Title: Florida Lakewatch newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055470/00035
 Material Information
Title: Florida Lakewatch newsletter
Series Title: Florida Lakewatch Newsletter
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida LAKEWATCH
Publisher: Dept. of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) at the University of Florida (UF)
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: 2009
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Lakes -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
Periodicals   ( lcsh )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on v. 9 (spring 1997); title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: v. 33 (2006).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055470
Volume ID: VID00035
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 65383070
lccn - 2006229159

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Fo rida


LAKEWATCH WAT



Mary Stonceipher is Retiring!


LAKEWATCH Head Chemist Mary Stonceipher receives her retirement plaque for 36 years of service from LAKEAWATCH founder and
Director Dan Canfield.


After 36 years of service to the
State of Florida, Florida
LAKEWATCH Head Chemist
Mary Stonceipher is ready to spend
more time with her grandchild, kids
and flowers in her yard. There is no
way to calculate exactly how many
water chemistry analyses Mary has
conducted and/or supervised over


the years because she has helped
with hundreds of projects for
several professors and hundreds of
graduate students. To put things in
perspective, just since 1986 when
LAKEWATCH started, Mary has
been involved in the analyses of
over 250,000 total phosphorus
and 250,000 total nitrogen samples.


If each phosphorus and nitrogen
analysis was a penny and you
Continued on page 2.
UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA
IFAS








stacked them on top of each other,
the stack would be approximately
2,438 feet high; the Empire State
Building is only 1,453 feet tall.
That is a lot of chemistry numbers
and a record that any English
Teacher (Mary was not trained as a
chemist) can be proud of!

It will be hard to replace Mary's
diligent and meticulous service.
There have been many cases over
the years where other laboratories
were getting different numbers for
water chemistry analyses that they


conducted on LAKEWATCH lakes.
When samples were split for
comparison, it was always Mary's
analyses that were correct. The
"professional/high priced"
laboratories were in error. Why?
Because Mary cared enough not to
accept outputs from machines as
gospel and always questioned
suspicious results.

Yes, Mary really was not trained
as a chemist. Her work ethic and
caring for others in the aquatics


family including the thousands
of LAKEWATCH volunteers
will be missed. Mary
Stonecipher is retiring, but she
shall not be forgotten! As a UF
retiree, Mary shall get her
plaques and other tokens, but
the highest praise any of us can
give her is:


A JOB WELL

DONE!!!!!!!!!


Mary enjoying her retirement party with her daughter and granddaughter.
2








The Florida Manatee


A West Indian Manatee in Florida waters.

The Manatee Still Needs Your
Help

The Florida Manatee, a subspecies
of the West Indian manatee, is a
large grayish-brown aquatic
mammal. Its sausage-like body
tapers to a flat, paddle-shaped tail.
The upper part of the body has two
flippers with three to four
"fingernails" on each flipper. The
head and face are wrinkled, and the
snout has stiff whiskers. Adults
have been known to reach
lengths over 13 feet and weights
over 3,000 pounds. Calves are
three to four feet long and 60 to 70
pounds at birth.


Manatees spend most of their time
feeding and resting. They graze for
food along rivers, coastal areas and
at the water's surface. Manatees
may hold their breath for as long as
20 minutes, but they usually
surface about every five minutes to
breathe.

Manatees Are Native to Florida

A fossil skeleton of a manatee was
found that inhabited the shallow
bays and rivers of Florida 15
million years ago. It was
discovered in a quarry in northwest
Florida and donated to the state in
1929. The "urban myth" that says


manatees were brought to Florida
for weed control is not true. A
study conducted during the 1960's,
which used test animals from
Florida's existing manatee
population, tried to determine if
manatees could help with weed
control. It was not an effective way
to do this job; it was too hard to
catch manatees or keep them in
targeted areas.

Manatees are considered one of
Florida's true native species a
Florida treasure we all can enjoy.
Please do your part to protect
Florida's manatees.

Continued on page 4.






As a wildlife watcher you are
encouraged to use common sense
when watching manatees. Observe
all boating signs and keep a
watchful eye on the waters in front
of your boat. When diving, keep
your distance from manatees and
never disturb them.

