• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Table of Contents
 Contributors and authors and composers...
 List of Illustrations
 Introduction
 Part I
 Part II
 Part III
 Part IV
 Part V
 Part VI
 Part VII
 Index
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Home book for very little people, their brothers and sisters, their mothers and teachers
Title: The home book for very little people, their brothers and sisters, their mothers and teachers
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055390/00001
 Material Information
Title: The home book for very little people, their brothers and sisters, their mothers and teachers
Physical Description: viii, 720 p. : ill. (some col.), port., col. maps, music ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Vincent, John Heyl, 1832-1920 ( compiler )
Phillips & Hunt ( Publisher )
Publisher: Phillips & Hunt
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1887
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Bible stories, English -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Physical sciences -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Outdoor recreation -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Proverbs -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1887   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1887   ( lcsh )
Puzzles -- 1887   ( rbgenr )
Readers -- 1887   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1887
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Puzzles   ( rbgenr )
Readers   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: compiled and edited by J.H. Vincent.
General Note: Pages 137-144 left blank for records.
General Note: Includes index.
General Note: Music, "Lullaby songs," p. 113-118; "Old home songs," p. 145-168; "Whisper songs" hymns, p. 509-512.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055390
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225097
notis - ALG5369
oclc - 37185846

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title
    Dedication
        Dedication
    Table of Contents
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
    Contributors and authors and composers quoted
        Page vi
    List of Illustrations
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Introduction
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Part I
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Baby's letter-pages
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11-12
        Baby's observation lessons
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
        Baby's picture pages
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
        The return of the dove (poetry)
            Page 41
        Bees in the clover (poetry)
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
        Out all night (poetry)
            Page 45
        The shoe family (poetry)
            Page 46
            Page 47
        In blossom time (poetry)
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
        Bubbles (poetry)
            Page 51
    Part II
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Pictures and words
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
        Words and sentences
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
        Baby's word page
            Page 72
        A day on the farm
            Page 73
            Page 74
        Pictures of nouns
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
        Nouns, singular and plural
            Page 81
        Nouns with adjectives
            Page 82
        Nouns and verbs
            Page 83
        Nouns, verbs, and prepositions
            Page 84
        Baby's reading lessons
            Page 85
        A lesson in counting
            Page 86
        Put them together
            Page 87
        Pick them out
            Page 88
        First lesson in geometry
            Page 89
        John Peterson's menagerie
            Page 90
            Page 91
    Part III
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Jingles
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
        Out of doors (poetry)
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
        Under the mistletoe (poetry)
            Page 103
        Waiting for Santa-Claus (poetry)
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
        Rhymes from Mother Goose
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
        Lullaby songs (words and music)
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
        How our forefathers learned their lessons
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
        Words in various languages of similar meaning
            Page 125
        "The hearth-stone"
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
        Family history
            Page 137
        Family record
            Page 138
        Family holidays
            Page 139
            Page 140
        Our little friends
            Page 141
            Page 142
        Autographs, blanks for
            Page 143
            Page 144
        Old home songs (words and music)
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
            Page 162
            Page 163
            Page 164
            Page 165
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
    Part IV
        Page 169
        A chapter on the kindergarten
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
            Page 175
            Page 176
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
            Page 184
            Page 185
