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 Buzz: Faculty guide to the Campus...
 People: Provost Janie Fouke
 Interdisciplinarity: Latin American...
 College in Focus: College of Public...
 Faculty Senate news: reports
 Faculty Senate news: Senate...






Title: Academics: a monthly newsletter for the faculty of the University of Florida
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 Material Information
Title: Academics: a monthly newsletter for the faculty of the University of Florida
Series Title: Academics: a monthly newsletter for the faculty of the University of Florida
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: UF Faculty Senate
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Faculty Senate
Publisher: Faculty Senate, University of Florida
Publication Date: October, 2005
 Subjects
Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
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Bibliographic ID: UF00055469
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

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Table of Contents
    Buzz: Faculty guide to the Campus Master Plan
        Page 1
    People: Provost Janie Fouke
        Page 1
    Interdisciplinarity: Latin American Studies
        Page 2
    College in Focus: College of Public Health and Health Professions
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Faculty Senate news: reports
        Page 7
    Faculty Senate news: Senate agenda
        Page 8
Full Text











Buzz:
Faculty Guide to the Campus
Master Plan
By: Linda Dixon, Planning Office Manager
An interactive process of public forums, committee
meetings and interviews has resulted in a campus master
plan that is "by the university and for the university." Over
the past year, the Facilities Planning and Construction
Division has coordinated the process to develop a draft
five-year update to the UF Campus Master Plan for 2005-
2015.
The draft will be aired in a series of public forums over
the next two months including the first step of adoption at
the December UF Board of Trustees meeting. Three
committees (Conservation Study, Transportation Study,
and Mater Plan Steering) have worked to prepare the plan
maps and policies.
The committees consist of 80 members, over half of
whom are faculty. Students and community representatives
are also members. The plan directs the next ten years of
campus development within a framework for sustainable
growth over a much longer period.
The plan identifies potential building locations, land uses
and transportation systems that enable
growth which retains conservation lands
and open space, respects historic
resources, address visitor access and
accommodates long-range facility needs
in a configuration of walkable
development centers linked by transit.
iUnda Dixon see Master Plan, pg. 6


People:
Provost Janie Fouke

By: Janie Fouke, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs


us. Please keep


What a pleasure to join the faculty,
staff and students at the University of
Florida! Thanks to so many of you who
have warmly welcomed me. I have
visited with many faculty groups and am
known to accept any invitation where
coffee is served! Each visit increases the
rate at which I get to know the chal-
lenges and opportunities that are before
educating me!


What challenges are ahead of us? Certainly one of them
is our information systems. Many of you are volunteering
your time to help assure that we have access to timely and
accurate data and that our many disparate systems can
communicate with one another. Thanks for your help with
this tremendous, urgent task.
Another challenge will be how to trumpet our successes
across the state when they could better be described with
"quality" language than with "quantity" language. The
State higher education budget has been heavily driven by
the expectation that our campuses will grow. "New
money" is typically linked to increased numbers of student
credit hours of instruction. This likely will continue to be
an important driver as the number of college students in
our State is projected to increase by 85 -percent over the
next decade. But where would UF put 85-percent more
students? What compelling arguments, "quality" argu-
ments will we make for "new money"?
see Provost, pg. 6


CONTENTS


Faculty Senate News


2


7


1:1 l ADr 9 j f t- I


Interdisciplinarity















Buzz:
Faculty Guide to the Campus
Master Plan
By: Linda Dixon, Planning Office Manager
An interactive process of public forums, committee
meetings and interviews has resulted in a campus master
plan that is "by the university and for the university." Over
the past year, the Facilities Planning and Construction
Division has coordinated the process to develop a draft
five-year update to the UF Campus Master Plan for 2005-
2015.
The draft will be aired in a series of public forums over
the next two months including the first step of adoption at
the December UF Board of Trustees meeting. Three
committees (Conservation Study, Transportation Study,
and Mater Plan Steering) have worked to prepare the plan
maps and policies.
The committees consist of 80 members, over half of
whom are faculty. Students and community representatives
are also members. The plan directs the next ten years of
campus development within a framework for sustainable
growth over a much longer period.
The plan identifies potential building locations, land uses
and transportation systems that enable
growth which retains conservation lands
and open space, respects historic
resources, address visitor access and
accommodates long-range facility needs
in a configuration of walkable
development centers linked by transit.
iUnda Dixon see Master Plan, pg. 6


People:
Provost Janie Fouke

By: Janie Fouke, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs


us. Please keep


What a pleasure to join the faculty,
staff and students at the University of
Florida! Thanks to so many of you who
have warmly welcomed me. I have
visited with many faculty groups and am
known to accept any invitation where
coffee is served! Each visit increases the
rate at which I get to know the chal-
lenges and opportunities that are before
educating me!


