.
But," added Grandpa, with a merry twinkle in his eye, how
could he be the oldest man when he died before his own father ?"
"Why, he couldn't," said Charley, very positively, "or his father
would have been the oldest man."
"I know, Grandpa," shouted Carrie, clapping her hands. His
father was Enoch, who didn't die at all."
"Oh!yes, I forgot," said Charley. "So he did-I mean, so he
didn't-for God took him to heaven without dying."
"But who," asked Grandpa, "was the man who undertook this big
job of work when he was so old ?"
Silence rested on the company for a moment, and then Mary spoke
up somewhat doubtfully: "You mean Noah, don't you? It took
5







70 H /UNVDRAED YEARS' JOB.

him a hundred years to build the ark, but I didn't think he was so
old when he began."
"You have hit it, Mary. I mean Noah," said Grandpa. He was
one of those singular men who walked with God, as Enoch did.
And the Bible calls him just and perfect, and says he found grace, or
favor, in the eyes of the Lord. The rest of the world was so wicked
that God determined to destroy all men and animals, but Noah and
his family God determined to save. For this purpose God set Noah
at that marvelous piece of joiner work-the building of the ark. No
person sympathized with the good man in his queer undertaking,
though many must have helped him. I am sure the people laughed
at him and called him a crank; but Noah worked away in faith, as it
is said in Hebrews xi, and moved with fear, too, for he fully believed
that the flood would come, and so he pushed on with his work."
What was the shape of the ark ?" asked Mary. "I have seen ever
so many pictures of it and no two of them are the sape."
Nobody can answer that positively," replied Grandpa. It is not
likely that it had a rounded prow, like modern ships, for such work
was then unknown, in all probability, and such a prow would have
been useless, as the ark was not to sail and to be steered. A great
covered, scow-like affair, a sort of floating barn, would have answered
every purpose, and is probably more like the ark Noah built."
How big was the ark ?" was the next question. This came from
Charley, whose mind ran to the practical side of things.
That is not positively known," replied Grandpa, because the
length of the cubit in which its size is stated is not entirely clear.
But we are sure that the ark was at least four hundred and fifty feet
long, one hundred and fifty feet wide, and forty-five feet high, and
that its appearance was more like an immense block of warehouses
than an ordinary ship."
Why was it made so big, Grandpa, when only one family was to
sail in it ?" asked Carrie.
Because," said Grandpa, "with that family there needed to be







A HUNDRED YEARS' jOB. 71

kept, for a year or more, enough domestic animals to serve for sacri-
fices and for all future needs of men until another supply could be
raised. Birds, also, and many other living creatures were to be kept
there, and immense quantities of provisions were needed for them
while in the ark and to supply them for a considerable time after they

.-. ;:ak .di uno-- al- a ---Lo---g-"n, kin."-G- n e-s-s -i -
--h"c- t c c 'ha '-- ;'.

he i" a :-ed ;,



_:- V I N* ,,. -. ,,,'
-- -A- --*- A r'- -_' -- .. ... _-.-.





.'. --. 4 A- -- ,. -.-.,. -'->- i
', / .. -- .,.'-, ,
--









"Ve--r .-: -- "




/ id accord'g unto a-l th he Lod co n ded .I-,."-,Genesis vii, 6.

should leave it. The greatest ship ever built was the Great Eastern,
which has about the same carrying capacity as had Noah's ark."
--- --- ---- '-,-- ---- 4








"How did Noah manage to build such a monstrous affair, with
nobody to help him?" asked Mary.







72 A HUNDRED YEARS' JOB.

He worked on it for a long time," said Grandpa. "No doubt his
family and servants worked with him, and at times other help was
hired as needed. Very likely, the neighbors would occasionally lend
a hand, by way of a frolic if for no better reason. They cared
little for his supposed freak, but went on in their own ways, eating,
drinking, and carousing right before Noah's eyes, and under the very
shadow of the ark worshiping their dumb idols, while he was hard
at work."
But how could Noah get everything just right ?" asked Carrie.
" I think he would have made lots of mistakes."
God showed him how to do it. The wood to be used, the
height of the stories, the number and size of the rooms, the window,
the door-everything, in short, was directed by the Lord, to whom
Noah was always attentive and obedient. That was the way by
which he avoided mistakes," said Grandpa.
But why didn't other people come and help Noah, and get saved
in his ark ?" asked Charley.
Simply because they did not believe God," was the reply. "I
am sure Noah urged them, for Peter calls him 'a preacher of
righteousness,' and Paul says he condemned the world,' so we may
judge that he was not silent. He did preach. At his work and in
his rest, he told the story over and over, and warned the people of
the coming flood. Every blow of his axes and hammers was a call
to men to turn from their sins and be saved, and yet nobody came.
That is why only Noah and his family were saved. Nobody else.
was willing to enter the ark."
When the work was all done," asked Charley, did the flood.
come right off?"
No. The ark was finished, the rubbish was cleared away, and
it stood complete, but unoccupied, until God one day said to Noah,.
' Come thou and all thy house into the ark.' Seven days were then
allowed them to get settled in the great boat. It was a busy week..
Noah's family, the beasts, the birds, the food, the seed, everything






A HUNDRED YEARS' JOB. 73

needed for the long voyage and the wonderful change which was at
hand, was brought and stowed away safely; and then the Lord shut
him in and shut out all the world besides. So the hundred years'
job was ended, the ark was occupied, and everything was ready for
the threatened flood."
Oh! tell us about that," cried Charley.
"Yes, do, please do," echoed Mary and Carrie; but Grandpa
shook his silvery head and said, Not to-night, my dears. To-mor-
row night we will talk about that, if nothing prevent."
"I remember," said Mrs. Reed, "a little tract I saw when I was a
girl. Its title was Noah's Carpenters."
"Noah's carpenters!" exclaimed the children, Mary asking, "Who
were they, pray ?"
Why," answered their mother, the men who at one time and
another did work on the ark. Though they helped prepare the
vessel which saved Noah and his family, yet they themselves were
lost. They built an ark, but for them it did no good. They are
,dead, but many of the same stock live to-day."
Why who, mother, are like them to-day ?" asked Carrie. "I don't
know anybody who is so foolish."
Don't you, darling? Let us see. Sunday-school children who
gather in the poor or contribute their money to send tracts and books
to the destitute or to aid the work of missions, and yet do not for them-
selves enter the ark of God's full service, are like Noah's carpenters.
Parents who instruct their children in the doctrines of the gospel,
and yet fail to illustrate these doctrines in their lives and to seek a
personal interest in the Lord's work, are like Noah's carpenters."
Oh! I see, I see," answered Carrie, and I, for one, will try to be
in the ark."
"And I," a iswered Mary; to which Charley gave his not uncam-
lmonri" Me we "






74 TOO WICKED TO LIVE.



TOO WICKED TO LIVE;

OR, THE GREATEST STORM ON RECORD.