        Little housemaids
            Page 186
            Page 187
            Page 188
            Page 189
            Page 190
            Page 191
            Page 192
            Page 193
        A , B, C, cooking school (poetry)
            Page 194
            Page 195
            Page 196
            Page 197
            Page 198
        Rules for making candy
            Page 199
            Page 200
            Page 201
        Clay modeling at home
            Page 202
            Page 203
            Page 204
            Page 205
            Page 206
        First lessons in free-hand drawing
            Page 207
            Page 208
            Page 209
        Easy steps in chemistry
            Page 210
            Page 211
            Page 212
            Page 213
            Page 214
            Page 215
            Page 216
            Page 217
            Page 218
        Railways
            Page 219
            Page 220
            Page 221
            Page 222
            Page 223
            Page 224
        Good manners
            Page 225
            Page 226
            Page 227
            Page 228
            Page 229
        Rules in rhyme
            Page 230
        Famous in history
            Page 231
            Page 232
            Page 233
            Page 234
            Page 235
        Presidents of the United States
            Page 236
            Page 237
            Page 238
            Page 239
        Lines, surfaces, and solids
            Page 240
            Page 241
        A lesson in geography
            Page 242
        Famous mountains
            Page 243
        Large lakes and long rivers
            Page 244
        Names of places
            Page 245
            Page 246
            Page 247
        Outlines of general history
            Page 248
            Page 249
            Page 250
            Page 251
            Page 252
            Page 253
            Page 254
            Page 255
            Page 256
        Proverbs of all nations
            Page 257
            Page 258
            Page 259
            Page 260
            Page 261
            Page 262
            Page 263
            Page 264
            Page 265
            Page 266
            Page 267
            Page 268
    Part V
        Page 269
        Shadow games
            Page 270
            Page 271
            Page 272
            Page 273
        Noah's ark
            Page 274
            Page 275
            Page 276
        Toy games
            Page 277
            Page 278
            Page 279
            Page 280
            Page 281
            Page 282
            Page 283
            Page 284
            Page 285
            Page 286
            Page 287
            Page 288
            Page 289
            Page 290
        Paper toys
            Page 291
            Page 292
            Page 293
            Page 294
            Page 295
            Page 296
            Page 297
            Page 298
            Page 299
        Slate games
            Page 300
            Page 301
        Puzzles
            Page 302
            Page 303
            Page 304
            Page 305
            Page 306
            Page 307
        Answers to puzzles
            Page 308
            Page 309
            Page 310
            Page 311
            Page 312
            Page 313
            Page 314
        The horseshoe magnet
            Page 315
        All sorts of puzzles
            Page 316
            Page 317
            Page 318
            Page 319
            Page 320
            Page 321
            Page 322
            Page 323
            Page 324
            Page 325
            Page 326
            Page 327
            Page 328
            Page 329
            Page 330
            Page 331
            Page 332
            Page 333
            Page 334
            Page 335
            Page 336
            Page 337
            Page 338
            Page 339
            Page 340
            Page 341
            Page 342
            Page 343
            Page 344
            Page 345
        Puzzle pictures
            Page 346
            Page 347
            Page 348
            Page 349
            Page 350
            Page 351
            Page 352
            Page 353
        Key to puzzle pictures
            Page 354
        Indoor and outdoor recreation
            Page 355
            Page 356
            Page 357
            Page 358
            Page 359
            Page 360
            Page 361
            Page 362
            Page 363
            Page 364
            Page 365
            Page 366
            Page 367
            Page 368
            Page 369
            Page 370
            Page 371
            Page 372
            Page 373
            Page 374
            Page 375
            Page 376
            Page 377
            Page 378
            Page 379
            Page 380
            Page 381
            Page 382
            Page 383
            Page 384
            Page 385
            Page 386
            Page 387
            Page 388
            Page 389
            Page 390
            Page 391
            Page 392
            Page 393
            Page 394
            Page 395
            Page 396
            Page 397
            Page 398
    Part VI
        Page 399
        Picture Bible lessons
            Page 400
            Page 401
            Page 402
            Page 403
            Page 404
            Page 405
            Page 406
            Page 407
            Page 408
            Page 409