Boating Speed Zones
To alert the boater and protect the
manatee in its sanctuaries, the law
provides regulatory zones on
waterways. Here are typical signs
found on Florida's waterways:


IDLE SPEED ZONE-

A protected area where boats are
not permitted to go any faster than
necessary to maintain steerage and
make headway.

SLOW SPEED ZONE-

A protected area where boats must
be fully off plane and completely
settled and level in the water while
moving.

NO ENTRY ZONE-

A protected area that prohibits all
entry, including boating,


swimming and diving activities.

SAFE OPERATING
ZONE-

A sign indicting that you may
resume safe boating speed;
visible as you leave a protected
area.

CAUTION SIGN-

A sign posted by individuals in
areas frequently inhabited by
manatees. Requests caution on
the part of boaters to avoid
disturbing or injuring the
animals.


Manatees

are

considered

one of

Florida's

true native

species a

Florida

treasure we

all can

enjoy.


As a wildlife watcher you are encouraged to use common sense when watching
manatees.








Look Out For Manatees

Manatees are mammals. They
are expected to live in their
environment until old age (over
40 years). Based on age data
collected over a five-year period
the average age of the manatees
that were killed by watercraft
was 7.2 years. Researchers have
found that female manatees
mature sexually at 3 years of age
and that most females breed
successfully by 6 to 10 years of
age. After breeding starts,
females usually produce one calf
every 2 to 5 years, which
denotes a low reproductive
cycle. The loss of viable female
manatees in the breeding phase


of their life cycle further
impacts the overall manatee
population. Please follow the
guidelines in this article to
reduce impacts to manatees
from watercraft-related deaths.

Manatee Harassment

Manatee harassment is defined
as, "any intentional or
negligent act or omission
which creates the likelihood of
causing an injury to a manatee
by annoying it to such an extent
as to significantly disrupt
normal behavioral patterns
which include breeding,
feeding or sheltering. The
intentional provision of any
w 1110111p


JA.


a.
NoIs


type of food to manatees not in
captivity shall be considered
harassment under this
definition, unless authorized by
a valid federal or state permit."
(68C-22.022 FAC)

Manatees and the Law

Manatees are protected by the
Marine Mammal Protection
Act of 1972, the Endangered
Species Act of 1973 and the
Florida Manatee Sanctuary Act
of 1978. It is illegal to harass,
harm, pursue, hunt, shoot,
wound, kill, annoy or molest
manatees.

The State of Florida has also
established regulatory speed
zones to protect the manatee
and its habitat.

Anyone convicted of violating
state law faces maximum fines
of $500 and/or imprisonment of
up to 60 days. Conviction for
violating federal protection
laws is punishable by fines up
to $100,000 and/or one year in
prison.


A manatee with her calf in Crystal River in Citrus County.


This article was modified from a FWC pamphlet titled The Florida Manatee- A Florida Treasure. For
more information contact: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Comission, Imperiled Species
Management Section, 620 South Meridian Street, MS 6-A, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1600.
850-922-4330

To report manatee deaths, injuries, harassment, accidents or orphaned manatees, call the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Commission, Law Enforcement.
1-888-404-FWCC
(1-888-404-3922)







Florida's Fisheries are the Destination of

Choice


,t4.: V
pA


A "nice one" hanging out on the bottom of a lake.
Anglers throughout the United
States and from numerous other
countries flock to Florida for
it's diverse fisheries. Many of
these angler's are being
attracted to the freshwater
catfish species. When summer
comes around and vacations are
in full swing and gas prices
may restrict long-distance
travel, more than ever we will
likely see anglers from
neighboring states coming to
wet a line in our prolific
waters. Moreover, more
Floridians are likely to stay
within the state borders to


conserve fuel and avoid
nonresident fishing license
fees. No matter which group
(resident or nonresident) you
are from, there are several
species to target.

Top largemouth bass and
bream destinations remain
plenty hot, but the heat of the
summer changes the fishing
patterns. So, fish for bass early
or late in the day, look for
structure in deep water and
check out areas that have
shading such as around piers or
under overhanging trees.


