• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 The wolf and the lamb
 The frog and the ox
 The ass in a lion's skin
 The lobster and his mother
 The wolves and the sick ass
 The ape and her two young ones
 The daw in borrowed plumes
 The lion and the gnat
 The fox and the crow
 The fox that was docked
 The dog and the shadow
 The fox and the grapes
 The mole and her son
 The cat's paw
 The treacherous cur
 The dog and the wolf
 The dog in the manger
 The hare and the tortoise
 The fox and the crocodile
 The ant and the grasshopper
 The wolf in sheep's clothing
 The wolf and the crane
 Back Cover






Group Title: Fables of ¥sop and others, translated into human nature
Title: The fables of Æsop and others, translated into human nature
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055419/00001
 Material Information
Title: The fables of Æsop and others, translated into human nature
Alternate Title: Æsop's fables
Physical Description: 22 leaves, 23 leaves of plates : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bennett, Charles H ( Charles Henry ), 1829-1867
Aesop
Swain, Joseph, 1820-1909 ( Engraver )
W. Kent and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: W. Kent & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1857]
 Subjects
Subject: Fables   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Fiction   ( lcsh )
Characters and characteristics -- Fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Fiction   ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1857   ( rbgenr )
Satires -- 1857   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1857
Genre: Fables   ( rbgenr )
Satires   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: designed and drawn on the wood by Charles H. Bennett ; engraved by Swain.
General Note: Introduction dated: October, 1857.
General Note: Engraved t.p.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055419
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002471071
notis - AMH6588
oclc - 30657276

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title
    Table of Contents
        Contents
    Introduction
        Unnumbered ( 7 )
    The wolf and the lamb
        Plate
        Page 1
    The frog and the ox
        Plate
        Page 2
    The ass in a lion's skin
        Plate
        Page 3
    The lobster and his mother
        Plate
        Page 4
    The wolves and the sick ass
        Plate
        Page 5
    The ape and her two young ones
        Plate
        Page 6
    The daw in borrowed plumes
        Plate
        Page 7
    The lion and the gnat
        Plate
        Page 8
    The fox and the crow
        Plate
        Page 9
    The fox that was docked
        Plate
        Page 10
    The dog and the shadow
        Plate
        Page 11
    The fox and the grapes
        Plate
        Page 12
    The mole and her son
        Plate
        Page 13
    The cat's paw
        Page 14
        Page 14
    The treacherous cur
        Page 15
        Page 15
    The dog and the wolf
        Plate
        Page 16
    The dog in the manger
        Plate
        Page 17
    The hare and the tortoise
        Plate
        Page 18
    The fox and the crocodile
        Plate
        Page 19
    The ant and the grasshopper
        Plate
        Page 20
    The wolf in sheep's clothing
        Plate
        Page 21
    The wolf and the crane
        Plate
        Page 22
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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CONTENTS.




I. THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.
2. THE FROG AND THE OX.
3. THE ASS IN A LION'S SKIN.
4. THE LOBSTER AND HIS MOTHER.
5. THE WOLVES AND THE SICK ASS.
6. THE APE AND HER TWO YOUNG ONES.
7. THE DAW IN BORROWED PLUMES.
8. THE LION AND THE GNAT.
9. THE FOX AND THE CROW.
IO. THE FOX THAT WAS DOCKED.
II. THE DOG AND THE SHADOW.
12. THE FOX AND THE GRAPES.
13. THE MOLE AND HER SON.
14. THE CAT'S PAW.
I5. THE TREACHEROUS CUR.
16. THE DOG AND THE WOLF.

17. THE DOG IN THE MANGER.
18. THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.
Ig. THE FOX AND THE CROCODILE.
20. THE ANT AND THE GRASSHOPPER.
21. THE WOLF IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING.
22. THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.
















INTRODUCTION.