S1'VE been thinking about the people who were shut out of the
I ark, Grandpa," said Carrie, opening the conversation of another
evening. Why were they shut out and drowned ?"
Because the world had become so full of wickedness that God
determined to destroy all its inhabitants. They were too wicked to
live. God gave them time to repent though. For a hundred years
or more work on the ark went ahead, and Noah preached to them.
But they did not become better; so at the end God shut them out of
the ark and they all perished."
Mustn't they have felt awfully when they saw the ark shut?" said
Mary.
"I doubt it," replied Grandpa. "The final loading up of the ark
was probably a great frolic for them. Getting in the animals and
provisions was like a circus day in a country town. Everybody turned
out to see the sights. Some may have had misgivings; but there
was no sign of a storm, so they quieted their fears. Perhaps a few
had anxiety in the stillness of the night which followed, but when
clouds began to gather and torrents of rain to fall, then, no doubt,
they were full of fear and wished themselves safely in the ark."
"It must have rained mighty hard to make a flood big enough to
drown everybody."
"It did rain hard, sure enough, Charley," replied Grandpa-"so
hard that the Bible says, The windows of heaven were opened. Win-
dows mean flood-gates-gates which keep back floods of water. It
rained as if such gates were opened in the skies, allowing fearful







TOO WICKED TO LIVE. 75

torrents of water to be poured upon the earth. It may be that up
to that time rain had never fallen, which would make these torrents
a fearful surprise. It is said also that the fountains of the great deep
were broken up; that is, the waters rolled in over the land as if their
banks had been washed away. Men then lived east of the Mediter-
ranean Sea where a slight sinking of the ground would permit water
to flow from the Black and Caspian Seas on the north, from the Pa-
cific Ocean by way of the Red Sea and Persian Gulf on the south,
and from the Mediterranean Sea on the west. By causing the land
to sink even a little, this whole country would quickly be under water
deep enough to cover every hilltop."
"But I don't see, Grandpa, how the sinking of that one part of the
earth could make a flood all over the world."
I do not suppose there was a flood over all the world, Mary. All
the world inhabited by man was flooded. What need was there of
more? What the Bible says applies to this narrower limitjust as well
as to the entire world. Nor do I suppose all existing animals went
into the ark. Why should they? All such as might be destroyed
by the flood went in and were saved."
That's a new idea," exclaimed Mary, but I must admit it seems
to be right."
"Were n't there lions and tigers in the ark, Grandpa ?"
Why should there be, my boy? They live far beyond where the
flood reached and were in no danger of being blotted out, even though
some of them were drowned. I don't believe any wild animals were
there, though in this opinion I have against me all the picture-books
and Noah's arks of the toy stores."
"Pshaw! the ark wasn't half as grand, then, as I thought it was."
"You thought it was a menagerie, didn't you, Charley ?" asked
Mary, with a laugh. Charley made no answer, but looked cross.
How long did the flood last?" asked Carrie.
"Rain fell forty days and nights, but the ground continued to sink
even longer, and the flood rose forty days more. Then the waters







76 TOO WICKED TO LIVE.

stood over the hilltops for a hundred and fifty days. Then they
began to flow off as the land rose again, and at the end of seven
months the ark rested on the top of Mount Ararat. In two more
months lower hilltops appeared. In forty days more Noah sent out
a raven, which found plenty of dead bodies to feed on and did not
return to the ark. Next he sent out a dove, which found nothing
suiting its pure tastes, so it came back. After another week the
dove was sent again, and this time it brought back a branch from an
olive tree, which showed that the trees were budding. In another
week the dove was sent again, but it did not come back. Noah
then knew that the ground was fit for man to live upon. It was one
year and ten days from the time Noah went into the ark till God told
him to go out of it."
Mustn't there have been fearful suffering during that flood?" said
Carrie, sadly.
"No doubt there was," replied Grandpa. "When rain began to
fall and water to flow in from the seas the people were startled, but
they hoped it would soon be over. The first night must have been
terrible. Driven from their houses, they huddled together on higher
ground. Men, women, children, cattle: sheep, horses, dogs, and even
wild beasts, were there. All were wet, cold, shivering, panic-stricken.
The awful night dragged through only to bring a day of terrors.
Cattle bellowed, sheep bleated, dogs howled, men shouted, women
screamed, children cried. Some, caught in the rushing waters, were
quickly drowned; others clambered to higher places, and were there
overtaken by the rising waters; some reached the highest hilltops,
but death reached them even there; some died from fright, some from
exposure, some from hunger, but more by drowning. Men, beasts,
birds, and serpents clustered on the highest places, all struggling for
life. Still the waters rose until every trace of life was gone except
the ark, which floated in safety over a deluged world."
"That was awful," said Charley. "I'm glad I wasn't there."










-= -- __-

--_ --_-i-_ .-- -- -- -


....







- --
FI.











:II.
" -''- '











!-- _- 4-.. -.






-











THE DOVE SENT FOR..H.-By Do._...
~~ _-







78 THE BO IW OF BAA UTY.



THE BOW OF BEAUTY;

OR, A TOKEN OF GOOD THINGS TO COME.



"/ RANDPA, you said it was a year and ten days that Noah
was in the ark. But the ark rested on the mountain long
before that. Why didn't Noah go out of the ark sooner ?"
Noah did not go into the ark, Carrie, till God commanded it, al-
though the ark had been finished for some time; nor would he go
out of it till God commanded it, though he knew the earth to be
dried. He obeyed God in all things. Neither his own opinions, his
curiosity, nor anything else was allowed to rule him. He waited till
God said, Go forth of the ark. Then he and all that were in the
ark did go forth, and right glad they were to do so, I am sure. I
can imagine how the birds soared, the animals capered, and Noah's
family sang praises as they came down the gangway of the ark and
stood once more on dry land."
"They must have been glad to walk out again after having been
shut up more than a year."
"Yes, Mary. And what do you suppose was the first thing they
did after leaving the ark?" asked Grandpa.
"I know what I would have done," said Charley. "I would have
ran off to see how things looked after the flood and to see what I
could find."
Many other people would have done just so, Charley," added
Grandpa; 'but Noah and his sons began rolling great stones
together with which to build an altar. They then took one of every
suitable beast and bird, and having killed them beside the altar, they
burned their bodies as an offering to God. This showed thei- grati'







THE BOW OF BEA UTY 79

tude, and God was pleased. It was no great thing, but it came from
loving hearts. It was like the loving little things which children do
sometimes, and which make their parents very happy. As the
smoke of those sacrifices went up to heaven, the Lord was pleased
that He should be remembered in that way."






-- -- *- ^ ..- --:.- .. _
___- *' '
-44


















: And Noak wentforths, and his wife, and his sons' wives with hin."-Genesis viii, 18.

God had been very good to them and they ought to be good to
Him," said Carrie.
:' r i' ' .,




*;.i .,,5






I- '

SAnd Nook went/for/k, and kis sons, and his wjfe, and his sons' wives wi/k hin."--Genesis viii, i8.

