• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Buzz: Communication as a foundation...
 People: the President's cabine...
 Interdisciplinarity: Why does it...
 College in Focus: College...
 Faculty Senate news: reports
 Faculty Senate news: Senate...






Title: Academics: a monthly newsletter for the faculty of the University of Florida
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055469/00008
 Material Information
Title: Academics: a monthly newsletter for the faculty of the University of Florida
Series Title: Academics: a monthly newsletter for the faculty of the University of Florida
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: UF Faculty Senate
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Faculty Senate
Publisher: Faculty Senate, University of Florida
Publication Date: September, 2005
 Subjects
Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055469
Volume ID: VID00008
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

PDF ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Buzz: Communication as a foundation for the Gator Nation
        Page 1
    People: the President's cabinet
        Page 1
    Interdisciplinarity: Why does it matter?
        Page 2
    College in Focus: College of Law
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Faculty Senate news: reports
        Page 7
    Faculty Senate news: Senate agenda
        Page 8
Full Text










Buzz:
Communication as a Foundation
for the Gator Nation
By Kim Tanzer, Faculty Senate Chair
Item: Early in his tenure as UF President, Dr.
Young, 30-year Chancellor of UCLA, observed to the
Senate Steering Committee that we at UF are much
better than the world knows. He speculated that we
do not sing our own praises, particularly in national
settings.
Item: The UF Faculty Surveys done in 2004 and
2005 show that administrators are significantly more
positive about the University of Florida's efforts in
every dimension than are faculty members. In part
this may reflect the fact that administrators are more
aware of UF's successes, and of institutional efforts to
create positive change.
In my mind these items are linked by the common
problem of inadequate communication. This news-
letter, begun by my predecessor, Pierre Ramond, is
an effort to build redundancy into our communica-
tions network. It will be sent monthly from the Office
of the Faculty Senate Chair to the entire faculty.
It is our hope that ACADEMICS
will match UF's well-developed
vertical chain of command model
(provost-dean-chair-faculty-chair-
dean-provost) with a strong lateral
communication network. ACADEM-
ICS is intended to reiterate messages,
often well known to deans, regard-
Kim Tanzer

see Buzz, pg. 6


People:
The President's Cabinet
By Bernie Machen, University President
I'm pleased to begin this academic
year with a stellar senior leadership
team.
It's often been said that the Univer-
sity of Florida is better than its
reputation. We know the expertise
and variety at UF tower over that of
President most public and private universities.
BernieMachen The cabinet members I've assembled
have the skills, knowledge and
experience to make the most of our size in raising
UF's profile and standing.
In putting together this administration, I sought
leaders within and outside the university, from both
the public and private sectors. I also sought to bring
in fresh perspectives while maintaining current areas
of strength. Finally, I wanted people who could think
and act forcefully and independently, but also work
together.
Thanks to the hard work of many diligent search
committee members, patience and no small amount
of luck, I got what I hoped for.
I also reorganized the leadership structure to maxi-
mize the team's effectiveness. As one example, with
faculty and staff issues on my priority list, I created
the position of vice president for human resources,
one filled by the capable Kyle Cavanaugh.


see Cabinet, pg. 6


CONTENTS


Interdisciplinarity


2


Faculty Senate News

C=12t r A nrTz=>-I u


7


~














Buzz:
Communication as a Foundation
for the Gator Nation
By Kim Tanzer, Faculty Senate Chair
Item: Early in his tenure as UF President, Dr.
Young, 30-year Chancellor of UCLA, observed to the
Senate Steering Committee that we at UF are much
better than the world knows. He speculated that we
do not sing our own praises, particularly in national
settings.
Item: The UF Faculty Surveys done in 2004 and
2005 show that administrators are significantly more
positive about the University of Florida's efforts in
every dimension than are faculty members. In part
this may reflect the fact that administrators are more
aware of UF's successes, and of institutional efforts to
create positive change.
In my mind these items are linked by the common
problem of inadequate communication. This news-
letter, begun by my predecessor, Pierre Ramond, is
an effort to build redundancy into our communica-
tions network. It will be sent monthly from the Office
of the Faculty Senate Chair to the entire faculty.
It is our hope that ACADEMICS
will match UF's well-developed
vertical chain of command model
(provost-dean-chair-faculty-chair-
dean-provost) with a strong lateral
communication network. ACADEM-
ICS is intended to reiterate messages,
often well known to deans, regard-
Kim Tanzer