Topwater lures on a moonlit
night, especially with a little
noise or scent thrown in, create
some alternative action to
attract the "ole bucketmouths."
But most of all in the summer,
consider the variety of catfish
species that can be caught.
Below are a few ways to fish
for catfish species, places to
catch them, and ways to
increase your chances for
coming home with a stringer
full of fish.

Continued on page 7.







Channel cats (Florida's record
44.5 pounds) with their deeply
forked tails, whiskered faces
and spotted sides are the most
common of our catfish and
found everywhere (except the
Keys) in rivers, ponds or lakes
that are often stocked by the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC). Channel catfish
typically school where the
bottom drops off sharply to
deeper water. They usually do
not hide within vegetation but
can be found outside on the
deepwater side of weed
beds. Stink baits fished on the
bottom are popular for
channels.

White catfish (Florida's record
18.9 pounds) share some
similarities. However, the tail
isn't as deeply forked and the
lobes of the tail fin are more
rounded. White catfish prefer
live bait, such as a minnow or
worm.

Blue catfish (Florida's record
61.5 pounds) are bigger than
either channels or whites. Not
only does their coloring
distinguish them, but also the
long flat anal fin on their belly
and hump in front of the back
fin give them a distinct look.

Blues are river fish found in
Northwest Florida and among
the strongest of our freshwater
fishes. Typically, they are taken
with cut or live fish baits by
using heavy sinkers and bottom
rigs.

Flathead catfish (Florida's


- 1~
C


Happy Florida anglers holding up flatheads in North Florida.


record 49.4 pounds) like blues,
are not native to Florida. As a
result, intense harvest of them
is encouraged. It is important
that they not be moved and live
released into other waters.
They are solitary fish that are
more difficult to catch in the
warmer months, but these fish
can be caught year-round.
While fishing can be good
throughout the day, catfish are
usually most active in the
morning and evening.

Fishing at night can reward


anglers with outstanding
fishing. Fishing on the bottom
using a wide variety of baits
(chicken livers to commercial
stink baits) will help in
catching these fish. Catfish can
also be caught on live baits
such as small shiners and
minnows fished near the
bottom. Catfish in lakes and
ponds that have been enhanced
with automatic fish feeders
concentrate near these feeders
and can be caught on small

Continued on page 10.








Voute B-ulei Boame.


LAKEWATCH helps the
North American Lake Management
Society (NALMS)


Recently Mark Hoyer the Assistant Director of
Florida LAKEWATCH was elected as the president
of NALMS. He will serve a three year term on the
executive board as President Elect, President and
then finally Past President. NALMS is a society of
scientists, professionals and citizen scientists
dedicated to the stewardship of all aquatic resources
for future generations. The mission statement and
goals of NALMS are as follows:

Mission: The purpose of the Society is to forge
partnerships among citizens, scientists, and
professionals to foster the management and
protection of lakes and reservoirs for today and
tomorrow.

Societal Goals (from Constitution and Bylaws):

1. To facilitate the exchange of information on the
technical and administrative aspects of managing
lakes and their watersheds.
2. To promote public awareness of lake ecosystems.
3. To encourage public support for national, state or
provincial, and local programs promoting
management of lakes and their watersheds.
4. To provide guidance to public and private
agencies involved in or planning management
activities for lakes and their watersheds.
5. To improve the professional status of all persons
engaged in any aspect of managing lakes and their
watersheds.
6. To identify needs and encourage research on lake
ecology and watershed management.


The mission and goals of Florida LAKEWATCH
and its volunteers overlap with those of NALMS
considerably. With these overlapping interests
please consider becoming a NALMS member or just
supporting the society in any way you can. For more
information about NALMS feel free to contact Mark
directly or visit the NALMS web site
' !ii'. , ,ii.ilip ,..i ). For those interested in
supporting lake management programs closer to
home, there is a state chapter of NALMS
appropriately called the Florida Lake Management
Society (FLMS) (http://flms.net/). In either case,
please try to support one or both of these groups and
their missions of managing our precious aquatic
resources for future generations.