"God had been very good to them and they ought to be good to
Him," said Carrie.
"And yet," remarked Mrs. Reed, "we are not always willing to
serve God first. We usually please ourselves and then ask how we






80 THE BO TV OF BEA UTY

may please God. With Noah God was first-as He always should
be."
So well pleased was God with Noah and his children," resumed
Grandpa, "that He promised them many excellent things. They
were to become a very numerous family; to rule over all crea-
tures; to eat any food they wished; their lives were to be pro-
tected, and never again was the world to be drowned. This last
point was the great dread of men just then. The flood had been
awful; it had washed away all the people of the world except those
in the ark; but now, having promised that another flood should
never come, God gave a token or sign of that fact. But Mary may
read of this from Genesis ix, 12-16."
Mary's Bible was at hand, and she read as follows: "And God
said, This is the token of the covenant which I make between me
and you, and every living creature that is with you, for perpetual
generations. I do set my bow in the cloud, and it shall be for a
token of a covenant between me and the earth. And it shall
come to pass, when I bring a cloud over the earth, that the bow
shall be seen in the cloud: and I will remember my covenant, which
is between me and you, and every living creature of all flesh; and
the waters shall no more become a flood to destroy all flesh. And
the bow shall be in the cloud; and I will look upon it, that I may
remember the everlasting covenant between God and every living
creature of all flesh that is upon the earth."
"Wasn't there any rainbow until then ?" asked Charley.
"I suppose not," -said Grandpa. "The rainbow is caused by the
sun shining through drops of rain, the colors thus produced being
thrown on a screen of cloud beyond. It had probably never rained
till the flood came. No rainbow could have been seen, then, up to
the time Noah came out of the ark. But rain was to fall after that,
and with rain comes the possibility of a rainbow, and that was always
to be a token of God's good-will."
Well," remarked Mrs. Reed, "I never understood that rainbow.







THE BOW OF BEA UTY 81

It certainly was a very appropriate as well as beautiful emblem.
Where better could God write His promise never again to destroy
the earth with a flood than on the very clouds out of which comes
the rain ? Whenever again I look at a rainbow I shall be glad of
God's promise, of which it reminds me."

P.M



'-. i )...- :,t =-4- .-5 .



















"I do set my bonw in the cloud, and it shall be for a taken of a coy nant between me and the earth."-'
Genesis ix, 13.

"And so shall I," added Mary.
"And I," and I," said the other children
Did any of you notice, as Mary read a moment ago, what God
said He would do when He looked upon the rainbow ?"
-7--







82 THE BO OF BEA UTY.

None answered; but Mary's eye ran over the verses, and she
shouted: Well, really, Grandpa! God said, I will look upon it, that
I may remember the everlasting covenant. As if God could forget
anything !"
Not that He was in danger of forgetting unless the bow reminded
Him," said Grandpa; "but that when we look on the rainbow we
may think of God and know that He looks on it also and thinks
of us."
"That is perfectly splendid!" exclaimed Carrie. He and we
look at the same beautiful bow and think about each other. Don't
we?"
There are two references to the rainbow in the book of Revela-
tion. You have the idea of the natural rainbow so clearly that I
would like your opinions of these others. Revelation x, i, tells of a
mighty angel coming down from heaven, clothed with a cloud and
having a rainbow upon his head. What do you think this means ?"
"That he comes as clouds come," answered Mary; to bring a
storm; but that he will not destroy everybody, for the rainbow is
there."
Well explained, my girl! You will soon do for a teacher. But,
Carrie, what think you of Revelation iv, 3 ? There we read of a
great throne set in heaven and the great King sitting upon it. But
it is said, There was a rainbow round about the throne. What do
you understand by that?"
"Why, that while God is King and does rule over all, still the great
object about His throne is the rainbow, which He has made a token
of good. So nobody need be afraid of Him, but everybody may
love and come to Him."
"Well said, Carrie!" added Grandpa. "Let us all, when we look
to God, remember the rainbow, and when we look to the rainbow, let
us remember God."







MAKING FUN OF HIS FA THEIR. 83



MAKING FUN OF HIS FATHER;

OR, WHEN WINE IS IN WIT IS OUT.



W HAT became of Noah and his children after the flood ?"
began Carrie on the next evening after the rainbow
talk. I have wondered all sorts of queer things."
We do not know much about them," said Grandpa, as he ad-
justed his glasses; "and what we do know is not entirely pleasant.
They came out of the ark full of praise to God and went to work
with energy. Before the flood they had been shipbuilders for a
hundred years or more; but that job was done, and Noah went to
farming. They had no friends or neighbors, but were just a family
by themselves. Before long they had troops of little children play-
ing around and making their homes happy. Of course, they wanted
some fruit on the farm; so Noah set out a vineyard-and a splen-
did one it was, no doubt. In due time grapes were gathered and
the juice was preserved. It was a pleasant and wholesome drink,
and they put away some of it for future use. But in time grape-
juice will ferment and become intoxicating wine; and this happened
with the grape-juice of Noah's vineyard. One day Noah wanted
grape-juice, and in drinking it he found its flavor had changed. But
it was very pleasant, and, ignorant of its effects, Noah drank on
until he became drunk and fell over on his tent-floor in a heavy
drunken sleep. Good man that he was-able as he had been to dis-
regard the opinions of all the world for a hundred years and to work
at that ark-yet when he drank wine he sank helpless to the ground
and lay there in shame, like the commonest drunkard."
That was too bad," said Carrie, her quick sympathy taking in







84 4fAKING FUVN OF HIS FA THEIR.

the situation. "It reminds me of the saying, When wine is in wit is
out; for I'm sure Noah lost his wits when he took that wine."
"Any man loses his wits that way," said Grandpa. Intoxicating
drink has spoiled more good men and ruined more happy homes
than any other ten causes."
He ought to have joined our temperance society," said Charley.
" We boys don't mean to lose our wits."
That Noah became drunk is very sad," continued Grandpa.
" But that, I think, was an accident. He did not know the strength
of what he drank. But as he lay there in his drunken stupor, his
second son, Ham by name, came along and saw his father. Instead
of feeling an honest grief or shame, he ran off to tell his brothers-
as though it were a good joke, a thing to laugh at. He really made
fun of his aged father instead of trying to conceal his pitiable condi-
tion. Ham's conduct was not an accident. It was a base, unworthy
act; and God is angry with every child who does not honor his father
and his mother."
What did the other fellows say ?" asked Charley, much inter-
ested in the unfolding of the plot. Did they make fun, too. We
boys make fun of drunken men often."
Not they, Charley," answered Grandpa. Noah was their father
and they honored him, even if he was drunk; so they took a large
garment like a cloak or shawl, and holding it between them, they went
backward into the tent and covered it over their father so that not
even themselves should see the condition in which he was. They
were not disposed to make fun, but rather to hide their father's
wrong.
They were noble, good sons !" cried Mary, in a burst of enthusi-
asm. I like them for that."
What did Noah say when he woke, Grandpa?" questioned
Charley, anxious to get at the end of the case.
He slept-we know not how long-and when he awoke he found
out what had been done. He was covered with that garment, and







MAKING FUN OF HIS FATHER. 85

he naturally asked who had put it over him, and why So the truth
came out, and Noah was indignant. He spoke some terrible words;
but he spoke them, not in anger of his own, but for God, who was
angry too. Ham had a favorite son named Canaan. I am sure he


"- N oak a k e fr k ---'," an k- w k"s-- ... n-e had d n -. n s
*- 7


> ,, ,, .. ,r. .
EZ

















greoah awoke from his wine, and kint what his younger son had done hiso lle: and lie saion ,
Cursed e Canaan.-Genesis i, 24, 2.