see Buzz, pg. 6


People:
The President's Cabinet
By Bernie Machen, University President
I'm pleased to begin this academic
year with a stellar senior leadership
team.
It's often been said that the Univer-
sity of Florida is better than its
reputation. We know the expertise
and variety at UF tower over that of
President most public and private universities.
BernieMachen The cabinet members I've assembled
have the skills, knowledge and
experience to make the most of our size in raising
UF's profile and standing.
In putting together this administration, I sought
leaders within and outside the university, from both
the public and private sectors. I also sought to bring
in fresh perspectives while maintaining current areas
of strength. Finally, I wanted people who could think
and act forcefully and independently, but also work
together.
Thanks to the hard work of many diligent search
committee members, patience and no small amount
of luck, I got what I hoped for.
I also reorganized the leadership structure to maxi-
mize the team's effectiveness. As one example, with
faculty and staff issues on my priority list, I created
the position of vice president for human resources,
one filled by the capable Kyle Cavanaugh.


see Cabinet, pg. 6


CONTENTS


Interdisciplinarity


2


Faculty Senate News

C=12t r A nrTz=>-I u


7


~






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


Interdisciplinarity: Why Does it Matter?


By Angel Kwolek-Folland, CLAS Associate Dean for
Centers, Institutes and International Affairs.
Research and teaching that
bridges the disciplines is now a
commonplace in all higher education
institutions, for several reasons. In
the past 40 years, the cross-fertiliza-
tion of the "traditional" disciplines
(some of them not much more than
100 years old) has become increas-
Angel ingly necessary in order to respond
Kwollek-Folland to the complex questions facing
researchers and teachers. The
grounds of the disciplines themselves have eroded as
interdisciplinary approaches have reshaped them.
The sociologist who asks how individual gender or
racial identity is formed within a political movement
profitably draws on psychological, historical, or
linguistic premises and methods. There are indica-
tions that researchers and teachers find working with
others of different disciplinary backgrounds more
stimulating and rewarding than a narrow disciplinary
focus. The undergraduate experience, which asks
students to be anthropologists at 8:00 on Monday
morning and mathematicians at 3:00 that afternoon,
is inherently multidisciplinary, if not organized to
take full advantage of interdisciplinary perspectives.
Interdisciplinarity is embedded in the budgets and
intellectual missions of universities. Topical and area
studies programs and centers, such as UF's centers
for African Studies and Gerontological Studies, and
courses that focus on the history of cities, the
gendering of science, or the cultural production of
language, all rely on researchers and teachers who
draw on insights and methods from several disci-
plines. Some institutions-the University of
Wisconsin comes to mind-have hired faculty on
topical lines outside of the usual departmental struc-
ture. At UF, the number of centers and institutes
formed to pursue interdisciplinary research and
teaching has grown exponentially in the past 10
years. The challenge facing universities, in fact, is not
so much how to encourage interdisciplinary research
and teaching as it is to find ways to remove institu-


tional barriers, evaluate and monitor research
projects and coursework, and equitably apportion
resources.
Angel Kwollek-Folland is Professor of Women's
History and the CLAS Associate Dean for Centers,
Institutes and International Affairs


By: Winfred M. Phillips, Vice President for Research
Interdisciplinary research is a
defining element of 21st century
science. It is central to genomics,
bioinformatics, nanotechnology,
biomedicine and the investigation of
global climate change, among other
fields.