            Page 410
            Page 411
            Page 412
        Creation
            Page 413
        The first murder
            Page 414
        Israelites in Egypt
            Page 415
        From Egypt to Canaan
            Page 416
        Who shall be king?
            Page 417
        Four centuries before Chirst
            Page 418
        The star in the East
            Page 419
        Christ crucified, risen, ascended
            Page 420
        Serving the Lord
            Page 421
        The new Jerusalem
            Page 422
        Bible stories
            Page 423
            Page 424
            Page 425
            Page 426
            Page 427
            Page 428
            Page 429
            Page 430
            Page 431
            Page 432
            Page 433
            Page 434
            Page 435
            Page 436
            Page 437
            Page 438
            Page 439
            Page 440
            Page 441
            Page 442
            Page 443
            Page 444
            Page 445
            Page 446
            Page 447
        The blessed one
            Page 448
            Page 449
            Page 450
            Page 451
            Page 452
        Bible studies
            Page 453
            Page 454
            Page 455
            Page 456
            Page 457
            Page 458
            Page 459
            Page 460
            Page 461
            Page 462
            Page 463
            Page 464
            Page 465
            Page 466
        The key to Bible studies
            Page 467
        Bible geography
            Page 468
            Page 469
            Page 470
            Page 471
            Page 472
            Page 473
            Page 474
            Page 475
            Page 476
            Page 477
            Page 478
            Page 479
            Page 480
            Page 481
            Page 482
            Page 483
        The Elmwood Palestine class
            Page 484
            Page 485
            Page 486
            Page 487
            Page 488
            Page 489
            Page 490
            Page 491
            Page 492
            Page 493
            Page 494
            Page 495
            Page 496
            Page 497
            Page 498
        Books and a book
            Page 499
            Page 500
            Page 501
        Books of the Bible
            Page 502
        Books of the Old Testament
            Page 503
        Books of the New Testament
            Page 504
        Tiny texts for daily use
            Page 505
            Page 506
            Page 507
            Page 508
        Whisper songs (words and music)
            Page 509
            Page 510
            Page 511
            Page 512
        Who taught the birds?
            Page 513
        The Lord's prayer in various languages
            Page 514
            Page 515
            Page 516
        The time (on temperance)
            Page 517
            Page 518
            Page 519
            Page 520
            Page 521
            Page 522
            Page 523
            Page 524
            Page 525
            Page 526
            Page 527
            Page 528
            Page 529
        Where the cross-roads meet
            Page 530
            Page 531
        A garland of stories
            Page 532
            Page 533
            Page 534
            Page 535
            Page 536
            Page 537
            Page 538
            Page 539
            Page 540
            Page 541
            Page 542
            Page 543
            Page 544
            Page 545
            Page 546
            Page 547
            Page 548
            Page 549
            Page 550
            Page 551
            Page 552
            Page 553
            Page 554
            Page 555
            Page 556
            Page 557
            Page 558
            Page 559
            Page 560
            Page 561
            Page 562
            Page 563
            Page 564
            Page 565
            Page 566
            Page 567
            Page 568
            Page 569
            Page 570
            Page 571
            Page 572
            Page 573
            Page 574
            Page 575
            Page 576
            Page 577
            Page 578
            Page 579
            Page 580
            Page 581
        Choice hymns
            Page 582
            Page 583
            Page 584
            Page 585
            Page 586
            Page 587
            Page 588
            Page 589
            Page 590
            Page 591
            Page 592
    Part VII
        Page 593
        Stories of mythology
            Page 594
            Page 595
            Page 596
            Page 597
            Page 598
            Page 599
            Page 600
            Page 601
            Page 602
            Page 603
            Page 604
            Page 605
            Page 606
            Page 607
            Page 608
            Page 609
            Page 610
            Page 611
            Page 612
            Page 613
            Page 614
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        Wonder stories
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        Finale: A household idyl of memory
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        Colsing words
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    Index
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    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text