have had his dear boy suffer. But Noah said, Cursed be Canaan;
a servant of servants shall he be. Ham heard these words, and
the precious son was doomed because of the father's sin. Ham had
grieved his father, and in turn was to be grieved in his own son."
6
K ~ -














6aehdhsda o ufr utNa ad usdb aan






86 MAKING FUN OF HIS FA TIER.

But in what way was Canaan cursed, Grandpa? What harm
came to him ?" asked Carrie.
From him descended those nations-the African, for instance-
which have always been the servants and burden-bearers of the
world."
"That seems too bad," said both girls together. But Ham was
a mean, bad man," added Mary, to which Charley added a very
solemn That's so."
"On the other two sons," continued Grandpa, Noah pronounced
blessings, and said that Canaan's children should be their servants.
All we know more about Noah is that he lived until he became nine
hundred and fifty years old and then died."
"Why, Grandpa," continued Carrie, in a serious way, "I thought
no good man could get drunk."
"No good man willingly does anything which debases himself and
sets a bad example to others, which drunkenness certainly does.
Accidents may happen, as to Noah; tastes for intoxicating drink
may be inherited, as in the children of drunkards; men may be so
weak morally as to be unable to resist temptation, but still it re-
mains true, as Solomon said, Wine is a mocker, strong drink is
raging, and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise."
"That reminds me, Grandpa, of some verses from Proverbs which
I learned because they seemed so good and true. May I repeat
them ?"
Certainly, darling. I would gladly see each of you so firm that
your wits would never go out because wine came in."
Mary then repeated from Proverbs xxiii, 29-32, these words:
Who hath woe? who hath sorrow? who hath contentions? who
hath babbling ? who hath wounds without cause ? who hath redness
of eyes? They that tarry long at the wine; they that go to seek mixed
wine. Look' not thou upon the wine when it is red, when it giveth
his color in the cup, when it moveth itself aright. At the last it bitethi
like a serpent and stingeth like an adder."







TOO BIG A JOB. 87



TOO BIG A JOB;

OR, A SUDDEN CHANGE OF PLAN.



" 0OW did it come, Grandpa," began Mary, "that the people
[ of the world got so far apart in their looks and their lan-
guages ? If they all came from Noah, it seems to me they
would be more like each other than they are."
"That is a very natural question, my child. We have seen all the
people of the world as one family, in one ark, and on one farm, and
yet we now find many races of men very different from each other
in looks and in languages, as you say. While Noah still lived his
children and grandchildren became very numerous, and scattered in
all directions in search of good places to live. Toward the east,
where the Euphrates and the Tigris rivers flow, they found a splen-
did level country, very rich in soil, and here many of them settled.
By and by they concluded to build a city, as Cain had done before
the flood. The soil was good for making bricks. They found also
plenty of bitumen, or pitch, which they used as mortar to cement the
bricks together, and so they built their city. As they went on an-
other great idea struck them. Some one proposed to build a tower
that should reach to heaven, and at this big job they went."
How foolish! Why, they couldn't reach heaven, could they ?"
"No, Carrie, that was too big a job. The great pyramid of Egypt
is only some six hundred feet high. That is the greatest work of
man so far as height goes, and yet it scarce reaches the lowest clouds.
But they probably did not expect to build so high that they could step
off into heaven from their top story. It is more probable that their
idea was to build so high that they would be safe from another flood."







88 TOO BIG A JOB.

"But God had said there shouldn't be another flood," said Charley.
True; but people do not always believe what God says, and these
people seem to have forgotten God entirely, for when the building
of the tower was proposed they said, Let us make us a name.
They had no regard to God, but wished only to make themselves
famous."
Why," said Carrie, I always thought that tower-the tower of
Babel, I mean-was to honor God, like the steeples on our churches."
No, dear; it was to honor its builders, and nobody else. They
did have one other idea-they might be attacked by enemies, in which
case the tower would be a splendid place of safety. In its upper
stories they could so defend themselves that no enemy could reach
them. This would prevent their being captured or scattered from
that place. But God is never at a loss for a way to baffle bad
men. He saw what they were doing and heard what they said, and
He made His own plan for doing just what they did not want done."
"But, Grandpa," interrupted Charley, "what harm was there in
wanting to stay in a nice place ?"
None at all, my boy; God did not object to that. But He saw
how proud and selfish they were getting, and He said, Nothing will
be restrained from them which they have imagined to do. He knew
that they would not stop to ask whether a thing was right or wrong,
whether it pleased God or not, but if they wanted it they would go at
it-so God decided to scatter them. And how do you suppose He
did it ? He changed the language each leader spoke, so that not one
of them could understand another. There they were at their work,
talking as usual, giving and receiving orders, but suddenly one spoke
words no one else understood. The others suppose him to be in
fun and answer him in fun. But no one understands what the others
say. Every man thinks himself to be talking sense and others to
be talking nonsense-so they talk and jabber in the worst way."
"Ha, ha, ha," roared Charley. "What fun that must have been!"
"Not much fun for them," replied Grandpa, smiling at the boy's







TOO BIG A JOB. 89

glee. "The fact is that men would not stand much of that without
getting angry. It is quite likely that some did lose their tempers
and that they came to blows."
Ha, ha, that's so," said Charley, slapping his hand vigorously on

A 7, V
e-.- B- --- .. in a' i.'


No, nor any other day. They gave up that job and left off t



buid the city. Such a sudden change of plan men seldom make












iad never ws a cnge made for so odd a cause






No, nor any other day. They gave up that job and left off tk
build the city. Such a sudden change of plan men seldom make.
and never was a change made for so odd a cause."







90 TOO BIG A JOB.

But couldn't any one understand another? Did every one have
a new language ?" asked Mary.
"For each one to have his own language and understand nobody
else would have split them entirely into fragments. The probability
is that each family had its own language, so that when a man packed
his tools and went home from the tower he found his own folks quite
able to talk with him. This would only make each the more certain
that his talk was correct and that the others were all wrong. They
had known but one language up to that time, and they had no idea
that there could be another."
Ha, ha, ha," burst out Charley again in a most boisterous man-
ner; what a time the boys must have had trying to talk! I'll bet
they made faces and called hard names before they quit."
"And the mothers, too," said Mrs. Reed, "when they tried to ex-
plain things and make peace among the children, what a time there
must have been !"
"And the girls, too," said Carrie; "dear me! I'm glad I wasn't
there. I don't like quarrels and making faces."
You see," said Grandpa, "that the elements of a first-class row
soon gathered in that city, and the only thing that could be done was
to separate. The very thing they once meant not to do they now were
glad to do. God brought this about by His skill and power. He
knows just how to overturn the best laid plans of the wicked."
"I don't wonder," said Mary, that the place was called Babel.
That means confusion, and things did get rather mixed there."
"And our word babble, meaning the noises made by babes, came
from the same word," said Mrs. Reed. "The people there babbled
-used sounds without meaning-one to another."
"So it came to pass that families were separated one from another
in location as well as in language," said Grandpa. Living for ages
in different lands, under different conditions of food, water, shelter,
and employment, permanent changes were made in the appearances
of the people, such as Mary asked about when our chat began."