WinfredM. Phillips But the seemingly simple act of
researchers pursuing investigations
outside their specialties or crossing disciplinary
boundaries to work together faces a centuries-old
academic tradition of isolating specialization. The
National Institutes of Health and other funding agen-
cies are creating opportunities challenging this
tradition, as are universities nationwide, including the
University of Florida.
UF has an advantage in this effort, thanks to the
remarkable diversity of programs and efforts on its
full-service campus. Already, there are literally doz-
ens of interdisciplinary research centers and
programs here.
In science and engineering, these include the
Genetics Institute, the Institute for Nanoscience and
Nanotechnology and the Engineering Research Cen-
ter for Particle Science and Technology. In the
natural sciences, they include the Center for Wetlands
and the Center for Aquatic Plants. Others span the
Public Utility Research Center to the Center for Afri-
can Studies to the Center for Exercise Science.
What was once the exception is steadily becoming
the rule. Perhaps the latest and best example is the
Water Institute, a faculty-driven initiative that pulls
see Inter-disciplinarity, pg. 6


ACADEMICS 2






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


College in Focus: College of Law


College at a Glance
The following information is provided to increase our mutual
understanding of each other's disciplines at the University of
Florida. It is not intended to suggest a hierarchy among our
colleges, but rather to reflect the intellectual and organizational
diversity each college lends to the University.
Total number of faculty (Fall 2003)
Full-time: 92
Part-Time: 0
Ranked State: 46.26
Ranked 51.26
Number of faculty in tenure or tenure earning
positions (Fall 2004)
Tenure:
Regular Faculty: 51
Librarians: 5
Tenure track:
Regular Faculty: 9
Librarians: 1
Percentage of faculty in tenure
or tenure track positions:
76%
Number of degrees granted (2003-2004)
Bachelor: 0
Master: 87
Doctorate: 0
Professional: 408
Student credit hours generated annually
(2003-2004)
Lower: 0
Upper: 0
Grad I: 37,400
Grad II: 22
Cost per student credit hour: fundablee units)
2,322 Total SCH majors
117 Total SCH non majors
Enrollment (Fall 2004)
Undergraduate: 0
Graduate: 106
Professional: 1,158
NonDegree: 9
PostBacc: 0
Student/Teacher ratio:
Graduate: 15.9


Funded research expenditures:
Sponsored Research $47,770
UF Research Foundation $64,872
Returned Overhead $12,408
College development during the last year:
Gifts: $3,791,324
Pledges: $2,169,625
Significant national rankings:
Law Schools Graduate:
AAU Public Rank: 15 (tie)
Overall US News Rank: 41 (tie)
Law Trial Advocacy Graduate:
AAU Public Rank: 3
Overall US News Rank: 13
Environmental Law Graduate
AAU Public Rank: 6
Overall US News Rank: 17
Tax Law Graduate:
AAU Public Rank: 1
Overall US News Rank: 2
Taxation Undergraduate:
AAU Public Rank: 3
Overall US News Rank: 5
Fellows in major societies or equivalent honors:
12 Faculty members of the
American Law Institute


College Narrative
by Danaya Wright, Faculty Senate Chair elect
The University of Florida, Levin
College of Law was founded in 1909
and is fully accredited by the ABA
and the AALS. The College of Law
offers courses of study leading to the
JD degree, LLMs in Comparative Law
(primarily for foreign students with a
law degree from their home country),
Danaya Wright Taxation, and International Taxation,
and an SJD in Taxation. Our graduate tax program is
routinely ranked either number one or number two in
the country. In the regular JD program, the College
grants certificates identifying specializations in Envi-
ronmental and Land Use Law, Estates and Trusts


ACADEMICS 3






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


Practice, Family Law, Intellectual Property Law and
International and Comparative Law. The College
also works in conjunction with numerous Colleges
and Departments to offer Joint J.D./M.A. and J.D./
Ph.D. degrees.
The College of Law just completed a two-year
construction and renovation project that involved the
construction of two classroom towers on the east and
west sides of the courtyard between Holland and
Bruton Geer Halls. The entire first, second, and half
of the third floors of Holland Hall were gutted and
reconstructed to create new classrooms and a newly
expanded library that is now the largest law library in
the southwest. Through it all, classes continued to be
taught, the library was moved to the abandoned
Publix store on Archer Road, and the faculty and
students endured noise, flooding, periodic power
outages, network server vandalism, and the closure
of our cafeteria with a reasonable amount of good
cheer. Though the construction continues, the library
is open and the building dedication ceremony is
scheduled for September 9th. Supreme Court Justice
Sandra Day O'Connor is the guest of honor.
The College of Law has a strong history of shared
governance. The dean proposes appointments to a
wide variety of committees which are then voted
upon by the full faculty. Tenure and promotion,
hiring, and curriculum decisions, new program,
grading policies and even recommendations about
the choice of dean are made by vote of the entire
College faculty after consideration in faculty commit-
tees. Nearly everything affecting faculty, from the
new laptop policy to the student honor code, is
voted on by the full faculty after close consideration
in faculty committees. The College of Law is a
collegial place with a strong sense of procedure and
academic freedom. Law faculty often take positions
for a semester or a year as a visitor at another law
school and the general consensus from colleagues is
that it is nice to return home.
Danaya Wright is an Associate Professor of Law
and Chair-elect of the Faculty Senate