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. -., TRUMAN S. LEWIS =_I
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THE





,Home Book(



FOR


VERY LITTLE PEOPLE, THEIR BROTHERS AND SISTERS,

THEIR MOTHERS AND TEACHERS.


COMPILED AND EDITED
BY J. H. VINCENT, D.D., LL.D.,
Chancellor of Chautauqua University.






NEW YORK:
=. =-EIT-i J I_ I- S cd I-TIr_1TTl\
1887.





















/) A -/ \I
T I

, ,, 1
Ct, .L I', I'
. ___- -_ -__ _. -







THnE MIOTIHERS OF OUr- LAND,


SOVEREIGNS OF ITS HEARTS AND HOMES, .



\' A- :\.

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Copyright, 1887, by PHILLIPS & HUNT, New York.











THE HOME BOOK. i






CONTENTS.



PAGE PAGE
INTRODUCTION ................................... .3-6 Out of Doors (Poetry)........................... 99, 100
The Air, 99; The Clouds, 99; Mist, 99; The Wind,
PART FIRST..................................... 7-51 99; Drought, 99, Rain, 99 ; The Wind and the
Baby's Letter-Pages................ ..............9-12 Breeze, 99; Dew, 100; Snow, 100; Fire-Flies, 100.
Baby's Observation Lessons.......................13-15 Under the Mistletoe, (Poetry,) by Mary A. Lathbury... 103
Baby's Picture Pages ........................... 16-40 '. ,, .... for Santa-Claus, (Poetry,) by Mary A. Lathbury 104
Return of the Dove, (Poetry,) by J. P............... 41 iRhymes from Mother Goose .................... 107-112
Bees in the Clover, (Poetry,) by Mary A. Lathbury... 42 Lullaby Songs (Words and Music) ...............113-118
Out All Night, (Poetry,) by Josephine Pollard ......... 45 In the Harmmock, 113; Golden Slumbers Kiss Your
Shoe i ..I..i.. The, (Poetry,) by J. P ............... .46, 47 Eyes, 113; Good-bye to the Hills, 114; Rocking, 11-1;
In Blossom Time (Poetry) ......................... 48 The Tides, 115; The Night Moth, 115; Slumber Song,
Bubbles, (Poetry,) by Mary A. Lathbury ............. 51 116; Rain Drops are Falling, 117; Evening L.I'.I ,
117; Sing Lower, Sweet Winds, 118; Cradle Ilymin, 18.
PART SECOND. ..................... ................ 52-91 How our Forefathers Learned their Lessons ...... 119-12-
Pictures and Words ............................ 54-65 The Horn-Book, 119: New England Primer, 119;
Words.......................... ................. 66 Webster's Spelling-Book, 121 ; Of the Boy that Sto!e
Sentences........................................ 67 Apples, 121; The Country Maid aln her Milk-Pail,
Words ........................................... 68 122: The Cat and tIhe Ral, 122; The Partial Judge,
Sentences ....................................... 69 123; The Two Dogs, 123; The Fox and there Brable,
Words ........................................ 70 123; The Bear and the Two Friends, 12-1; The Fox
Sentences............................. 71 and the Swallow, 124.
Baby's Word-Page............................... 72 Words in Various Languages of Similar Meaning.... 125
A Day on the Farm ............ .... ........ ..... 73, 74 The Hearthstone ".. ........................2. -136
Pictures of Nouns .............. .............. 75-80 Family History ................................. 137
Nouns, Singular and Plural .......... ............. 81 Family Record................................... 138
Nouns with Adjectives ........................... 82 Family Holidays........................ ...... 139, 140
Nouns and Verbs................................. 83 Our Little Friends.............................141, 142
Nouns, Verbs, and Prepositions .................... 84 Autographs, Blanks for. ...................... 143, 14.1
Baby's Reading Lessons ........................ 85 Old Home Songs (Words and Music). ............145-168
A Lesson in i ...... 1............................. 86 Home, Sweet Hlome, 145; Hoime's Not Merely Four
Put them Together. ................ .............. 87 Square Walls, 146: Hobby Horse, 146; Good Cheer,
Pick them Out (Figures).................... .. 88 147; The Golden Rule, 147 ; Smiling May Comes
First Lesson in Geometry........................ 89 in Play, 148 ; See Where the Rising Sun, 149; Life
Joln Peterson's Menagerie ....................... 90, 91 Let us Cherish, 119; Follow Me, Full of Glee, 150;
While the Morning Bells are Ringing, 151; Old
PART TIRD. .................................... 92-168 Grimes, 151: Auld Lang Syne, 152; Thle Mill-Wheel,
Jingles ........................................94-98 153; Rounds, 153; The Mower's Song, 154; Up the
Counting, 94; Inside the Garden Gate, 94; Baby's Hills, 154; Try, Try Again, 155; Little Things, 155;
Hand, 94; A Dandelion Seed, 94; Glow-worms and Days of Summer Glory, 156; lHearts and Homes, 156;
Fire-flies, 94; There was a Blue Meadow, 95; Dolly, Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star, 157 ; The Better Wish,
95; The First Tooth, 95; The Chicken, 95; Baby's 157; Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep, 158; The
Mouth, 95; The Horse, 95; Fairy Lace, 95; Would Spider and the Fly, 159; Home, Home, Can I Forget
You? 96; Visitors, 96; Mist, 96; The Moon-Boat, Thee? 160; The Old Oaken Bucket, 160; Good-Bye,
96; The Sparrow's Call, 96; The Cricket, 96; Rain 161; Robinson Crusoe, 162; The Dearest Spot, 163;
Fairy, 97; How Slall we Keep the Baby Warm ? 97; O Come, Come Away, 163; Kind Words Can Never
Bird-Songs, 97; The Discontented Lambs, 97; What Die, 164; The Ingle Side, 165: Melodies of Many
Ails the Moon? 98; The Snow-Hake, 98: Butterfly, Lands, 165; My Mother's Bible, 166; Meek and Lowly,
98; A Jingle, 98; Daisies, 98; Shadows, 98. 167 ; The Last Rose of Summer, 168.