SURPRISED AND DELIGHTED. 91



SURPRISED AND DELIGHTED;

OR, THE FIRST SIGHT OF A SPLENDID INHERITANCE,



" "ERE is another Bible picture," said Grandpa Goodwin, un-
rolling an engraving and spreading it on the table. "I
want you to look it over carefully and tell me what you
suppose it to. show."
After a good deal of looking and talking, the children agreed they
could not tell. Nothing in the picture reminded them of anything
they had read or heard of in the Bible.
Grandpa then followed with the question: "What to you, Mary,
is the main thing of this picture ?"
"The angel who is directing the company. He seems to be point-
ing them to the country off to the left, toward which they are all
looking."
"And who are the persons riding, Carrie ?"
"I don't know their names," replied she; but there is an old man
in the middle with a young man and a young woman. They look
surprised; but whether at something pleasant or not, I'm not sure."
"What have you to say about the picture, Charley?"
"I was wondering about those boys who are cutting capers in front
of the donkeys. They'll get run over if they're not careful. Any-
how, I'd rather walk than ride a donkey. But if I were there, I'd
get on one of the camels. I'd like to ride on a camel."
"You get the points of the picture very.well," said Grandpa;
"but what it represents you don't catch. Mary, please read Genesis
xii, 4, 5."
Mary turned as directed and read thus: "So Abram departed, as






42 SURPRISED AND DELIGHTED.

the Lord had spoken unto him; and Lot went with him: and Abram
was seventy and five years old when he departed out of Haran.
And Abram took Sarai his wife, and Lot his brother's son, and all
their substance that they had gathered, and the souls that they had

,I --^ .-- -^ ^-^=- ^- ^4-')-'- .r'-_

-. _I '.I. ..




SN '-: ----
-- .1; '" , i
.:- .". "- ,V-'_ i'. : I-'' ',











ing out one and another of the ersonsandsain as the did so
; '. .' ..'.i .. t- i,- *. :.

",-, ,'4-" -. ---- -' .- i -' -' -' --I



-Genes 1i s'7 .', "'' -
*' .: A ^ J ^ / t ". ^ "V ^ *

Gene s .:- -is ii5
." ,, '!,. . '""".,v ''--- . i.







SURPRISED AND DELIGHTED. 93

"That's Abram;" "And that's Sarai;" "This is Lot;" "Here are
the servants;" Here are the flocks," and so on until almost every
point of the picture was covered by some one. Then Charley asked:
"Who's boys are these?-Abram's?"
No," answered Grandpa; Abram had no boys; nor had Lot-
so far as we know. They are probably children of some of the ser-
vants; but Abram allows the lads to cut capers, as you put it, and to
have a good time as they journey on."
Do, Grandpa, tell us the story about Abram. I want so much
to hear about this journey," said Carrie; and the others heartily
seconded her request.
On this invitation, Grandpa settled himself in his chair and began:
"About four hundred years after the flood, when the inhabitants of
the world had again become very many, there was a man named
Abram, who lived at Ur, in the land of Chaldea, away to the east of
Palestine. When he was over seventy years old, God told him to
leave his own country and all his kindred and go to a place which
should be shown him. Where that place was, or what it was, Abram
did not know. But he started, as Paul says of him, Not knowing
whither he went."
Good for him !" exclaimed Charley. He wasn't afraid to travel
if he was old. Was he ?"
No. But though he started so well, he did not fully obey God
and leave his kindred; for he took Terah, his father, and Lot, his
nephew, with him. No doubt he loved them; but he had been told to
leave them, and he ought to have done just that. When they had gone
about half way on their journey they stopped at a place called Haran,
where, after a delay of two years, Terah died. After his death Abram
started again to go into Canaan, and into Canaan he did go, as Mary
read. As he entered'this land from Haran he passed along the hills
at the foot of the Lebanon mountains, and off to his left, as shown in
the picture, the promised land could be seen. Its hills and valleys;
its famous river, the Jordan; and its great lake, the Sea of Galilee-







94 SURPRISED AND DELIGHTED.

all were clearly seen. Abram had always lived in a flat country, so
that the view of this splendid, rolling land must have been to him
particularly charming. It would surprise and delight him at every
step of his journey. Charmed by his new surroundings, Abram
journeyed on into the very heart of the country. Wherever he
stopped on his way he built an altar and worshiped God, who had so
kindly led him. This is the journey shown in the picture. It was
one in which they had reason to be happy every moment."
So I think," said Charley. And now I don't wonder the boys
are dancing along in such a jolly way."
"But no man's path is always full of sunshine," resumed Grandpa.
"Abram soon found that his two years' delay in Haran was to cost
him very dearly. A famine was just then beginning in Canaan. The
water failed, the grass dried, and no food could be found, Had
Abram reached there two years sooner he would have been ready
for this trouble. But what could a stranger do who had just arrived
in the country? So Abram could not stop in Canaan. He had to
move on and on toward the south and southwest, until he came to
Egypt. Here was plenty of food. But after a while he had trouble
with the King, who wanted to marry Abram's wife. Abram could
not stay there any longer; so back again he went to Canaan, sorry
enough, I am sure, that he had lost those two years at Haran."
"Guess the boys didn't dance so much that time," said Charley,
with a shrug of his shoulders.
"Probably not, Charley," added Grandpa. "But when they got
back to Canaan the famine was over and all the country was green
and beautiful. Then Abram was ready really to settle in the land
and the boys were ready once more to cut their capers."
"All's well that ends well," added the boy, feeling that the end
was all that could be desired.







TRUE NOBILITY. 95



TRUE NOBILITY:

OR, STOOPING TO CONQUER.



" I EFORE Abram went into Egypt," began Grandpa, as the
Family was awaiting the expected talk, "he had stopped at a
place called Bethel. It is up on the highlands of Palestine,
northeast of the city of Jerusalem. Toward the east of Bethel this
high ground falls off rapidly to the plain of Jericho. This plain is a
rich, broad piece of land, east of which the Jordan flows. The Jordan
is very crooked and rapid, rushing and tumbling on its way from the
Sea of Galilee on the north to the Dead Sea on the south. From
Bethel one looks down upon the river winding through its beautiful
green banks and stretching away mile after mile in either direction. On
that high ground, overlooking the beautiful river scene below, Abram
and Lot pitched their tents when they came back from Egypt. Both
of them had become very rich, having immense flocks of sheep and
herds of cattle, with tents, slaves, silver, and gold. Indeed, they had
such great possessions that the place where they settled was not big
enough for them; and their servants, for the want of room, fell to
quarreling and fighting among themselves. This was a great grief
to Abram. The old inhabitants of the land saw it and sneered at
him and his religion because his servants behaved so badly. Abram
at last determined to stop this disgraceful conduct, and how do you
suppose he did it?"
"I know what I'd have done if I'd been Abram," responded Charley,
shaking his head with a decided air-" I'd have bounced every fellow
that quarreled. I wouldn't have had such chaps about the place."
I think he would have done better to clear out Lot bag and bag-