THE Author of this little Book knows that he has much to
learn, and even believes that he has something to forget.
He has had one Succefs ("Shadows"), but knowing how many
shortcomings muff have been forgiven before fo unanimously
favorable a verdict could have been arrived at, he is encouraged
to put forward this book of cc Fables tranflated into Human Nature,"
as little more than a promise of what (God willing) he hopes to
attempt.
It may be as well to fate that this is but the firff half of the
originally projeAed work, and that contingent on the fuccefs of this
inftalment the remainder will be published next year.
The Defign which forms the Frontifpiece to this Book, and which
is therefore prefumed to be somewhat typical of the intention of
Fable, represents Man tried at the Court of the Lion for the ill-
treatment of a Horfe. It will be feen that Man has the worft of it;
while his Viaim has fecured the Shark for his Solicitor, and the
Fox, Ape, and Vulture for Counfel; the woe-begone Defendant has
had to make fhift with Wolf, Dog, Afs, and Daw. The Rat and the
Rabbit, the Elephant and the Sheep, even the Turkey and the little
Birds, feem to have given it againift him, irrefpeaive of the Silence"
of the Parrot Ufher. The Clerk of the Arraigns looks through his
fpedacles, and the Bull has gone to fleep in a corner.
CHARLES H. BENNETT.
LONDON,
OCober, 1857.














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THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.

AS a hungry thief of a Wolf was loitering at the end of a lonely
road, there paffed by a mild-faced, timid-looking Lamb,
who was returning to the maternal pen. As the Lamb wore a fine
fleecy coat and carried about him many figns of good living, the
marauder's jaws watered at the profped of a upper.
SWhat do you mean,', faid he, glaring upon the little traveller
with his fierce eyes, "by taking up fo much of the path where I
am walking ?"
The Lamb, frightened at the Wolf's angry tone and terrible afpe&,
told him that, with all due fubmiflion, he could not conceive how his
walking on fuch a wide path could occasion him any inconvenience.
C What!" exclaimed the Wolf, seemingly in great anger and
indignation; "you are as impudent as your father, the magistrate's
dog, with the letters on his collar, who feized me by the throat laft year,
and caused me to be kept in a cage for three months-having all my
beautiful hair cut off!"
If you will believe me," faid the innocent Lamb, my parents
are poor simple creatures who live entirely by green fluffs, in Lambeth
Walk, hard by; we are none of us hunters of your species."
Ah! I fee it's no ufe talking to you," faid the Wolf, drawing
up clofe to him; "it runs in the blood of your family to hate us
Wolves; and therefore, as we have come fo conveniently together, I'll
juft pay off a few of your forefathers' fcores before we part."
So faying, he leapt at the throat of the poor Pet Lamb from
behind, and garotted him with his own pretty gold-ftudded collar.

MORAL.
If you have made up your mind to hang your dog, any rope will
do for the purpose.

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THE FROG AND THE OX.
















THE FROG AND THE OX.



A S a splendid Ox-who, by right of the great family he
belonged to, was permitted to difport himself as he pleaded
in the fashionable parks of London-was taking his afternoon ftroll,
an envious, tawdry-coated little Frog, that flood gaping at him hard-
by, called out to certain of his fellows (who had hopped thither in
his company all the way from the Fleet Ditch in the City), to take
particular notice of the enormous fize of the firft-mentioned animal.
"And fee," he faid, "if I don't make the biggeft well of
the two."
So he puffed himself up, once, twice, and again, and went fill
fwelling on in impotent emulation, till in the end,-fpite of the
cautions of his brother frogs-he burft himself.



MORAL.
The humble citizen who ftrives, by mere inflation, to make as great
an outward appearance as his fubftantial neighbour, muff inevitably
go to pieces.




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THE ASS IN A LION'S SKIN.



T HERE was a dreadful young Afs once, who prevailed upon
the old Affes, his indulgent parents, to obtain for him a
Lion's fkin, in which to masquerade about the world. At great coft
and inconvenience to themselves, they provided him with the difguife
he had begged for; and, clothed in it, he ftrutted forth believing
himself a very Lion, and causing men to flee before him in terror.
But it chanced in the end that, partly by the length of his ears,
and partly by the difcordance of his bray when he tried roaring,
he was discovered, and the Lions with whom he had fought to
herd fell upon him fo mercileffly, that he only faved himself by
flight, leaving his brave coat behind him, while men on every fide
laughed at and pelted him as he flew to his native common.



MORAL.
It is not the cocked hat that makes the Warrior.






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THE LOBSTER AND HIS MOTHER.















THE LOBSTER AND HIS MOTHER.



A GREENISH young Lobfter crawling along the Strand with
his mother (who, being old and learned, had attained to a
deep Blue complexion), was truck by the appearance of a fpecimen
of his own tribe-evidently laid out for fhow-whofe fhell-jacket was
of a brilliant red. Young, ignorant, and vain, he viewed the dazzling
fpe&acle with admiration and envy.
c Behold," he said, addrefling his parent, "the beauty and
fplendour of one of our family, thus decked out in glorious fcarlet.
I hall have no reft till I am poffeffed of an appearance equally
magnificent. How can I bear to fee myfelf the dingy objea I
am at present, mingling undiftinguifhed with our race ?"
cc Proud and heedlefs idiot," replied the hard old lady, "this
fame tawdry finery, you fo earneftly covet, is but too easily obtained.
In order to poffefs this appearance it is cnly neceftfay to be boiled."