What challenges are ahead of us? Certainly one of them
is our information systems. Many of you are volunteering
your time to help assure that we have access to timely and
accurate data and that our many disparate systems can
communicate with one another. Thanks for your help with
this tremendous, urgent task.
Another challenge will be how to trumpet our successes
across the state when they could better be described with
"quality" language than with "quantity" language. The
State higher education budget has been heavily driven by
the expectation that our campuses will grow. "New
money" is typically linked to increased numbers of student
credit hours of instruction. This likely will continue to be
an important driver as the number of college students in
our State is projected to increase by 85 -percent over the
next decade. But where would UF put 85-percent more
students? What compelling arguments, "quality" argu-
ments will we make for "new money"?
see Provost, pg. 6


CONTENTS


Faculty Senate News


2


7


1:1 l ADr 9 j f t- I


Interdisciplinarity






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


Interdisciplinarity: Latin American Studies


The Center for Latin American Studies, founded in 1963
is one of the top-ranked centers of its type in the world.
Fifteen core faculty and over 100 faculty affiliates work
with Director Carmen Diana Deere to offer a Master of
Arts, three Graduate Certificates, and an Undergraduate
Minor and Certificate.
The Center facilitates research and study abroad
programs throughout Latin America. For more information
visit www.latam.ufl.edu.


By: Anna Peterson, Affiliated Faculty
member of Latin American Studies
Anna Peterson's work in Latin
America has examined the political roles
of religious belief systems and religious
communities. Her recent work focuses
on the possible contribution that religion
might make to environmental and social
sustainability.


In her new book, Seeds of the Kingdom, (Oxford, October
2005) Dr. Peterson looks at two agrarian communities;
repopulated villages in former war zones in El Salvador
and Amish settlements in the United States Midwest.
These two groups differ in many important aspects, but
their experiences suggest that work for more sustainable
communities is more likely to succeed in the presence of
certain factors, including a strong collective identity and
commitment to the common good, deep attachment to
local places, and a utopian horizon that provides both
goals and the hopes of reaching them.
Building on this study, Dr. Peterson is working with
University of Florida colleagues to build an interdiscipli-
nary research initiative on the cultural foundations of
environmental sustainability.
Anna Peterson is a Professor of Region.


By: Karen A. Kainer, Core Faculty member
of Latin American Studies

Jointly appointed to the Center for
Latin American Studies and the School
of Forest Research and Conservation,
Assistant Professor Karen. A Kainer
Karen Kainer works on the cutting edge of tropical
ecology and community forest
management in Amazonia. As decentralization of forest
control proceeds across the developing world, local
peoples who have resided in the forest for generations,
increasingly aspire to (and are expected to) manage their
forests with greater sophistication. Supporting these efforts
with ecological research, Dr. Kainer integrates social
concerns into her work, accounting for the substantial
differences between smallholder and industrial forest
management. Her research program is highly collaborative
partnering with local universities, non-governmental
organizations, and communities in Brazil, Peru, and
Ecuador. Her graduate students tap into this network,
increasing their effectiveness as on-the-ground
contributors and enhancing their ability to execute good
science. Dr. Kainer also takes interdisciplinarity to the
classroom by team teaching Community Forest
Management with an anthropologist.
Karen A. Kainer is an Assistant Professor of Latin American Studies.