96 TRUE NOBIjLITY.

gage," said Mary, warmly. God did not tell Abram to take Lot,
anyway, but to leave him. Abram brought Lot along, and had been
a good, kind uncle to him, and now that Lot had grown rich he had
grown saucy too. It was mean of him to let his men interfere with
Abram's. Abram had the best right there. God called him, but
didn't call Lot."
"Well! well!" exclaimed Grandpa, with an amused look, "Abram's
interests are not likely to suffer in your hands, Mary. But what you
say is really very forcible. The probability is that Lot came with
Abram solely because he saw a chance to make money. When he
and Abram had come to be in each other's way, Lot should have
stepped out of the way."
Abram would have done just right had he driven Lot of," sug-
gested Carrie.
He might have done that," answered Grandpa, or he might have
talked with Lot and insisted on his going, or he might have claimed
the land as his by gift from God. Then, too, as the younger, Lot
should have given way to his elder and superior, as Abram certainly
was; bu t Lot did not move in the matter. He did not seem troubled
over the quarrels of the men nor concerned about what the neighbors
thought. At last, therefore, Abram called Lot aside, and what, sup-
pose you, he said ?"
Get away, or I'll blow you out," shouted Charley.
Oh! no, Charley; Abram did not talk like a thoughtless boy," in-
terposed Mrs. Reed, "and I am glad he did not."
Mary may turn to Genesis xiii, 8, 9, and see what he said," added
Grandpa.
Mary found the place and read as follows: "And Abram said unto
Lot, Let there be no strife, I pray thee, between me and thee, and
between my herdmen and thy herdmen; for we be brethren. Is not
the whole land before thee ? Separate thyself, I pray thee, from me.
If thou wilt take the left hand, then I will go to the right: or if thou
depart to the right hand, then I will go to the left."





















I I











ti : /



9 ,







A- RI'S MR
: ~~~~; ._.- __





:.. ..... -._ .. .-; -

l--






98 TRUE NOBILITY.

"Wasn't that splendid ?" exclaimed Mary, as she finished reading.
" That was really noble, wasn't it, Grandpa ?"
"It certainly was. Abram did show true nobility in this offer.
Instead of clamoring for his rights or acting selfishly, he waived
them all and at once settled the trouble. In short, he stooped to
conquer. He made himself the less that he might secure peace,
and in so doing he became immensely the greater. He acted ac-
cording to a rule which Jesus put into words 2,500 years later, when
He said, Whosoever will be great among you, let him be your min-
ister; and whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your
servant."
"What did Lot say, Grandpa ? I think he must have felt flat when
Abram talked to him that way."
He does not seem to have felt flat, Charley. He looked down
into the beautiful Jordan valley; he saw how green it was and how
well watered, and said he, I'll take this for my share. He was quick
to fall in with Abram's offer. That he owed anything to his uncle
does not seem to have occurred to him. Abram must have felt that
Lot was selfish and mean, but he nobly granted Lot his choice, and
that day the two rich chieftains separated from each other."
"Good riddance to him," exclaimed Mary.
"But he was not rid of him, my child," said Grandpa. "Abram
had a great deal more trouble with Lot, of which I will tell you.
Lot was not long in gathering all his live stock and other treasures
together, and soon was on his journey down the hillside to the plain
below. Over the southern end of this plain little cities were scat-
tered ; and though -he left his flocks and herds on the plain of Jeri-
cho, he himself moved on toward Sodom, the very worst of those
cities, and there he pitched his tent. The men of Sodom are said to
have been wicked and sinners before the Lord exceedingly. That
is the Bible statement about them, and yet among those vile persons
Lot went to live with his family."
"Why did he do such a foolish thing ?" inquired Carrie. "I should







TRUE NOBILITY. 99

think he would want to keep as far as possible from such persons. He
had plenty of room in the fields, hadn't he, without going to that
city ?"
"Why he settled there we can readily judge," was Grandpa's an-
swer. "Lot went into the valley to make money. It was a warm,
unhealthy place, but it promised large profits. Sodom was the chief
city of the-vicinity, and for this reason was an attractive place for
him, and his family who had seen but little of city life. Lot was not
quite willing to go at once into the city to live, but he set up his tent
near it.. By one writer of the Bible he is called a righteous man.
He did not plunge headlong into so wicked a place as Sodom, but
pitched his tent outside the city, and yet near by. The next news
we have of him, however, is that he had really gone into the city to
live. He had taken a house there, and was settled among its vile
inhabitants."
"That's the way people do," said Carrie. "They don't mean any
great harm, but once started, on ihey go, and do far worse at the end
than they ever meant to."
"Yes,".said Grandpa, entering into sin is like entering into a net.
The danger seems small at first, but once in, every moment makes
matters worse and fastens the captive tighter-so Lot became entan-
gled, and directly we find him sitting at the gate of Sodom. The
gates of a city were cool, sheltered places, where idlers loved to sit
and talk and see the passers-by. Lot had become so far like the
men of Sodom that he sat and chatted with'them in these public
places. He was quite at home among them. He had become more
and more entangled in their net. Then his daughters married and
settled in Sodom; but so far did Lot fall from the right and the
good way, that when he tried to warn them of danger because of
their sins he seemed to them as one that mocked. His influence
with his own children was gone, and the people of the city spoke
contemptuously of him. Everybody despised him."
"He did indeed get into the net, sure enough," said Mary, as she







100 TRUE NOBILITY.

heard this sketch of Lot's history. How could he enjoy such a life
after being so long with Abram ?"
He did not enjoy it. See what is said of him in i Peter ii, 8,"
said Grandpa.
Carrie took the Bible this time and read as follows: "For that
righteous man dwelling among them, in seeing and hearing, vexed
his righteous soul from day to day with their unlawful deeds."
He was a big goose to stay in such a place and be vexed every
day. I'd have moved," said Charley.
"Why he did not move we can only imaginee" answered Grandpa.
" He was probably making money and living in luxury-so he stayed,
right or wrong, happy or unhappy. Better far is it not to enter the
net at all, not to go near that which is wrong. Keep away off
from it, as a careful driver keeps from the edge of a precipice. Do
not enter the outer circles of a whirlpool, then the centre of it will
never swallow you."
"May I add a quotation from Solomon ?" said Mrs. Reed. "My
son, if sinners entice thee, consent thou not."
What about my daughter, if sinners entice thee ?" asked Charley,
laughing.
"Solomon knew the daughters would be all right," answered
Mary, as the party broke up in a merry mood.







HOME FROM THE FIGHT. 101



HOME FROM THE FIGHT;

OR, ROYAL HONORS FOR VICTORS.



-T ELL us about Abram and Lot, Grandpa. I want to know
more of what happened to them," said Carrie on the next
S assembling of the family in the sitting-room.
"How do you suppose," asked Grandpa in reply, "that Abram
treated Lot after they separated ?"
"I know how I would have treated him," said Mary. "I would
have let him totally alone' I would never have spoken to him again;
I would never have cared to see him. He was too mean for any
thing."
"So would I-only worse," exclaimed Charley.
"Well, .we will see what Abram did," replied Grandpa. "Sodom
and the cities about it were subject to a great King known as the
King of Elam. But they rebelled against him, and would not pay
him any more money for taxes. So this King and three others came
one day and attacked the cities of the plain. They made short work
of the soldiers who came out to fight them. Then they stole all the
valuables they could find and carried off Lot and many other people
as prisoners."
"Served Lot right," exclaimed Charley; "he had no business to
live there."
"By and by Abram heard what had happened to Lot. What do
you suppose he then did ?- He did not say, Served him right, nor, It's
none of my business. Oh! no; he gathered together his own men who
could serve as soldiers and other men who were his friends, three
hundred and eighteen in all, and away he went in pursuit of the vic-
7







102 HOME FROM .7HE FIGHT.

torious King of Elam. After a chase of about a hundred miles, he:
overtook and beat him completely and took back the prisoners and
all the stolen goods. So Abram saved Lot and recovered all the
treasures of those cities of the plain."