MORAL.
When the Recruiting Sergeant tempts you with the fcarlet
uniform, he fays nothing about getting you into hot water.




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THE WOLVES AND THE SICK ASS.



T HERE were certain hungry carrion-hunting Wolves, who,
in a qualm of wonderful charity, paid a vifit to a fat
old Afs, who lay ill of a bean-furfeit, and was like to die.
"Pray, my good friend," faid they, after many protestations of
regard, whereabouts is your greatest pain?" -
"Oh, gently! gently!" replied the Afs, as they proceeded to
feel his pulfe, for it pricks me juft there, where you lay your
'fingers."

MORAL.
The kindnefs of a legacy-hunter is apt to be killing.










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THE APE AND HER TWO YOUNG ONES.




T IERE was a foolish old widowed She-Ape, who had two
young Monkeys of twins. She doted upon one of them,
whom fhe countenanced in breaking and pilfering what he pleaded;
while fhe only noticed the other to punish him bitterly if he should
aggrieve or thwart his brother, but on the whole left him to his
own devices.
In the end the fpoiled favourite broke out of bounds, and com-
mitted a theft away from his mother's cage, and was fnapped at by a
big Watch-Dog, whofe kennel was in a neighboring Court; while
his neglected brother grew up a harmlefs, aAive, and amufing
Monkey, much refpeaed by all who knew him.



MORAL.
A plant may thrive better by the road-fide than in a hot-houfe
where a Fool is the Gardener.







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THE DAW IN BORROWED PLUMES.



A RICH vulgar Daw, who had a mind to be genteel, tricked
herself out in all the gay feathers which fell from the fafhion-
able Peacocks, and upon the credit of thefe borrowed ornaments
valued herself above all the birds of the air. But this abfurd vanity
got her the envy of all the high-born birds with whom fhe wished
to affociate ; who, indeed, upon the discovery of the truth, by common
content fell to pluming her, and when each bird had taken her own
feather, this filly Daw had nothing left wherewith to cover her naked
vulgarity.


MORAL.
Fine feathers do not always make fine birds.








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THE LION AND THE GNAT.



A S a great majestic Lion was gathering himself up within his
lair, to aftonifh mankind with the wondrous powers of his
roar, there came buzzing under his very nofe a troublesome Gnat,
who challenged him to combat.
What avail your tremendous lungs and cavernous throat,
compared to the melodious pipes of my little organ? and, as for
your strength, endurance, and resolution, I defy you to put that
point to an iffue at once."
The Lion, finding the infe& would not be brufhed away, was fain
to accept the challenge; fo to it they went. But the Lion had no
chance, for the Gnat charged direct into the drum of the Lion's ear,
and there twinged him until in very defpair he tore himfelf with his
own paws. In the end the Gnat gained the victory over the noble
beat, upon which he flew away, but had the misfortune afterwards
in his flight to ftrike into a Cobweb, where he, the conqueror, fell a
prey to a large Blue-bottle Spider.



MORAL.
Little miseries are the greatest torments.




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THE~ FOX .4.ND THE CROW.













THE FOX AND THE CROW.

A HOMELY old female Crow, having flown out of a ihop in
the town with a piece of rich cheefe in her bill, betook herself
to a fine eminence in the country, in order to enjoy it; which a
cunning Fox observing, came and fat at her feet, and began to
compliment the Crow upon the fubjeft of her beauty.
I protect," faid he, I never observed it before, but your feathers
are of a more delicate white than any I ever faw in my life Ah,
what a fine fhape and graceful turn of the body is there And I
make no question but you have a voice to correfpond. If it is but
as fine as your complexion, I do not know a bird that can pretend
to ftand in competition with you. Come, let me hear you exercise
it by pronouncing a single monofyllable, which will bind me to you,
hand and heart, for ever."
The Crow, tickled with this very civil language, neftled and
wriggled about, and hardly knew where fhe was; but thinking the
Fox had fcarcely done justice to her voice, and wishing to fet him
right in that matter, the called out "Yes," as loud as poffible. But,
through this one fatal mistake of opening her mouth, ihe let fall her
rich prize-(in the Fox's fhrewd estimation all fhe was worth in the
world)-which the Fox snapped up direcly, and trotted away to
amufe himfelf as he pleaded, laughing to himself at the credulity of
the Crow, who faw but'little of him or her cheefe afterwards.

