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Group Title: The Victoria tales and stories
Title: Toto
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055402/00001
 Material Information
Title: Toto
Series Title: The Victoria tales and stories
Physical Description: 16 p. : ill. ; 14 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Valentine, L ( Laura ), d. 1899 ( Editor )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Butterworth and Heath ( Engraver )
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1870?]
 Subjects
Subject: Generosity -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Loneliness -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children and animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Goats -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Only child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: edited by Mrs. Valentine.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Date from inscription.
General Note: Illustration engraved by Butterworth & Heath.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055402
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002251085
notis - ALK2847
oclc - 56970098

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Title
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Content
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text




































The Baldwin Library
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JENNY AND TOTO.




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TOTO.




SENNY was a little girl who lived in a cot-
tage among the Welsh hills. Her father
worked at the iron works in the valley below,
and her mother went to help at a farm close by,
milked the cows, and made cheeses and butter.
Jenny was very much alone. There was no
school near, and no church for a long way, and
only a cottage here and there among the hills.
The nearest was half a mile off, and in it lived
1--






Toto.

two little children, called Peg and Dick, who
used to play sometimes with Jenny; but very
often she was alone all day, till her mother came
home in the evening.
On a fine day she would take the bread and
cheese her mother had left for her dinner, and
climb up to the top of the hill, and eat it there.
Then she would scramble down on the other
side to a very wild part, where a little stream
bubbled out of the side of the hill, and dip her
tin cup into the fresh clear water for a drink.
There were ferns and pretty blue harebells grow-
ing on the edge of the brook, and Jenny liked
to pick these, and stick them in her hat. Many
an hour she spent wandering by the stream,
picking flowers or paddling about in it.
One fine afternoon Jenny had taken her dinner
to the top of the hill, as usual, and was eating it
there, when she thought she heard a little faint
cry somewhere near. She started up, and looked
all round, but she could not see any creature







Toto.

except the larks singing high above her head,
and the bees buzzing in and out among the wild
heath. Again she heard the little cry. It was
as if some tiny child were calling, Ma! ma!"
and it seemed to come from the stream on the
other side of the hill.
Jenny ran down that way, with her bread and
cheese still in her hand. She did not stop till
she got to the brook, and there she saw-what
do you think? A little white kid standing in
the water and crying, "Ma ma !"
"Oh, you poor little thing!" cried Jenny;
" you dear little thing "
Very quickly she slipped off her shoes and
socks, and paddled into the stream. The kid
tried to run away from her, but the water was
too deep for it to go farther in; and so Jenny
caught it in her arms, and carried it to the bank,
where she sat down and kissed and hugged the
poor little trembling thing.
You shall be my kid, my own little darling!"







Toto.

she said; and afraid lest her treasure should slip
out of her arms and get away, she wrapped it in
her pinafore, and ran home with it as fast as she
could.
When Jenny got into the cottage, she shut the
door quickly to keep the little kid from running
out. Then she set it down on the floor, to see
what it would do.
The poor little thing stood trembling and
frightened, looking round this side and that, as
if it would hide itself. Jenny went to the cup-
board, where she knew there was a mug half full
of milk for her tea, and she poured some of it
into a saucer, and put it down before the kid.
The little creature would not take it at first, but
by-and-bye it put its nose down and began to
smell at the saucer. Then it began to lap up
the milk, lifting its little head and looking round
in fear every minute. At last it seemed to be
less frightened, and after drinking the milk, trotted
about, and came up to Jenny, who stroked and






Toto.

petted it, and called it her little darling. She
stayed in the cottage with the kid all the rest of
the day, till her mother came home.
"Why, Jenny, what have you got here ?"
asked her mother, when she opened the door.
"Oh, mother, please shut, the door quick!
don't let it run out! It's mine; my dear little
kiddy!"
"What a nice little thing Who gave it you ?"
asked the mother.
I found it," said Jenny, in the brook on the
other side of the hill. Poor little thing, it was
all wet, and I dried it and brought it home in
my apron, and gave it some milk, and it's been
so happy "
It must have strayed from somewhere," said
the mother. "Look, it has got a little collar
round its neck!"
"Oh, mother," said Jenny, "let me keep it!
I do love it so !"
"What's this written on the collar?" asked






Toto.

the mother. "See, here's a name. We must
take it back, if we know who it belongs to."
Jenny knelt down by the kid, and put her
arms round it, to keep it from getting away.
She pushed aside the kid's long hair, and spelt
on the band round its neck the letters T, o, T, o.
"Toto What does that mean?" said Jenny.
"Toto! Who is Toto?"
More than I can tell," said the mother. I
never heard of any one called Toto."
"It must be the kiddy's name !" cried Jenny,
joyfully. "Yes, that's it! and I shall keep you,
my little Toto! I'm so glad!" And she took
the kid up in her arms, and hugged it.
After that day, Jenny and Toto were always
to be seen with each other. Jenny would not
go anywhere without her Toto. She had a long
string, one end of which she tied to Toto's collar,
and the other end round her own waist. She
would never let Toto go loose, for fear he should
run away. And when her father asked her what






Toto.

he should bring her home for a Christmas-box,
she said-what do you think?
"A big ball of string, dear daddy, that Toto
may be able to have a very long run when we go
out!"
Was not that a funny thing to have for a
Christmas-box ?
But Jenny had it, all the same; and Toto
seemed to like the fun very much. When they
went out, he ran away, and away, and away; and
Jenny held the ball in her hand, and let the
string out farther and farther, till she could not
even see Toto among the ups and downs of the
moor. You see, the moor was a lovely place for
Toto to run in, for there were no trees there; it
was all little ups and downs, covered with short
grass, and fern, and heath, so Jenny felt that
Toto was quite safe. Many a play they had out
there on the fine bright days; and Toto grew so
fond of Jenny, that I don't think he would have
run away from her for anything. He used to