ii THE HOME BOOK.


PAGE PAGE
PART FOUHTII ............................... 169-268 Ice Before a Fire, 216; Rarefied Air, 217; Water
A Chapter on the Kindergarten, by Mary A. Bemis. 170-185 Boiled by Cold, 217; The Paper Crucible, 217; Fire-
Little Housemaids, by Olive Thorne ............. 186-193 Proof Paper, etc., 217; A Handful of Boiling Water,
A, B, C, Cooking School (Poetry)............... 194-198 217 ; The Incombustible Thread, 217; Currents of
Rules for Making Candy........................199-201 Heated Fluid, 217 ; White Figures on Black Ground,
Cocoa-nut Caramels, 199; White Candy, 199; Clooc- 217 ; Red Dye, 217; Black Dye, 217; Scarlet Figures
late Puffs, 199; Chocolate Caramels, 199; Tafly, on a Black Ground, 218; Stains Removed, 218; Mimic
199; Peppermints, 199; Cocoa-nut Drops, 200; Ice- Ioar Frost, 218; Galvanic Action, 218; Photogenic
Cream Candy, 200; Fig Candy, 200; Everton Taffy, Drawing, 218; Alto Relievo, 218; Waterproof Hands,
200; Caramels, 200; Molasses Candy, 200; Cream 218; Vanishing Drawings, 218; Attraction of Cole-
Walnuts, 200; Vinegar Candy, 200; Chocolate Creams, sion, 218; Egg in a Bottle, 218 ; Water Formed by
200, 201; Butter Scotch, 201 ; Butter Tally, 201 ; Combustion, 218.
Chocolate Taffy, 201 ; Lemon Drops. 201; Nut Candy, Railways.... ...........................219-224
201; Lemon Candy, 201; Chocolate Drops, 201; Good Manners ................................ 225-229
Cream Sticks, 201. At Home, 225; At Table, 226 ; On the Street, 227;
Clay Modeling at Home, by Edw. A. Spring....... 202-206 In Church, 228; General Hints, 228; Golden Rules
First Lessons in Free-Hand drawing............ 207-209 for Boys and Girls, 229; Worth C1i. ..,.,,.. 229;
Easy Steps in Chemistry ...................... 210-218 Healthy Homes, 229.
The Miniature Volcano, 210: Violet Electric Light, Rules in Rhyme ................................ 230
210; The Well of Fire, 210; The Floating Beacon, Famous in History (Noted Men and Womenu)...... 231-236
210; Fiery Stars, 210; Mimic Lightnitg, 210; White Presidents of the United States (Biographical Sketches
Crystals, 210 Blue Crystals, 210; Red Crystals, 211; and Portraits).................... ..... 236-239
Yellow Crystals, 211; Green Crystals, 211; Mineral Vice-Presidents of the United States ................ 237
Spars, 211 ; Needle-shaped Crystals, 211 ; Bed of Lines, Surfaces, and Solids .....................240, 241
Crystals, 211; Prismatic Windows, 211; Geometric A Lesson in Geography. .......................... 242
Crystals, 211; Instantaneous Crystallization, 211 ; Famous Mountains ............................ 243
Blue Precipitate, 211 ; Test for Iron, 212; Yellow Large Lakes ................ .................. 244
Precipitate, 212; Brown Precipitate, 212; White Long Rivers. ................ ................... 244
Precipitate, 212; Metallic Precipitate, 212; Test for Names of Places ........................ .... 245-247
Silver, 212; The Lead Tree, 212; Power of Trans- Outlines of General History .................. 248-256
mutation, 212; Metallic Transformation, 212; Black Proverbs of all Nations........................ 257-268
Proverbs of Solomon, 257 ; Spanish Proverbs, 257;
Precipitate, 212; Test for Gum, 212; Crimson Pre- Proverbs of Solomon, 257; Spanish Proverbs, 257;
cipitate, 212; Soluble Precipitate, 212; Test for Car- Proverbs in Spanish and English, 258; Portuguese
bonic Acid, 213; Precipitate Formed by the Breath, Proverbs, 259; Proverbs in Portuguese and English,
213 ; Test for Lime, 213; Lime in -i.f ... Water, 213: 259; Dutch Proverbs, 260; Proverbs in Dutch and
Test for Sulphuric Acid, 213; Blue Sympathetic Ink, English, 260; Italian Proverbs, 261; Proverbs in
213; Brown Sympathetic Ink, 213; Green Sympa- Italian and English, 261; French Proverbs, 262;
thetic Ink, 213; Black Sympathetic Ink, 213; Pur- Proverbs in French and English, 263; German
pie Sympathetic Ink, 213; Yellow Sympathetic Ink, Proverbs, 264; Danish Proverbs, 264; Eastern
213; I ..:. of Properties, 214; The Invisible Vis- Proverbs illustrating Scripture, 265; Latin Proverbs
ible, 214; Iridescent Gold Letters, 214; Gray Sym- and Mottoes, 268.
pathetic Ink, 214; Vegetable Sympathetic Ink, 214;
Illegible Writing Restored, 214; Manufacture of Soap, PART FIFT ................................... .269-398
214; Simple Affinity, 214; Compound Affinity, 214; Shadow Ganes ..............................270-273
Efflorescent Salts, 214; Deliquescent Salts, 215; A Noah's Ark .................................. 274-276
Liquid from Two Solids, 215; A Solid from Two Toy Games ................... .............. 277-291
Liquids, 215; Cloud in Water, 215; Litmus Paper, Whirligigs, 277; Tournameht, 277; Whiz-Gig, 277;
215; Test for Sulphuretted Hydrogen, 215 ; Turmeric Teetotum, 277; Targetta, 277; Dart and Target, 277;
Paper, 215; Tests for Acids, 215; Acids in Salts, Puff and Dart, 278; 1Eolian Harp, 278; Animated
215; Alkali in i- 215; Volatile Alkali, 215; Al- Serpent, 278; Apple Mill, 279; Apple Woman, 279;
kalies Detected, 216; To make Test Papers, 216; Bandilor, 279; Bird Whistles, 279; BottleImps, 280;
White to Black, 216; Blue to Red, Green, and Pur- Cup and Ball, 280; Cupolette, 280; Flying Top, 280;
pie, 216; White to Blue, 216; Color Changed by the Decimal Game, 281; Chameleon Top, 281; Demon
Breathl, 216; The Wonderful Liquor, 216; Animated Bottle, 281; Loto, 281; Flying Cones, 282; Pith
Water, 216; Fire Disarmed, 216; Intense Cold, 216; Dancer, 282; Pegasus in Flight, 282; Quintain, 283;












