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 Frontispiece
 Content
 Back Cover






Group Title: The Victoria tales and stories
Title: The virtue of patience
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055408/00001
 Material Information
Title: The virtue of patience
Series Title: The Victoria tales and stories
Physical Description: 16 p. : ill. ; 14 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Yonge, Charlotte Mary, 1823-1901 ( Editor )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1870?]
 Subjects
Subject: Patience -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's parties -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: edited by the author of "The heir of Redclyffe.".
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Date from inscription.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055408
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002251080
notis - ALK2842
oclc - 56970078

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Title
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Content
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text










































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THE

VIRTUE OF PATIENCE.










































THE DRAWING-ROOM WINDOW AT THE GRANGE.















THE

VIRTUE OF PATIENCE.



PARTY of children, dressed for
some outdoor expedition, stood
about in the drawing-room win-
dow of Longford Grange. They were wait-
ing, and silence reigned over the group, till a
little boy broke it by exclaiming suddenly,
I say, mamma!"
"Well, Reggie, what do you say?" an-
swered his mother.
"I wish people would always ask us the
1-2








The Virtue of Patience.

very day of the party, as Miss Mostyn does.
She waits for a fine morning, and then asks
us to go that same afternoon; so we never
have to stand at the window, looking at the
clouds, and saying, 'Rain, rain, go away !'"
You've been looking at the sky so in-
tently, Regg, that I thought you must be
studying the clouds."
"No, mother. There are only very little
white ones, but they made me think of that
morning before the Walton school-feast, when
the clouds were so big and black, and wouldn't
go away, though I asked them for ever so
long."
"If you were always asked the day you
were to go out, Reggie, you would lose some
of the pleasures of anticipation. You know
you often tell me you like to have something
to look forward to."






The Virtue of Patience.

"Oh, yes; but if it would only always be
fine after one has looked forward," answered
Reggie.
"A bird in the hand is worth two in the
bush, Regg," remarked Tom, who was trying
to make the spaniel sit steadily on its hind legs.
The children were all bound for the Rec-
tory, where they were to spend the after-
noon. The Rectory was guiltless of children,
old Mr. Mostyn and his two sisters, nearly
as old as himself, being its sole occupants.
Nevertheless, there was no place to which the
small folk from the Grange went with such
glee. The old people at the Rectory had such
a wonderful faculty of making themselves
young for the occasion.
"I know what I wish," exclaimed Freddy,
a red-haired piece of quicksilver, and the
youngest of the group, who had been amusing






The Virtue of Patience.

himself with jumping over every available
bunch of lilies in the carpet. I wish every-
body would ask us just the mimnte we're to
go. I hate waiting, and I wish Flowa would
come;" by which sentence it will be remarked
that Master Freddy's "r's were rather defec-
tive.
I wish Flora would come too," said Nan-
nette, who was vainly endeavouring to read.
"Waiting is good for you, sometimes,"
said Aunt Gertrude, catching hold of Freddy
as he hopped by her. Cela vous donne
occasion d'exercer la vertu de la patience."
"How much ?" asked Tom, whilst Freddy
paused in the midst of his gymnastics, and
looked up at Aunt Gertrude with an admir-
ing glance of wonder.
"It means this much, Tom: 'It gives you
an opportunity for exercising the virtue of







The Virtue of Patience.

patience.' It's a remark I once heard made
by a gentleman at a table d'hdte, and it came
into my mind on hearing you talk as you did
about waiting."
What's a table d'h6te, aunt ? said
Freddy, looking still more bewildered.
"A table d'h6te, Freddy, is a public dinner
provided every day in hotels abroad, and in-
deed in England now, for any one who likes
to go to it, and open to people living in other
parts of the town, as well as to those actually
in the hotel where the dinner is given."
"How nice! said Reggie; "just like a
dinner party every day."
Except that you have to pay for your
dinner," said Aunt Gertrude, "and as there
are from forty to a hundred people in large
hotels, it is considerably larger than most
dinner parties."







The Virtue of Patience.

"And do you know all the people, aust ?"
asked Nannette, old enough to be very shy.
"Oh, no," said Aunt Gertrude, "some-
times no one but your own party."
"Then I shouldn't like it at all."
I was staying for some weeks with your
grandfather at an hotel at Wiesbaden," con-
tinued Aunt Gertrude, "and we used every
day to go to the table d'hote. At first, Nan-
nette, I felt rather shy walking into the large
room full of strangers, but that wore off, and
besides, I soon made acquaintances. English
people are less stiff and ceremonious abroad
than in their own country; and a Frenchman
sitting next you at dinner, though a perfect
stranger, will open a conversation with a bow
and a smile in the easiest manner possible.
It was one day when the tables were very full,
and the waiters in consequence had a great






The Virtue of Patience.