Toto.

jump up and put his paws on her frock, and lick
her hand, and rub his little head against her;
and often she would take Toto up and carry him
in her arms, and he would put his face by hers,
and sometimes, when she did not expect it, lick
her cheeks. That was Toto's kiss, you see.
Often Jenny took Toto to see Peg and Dick,
and they all played together very happily. Peg
and Dick wished they could find a Toto too, and
they sometimes went to the brook on the hill-side,
and looked about to see if they could; but they
never did.
Now I come to a very sad part of my story.
One day Jenny and Toto were out playing on
the moor, Jenny with her ball letting Toto go
out as far as he would, and then winding him
up again" as she called it; when on the road
which crossed the moor there came the sound
of horses' feet trotting along. It was not often
that any one passed that way, and Jenny stopped
her play, and ran up to the top of a mound to
look.






Toto.

A gentleman was riding by on a big horse, and
at his side there was a little girl on a very small
white pony. She was frisking along gaily, with
a tiny whip in her hand, and Jenny wondered
how she could sit so steady on the pony's back
without falling off.
Her merry laugh sounded over the moor, and
her fair hair shone and waved in the sunlight,
and her rosy face was as bright as the day; and
the cock-feathers in her tiny black hat nodded
to and fro as she trotted along; and Jenny
thought to herself, "What a dear little lady "
But what did Jenny think when the dear little
lady all at once stopped her ponyr and called
out,
"Papa! papa! I see my Toto, I do!"
She pointed with her whip to the little white
kid, which stood by Jenny's side on the mound.
Poor Jenny I cannot tell you how she felt.
The little girl rode up with her papa to where
Jenny stood with Toto.






Toto.

"Yes, it is my Toto I see by the collar on
his neck. Oh, I am so glad! Toto, don't you
know me?" cried the little Lady May, for that
was her name.
"Where did you find the kid, my child?"
asked the gentleman of Jenny.
"In the brook, sir, on the hill-side," said
Jenny.
"How long ago?"
Near three months agone, sir," said Jenny.
"Is he fond of you?" asked the Lady May.
"Yes, lady," said Jenny.
Her heart was full, and she was hardly able
to speak, for fear of crying; for she knew that
Toto was going to be taken from her at last;
and what should she do without Toto ?
"You're a good little girl," said the gentle-
man. "I see you have taken care of the kid.
If you will bring it this afternoon to Llan Court,
where we live, you shall have something-some
money. Do you know where Llan Court is?"






Toto.

"Yes, sir," said Jenny.
She did not say, "Thank you." She did not
want money, or anything else, if Toto was to be
taken from her: what was money to her without
Toto? She would rather have Toto than any
money.
"Come, May," said the gentleman; and away
rode Lady May and her papa over the mooi
full gallop. Jenny sat down on the mound
when they were gone, and took Toto in her lap,
and burst into tears.
It was the first sorrow Jenny had ever had;
and it was so very hard to part with her dear
Toto; but it must be done. Jenny felt that
Toto was not hers ; and her tears fell faster and
faster over his white silky coat as he put up his
head and licked Jenny's face.
Lady May and her papa had ridden to the
end of the moor, and were coming back again
on their way home. When they were still some
way from where Jenny sat, Lady May said,






Toto.

"Papa, the little girl is sitting there now. I
don't see Toto. Ah, yes, she has got him in her
lap. She is kissing him. Papa, I do believe
she is-yes, I am sure she is crying. Do come
and see!"
They rode to the mound, where Jenny still
sat with her face down over Toto. She did not
care to look up this time when she heard the
sound of the horses' feet. She was startled by
hearing some one say, close to her,
"What are you crying for, little girl?"
It was Lady May. Jenny made no answer.
"Are you crying because you don't want to
give up Toto ?" asked Lady May.
Jenny nodded. Lady May said,
"Yes, I can understand that. I cried a great
deal when I lost him. I am so happy now that
you have found him. Don't cry, little girl.
What is your name?"
"Jenny," she answered.
"Well, Jenny, when you bring Toto up to






Toto.

Llan Court, papa will give you some money,
and I will give you one of my toys, a doll, per-
haps: I have heaps of dolls. Would you like a
doll?"
"A doll can't love me," said Jenny, sadly.
No, but then--I can't give you Toto, you
know; he is mine," said Lady May.
"I know, lady," said Jenny. "I am going to
bring him to you, now directly."
"That's right," said Lady May. "We shall
be home before you. Papa, I'm ready."
Her papa was waiting by, but he did not
speak, and they rode away slowly.
"Why don't you talk, papa?" asked Lady
May, when they had gone some way without
speaking.
"I was thinking of that little girl," said Lady
May's papa.
"Were you? And what were you thinking
about her ?" asked May.
"I was thinking that perhaps she had only






Toto.

that one thing to love and play with, while some
little girls have everything they can wish for."
"Do you mean me, papa?" asked May.
"Yes, my love."
Lady May was very silent all the way home
after that.
When Jenny brought Toto to Llan Court,
about an hour afterwards, she was told that Lady
May wished to see her herself. She stood waiting
sadly in the hall, with Toto in her arms, when
Lady May came in.
"Poor Jenny, you love Toto, don't you ?" she
said. I am going to give him to you for your
own. Yes, you may keep him, Jenny. I know
you will be kind to him. Good-bye, Toto."
I leave you to think how happy Jenny was, as
she went home from Llan Court with her Toto.
And Lady May was quite as happy, for she had
known the happiness of giving up.




~~e\"iz-







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