New Chemist/Seasoned LAKEWATCH Staffer
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David Watson










New Florida LAKEWATCH Regions











LAKEWATCH NEEDS




YOU!







anyone~~~~ wh mih-attgapeay fteelkspes


Hillsborough County


Alice
Buck
Carlton
Carroll Cove
Chapman South
Crenshaw
Crystal
Dorothy
Edna
Elizabeth
Fleur de Lis
George
Gomto
Grady
Hanna
Hog Island
Horse
Island Ford
Jeanette
Keene
Little Bass
Little Halfmoon
Lords
Martha
Mill
Morley
Mound
Pine Pond
Platt
Roberta
Roget
Taylor
Silver
Taylor 2
Sinclair


Allen
Calm
Carlton 2
Chapman
Charles
Crescent
Deer
Dosson
Egypt
Fantasia
Gass
Glass
Grace
Hammock
Heather
Hickory Manor
Holly
Hunter
Jackson
Juanita
Kell
Little Jewel
Little Moon
Mango
Mead
Mirror
Morris
New Ryan
Place
Rainbow
Rogers
Russell
Shangri-La
Snake
South


Hillsborough County

Stall Stemper
Stillwater Swan
Silver Sinclair


It'll 1 lllIt



onCo

,1 .., II I n
.1 want
t' < gl L \1'


Irout I1
lamonia
Orchard Pond
Little Jackson
Piney Z
Ochlockonee
River
Chapman Pond
Carolyn
Moore 2
Clear


J .ctl
Sheelin
Mattie
Goose Pond
Mitchell Arm

Duck
Lee

Home Springs


Andrew
Lofton Pond
Belmont


.hnit llnhah
\\ Ii.li

I k'n I nLar Deltona)
I ciI. (Clermont)


I -lii l




I L i


I 'i I .ind
Ic %:11
Middle Bear
Loch Leven
Eagle
Evert
Heron
Glona
Shady Nook
Desire
Idlewild
Dolls
Dixie West


Cascade
Grassy
Meginnis Arm


Nellie
Crescent (Umatilla)
Nettie
Placida
Dixie West
South Twin
Pearl
Akron
Little Nellie
Norris
Arthur
Jack's
Arlene
Haines
Grassy
Zephyr
Purdum Pond
Black
Dixie East
North Twin
Silver Paisley
CR Big
CR Small
Umatilla
Mill Stream Swamp
Nettie
Placida


Leon County


Lake County






(Florida's Fisheries are the Destination of Choice- continued from page 7.)


The following good sites
for catching catfish occur
all over the state and
more information on these
spots can be found at
myfwc.com:

*:* The Apalachicola River
*:. The Choctawhatchee
River
*:* The Escambia River
*:* The St. Johns River and
Dunn's Creek
*:* The Ochlocknee River
*:. Clermont Chain of
Lakes Haines Creek
*:* Upper Kissimmee Chain
of Lakes
*:* Southwest Florida
Lakes
*:. Joe Budd Pond
(Gadsden County)


LEARN MORE
FishingCapital.org

INSTANT LICENSES
MyFWC.com/Iicense
or 1-888-FISH FLORIDA
1-888-347-4356



pieces of dog food, bread and
hot dogs.

Finally, Florida earned the title
"Fishing Capital of the World"
by coupling its great resources
with responsible management
of those resources by the FWC.
Anglers will be coming to test



I C








E
E
a0
U

'4-

wL
... .jLU-


their skills, but now you have
some insider knowledge to
expand your horizons and try
out some new fishing
opportunities. Help keep
Florida the Fishing Capital by
following sound conservation
practices.


By: Bob Wattendorf,
Florida Fish and
Wildlife
Conservation
Commission, with
special thanks to
Andy Strickland,
FWC (edited by
LAKEWATCH)


You can visit
them at:
http://
myfwc.com


10


lit3~







Outstanding LAKEWATCH Volunteers


Lake Powell is located in Walton
and Bay County. Lake Powell is
sampled by Chris Forman and
Emily Ellis. They began sampling
Lake Powell monthly as Florida
LAKEWATCH volunteers
through the Resource
Management Association (RMA).
RMA had four sampling sites
located in the Bay County portion
of the lake. When the
Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance
(CBA) began coordinating
volunteer water quality monitoring
in Walton County, Chris and
Emily took on the Walton County
portion of the lake as
well. They also collect
data and samples for the
Aqualab program,
which is organized by
the Florida Department
of Environmental
Protection. They have
been sampling Lake
Powell monthly for
eight years now for /
three different non-
profit organizations. .\
When Lake Powell's :
total phosphorus
concentrations spiked to
extremely high values
as compared to baseline The Scott Dr
values determined for Emily Ellis, a
the lake, Chris and Emily enlisted
the help of Richard Bryan to
organize what is now known as
the Lake Powell Community
Alliance (LPCA). LPCA is made
up of individuals "dedicated to
preserving the water quality and
biodiversity of the Lake Powell
ecosystem through education,
habitat restoration, watershed-
based planning and community
partnerships." Under the