MORAL.
Advice to Rich Widows.-When you liften to a knave's flattery
upon what you are, you may have caufe to regret not having kept
your mouth fhut upon what you had; and if you poffefs great ifore
of cheefe, be fure that no fortune-hunter will marry you for the
mere fake of the Pairing.


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THE FOX THAT WAS DOCKED.



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THE FOX THAT WAS DOCKED.



T HERE was a cunning but over-reaching old Fox, who,
Shaving fortified himself within certain Banks for the plucking
and eating of unfufpeding Geefe, was, neverthelefs, unearthed, and
purfued by the County Hounds. Being caught by a trap in his
flight, he was glad to compound for his neck by leaving his magni-
ficent tail behind him. It was fo uncouth a fight for a Fox to appear
without this diftinguilhing ornament of his race, that the very thought
of it made him weary of his life. But however, for the better
countenance of the fcandal, he called the Foxes together, when he
made a learned difcourfe upon the trouble, the ufeleffnefs, and the
indecency of Foxes wearing long, draggling, bufhy tails. He had
no fooner finished his harangue, than up rifes a cunning old Fox,
who defired to be informed whether the worthy Fox that had
moved against the wearing of tails gave his advice for the advantage
of thofe that poffeffed fuch natural appendages, or to palliate the
deformity and difgrace of thofe that had none.


MORAL.
A thief who has had his ears cropped in the pillory, should not
be suffered to fet the fashion in periwigs.



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THE DOG AND THE SHADOW.



















THE DOG AND THE SHADOW.



T HERE was a vain and greedy young Dog, who, coming near
a certain Shallow Stream called Fafhionable Society, faw
therein the mere fhadow and reflection of a tempting prize (the
more fo, that he conceived it the property of a luckier Dog than
himself), in flapping at which he opened his mouth fo eagerly and
fo foolishly as to caufe to fall away from him a rare poffeflion of
the fame kind which was his own, and which was all he could
have defired for his heart's content, but which his lips were never
allowed to touch more.


MORAL.
Many a fool who has fenfe enough to get a good wife, lacks the
wit to know it.















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THE FOX AND THE GRAPES.



A LONELY She-Fox was fascinated by fome grapes which hung
high in a certain Vineyard, and, in order to obtain which, fhe
for fome time fatigued herself in leaps, frifkings, and contortions,
more or lefs graceful, until her joints grew ftiff and her bones fairly
ached again. But at laft, finding her agility decrease, and the grapes
farther from her reach than ever, Let who will, take them," faid fhe,
" as for me, I would none of them at a gift, for I am fure they are
as four as vinegar."


MORAL.
It is natural that we should affect to defpife what we cannot
obtain. In the ball-room of life, the unfortunate "Wall-flower,"
who has wearied herself out with jumping up in the vain hope of
catching a partner, will be found, towards the clofe of the entertain-
ment, expreffing herself in the fevereft terms on the folly and
impropriety of Dancing.






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THE MOLE AND HER SON.



A YOUNG conceited Mole one day prevailed upon his mother
to take him out of their dwelling-hole to fee fome of the fine
fights fo much admired by the people above them. He proceeded
to criticize the surrounding beauties.
"What an execrable view this is," faid he, paufing in fight of
a beautiful landscape, and twirling his fcanty whifkers with an air.
" You don't mean to tell me that fky is blue and the idea of purple
grafs is positively ridiculous. There's a horfe, too, with fix legs, and
a man taller than his own houfe. And I'm fure we ought to be able
to fee the flowers growing on thofe mountains at this distance! Out
of all reafon, colour, and proportion. Prepofterous "
My fon, my fon," faid the mother, as you are incapable of
appreciating what you affect to defpife, it is unfortunate that you
are not dumb as well as blind, and fo might have efcaped this'
exposure of your ignorance."



MORAL.
The fool's tongue is like the rattlefnake's alarum, the providential
fign by which we may avoid him.



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THE CAT'S PAW.