deal to do, that an old French lady and a
young Englishman sat opposite to us. The
old lady was very indignant at not being
properly attended to, as she thought. She
wanted salad, and salad for some time she
couldn't get, and she expressed her displeasure
most audibly. The day was so hot, I could
scarcely eat at all, and had little to do during
the long programme of courses, but to watch
my neighbours and the waiters. The latter,
poor things! were some of them quite pale
with heat, and I didn't wonder at most of
-. them looking so thin, for during the season
they have terribly hard work. The tables for
the guests went round the two sides and the
farther end of the room, and up the middle
of the room ran another table, on which the
dishes were placed when first brought in, for
the purpose of the meat being cut up. Two







The Virtue of Patience.

or three of the principal waiters were the
cutters up, and I used to look with admira-
tion at the masterly way in which they dis-
sected chickens and ducks. The other waiters
stood round till all was in pieces, and then
started off together like stones from a sling,
carrying each a dish of the cut meat into a
different part of the room. Well, as I said,
the old lady was much troubled at getting no
salad."
Wasn't she weather a gweedy old lady ?
asked Freddy.
"Poor old lady! No; I don't think so.
Such a day as that, if you were to eat, salad
was about the most refreshing thing you
would indulge in, and, besides, French people
never think a dinner complete without some-
thing of the kind. But she certainly was
like you, Freddy, in one way-she didn't like







The Virtue of Patience.

waiting. So presently, after she had again
proclaimed to the world in general, how im-
possible it was to get what she wanted, the
young Englishman turned to her and said
with a smile, and with a most perfect French
accent, Cela vous donne occasion d'exercer
la vertu de la patience, madame.' The old
lady was so struck with the sentiment, or so
pleased with the attention (I remember the
Englishman was remarkably gentlemanly and
pleasing-looking), that her protestations be-
came much less energetic."
Did she get her salad after all?" asked
Nannette.
"Yes; one of the head waiters happened to
pass, and the young man called to him and
begged that the old lady's wants might be
attended to. The waiter turned in an instant,
making that curious sound between teeth and







The Virtue of Patience.

lips by which foreigners call attention to those
at a distance. It takes the place of the Eng-
lish 'hoy! but is so much more gentle that
it can be used with impunity indoors. I can
hardly give it you, but it's more like pst! than
anything. It was heard immediately by one
of the subordinates, and the coveted salad was
soon placed on the lady's plate. I think the
Englishman was right, Freddy, and I think
when we are obliged to wait for anything, we
should try and remember that it's a good
opportunity for exercising our patience."
"But I don't like patience."
"You haven't got any, you mean, little
man; but you should try and get some, and
when you have a little, the best way to in-
crease it is to use it whenever the opportunity
offers."
Patience is a very good friend, Freddy, if







The Firtue of Patience.

you treat her well," said his mother, but if
you don't make friends with her, you'll be
sorry for it, and feel the want of her some
day."
"How shall I make fwiends with her,
mamma ?"
"Well,just now try and sit down quietly
on the carpet till Flora comes, and perhaps
Patience will pay you a visit, and help you to
be still."
Freddy popped himself down in the middle
of his favourite bunch of lilies, folded his
hands, and looked towards the door, half
expecting Patience to walk in.
If Patience did make her appearance, it was
in the shape of his eldest sister Flora, and with
a little yell of delight, Freddy had jumped
from the floor, capered round the room,
kissing his mother and aunt, and was out of







The Firtue of Patience.

the door before Reggie had hoisted himself
down from his chair in the window.
Freddy's a great pet of mine," said Aunt
Gertrude, as she and Mrs. Merton stood
watching the- children chasing each other
through the avenue. "He's such a quaint
little fellow, with such high spirits, and such
a tender little heart of his own."
Yes," said his mother, well pleased, and
he's so much pluck. His uncles always call
him a 'broth of a boy.' His curly red hair
seems to suit his eager little face."
And then the children, turning the bend in
the road, were lost to sight.
The afternoon at the Rectory was as suc-
cessful as afternoons there always were. Even
more so, the children said, when they came
home. Mr. and Miss Mostyn and Miss Ada
were kinder than usual, the boating more







The Virtue of Patience.

delightful, the strawberries sweeter. It was
well they enjoyed it so much, for it was their
last visit. Old Mr. Mostyn fell ill soon after,
lingered for months, and died the following
summer. All the children begged to go to
his funeral, and saw him laid in the church-
yard, near the priests' door, through which he
had passed for so many years.
They all cried bitterly as they were allowed
to peep into the grave, and see the coffin with
the sprinkling of earth upon it, realizing then
more fully that he had gone away, and that
in this life they could hope to see his face no
more.
So that last visit to the Rectory the chil-
dren long remembered, and to Freddy's mind
the recollection came always mingled with a
thought of the conversation on waiting and
patience. He used to say that, though Mr.







The Virtue of Patience.

Mostyn never kept him waiting, with him
seemed associated all his first ideas of patience.
He had much need of it in after life, as is
often the case with those bright mercurial
natures, and Aunt Gertrude's French phrase
was constantly on his lips. "Monsieur," or
" Madame," as the case might be, Cela vous
donne occasion d'exercer la vertu de la pa-
tience." It was the only French sentence he
could bring himself to remember, and his
aunt used to laugh, and tell him that the
process of time had injured the accent, but
had left the sentiment unimpaired.



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