guidance of Chris, Emily, Richard,
and other members of the LPCA
board, this organization created a
comprehensive management plan,
wrote and received grants to
support research on the lake, and
recently obtained 501(c)(3)/Non-
Profit status. LPCA also provides
a mechanism for the promotion
and exchange of scientifically
sound information about the lake
for the local community.
They publish a quarterly
newsletter, they host monthly
meetings and/or events, they also
talk, visit, and field phone calls
about the lake with anyone and


iver Award being given to the LPCA (represented by Chr
nd Richard Bryan) by FLMS president Clell Ford.
everyone they meet.
Chris and Richard have been
certified by the Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection as Stormwater
Management Inspectors. In
addition to Chris and Emily's
monthly water chemistry
monitoring, Chris and Richard
patrol the shoreline of Lake
Powell regularly to monitor and


record all construction activities
on the lake. Violations are
recorded, attempts are made to
correct each violation, and
ultimately violators are reported.
The LPCA works closely with the
CBA. CBA is a partnership of the
Mattie M. Kelly Cultural &
Environmental Institute at North
West Florida College (NWFC).
The CBA holds meetings and
workshops in both Bay and
Walton counties. This helps the
group to stay apprised of
municipal actions affecting coastal
dune lakes and focused public
attention for the protection of
Lake Powell.
The LPCA represented
by Chris Forman, Emily
Ellis, and Richard
Bryan also received the
Scott Driver Award
from the Florida Lake
Management Society
(FLMS) in 2008. The
Scott Driver Award is
given to an "activist" or
= group who has
promoted the
Restoration, protection
Sand/or appreciation of
u Florida's aquatic
is Forman, resources.

The LPCA epitomizes the power
of what a few dedicated citizens
can do to make a difference in
their watershed. LPCA has created
a comprehensive management
plan for Lake Powell, and they
have secured funding for
biodiversity surveys, aquatic
vegetation surveys, and publish
quarterly newsletters to keep
everyone living around the lake










Florida LAKEWATCH
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
School of Forestry Resource Conservation
7922 NW 71st Street
Gainesville, FL 32653


Outstanding Volunteer (Continued from page 11)


informed about the activities
around Lake Powell. We
cannot think of any other
individual or group more
dedicated to the aquatic
resources in their area.

It has been a pleasure working
with Chris and Emily because
their dedication to Lake Powell
goes above and beyond
anything we could have hoped
for from volunteers. We
commend them for their time,
energy and continued service to
LAKEWATCH, RMA, CBA
and most importantly, to Lake
Powell.


A view of Lake Powell from the Camp
Helen State Park in Bay County Florida


This article was written by Julie Terrell, Director of the Choctawhatchee
Basin Alliance and a former Florida LAKEWATCH Regional Coordinator


ETorida

LAKEWATCH
This newsletter is generated by the Florida
LAKEWATCH program, within UF/IFAS Support
for the LAKEWATCH program is provided by the
Florida Legislature, grants and donations For more
information about LAKEWATCH, to inquire about
volunteer training sessions, or to submit materials for
inclusion in this publication, write to
Florida LAKEWATCH
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
School of Forestry Resource Conservation
7922NW71stSlree
Ganmesvile,FL 32653
orcall
1-800-LAKEWATCH(800-525-3928)
(352)392-4817
E-mail fl-lakewatch@ufl edu
http //lakewatch ifas ufl edu/

All unsolicited articles, photographs, artwork or other
written material must include contributor's name,
address and phone number Opinions expressed are
solely those of the individual contributor and do not
necessarily reflect the opinion or policy of the Florida
LAKEWATCH program


12




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