Laudamus

Over the past three years, faculty members pub-
lished 68 books (including treatises and casebooks),
contributed chapters or other material to another 63
books, and wrote 234 articles published in law re-
views including 13 articles in the nation's top 20
law reviews. Faculty work has been cited in courts at
all levels thousands of times, including dozens of
recent citations by federal courts and several by the
U.S. Supreme Court.
The faculty also are doing their part to educate the
public about legal issues. In the first seven months of
2005 alone, UF's faculty appeared in more than 150
different news reports in media outlets such as The
New York Times, CNN, Newsweek and National
Public Radio. These numbers tell only part of the
story. From mediating international disputes to pro-
viding counsel for homeless people here in
Gainesville, UF law faculty make an impact on a
wide array of issues at all scales of human interac-
tion.
To list just a few examples of our faculty's impact
on both academia and public policy:
Professor Juan Francisco
Perea's casebook,
Race and Races: Cases and Re-
sources for a Diverse America, broke
new ground in legal scholarship by
examining how the law affected and
affects all major racial groups in the
United States. The book has been
used at 48 law schools throughout the country. He
has testified before the U.S. Senate as an opponent of
Official English legislation and before the U.S. Equal
Employment Opportunity Commission and U.S.
Commission on Civil Rights regarding his proposals
to remedy national origin discrimination.
Professor Christopher
Slobogin's work on search and
seizure, mental health law, and
juvenile law has been referenced in
more than 1,000 law review articles
and close to 100 judicial decisions.
He was cited this year in the dissent


ACADEMICS 4






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


in Roper v. Simmons, the U.S. Supreme Court deci-
sion overturning the juvenile death penalty.
David H. Levin Professor Bar-
bara Bennett Woodhouse, director
of the Center on Children and Fami-
lies, is one of the nation's foremost
advocates for the legal rights of
children. She has authored or co-
authored amicus briefs in many
high-profile court cases relating to
children, including Roper v.
Simmons, in which the U.S. Supreme Court over-
turned the juvenile death penalty, and Lofton v.
Florida Department of Children and Families, which
challenged the state's ban on gay adoption.
Assistant Professor Christopher
Peterson's research is changing the
way America views payday loans
and other forms of "fringe" banking.
His book, Taming the Sharks: To-
ward a Cure for the High-Cost Credit
Market, has been honored by the
American College of Financial Ser-
vices Lawyers for sounding the alarm
about high-interest loans. Peterson was most recently
featured on ABC News to discuss price gouging in
the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.
In addition to his role as editor
of the widely-used text Powell on
Real Property, Richard E. Nelson
Professor Michael Allan Wolf is
often sought out by the news media
for expert opinion on legal issues
affecting public policy. In Summer
2005 alone, he delivered a commen-
tary on the Supreme Court
nomination of John Roberts for National Public
Radio's "All Things Considered," penned an opinion
piece on recent court rulings on the Ten Command-
ments for the Miami Herald, and was quoted in
newspapers around the country on Kelo v. New
London, the much-debated ruling on eminent do-
main.
Professor Katheryn Russell-Brown, director of
the Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations,