A CUNNING old Ape who felt his mouth water at the
vicinity of certain tempting fruits which he longed to
poffefs, but which he knew to be guarded in a place too warm for
his fingers to venture in, afked a foolifh young Cat, whom he faw
paffing, to come to his affiftance.
"I pray you," he faid, lend me your paw to reach thofe pretty
nice things that I require. I am a poor old creature that cannot
help himself, and will well reward you for your pains."
The filly Cat complied ; but in fo doing, burnt his claws fo terribly
that he was unable to catch mice for months to come, while the old
Ape got fafely off with the plunder.



MORAL.
In the trade of chefnut-flealing, it is the Cat comes in for the
kicks, while the Monkey enjoys the halfpence.






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THE TREACHEROUS CUR.



A CERTAIN Merchant had a Dog called Clerk," in whom he
placed a particular confidence. He fed the creature from
his own table, and, in fhort, took more care of him than of any of his
fellows. This kindnefs, however, was but ill repaid; for, one day,
no fooner was the Merchant's back turned, than the rafcally hound
flew to the fafe, tore it open, and helped himfelf to all the choice
bits that his benefador, with much care, had fcraped together for the
fuftenance of his own children. But, fortunately, his Mafter returned
in time to detect him in the ad, and bade him prepare for punishment.
Afterr" faid the Cur, in excuse, bethink you, I am one of your
family. I am a Dog who has hitherto borne a good name.
Punifh me not for this firit offence; rather turn your difpleafure
upon thofe rafcals the Wolves, who make a daily practice of plunder."
No! no!" replies his Mafter. "I would rather fpare forty
Wolves, who rob through want or evil-training, than a Dog like
you, who is faithlefs to truft and infenfible to kindnefs."
So the Dog was bound and carried out of the houfe, and con-
figned to the mercy of deep water, with a heavy chain attached to
him to keep him from finding his way back again.


MORAL.
In the country of Traitors the mere Thief is chosen as king, on
account of his superior honefly.



'5












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THE DOG AND THE WOLF.














THE DOG AND THE WOLF.



THERE was a gaunt, ragged, gipfy of a Wolf who fell into
company with a fleek jolly Dog belonging to the fpaniel tribe,
on the King's highway. The Wolf was wonderfully pleaded with his
companion, and was inquifitive to learn how he had brought himself
to that commendable fate of body.
Why," faid the Dog, I keep my Mafter's houfe, and I have
the beft of meat, drink, and lodging for my pains; indeed, if you'll
go along with me, and do as I do, you may fare as I fare."
The Wolf readily agreed, and fo away they trotted together; but
as they approached the houfe the Wolf caught fight of the Dog's
curioufly embroidered collar, from which a kind of gold chain hung
down over the shoulder. Brother," faid he, "what is this I fee ? "
cc Oh, that's nothing," fays the Spaniel; "a mere focial Badge to
let the world know whofe Dog I am."
Indeed fays the other. If thofe be the conditions, good bye.
Bare bones and independence, rather than cold chicken with a chain
and dog-collar."


MORAL.
To the independent fpirit, gold fetters are as galling as iron ones.


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THE DOG IN THE MANGER.


















THE DOG IN THE MANGER.



A CHURLISH, pampered Cur, who had a comfortable place
in a gentleman's well-filled Manger, would from thence
fnap and fnarl to frighten off all poor beafts of draught and burden
who pafied that way-driven by the hardnefs of the time of year to
beg for provender they could not earn by labour in the fields. This
Dog wanted for nothing himself, and yet took an ill-natured pleasure
in keeping poor famifhing creatures from many a meal, which, but
for his officious yelping, they might have enjoyed from his Mafter's
bounty.


MORAL.
There would be funfhine in many a poor man's houfe, but for
officious, go-between window-ihutters.








17






























Ii" : T O]-.0 -^^
















THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.















THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.


c HAT a dull, heavy creature," faid a bright-eyed, nimble-
VV footed Hare, is this fame plodding Tortoife! He
trudges along in the mud, neither looking to the right nor to the
left, only caring to nibble fuch of the dryeft grafs and the dirtieft
roots as come in his way, and making no more progress in a day's
march than I can accomplish in two or three carelefs bounds !"
"And yet," faid the Tortoife (in whofe hearing the speech had been
made for his humiliation), "although I have neither your lightnefs of
foot, nor the compad and powerful fymmetry of your haunches, I
will undertake to run you for a wager."
Agreed," faid the Hare, contemptuoufly. So a goal was named,
and away they started together. The Tortoife kept jogging along at
his ufual rate, and was foon left behind and out of fight by the Hare,
who, tired of running alone in a given dire&ion, fell to browning on
choice plants, and then went off to a game of play with certain of his
fportive companions, finally making up his form for a fnug nap
among fome tempting long autumn grafs: For," faid he, with
my great natural gift of fwiftnefs, I can fetch up Old Humdrum
Master Tortoife whenever I pleafe."
But he overflept himself, it feems. For when he came to wake, it
was already dark, the weather had changed, and the fields were heavy
with clay; and though he fcudded away as faft as the ground would
let him, he was fain to drop at laft half dead with cold and fatigue in
fight of the winning-poft, which the Tortoife had reached comfortably
before him,-thereby winning the wager.