By: Philip Williams and Manuel Vasquez,
Affiliated Faculty members of Latin American
Studies


Philip Williams and Manuel Vasquez
are co-Directors of a
major research project
entitled, "Latino
Philip Williams Immigrants in the
New South; Lived Religion, Space and
Power." The study has been funded by
three grants from the Ford Foundation
totaling $815,000. Since 2001, Williams
and Vasquez have been working with Manuel VasqueZ
colleagues in Brazil, Guatemala,
see Latin American Studies, pg. 6


ACADEMICS 2






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


College in Focus:

College of Public Health and Health Professions


College at a Glance
The following information, supplied in part by the UF Fact Book, is
provided to increase our mutual understanding of each other's disciplines
at the University of Florida. It is not intended to suggest a hierarchy
among our colleges, but rather to reflect the intellectual and organizational
diversity each college lends to the University.
Total number of faculty (Fall 2005)
Full-time: 108
Part-Time: 17
Number of faculty in tenure or tenure earning
positions (Fall 2005)
Tenure: 36
Tenure track: 23
Percentage of faculty in tenure or tenure track
positions
78 percent
Number of degrees granted (2003-2004)
Bachelor: 237
Master: 135.99
Doctorate: 104.50
Professional: 0
Student credit hours generated annually (2003-2004)
Lower: 708
Upper: 9,348
Grad I: 8,303
Grad II: 2,459
Total student credit hour fundablee units)
*Total SCH majors: 20,821
*Total SCH non majors: 2,055
Enrollment (Fall 2004)
Undergraduate: 983
Graduate: 556.16
Professional: 0
NonDegree: 9
PostBacc: 3.32
Student/Teacher ratio
*Upper: 76.1
*Graduate: 18.3


Funded research expenditures
Sponsored Research $ 10,094,834
UF Research Foundation $ 11,203
Returned Overhead $ 652,589
College development during the last year
Gifts: $ 2,458,300
Pledges: $ 60,050
Significant national rankings
Audiology Master's/ Doctorate
Overall: 8 (tie)
Clinical Psychology Doctorate Graduate
Overall: 20 AAU: 12 (both ties)
Health Services Administration Graduate
Overall: 29 AAU: 12 (both ties)
Occupational Therapy Graduate
Overall: 15 (tie) AAU: 5
Physical Therapy Master's/ Doctorate Graduate
Overall: 25 AAU: 4 (both ties)
Rehabilitation Counseling Master's/ Doctorate
Graduate
Overall: 9 AAU: 5 (both ties)
Speech Language Pathology Master's Graduate
Overall: 17 AAU:14 (both ties)
Fellows in major societies or equivalent honors
32


College Narrative

By: Christy Harris Lemak, Faculty Senator


The University of Florida College of
Health and Health Professions (PHHP)
is one of the largest and most diversi-
fied academic health institutions in the
nation. Established in 1958, the college
was a prototype for health professions
education and the first college of its
kind located within a health science
Chti YLemak center. We educate students in public
health; clinical and health psychology; communicative
disorders; health science; health services research, manage
ment and policy; occupational therapy; physical therapy;
rehabilitation counseling; and rehabilitation science.


ACADEMICS 3






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


In addition, the college is committed to the
development of cutting edge science in areas such as
health and behavior, the rehabilitation of central nervous
system impairment, and health systems functioning.
In 2003, the College expanded its offerings to include
public health programs. The combination of public
health's emphasis on population health and the college's
long-term focus on the management of chronic health
conditions is a powerful model. We were recently named an
associate member of the Association of Schools of Public
Health, signifying the completion of our first major step
toward receiving accreditation as a school of public health.
PHHP faculty are a diverse group of teachers,
researchers, and clinicans. Some split their time among the
traditional teaching, research and service missions; others
are dedicated clinicians who teach as they provide health
care services to patients. Still other PHHP faculty are
primarily involved in research projects that have led to
important scientific discoveries and advancements in
health care practice and policy. Many of our faculty have
joint appointments in other university centers and colleges,
reflecting our collaborative approach to health, disability
and rehabilitation.
The diverse group of PHHP faculty get together at least
once a semester to hear and share information with
College leadership and to participate in strategic decisions
about our future. In addition, faculty committees are at the
heart of everything we do in PHHP, from reviewing
curricular changes to setting the College's strategic direction
to deciding how to best use the space in our fabulous new
building.
Faculty, staff and students of PHHP get together
informally to have fun and raise money at various
activities, such as the Horse Farm 100 Bike Ride where
Team PHHP raised $10,000 and counting for student
scholarships and travel grants. PHHP faculty agree that
PHHP's diverse environment provides many collaborative
opportunities for faculty to work together as we seek
excellence in all we do.

Christy Lemak is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health
Services, Research, Management and Poicy.