speaks out on a topic of concern to
tens of millions of Americans: racial
stereotypes about crime. She has
written two books on the subject
Underground Codes: Race. Crime
and Related Fires, and The Color of
Crime and her work was cited by
Justice Stevens in the 1995 Harris v.
Alabama opinion.
Ed Rood Eminent Scholar Jerold
Israel is one of the nation's most
respected authorities on criminal law
and procedure, and his work has
been cited more than 550 times in
federal courts and 1,800 times by
state courts. He is co-author of
Modern Criminal Procedure now
in its 11th edition, a coursebook
used by more than 100 law schools and an estimated
450,000-plus students over the years and Criminal
Procedure Treatise, one of the most widely-cited
texts on procedure.
Michael Gordon, John H. and
Mary Lou Dasburg Professor in
Corporate Law, is widely recognized
as a leading expert in international
law. He has been appointed to North
American Free Trade Agreement and
World Trade Organization dispute
panels, and served as a lecturer for
the Council on Foreign Relations in
the U.S. and for the State Department in more than a
dozen countries.
A member of the law school's
respected Graduate Tax faculty,
Professor Patricia Dilley is an
important voice in the ongoing
debate about the future of Social
Security. Dilley, who served as a
Congressional aide during the Social
Security crisis of the early 1980s has
traveled the country to appear in
panel discussions on the issue, including recent
conferences sponsored by Congresswoman Susan
Davis (Calif.) and Congressman Jim Davis (Fla.).


ACADEMICS 5






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


Assistant Professor Mark
Fenster is building a body of re-
spected scholarship on federal
constitutional property protections
and zoning and planning law. His
most recent article, appearing in
California Law Review, explores the
effects of past U.S. Supreme Court
decisions on conditional land use
approvals by local governments in their dealings with
property owners and developers.
Legal Skills Professor Joseph
Jackson is one of the many Levin
College of Law faculty who devote
significant amounts of time to pro
bono work. In April 2005, Jackson
was honored with The Florida Bar
President's Pro Bono Service Award
for his work representing and advo-
cating for homeless residents and
service providers in Gainesville and Tampa in a
variety of legal disputes.


Buzz from, pg. 1
ing campus-wide initiatives. It is also intended to
bubble up the ideas and perspectives of members of
the faculty, allowing us to share with each other and
with the administration simultaneously.
The format is simple: Buzz will focus on topical
issues. People will introduce faculty to colleagues
with university-wide impact. Interdisciplinarity
will highlight emerging or developed cross-college
programs. College in Focus will highlight individual
colleges through objective data, narrative and faculty
accomplishments. Last but not least, Faculty Senate
News will provide timely updates about the doings
of UF's elected faculty representatives.
ACADEMICS is published by the Senate for the
Faculty. Send me your comments at
facultysenatechair@aa.ufl.edu.
Kim Tanzer is a Professor in the School ofArchitec-
ture and Chair of the Faculty Senate.


Cabinet from, pg. 1
We have a lot to do. We want to grow our graduate
programs, boost our research funding, hire great
faculty, break ground for new buildings and nurture
the kind of forward-thinking interdisciplinary re-
search embodied by the new UF Water Institute.
We've just launched a new marketing campaign and
are about to launch a new capital campaign. We
want to improve the quality of our academic pro-
grams, take the wraps off our achievements and rise
in the rankings.
Big challenges all, but I'm confident our senior
leaders are equal to them.
Bernie Machen is the President of the University of
Florida


Inter-disciplinarity from, pg. 2
together UF's extensive water-related research and
education efforts. The goal: To focus serious exper-
tise on one of the state's most pressing problems.
At UF and elsewhere, the next challenge is to
extend the interdisciplinary focus to education,
specifically to degree programs.
Along those lines, UF has proposed creating a new
doctoral program in interdisciplinary studies. The
program would allow a student to blend two or more
majors and design a plan of study not currently
available on campus. For example, a student could
earn a doctorate in bioinformatics a degree not
now offered at UF, despite the presence of the
needed expertise in computer science, genetics and
elsewhere. If approved by the Board of Governors,
the program could be available as early as next
school year.
From the essence of matter to the origin of life,
answers to today's big questions in science and
scholarship no longer come from a single discipline.
UF'stresearchers are focusing strong attention where
many of the answers will lie: at the boundaries.
Win Phillips is Professor of Mechanical & Aerospace
Engineering and Research Professor of Biomedical
Engineering, and Vice President for Research


ACADEMICS 6






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


Faculty Senate News: 4.14.05 Meeting Outcomes


Danaya Wright is the new chair-elect.

Name Change
Graduate Engineering Research Center at Eglin Air
Force Base (GERC) to Research and Engineering
Education Facility (REEF).
Presented by Sheila Dickison, Chair, Curriculum
Committee Approved unanimously.