THE HOME BOOK. iii


PAGE 1A AGE
Magic Figure, 283; Magician of Morocco, 284; Magic Puzzle Pictures. ............................. ...346-353
Flute, 284; Microscope, (Toy,) 284; Steady Tar, 285; Key to Puzzle Pictures ............................ 354
Mocking Call, 285; Moorish Fort, 285; Navette, 286; Indoor and Outdoor Recreation .................355-398
Palada, 286; Obedient Soldier, 286; Solitaire, 286; To Make Daisy Chains, 355; Chain of Dandelion
Nine Men's Morris, 289. Stems, 355; Take Care 355 ; Chain of Ivy or Beech
Paper Toys................................. .291-299 Leaves, 355 ; Soap Bubbles, 355; Fly Away, 355;
Paper Bellows, 292; Paper Boat, 292; Paper Boxes, Oranges and Lemons, 356; Buz! 356; The Mulberry
292; Paper Chinese Junk, 293; Paper Dart, 294; Bush, 356; The Swiss Peasant, 357; Melon-Seed
Paper Hat, 294; Paper Parachute, 294; Paper Birds, 357; The Sea and Her Children, 358; Hunt
Purses, 295; Magic Fau, 295; Paper-Ball Baskets, the Slipper, 358; Cat and Mouse, 358; The Ele-
297 ; The Three Crosses, 297; Paper-Rosette Baskets, ments, 358; The Farm-yard. 358; The Feather, 359;
297; Another Paper Mat, 298; Paper Mat Like a Giant, 359; The Giraffe, 359; Flying, 359; Hands,
Water Lily, 298; Flower Dolls, 299. 360; The Grand Mufti, 360; He Can do Little who
Slate Games................................ .300-301 Can't do This," 360; Kiss and Clap, 360; Jingling,
Birds, Beasts, and Fishes, 300; French and English, 361; Five Geese in a Flock, 361 ; Hunt the Whlistle,
300; The Double Heart, 300; Naughts and Crosses, 361; "I Apprenticed my Sou," 361; Puss in the
or Tit-Tat-To, 300; The Puzzle Wall, 301; You Are Corner, 361; Magical Music, 362 ; The Old Game of
Nothing but a Goose, 301. Honcypots, 362; Clap! Clap! 362; Shouting
Puzzles ................... ........ ....302-308 Proverbs, 362; Blind Man's Buff, 363; Pointer's
Answers to Puzzles ........................... 308-313 Buff, 363; Fettered Buff, 363; Twelve o'Clock
at Night, 363; "Simon Says," 363: Mixed-up
Horseshoe Magnet, The........................... 315, 3The Giantess,
Poetry, 364; Musical Chair, 364; The Giantess,
All Sorts of Puzzles...........................316-345 Pt, 36 Ma sical Cair, 364; The M agicats,
364; The Magic Answer, 364; The Magic Hats, 365;
The Balanced Pail, 316; The Balanced Stick, 316; The Magic Wand, 365; The Schoolmaster, 366; Con-
The Bridge of Knives, 316; The Square and Circle ques 366; A uess ame 366; Famous umbers,
quest, 366; A Guess Game, 366; Famous Numbers,
Puzzle, 316; The Divided Farm, 317; The String 366; My Master has Sent me Unto You," 367 ; The
and Balls Puzzle, 317 ; The Puzzling Rings, 317 ; The Adventurers, 367 ; Twenty Questions, 367; The Two
Six Rows Puzzle, 319; The Magic Octagon, 319; Hats, 368; "What is my Thought Like?" 368 : The
The Six Square Puzzle, 319; The Accommo- Trades, 368; Consequences, 369; The Comic Con-
dating Square, 319; To Take a Man's Waist-rt, 369; Conveyances, 369; "Ho, When, and
coat off Without Removing his Coat, 319; To Whre," 3 ; Hunt the Ring, 370; Toilt, 370
Break a Stone with a Blow of the Fist, 320; The 3 D 3; D
Prisoner's Puzzle, 320; Puzzles 15 and 34," 320; a u 3 ;
Stage Coach, 372 ; Buff with the Wand, 373; Spoon
The Magic Nine, 322; The Magic Thirty-six, 322; Music, 373; Cross Questions and Crooked Answers,
The Magic Hundred, 322; To Take One from Nine- 374; f pp Verses, 374; Charades, 374; The
teen so that the Remainder shal be Twenty, 322; Baby Elephant, 375 ; The Bird Catcher, 375 ; Blind
The Famous Forty-five, 322; The Progression of Postman, 375; Adjectives, 376; Blowing out tie
Numbers, 323; Magical Addition, 324; The Clever Candle, 376; Te sting Wand, 3; etch's Out-
Lawyer, 325; NewWay of Multiplying byNine, 326; lines, 377; The Artist's Menagerie, 377 ; A Word
To Reward the Favorites and show no Favoritism, Game, 377; An Amusement, 378; The Telescopic
326; Lord Dundreary's Finger Puzzle, 326; Uniform 3 ling, 378; Proverbs,
Results of Multiplication, 326; To Ascertain a Square 378; Think of a Number, 370; Pairs, 379; The Or-
Number at a Glance, 326; To Distinguish Coins by ator, 379; The Reviewers, 379; The Five-Dot Game,
Arithmetical Calculations, 327; Properties of Num- 380; Trades, 380; Forfeits, 380; Kite Flying, 383
bers, 327; Alphabetical Puzzles, 327; Guessing An Old Game of Ball, 387 ; Prisoners' Base, 387
Stories, 328; Numbered Charades, 328; Letter or Bags, 389; Battledore and Shuttlecock, 389; Cut-
Figure Charades, 330; Verbal Charades, 330; Ana- Water, 389; Brother Jonatlan, 390; Tierce, 390;
grams, 330; Decapitations, 332; Curtailments and Boomerang, 391; Hop Scotch, 391; Revolving Ring,
Retailings, 332; Acrostics, 334; Enigmas, 335; 392; Royal Star, 392 ; Graces, 393; Sucker, 393;
Chronograms, 335; Logograms, 336 ; Rebuses, 337 ; Ring the Nail, 393; Skip-Jack, 393.
Arithmorems, 338; Diamond Puzzles and Word Lawn Pool, by Sherwood Ryse..................94-396
Puzzles of Various Shapes, 340; Cryptography, 341; Lawn Tennis, by Sherwood Ryse................ 396-398
Metagrams, 341; Paragrams, 341; Definitions, 342;
Word Squares, 343; Inversions, 343; Hidden Words, PART SIXTH .................. ................ 399-656
344; Birds, Fruits, and Flowers Enigmatically Ex- Picture Bible Lessons ......................... 400-412
pressed, 345. Creation ........... ................ ........... 413