Laudamus

The faculty members of the College of Public Health
and Health Professions are among the most productive in
our field. In the past year, faculty members have pub-
lished 15 books, more than 25 book chapters and more
than 230 articles in peer-reviewed publications.
We are proud of our heritage and role in developing a
new educational model, started in Gainesville and now
adopted across the nation. Without exception, our pro-
grams have won national recognition for the quality of the
education provided. We have also remained committed to
expanding the science supporting our disciplines, placing
our college first or second in National Institutes of Health
funding for colleges of health professions over the last few
years, and among the top 20 in NIH funding for colleges
of public health.
Our faculty members are nationally and internationally
recognized for their contributions to education, science
and clinical treatment.

Elena Andresen, Ph.D., a professor and
Chief of the Division of Epidemiology
in the Department of Health Services
Research, Management and Policy at the
College of Public Health and Health
Professions, has been named to the
Institute of Medicine's Committee on
Disability in America. She will be
among a group of disability experts whose task is to
review the new literature and developments since the
Institute of Medicine's report, "Disability in America,"
was published in 1991. She is a nationally recognized
researcher in the fields of chronic disease epidemiology
among older adults, disability epidemiology, and outcomes
research in rehabilitation and disability.

Linda Bartoshuk, Ph.D., a visiting
professor in the Department of Clinical
and Health Psychology, is a member of
the National Academy of Sciences and is
the first female academy member at U.F
Bartoshuk is a world-renowned taste
researcher who studies the genetic
variation in taste perception, oral pain


ACADEMICS 4






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


and taste disorders. Bartoshuk has discovered that a
quarter of the population are "supertasters," born with an
unusually high number of taste buds. She has found that
taste status also affects a person's health. Super tasters are
less drawn to sweets and fatty foods, which explains why
they have superior cardiovascular profiles and tend to be
thinner than nontasters. But they are also less likely to eat
bitter green vegetables, putting them at increased risk for
colon cancer.
R. Paul Duncan, Ph.D., chair of the
Department of Health Services
Research, Management and Policy,
examines access to medical and dental
care, especially issues involving health
insurance and the uninsured. Duncan,
who was appointed by Florida Gov. Jeb
Bush to the Governor's Task Force on
Access to Affordable Health Insurance, leads a research
team focused on estimating the number of people without
health insurance in particular states and comparing the
health insurance experiences of various groups. In recent
years, the team has studied uninsured populations in
Florida, Indiana and Kansas.

SLouis Gapenski, Ph.D., a professor in
the Department of Health Services
Research, Management and Policy, is one
of the world's foremost experts on
health care finance. He has written
several best selling textbooks, and is the
author of a popular self study program
published by the American College of
Healthcare Executives. He is also one of the college's
most admired instructors, having received 12 "Teacher of
the Year" awards at department, college and university
levels.

James Hall III, Ph.D., chief of
audiology in the Department of
Communicative Disorders, is the author
of Handbook of Auditogy Evoked
Responses, considered a standard resource
for audiologists. Hall studies auditory
electrophysiology, the evaluation of
auditory function through recorded
responses from the brain, and researches treatments for

ACADEMY


tinnitus, the occurrence of sound such as ringing or
whistling in an individual's ears when there is no external
sound present. Working with local schools, Hall is
developing techniques for the evaluation and treatment
of school-age children with auditory processing disorders
who routinely perform poorly in school.

Amal Khoury, Ph.D., an associate
professor in the Department of Health
Services Research, Management and
Policy, is working to close the gap in
health disparities for underserved
women who are members of minority
groups, have low income or live in rural
areas. Khoury and her colleagues have
several research projects underway aimed at understanding
the barriers that prevent underserved women from
receiving breast cancer care. She serves on the council of
the American Public Health Association's Medical Care
Section and chairs the women's health committee of the
Section. Khoury is also a founding member of the Gender
and Health interest group of Academy Health.

Peter Lang, Ph.D., a graduate research
professor in the Department of Clinical
and Health Psychology is the director of
the Center for the Study of Emotion and
Attention, Funded by the National
Institute of Mental Health. He is
internationally known for his
contributions to the scientific study of
human emotion, particularly fear and anxiety and his
pioneering work in behavior therapy and biofeedback.
Lang is the recipient of the American Psychological
Association's Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award.


William Mann, Ph.D., chair of the
Department of Occupational Therapy,
leads the development of new assistive
technologies- devices designed to make
everyday tasks easier for seniors and
people with disabilities- as the director
of the Rehabilitation Engineering
Research Center on Technology for Successful Aging. In
his other major research role as the






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


director of the National Older Driver Research and
Training Center, Mann and his colleagues offer
interventions to help older people drive safely longer and
provide counseling, education and training on alternatives
to driving. His work has been funded by more than $23
million in research awards over the years.
Michael Perri, Ph.D., the college's
associate dean for research and a
professor in the Department of Clinical
and Health Psychology, studies obesity,
exercise and health promotion. Perri has
received more than $15 million in
research funding, including a recent $2.6
million grant from the National Institutes
of Health to study an obesity treatment for women in rural
areas. He is a fellow of the North American Association
for the Study of Obesity.

Horace Sawyer, Ph.D., a professor in
the Department of Rehabilitation
Counseling, is considered a pioneer in
the field of life-care planning. A life-care

needs, services and equipment a person
with a serious injury or illness will need
for the rest of his or her life. This can
include medical care, rehabilitation, home care,
medication, transportation and structural renovations to
the home. In 1985, Sawyer coauthored "Guide of
Rehabilitation," the first textbook to include life-care
planning and he teaches the nation's only graduate-level
course in life-care planning.

Krista Vandenborne, Ph.D., chair of
the Department of Physical Therapy, is
an internationally recognized leader in
muscular dysfunction and rehabilitation
with a focus on musculoskeletal and
neurological conditions. She studies the
Adaptations in skeletal muscle during
disuse and disease, known as muscle
wasting. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and
spectroscopy techniques, Vandenborne studies the
effectiveness of specific rehabilitation interventions,
including gene transfer. She is the principal investigator on
several National Institutes on Health grants and has
served on NASA and NIH study sections.


Craig Velozo, Ph.D., an associate
professor and associate chair of the
Department of Occupational Therapy,
focuses his research on the development
of physical rehabilitation outcome
measures. With funding from the
National Institutes of Health, Velozo is
currently developing a computer-based
model for assessing cognitive function for patients with
traumatic brain injury. In 2000, Velozo received the
highest research recognition in the profession, selection to
the American Occupational Therapy Academy of
Research.


Provost, frompg. 1
Opportunities abound. We have terrific people with bold
ideas on one of the most complex campuses in North
America. That complexity is a blessing and a curse.
Probably any resource you could possibly need is here if
you can FIND it! If we can unleash that potential, increase
our awareness of who and what is here, and reduce the
barriers to collaborations, our opportunities will be
unlimited.
Janie Fouke is the Provost of U.F. and a Professor of Biomedical
Engineering.


Master Plan, frompg. 1
committee records, plan documents and contact
information are posted at:
http://www.masterplan.ufl.edu/20052015.htm.
Linda Dixon is Manager of the Planning Office in the Faciities
Planning and Construction Division.


Latin American Studies, from pg. 2
and Mexico to map out immigrant communities in
Florida and to build detailed accounts of the social,
cultural and religious life in these communities. During
the next phase of the project, the researchers will begin
preliminary work in greater metropolitan Atlanta, a "hyper
growth" area for Latino immigrants. Expanding the
research scope in this way will allow them to assess the
comparative impact of migration in the New South and
the roles that religion plays in generating, mediating and
resolving conflicts between long established African-
American communities and newly arrived Latino
immigrants.
Philip Williams is a Professor and Chair of the Political Science
Department. Manuel Vasqueg is an Associate Professor of Relgion.


ACADEMICS 6






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


Faculty Senate News:
Reports:

Chair's Report
Professor Tanzer updated the Senate on her current
projects including meetings with Deans, College faculty,
and faculty and student groups. She urged faculty
attendance at Board of Trustees meetings held in
December in March. Professor Tanzer explained the
administrative liaisons to the policy councils and council
issues. She discussed some topics that the policy councils
will focus on this year. Senate participation from the 2004-
2005 Academic Year was displayed. Attendance will be
taken this year and relayed back to College Deans.
Senators are responsible for relaying Senate news to
college faculty. The Implementation on Shared
Governance task force has been created. After further
deliberations the Provost's office was able to resolve
graduation conflicts within the framework of the current,
approved UF calendar. ACADEMICS will be distributed to
the entire faculty. Professor Tanzer is looking into the
possibility of creating an interactive faculty listserv for any
faculty members interested in participating.
Provost's Report
Dr. Fouke updated the Senate on upcoming projects that
she is developing. The University is currently in the
process of hiring an Admissions Director and Deans. The
University will focus more attention on the quality of
graduate admissions. The University is also increasingly
focused on developing additional undergraduate
opportunities and increasing engagement. UF is under
resource in two areas when compared to peer institutions:
student/faculty ration and faculty resources. Administration
is working on improving these areas. This year additional
class sections were created due to the larger than
anticipated freshman class. Dr. Fouke is open to
suggestions to ameliorate this problem. Dr. Fouke surveyed
faculty and staff and prioritized issues of interest. A series
of task forces will begin working in October on these
issues. The administration is working on improving
PeopleSoft. There are currently alternate billing and
accounts receivable tools in place to be used while the
PeopleSoft applications are being fixed.


9.22.05 Meeting Outcomes
Action Items:
Board of Governors Chancellor Resolution
Professor Tanzer proposed a resolution to send to the
BOG in support of higher education experience in the
search criteria for a new Chancellor. Currently, the criteria
is that a candidate is familiar with governance in the state
of Florida. A motion was made to include "outstanding
academic credentials." The motion was approved.
The resolution states:
Be it resolved that the University of Florida Faculty
Senate unequivocally urges the Florida Board of
Governors to conduct a national search for Chancellor of
the Florida State University System, and to appoint an
individual with experience, outstanding academic
credentials, and nationally recognized leadership in higher
education.
Resolution Condemning the Independent
Florida Alligator Cartoon
On behalf of the Steering Committee, Scott Nygren
proposed a resolution condemning the Sept. 13, 2005
Alligator Cartoon. Part A of the resolution was approved.
The motion to approve part B was not passed. There were
no motion to include part C.
The approved portion of the resolution states:
Whereas: the cartoon printed in the Independent Florida
Alligator of Sept. 13, 2005, depicting Kayne West and
Condoleeza Rice, demonstrates bad taste and bad
judgement in excess of acceptable norms of social conduct;
And whereas: an appeal to comic intention can never
justify the racist effects of inflammatory caricatures and
language; and whereas: this is not an issue of free speech,
but of respect for diversity and all members of the
university community; And whereas: public
communication carries with it an equal measure of public
responsibility; Therefore be it resolved: that the Faculty
Senate condemns said cartoon and demands that the
editors of the Independent Florida Alligator publicly
apologize, in print, in good faith, in a prominent font and
on the front page, for their bad judgement and its corrosive
effects on the University community.


ACADEMICS 7






A Monthly Newsletter for the Faculty of the University of Florida


Faculty Senate News:

Senate Agenda
October 20, 2005 3:00 -5:00 P.M.
Reitz Union Auditorium


Agenda:
Approval of September 22, 2005 minutes ..................................... Kim Tanzer, Chair

Reports:
Chair's Report ............................................................ Kim Tanzer, Chair
Provost's Report ........................................................ Janie Fouke, Provost


Information Items:
*UF Regulations
*Master Plan
*Healthy Gators 2010


Chris Snodgrass, University Constitution Committee
Linda Dixon, Manager Planning Office
Jill Varnes, Dean College of HHP
and Chris Machen Chair of Healthy Gators 2010 Steering Committee


*Curriculum Changes Sheila Dickison, University Curriculum Committee
New Degree
*Move International Business concentration to a major under the Master of Arts degree.... College of Business
*PhD Degree with a major in Genetics................Multi-college department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
Action Items:
Curriculum Changes ........................... Sheila Dickison, University Curriculum Committee
New Degrees
Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) ...................................... College of Nursing
Name Changes
Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology from
Department of Pathobiology .................................. College of Veterinay Medicine
Department of Educational Administration and Policy from Department of Educational Leader-
ship, Policy and Foundations .......................................... College of Education
M.S. major in Real Estate from M.S. major in Business Administration,
concentration in Real Estate and Urban Analysis .......................... College of Business
New Department
Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science .............. College of Dentistry
New Major
Migration of Landscape and Nursery Horticulture to a major from Interdisciplinary studies
specialization, IDS: Landscape and Nursery Horticulture ... College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
Changes to General Ed Requirements ......................... Andy McCollough, Gen Ed Council
International/Diversity Focus
Minimum Grade Requirement for General Education Courses
Open Discussion from Floor of Senate:
Three minute limit per speaker, floor will be open to Senators first


ACADEMICS 8




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