New Degree Proposal
Master of Science with a Major in Animal Molecular
and Cellular Biology and Doctor of Philosophy with
a Major in Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology.
Presented by Ken Gerhardt, VP Research and
Graduate Programs
Both Approved unanimously.

New Degree Proposal
Master of International Taxation
Presented by Ken Gerhardt, VP Research and
Graduate Programs
Both Approved unanimously.

Proposed Constitutional Language
Article II Section-5 APA Assembly
Presented by Chris Snodgrass, Chair, Constitution
Committee
Two options to consider for proposed constitu-
tional language regarding the definition of the
Academic and Professional Assembly (APA)
Option 1 [New] Section 5: ACADEMIC AND
PROFESSIONAL ASSEMBLY: The Academic and
Professional Assembly (APA) shall be the organiza-
tional representative of the University's academic and
professional staff not represented in the Faculty
Senate. The APA shall have the authority to define
its membership, to approve its own bylaws, to ap-
point committees and other groups as are deemed
necessary to aid in the performance of its mission,
and to serve in an advisory capacity to the President
and the Faculty Senate.
Motion to approve this recommendation was
approved unanimously.


UF Libraries Approval of Statement
Presented by Scott Nygren, Chair of the Council of
Academic Infrastructure and Support
"The Faculty Senate recognizes that library re-
sources and services are crucial to our academic
mission. However, out libraries have been docu-
mented as deficient when compared to top ten
universities with which the University of Florida aims
to compete. Therefore, the Faculty Senate asks the
Administration and the Board of Trustees to formu-
late a policy to improve university libraries to meet
the diverse and complex needs of 21st century teach-
ing and research, and to report back within one year
regarding resources and strategies to enable the
libraries to achieve this goal."
Motion to pas statement passed unanimously

UF Calendars
2005 Commencement Ceremonies
Presented by Sheila Dickison, Chair, Curriculum
Committee
Revise the academic calendar for 2005-2006 and
2006-2007 to address concerns about commencement
ceremonies and final exams on the Friday of exam
week.
Motion was defeated.

Constitution Committee
Rules Report
Presented by Chris Snodgrass, Chair, Constitution
Committee
Dr. Snodgrass reported on the recent proposed
university rules. All rules that were not previously
withdrawn were approved by the Board of Trustees.

Nominating Committee Report
Presented by Carol Kem, Chair, Nominating Com-
mittee
Dr. Kem gave annual report of the committee and
provided a list of candidates for the Senate commit-
tees and joint committees. Electronic ballot voting
ended April 29, 2005.


ACADEMICS 7






A A D M G A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


Faculty Senate News:
Senate Agenda
September 22, 2005 3:00 -5:00 P.M.
Reitz Union Auditorium


Agenda:
Approval of April 14, 2005 and August 25, 2005 minutes .............. Kim Tanzer, Chair
Reports:
Chair's Report .............................................Kim Tanzer, Chair
Provost's Report .........................................Janie Fouke, Provost

Information Items:
Conversations About...Series:
University Budget .............. Dr. King, Associate Provostfor Faculty Development
Curriculum Changes ............... Sheila Dickison, University Curriculum Committee
New Degrees
Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) ........................... College of Nursing
Name Changes
Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology
from Department of Pathobiology .................. College of Veterinary Medicine
Department of Educational Administration and Policy
from Department of Educational Leadership, Policy and
Foundations .......................................... College of Education
M.S. major in Real Estate
from M.S. major in Business Administration,
concentration in Real Estate and Urban Analysis ............... College of Business
New Department
Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science ...... College of Dentistry
New Major
Migration of Landscape and Nursery Horticulture
to a major from Interdisciplinary studies specialization,
IDS: Landscape and Nursery Horticulture ..... College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
Changes to General Ed Requirements ............. Andy McCullough, Gen Ed Council
International/Diversity Focus
Minimum Grade Requirement for General Education Courses
Nominations ........................... Carol Kem, Senate Nominating Committee
Call for Nominations from the floor for Policy Councils
Action Items:
None

Open Discussion from Floor of Senate:
Three minute limit per speaker, floor will be open to Senators first


ACADEMICS 8




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs