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Group Title: The Victoria tales and stories
Title: Joe and Ned
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055400/00001
 Material Information
Title: Joe and Ned
Series Title: The Victoria tales and stories
Physical Description: 16 p. : ill. ; 14 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Valentine, L ( Laura ), d. 1899 ( Editor )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: c1870
 Subjects
Subject: Attitude change -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Discipline of children -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Temper tantrums -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Teasing -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: edited by Mrs. Valentine.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Date from inscription.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055400
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002251086
notis - ALK2848
oclc - 56970103

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Title
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Content
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text




























The Baldwin Library
Univeity
mB Plofda














JOE AND NED.




























4



Si'

SLY NE D,





SULKY NED.













JOE AND NED.




NCE upon a time there were two little
boys; their names were Joe and Ned.
They lived with their mother in a cottage on the
moor.
Joe was a boy who tried to be good, and did
what he was bid: he was true and kind. But
Ned was a bad boy: he did not mind what was
said to him, and he did not speak the truth; and
often he was very cross to Joe. Which boy do
you like best?
One day their mother said to Joe and Ned,
"It is time for you to go to school. You are
too big to play all day. You must go and learn
your A B C."
1-2







Joe and Ned.

"I don't want to go to school," said Ned; and
he began to cry and roar like a bull, "I don't
want to go to school!"
You must go," said his mother. Now be a
good boy, and get your cap, and come with me."
"I don't want to go to school," cried Ned,
again. "I can't! I shan't!"
"Come, Ned," said Joe, "I like it. Here's
your cap. Come on!"
But Ned gave Joe a thump, and hit the cap
out of his hand. Then Ned's mother said,
I shall whip you, see if I don't! Where's
the rod ?"
While she was looking about for the rod, Ned
ran slyly out of the cottage, and went and hid
himself in a heap of straw by the pig-sty. He
crept quite in, so that he could not be seen. He
said to himself, "What fun! now I shall stay
here warm and snug, while Joe goes to school,
and learns that horrid A B C!"
By-and-bye lie heard his mother calling him.







Joe and Ned.

"Ned! Ned! where are you? come to me
this minute, sir !"
"Ned Ned cried Joe. Do come !
Mother won't whip you, if you'll be good, and
come along to school."
But no Ned could be found; so at last Joe
had to go to school without him.
He liked going to school, and he was very
happy there. There were a great many little
boys, some bigger, some smaller than he was.
And they had a very kind teacher, who drew
their A B C on a big black board, and taught
them a pretty little song, and made them clap
their hands, and march. Joe thought it was
good fun, and he wished Ned was there, so much.
I am sure Ned was not half so happy in the straw.
There he stayed, for he was afraid to come
out. He was afraid his mother would see him,
and he knew he should be whipped now. So he
stayed in the straw, and after some time he began
to think it was very dull there, and to wish that







Joe and Ned.

he had gone with Joe. It was not much fun to
be stuffed up in a heap of straw, all the bright
fine morning. He could hear the old sow grunt,
grunt, in the sty, and the little pigs squeaking
and pattering about, and the ducks quacking and
splashing in the pond close by.
At last he got so tired that he thought he must
creep out. So he began to push away the straw
and put his head out. He meant to run away
and play on the moor till Joe came home. But
just as he was going to slip down, his mother
came out of the cottage with a bucket in her
hand. She was coming to feed the pigs.
Oh, how quickly Ned hid himself in the straw
again! He was all in a tremble, for fear his
mother should have seen a bit of him. He
heard her pour out the pigs' food into their trough,
and then she shut the gate of the sty, and said
to herself, out loud, Wherever is that naughty
boy? he shall catch it, he shall!" Then Ned
made up his mind to stay where he was. And







Joe and Ned.

at last he shut his eyes and went to sleep, for it
was so stupid in the straw.
He slept for a long time, and was awoke by
hearing a man's voice speaking very loud, close
by. It was his father.
"We must give the old sow some fresh straw,"
he heard his father say. "Where's the iron
fork ?"
"Here it is!" said Ned's mother; and she
opened the door of the sty.
Oh, what a fright Ned was in now In went
the fork into the straw. There was a loud scream,
and Ned jumped up, and rolled out of the straw-
heap on to the ground. The fork had stuck into
his leg.
"It hurts, oh, it hurts me so !" he cried.
But his father said,
It serves you quite right, you bad boy !"
His mother took him up, and carried him into
the cottage. His leg bled, and she tied it up,
and put him to bed. So there was no more fun







Joe and Ned.

for him that day, nor for some days after; for he
had to sit still in a chair for a whole week, until
his leg was well. He often wished he had gone
to school with Joe that morning.
Joe told him all about his school, and said that
A B C was not at all a horrid thing. He could
tell about D E F, and many more letters, and
how he marched, and sang, and clapped; and
what nice games of play the boys had in their
playground; till one day Ned got quite cross,
and said he would not hear any more about it,
and he gave Joe a slap, and pushed him away.
Joe began to cry.
What's the matter? said his mother, coming
in;
"Joe's teasing me," said Ned.
"Oh, Joe, for shame! It's not kind of you,
when Ned's bad," said his mother, and then she
went into the back kitchen.
Joe felt very hurt; he knew it was not true.
He had been trying to amuse Ned by telling him







Joe and Ned.

about the school. But he was too kind to tell
of Ned; so he went out of the cottage, and
went to look at the little pigs and the ducks.
By-and-bye he heard Ned roaring very loud
indeed. He ran in to see what was the matter.
He thought Ned must be hurt. But, no; he
was sitting in the chair by the fire, as before.
"What is it ? said his mother, running in too.
"Joe's so unkind !" cried Ned. "He leaves
me here all alone !"
"You naughty boy, Joe stay with Ned, and
don't be so unkind," said his mother.
Poor Joe! Still he would not tell of Ned.
Ned kept on vexing Joe until he went to bed.
He was in a very cross mood, because he could
not go to school. He wanted to go now when
he could not.
At the end of a week Ned's foot was well, and
very glad he was to go to school on Monday
morning with Joe. But he was not as happy at
school as Joe had been. Can you tell why?