MORAL.
Genius that may outrun the Conftable, cannot overtake Time loft.


18
















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THE FOX AND THE CROCODILE.


















THE FOX AND THE CROCODILE.



THERE happened to be an argument once between a quiet
cynic of a Fox and a conceited vulgar Crocodile upon the
point of Blood and Extration; the Crocodile boated of his descent
and the renown of his Anceftors.
Our family.," faid he, is of the greatest antiquity. We were
princes in Egypt before the foundation of the Pyramids."
Friend," faid the Fox, fmiling, and pointing with his claw to
certain dabs of mud reffing between the coarfe excrefcences of the
speaker's hide, "there will need no herald to prove your gentility,
for you carry the marks of your origin on your very fkin."



MORAL.
No disgrace can arife from a humble origin but the folly of
denying it.







19











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THE ANT AND THE GRASSHOPPER.

















THE ANT AND THE GRASSHOPPER.



AS a rich purfe-proud Ant was airing himfelf at the foot of an
old oak tree, beneath the roots of which lay his vaft bonded
warehouses of Corn, up came a poor ftarveling Graffhopper to folicit
a grain of barley. The felfifh Ant told him he should have laboured
in Summer if he would not have wanted in Winter.
"But," faid the poor Chirper, c I was not idle: I fung out the
whole feafon. I did my beft to amufe you and your fellow-husband-
men while you were getting in your harveft."
If that is the cafe," returned the Ant with unpardonable callouf-
nefs, C" you may make a merry year of it, and dance in Winter to the
tune you fang in Summer."


MORAL.
As the world difpenfes its payments, it is decreed that the Poet
who fings for his breakfast hall whistle for his dinner.







20
















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41
THE OLF IN SHEES CLOTHING.
















THE WOLF IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING.



THERE is a ftory of a greedy Wolf, who, having decep-
tively wrapped himself in woollen clothing, marked X 25,
in fign of his belonging to the peaceful flock, wa, for a long while,
permitted to prowl about certain homefteads, where, his real nature
not being fufpecled, he caused moft unaccountable decreafes in the
family tore of mutton.
But being in the end discovered by the Shepherd (who was named
Infpe&or), he was, by that watchful guardian of the public
pastures, ignominioufly stripped and flogged, howling, to the
wilderness.
Why whip you the animal ? afked the neighbours. Was he
not faithful ? "
Faithful!" cried the Shepherd, laying on in wrath. "I took
him for an honeft watch-dog, and lo! I find him in Sheep's clothing,
making fheep's eyes at a foolish ewe, whom he would have eaten out
of houfe and home to fatisfy his wolfifh cravings, had fhe not given
him her Mafter's lamb for upperr"


MORAL.
Beware how you invite a man to dinner on the strength of -his
outside recommendations. His inside capabilities may aftonifh you.



21








































i _I i

















T OL AN/ T


THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.


















THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.



ARAGGED-HAIRED, fharp-fanged Wolf, having, through
overgorging himself with honeft men's property, brought
on an uneafy fenfation about his throat, which threatened to be fatal,
applied to a clever Crane of the long-billed species to help him through
his trouble, upon condition of a very considerable reward for the
pra&itioner's pains. The Crane, by fkilfully removing certain perilous
obftruAive matters, brought the Wolf's throat out of danger, and
then claimed the fulfilment of his client's promise.
cc What !" faid the knavifh brute. cc Have I not let you go without
even the mark of my gripe round your own throttle ? Be thankful that I
have not mangled your lean carcafe for you, firipped your head of its
knowing wig, and your back of its gloffy ruftling robe. Expect no
greater recompenfe for having the life of a Wolf."



MORAL.
Abftention from harm is a Rafcal's magnanimity.





22





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