> .* ., '-: -' -- .. *." .- ._F '
I. .I .




J k J i 8
I ".s I ha e n t'h. f h -d 'h ,,e,' I-t -" would have -ee




W",'Y' "" ;f f'" .- 0""' 'i ." -' n "i '- : .





wa jus grand!" e'x ...... 'Mary-', wh ',w an ar t ho1
1': . .*,t,$ -f.. '.
.-. .' .n -a












kik God. Genesis xiv i8.


worshiper.
I wish I had seen that fight," said Charley. It would have been
splendid fun to see those fellows chased over the hills, dropping all
the nice things as they ran."
--",:.,ecl~c'.-. ,,-;;,rro .n~ br,,l~ ,,.t dlea ,a-I ...e ,--. ,: , Bews ~ ret 1~103
::-.:. r>-<"-":,' ., Go.-Geei -'!f" ,. ; 18 .. . ,i:, a,1
' ... -",, ju ': ,,,n -., :."ime ./ar,::. .'c w.,.- lt.. "[n' ar n h'-,
'l .;; : -" :1 'l '
..- -.,.,. I -- a -.-,. th tfi ,"- --i ...; _'< : peaci u :4. q, ,'e th s "elw :h se .L: -:. '-ls _,-:-;.. :" :::'.-a-.l"'" -l' --:''
:.-:-;- n.. ;...::<;- : .' -he .. ,'.. '1







HOME FROM THE FIGHT. 103

When the fight was over and Abram's men had rested, he began
his march home, and everybody on the way was anxious to do him
honor. The King of Sodom, who had escaped capture at the time
of the battle, went out a long way to meet Abram and his men; and
well he might. They had done a great thing for him. Another
great King named Melchizedek came out to meet them also. He
was King of Salem. He was so noble and good and so honorable a
priest of God that the Lord Jesus Himself is called, a priest after the
order of Melchizedek. This King brought out food and drink for the
soldiers, and in the name of God pronounced blessings on Abram.
So as they came home from the fight royal honors were bestowed
upon them everywhere, and it must have been a happy day for them
all. Melchizedek's men brought jars of wine and baskets of bread, and
Abram's men brought the treasures they had recaptured, a tenth of
which he gave to Melchizedek to be used in the service of God."
"What was Lot doing all this time ?" asked Carrie.
"Standing around, I suppose," said Grandpa. He probably
picked up the sword of some dead man, so that he too might look
like a soldier now that danger was over. But he must have been
very glad to be free again, and must have realized how good and
grand his dear old uncle was. The King of Sodom was so grateful
that he urged Abram to keep all the recaptured treasures for himself.
But Abram was too independent for that; he would not take a thread
or a shoestring. He did his part from a generous and noble heart,
and he was generous and noble to the end."
"That's so," shouted Charley. "They ought to have made him
President, so they ought."
Laughing heartily at Charley's republican honors for the old patri-
arch, the little company separated, each thinking of Mrs. Reed's
good-night text, which she read from Matthew v, 44, 45: Do good
to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you
and persecute you, that ye may be the children of your Father which
is in heaven."







104 LESSONAS FROM THE STARS.



LESSONS FROM THE STARS;

OR, A GRAND FUTURE FORETOLD.



" ET us go out to the p6rch," said Grandpa, as the family rose
from the supper table. "It is a clear night and we will
enjoy looking at the stars."
This request seemed a little odd; but nobody questioned it, and
in a moment all were looking heavenward upon stars which seemed
especially bright in the dark-blue heavens.
Let us count them," said Grandpa, after a moment's silent
looking.
Count them !" said Mary. "That's more than any of us can do."
With this all agreed; so Grandpa proposed that, as they could
not count the stars, they should go again to the sitting-room. Won-
dering at his unusual conduct, they re-entered the house, and when
all were seated, Grandpa began: One night Abram and the Lord
had been talking together very lovingly, and Abram opened his heart
on a matter that puzzled him. It had been promised that he should
have many descendants, who should become a great people. But
the fact was that Abram had no child at all. How that promise was
to be fulfilled Abram did not see; so he made free to ask the Lord
about it. Then the Lord led Abram out of the house. It was a clear,
bright night, and God said, Look, now, toward heaven and count the
stars. Could Abram do any better at this than we did a few minutes
ago? The skies of Palestine are very clear and more stars are
visible there than here. We could not fairly begin to count the
stars we saw. Could Abram have done any better?"
"Why, no," said all at once.







LESSONS FROM THE STARS. 105

"Just so; and when Abram gave up his effort to count, then God
said, So shall thy seed be."
Wasn't that a beautiful way for God to teach Abram ?" said Mary.
"Yes; and Abram believed it just as God said it. This pleased
God all the more, and He went on to assure Abram that he should

























" And te brought him forth abroad, and said, Look now toward heaven, and tell the stars, if thou be
I I ,






















able to number them. And he said unto him, So shall thy seed be."-Genesis xv, 5.

possess all that land. He also foretold many important things about
Abram's descendants, and finally told Abram that he should end his
days in peace and be buried at a good old age."
That was lovely, wasn't it ?" said Carrie, who had made Abram's







106 LESSONS FROM" THE STARS.

affairs her special delight. "But, Grandpa, what great nation is it
that descended from Abram ?"
"The Jews-or Israelites, as they prefer to be called; a people
that has held together from Abram's time till now, though it has
suffered more persecution and harsh treatment than any other nation
of the world."
Why, I don't think the Jews are so many that they can't be num-
bered," said Mary. My geography gives their number as six hun-
dred thousand, while some nations have eight or ten times as many."
True; but the Jews have been a people continuously for nearly
four thousand years. Who can tell how many of them have lived in
all that time ? And remember one other thing: Abram's seed, or
descendants, are not those who bear the name of Israel only. Real
servants of God-those who love Him from the heart-are the true
Israelites, the true children of Abram; for see what Paul says in
Galatians iii, 29.
Carrie found the verse and read as follows: And if ye be Christ's,
then are ye Abraham's seed, and heirs according to the promise."
Oh! I understand," exclaimed Mary. "Abram was so very
good that all good people are called his children."
"Yes," added Grandpa; "and when we feel discouraged at the
great number of evil people in the world, we need only to look to
the stars, as Abram did. We may be sure that those who love and
serve God can no more be counted than can the stars."
"That is a grand encouragement," said Mrs. Reed. "It reminds
me of those splendid words of the hymn:
'Ten thousand times ten thousand,
In sparkling raiment bright-
The armies of the ransomed,
Throng up the steeps of light.' "
"And that," said Grandpa, "is but the echo of those Bible de-
scriptions of the occupants of heaven" as an innumerable company, a
multitude which no man could number in that throng."