Joe and Ned.

Because Ned liked to have his own way. He
wanted to clap hands when he was told to learn
his A B C, and he wanted to sing when he was
told to count. He always wanted to do just the
thing that he was not to do. He spoilt the
boys' fun when they were at play, and teased
them and played them tricks in school. Once
when he was marching round the room with the
others, he slyly pulled the hair of the boy in front
of him, and made him cry out. Then the teacher
took Ned, and made him stand up on a form all
by himself. Ned did not like this at all, and he
was very cross when he went home, and he said
to Joe,
"School is a horrid place !"
I don't think so," said Joe. If you would
be good, you would find it very nice."
"I don't mean to be good," said Ned. It's
too much trouble."
"It's more trouble to be naughty," said Joe.
Don't you tell me," said Ned. "I know best."







Joe and Ned.

The next day, when the little boys were called
up to learn their letters, the teacher made a Q on
the board with a bit of chalk, and she asked the
children what it was. Some of them knew, and
said,
Q."
"It's a pussy cat with a curly tail," said Ned.
The children all burst out laughing.
"Steady !" said the teacher. "Ned, behave
yourself, and tell me what it is."
"An apple with a crooked stalk," cried Ned.
Again all the children laughed.
"Hush! hush !" said the teacher. "This is
not the time for play. Tell me the name of that
letter Ned, directly."
"A," said Ned.
"No; you know it is not," said the teacher.
"B," said Ned.
"No. You are naughty," said the teacher.
"You know it is not B."
C," said Ned.







Joe and Ned.

"That is not right," said the teacher. Go
down to the end of the class, naughty boy."
Ned went slowly down behind the row of chil-
dren, and as he did so, he pricked each of them
with a pin which he had found on the floor.
They all began to squeak and cry, while Ned
stood at the end looking as quiet as if he had
done nothing.
"What is all this?" asked the teacher.
"He pricked me, teacher Teacher, he stuck
me! Teacher, he run a pin into me!" they
began to cry.
Oh, Ned, Ned, this is very naughty," said
the teacher. "Go away, quite away into that
corer, and stay there until the lesson is over."
Ned went into the corner, and amused himself
with pricking holes with the pin all over a picture
which hung there. When the lesson was done,
the children went out into the playground for
half an hour. The teacher came up to Ned,
and said to him,






Joe and Ned.

"Now come here and say Q' to me."
"I can't," said Ned, sulkily.
Can't Why not ? asked the teacher.
"I can't say it," said Ned.
"What can't you say?" asked the teacher.
"Q," said Ned.
"There, you have said it, so now you see you
can," said the teacher.
"I can never say it again," said Ned.
"Ned, how can you be so naughty ?" said his
teacher. Do try to be a good boy, now. Ask
the Good Spirit to help you. You would be so
much happier, and we should all love you."
But Ned only pouted, and looked sulky. He
had made up his mind that he would not be
good. He was letting the wicked spirit do what
it liked with him. He would not listen to the
Good Spirit, which said in his heart, It is better
to be good: try to be good, Ned."
The next day when he went to school, he
would not say Q again, nor any of his letters,






Joe and Ned.

and he was so naughty that after school the
teacher went to the cottage to speak to his
father.
When he saw his teacher coming, he was in a
fright. He knew his father would give him a
good beating. He would have run to hide in
the straw again, but he could not forget what had
happened to him before. He said to Joe,
"Oh, Joe, Joe, what shall I do?"
Joe could not tell. He was nearly as unhappy
as Ned was. By-and-bye Ned's father came out.
"Where is that boy?" he cried, in a voice of
great anger. He had a cane in his hand. Ned
was crouching down behind a bush in the garden.
"Go and beg for me, Joe," he said. "Tell
him I will be good !"
He was quite white with fear. Joe ran to his
father, and took hold of his hand.
"Father !" he said. "Don't beat Ned, please !
Oh, please, not this once He will be good, he
will, indeed!" Joe was nearly crying. And yet







Joe and Ned.

he was begging for Ned, who had been so unkind
to him.
What does it matter to you ? said his father,
roughly.
Oh, I do care; I don't want Ned to be beat!
I love him !" said Joe. "He will be good, he
will, indeed !"
Ned heard all this behind the bush. He
thought he never would be unkind to Joe again,
as long as he lived.
Has Joe been a good boy at school ? asked
the father.
"Yes," said the teacher, who was standing by
the cottage door. "He never gives me any
trouble."
"Then I'11 forgive Ned this once, for Joe's
sake, as he's begged so hard," said his father.
"Come out, Ned, wherever you are." Ned came
from behind the bush; he was crying.
Only this once, and for Joe's sake," said his
father. "Because he has been a good boy, and







Joe and Ned.

because he loved you so much as to beg for you.
But next time, remember, there will be no chance
for you !"
There shan't be any 'next time,'" said Ned,
through his tears.
And Ned kept his word. After that day he
was a better boy. I don't mean to say that he
grew good all at once: nobody does that. But
he did what he had never done before: he tried
to be a good boy. And whenever he was just
going to let the evil spirit have his way, and to
let naughty tempers come, he thought of Joe's
kindness, and said to himself,
I will be good, I will! 0 Good Spirit, help
me !"
"Still that Spirit stronger growth
In the hearts that hold it fast:
He will help us, teach us, crown us
More than conquerors at the last."




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