FAMILY TROUBLES. 107



FAMILY TROUBLES;

OR, THE SERPENT IN THE HOME.



" THAT would you think if I should tell you a story that
would make you feel displeased with Abram?" asked
Grandpa Goodwin, as the children gathered about him.
"I should be very sorry," said Mary, "for I think Abram was just
splendid."
"So should Lbe sorry," chimed in Carrie, for he is so nice."
Tell us the story, Grandpa," urged Charley; "I guess we can
stand it."
Well," began Grandpa, "I suppose we may talk over this story,
since God for some good reason has allowed it to go into the Bible.
Abram's wife had a servant-maid named Hagar. She was dutiful
and well-behaved, and Sarai at last urged Abram to marry this maid
and have two wives. It was an odd thing for her to urge, but she
did it, and Abram yielded and married Hagar. It was quite common
in those days for men to have several wives, though the Bible never
approves such conduct. This second marriage soon brought trouble
into Abram's family. It let Satan, the old serpent, right into his
home."
I should think it would," said Mary; "but Sarai was very foolish
to ask Abram to do such a thing."
"And he very foolish to do it," continued Grandpa, for no sooner
was Hagar recognized as his wife than her head was turned by her
new honors, and she despised the very woman whose influence had
made her what she was. Then Sarai became jealous and ran to
Abram with sore complaints against Hagar. Abram hardly did







108 FAMILY TROUBLES.

right by Hagar either, for he said to Sarai, Do to her as it pleaseth
thee. Now Sarai was pleased to abuse Hagar, and abuse her she
did, until in sheer desperation Hagar ran off into the woods away
from Abram and his people."
"That was a shame !" exclaimed Mary, indignantly; "but I blame
Sarai most. She was real ugly, and had no business to treat Hagar
so."
"What happened to Hagar out in the woods ?" asked Charley.
" Did Indians get after her ?"
"No, Charley. There were no Indians there; but an angel of the
Lord got after her, and that was a great deal better."
What did he say ?" asked the boy, who anticipated some great
adventure of this lone woman in the woods.
"The angel found her sitting by a well of water, where she had
stopped for rest and drink. On his asking where she was going,
she told him all about her troubles. Then he told her to go back,
be patient, and all would come out well, because the Lord had heard
her cry and would care for her. Then Hagar said, Thou God seest
me; and trusting this fact and saying these words over and over in
her heart, she went back to her home, and for several years after
this we hear of no more trouble."
"That was real kind of the angel," said Carrie; "but then angels
are always kind, aren't they, Grandpa ?"
"Yes, darling; it is their business to minister to the children of
God ?"
What happened after that ?" inquired Charley, feeling that the
story had not yet topped out just as he had anticipated.
Years ran on, and a son of Hagar's had become a large, strong
lad. His name was Ishmael. Sarai, too, had a son, named Isaac.
One day Sarai gave a great party in honor of her boy, and in the
midst of the enjoyment what did she see but Ishmael making faces at
Isaac and mocking him. She was very angry at this, and demanded
that Ishmael be sent away from the house at once, and his mother







FAMILY TROUBLES. 109

with him. That boy and her boy should not live together. One or
the other must go. That was an awful trial for dear, kind Abram.
What could he do ?"
"Let Sarai clear out herself and take Ike along," answered Char-
ley, with promptness and decision.

























I'm not so sure about that," said Mary; but Hagar was not to
-and didn't mean any harm. He wouldn't have hurt little Isaac, I'm


























sure. Sarai needn't have become so cross about it."
fIf







blame. Boys will be boys; and I suppose Ishmael was full of fun
1-











and didn't mean any harm. He wouldn't have hurt little Isaac, I'm
sure. Sarai needn't have become so cross about it."






110 FAMILY TROUBLES.

"I don't like her, any way," said Carrie. She was an old mischief-
maker-that's what she'was."
I don't suppose Abram was very clear as to what was best in the
case," continued Grandpa; "but he went to God with his trouble,
and God told him to do what Sarai asked and He would make it all
right for Hagar. So, early the next morning, Abram sent Hagar
off, giving her food and water, and Sarai, no doubt, rejoiced to be rid
of her and her saucy boy. It was a terrible trouble in a family, and
none but God could in any way lighten it."
It must have been all right, for God approved it. But it don't
seem so; does it, Grandpa?"
No, Mary; it does not seem right. It was grievous to Abram,
and I am sure it was terrible to Hagar and Ishmael. But God
undertook to bring good out of it, though it seemed so full of evil."
"What did He do? I'm sure I don't see what could be done,"
added Carrie.
Hagar and the boy started and journeyed on in the wilderness
until their provisions were gone and they were thoroughly tired.
So faint did. Ishmael become that Hagar laid him in a shady place
under the bushes, supposing he was about to die. She could not
bear to sit there and see his agony; so she went off a little way and
wept aloud, while the boy, too, sobbed and moaned in his sufferings.
Then she heard a kind voice asking, What aileth thee, Hagar? what
aileth thee, Hagar? It was God's voice, and He assured her that
the lad should be saved and should become the head of a great
nation. Looking up, as she heard this good news, she saw a well
near by. It took her but a moment to fill her pitcher, give the sick
boy a drink, and bathe his hot head. Soon he was much better, and
he lived, grew, became a famous hunter, and at last married a woman
of Egypt, which was his mother's native land."
"And is that all we know about him ?" asked Charley.
"We know," answered Grandpa, "that many-years after, when his
father died, Ishmael and Isaac met in sorrow and buried him. We






FAMILY TROUBLES. 111

know, also, that Ishmael became very great and that his descendants,
the Ishmaelites, were a brave and strong people, so that the outcast
boy had no reason to grieve in the end. The Arabs, probably, are
descended from him, and through him they claim Abram as their
father. They believe that Ishmael was offered in sacrifice by his
father, on a mountain near their sacred city, Mecca. When Mo-
hammedan pilgrims go to that city they visit this mount in honor of
Ishmael. If they desire to make a perfect pilgrimage, they also
listen to a sermon at this place and offer a sacrifice of their own.
Ishmael's burial-place is pointed out near Mecca, and the claim is
made that Abraham once visited him in this city and helped him
rebuild its temple, which had been destroyed by a flood. Ishmael
lived to be one hundred and thirty-seven years old and to become
very famous."
"This is far better than I expected," said Mary; "but God, not
Sarai or Abram, made it come out so well."
God's hands are good hands in which to leave our affairs," said
Mrs. Reed. As the Psalmist says, Commit thy way unto the Lord,
trust also in Him, and He shall bring it to pass."
"That's what I'll do," added Charley. He did so well for Ish-
mael I'll let Him try me."
"If you really do, Charley," said his mother, "I'm sure He'll make
a good job of it; so I hope you'll let Him try."
"About one hundred and twenty years ago," added Grandpa,
" Michael Bruce, a Scottish poet, died, being only twenty-one years
of age. Among many beautiful verses he left are these:
How happy is the child who hears
Instruction's warning voice,
And who celestial wisdom makes
His early, only choice.
For she has treasures greater far
Than east or west unfold,
And her rewards more precious are
Than all their stores of gold.'




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