iv THE HOME BOOK.


PAGE PAGE
First Murder, The ............................... 414 Story, 562; Something Homely, 564; Katy's Rose
Israelites in Egypt .............................. 415 Bush, 576; The Lost Child, 578; The Athenian and
From Egypt to Canaan ............................. 416 his One-Eyed Slave, 580; A Brave Girl, 581.
Who Shall be King? ............................. 417 Choice Hymns...................... ........ 582-592
Four Centuries Before Christ .................... 418 Jesus Our Only Joy, 582; O Sacred Head now
Star in the East, The. ........................... 419 Wounded, 582; The Celestial Country, 582: Brief
Christ Crucified, Risen, Ascended ................... 420 Sorrow-Eternal Rest, 583; Paradise of Joy, 583;
Serving the Lord .............................. 421 Jerusalem the Golden, 584; Luther's Hymn, 584;
New Jerusalem, The.......................... 422 Evening Hymn, 585; Old Hundred, 585; Antioch, 585;
Bible Stories................................... 23-447 Jesus Shall Reign, 585; At the Cross, 586; There
Adam and Eve, 423; Cain and Abel, 427; Noah, is a Land of Pure Delight, 586; Dying Grace, 586;
429 ; The Family of Israel, 432; Joseph, 436; Moses, When I Survey the Wondrous Cross, 586; Welcome,
437: Job, 4:39; Joshua, 439; Gideon, 440; Samson, Sweet Day of Rest, 587; When I Can Read my
440; Goliath, 441; David, 412 ; Solomon, 443; Ab- Title Clear, 587; Give to the Winds thy Fears, 587;
salom, 4-43; Elijah, 444; Jehu, 444; Hezekiah, 44; How Gentle God's Commands, 587; Grace, 588;
Josiah, 445; Jeremiah, 445; Zaccheus, 445; Cor- Awake, my Soul, 588: 0 for a Thousand Tongues to
nclius, 446; The Apostle Paul, 446; Eutychus, 447; Sing, 588; Come, Thou Almighty King, 588; Jesus,
Timotiy, 447 ; my Strength, my Hope, 589; Easter Hymn, 589;
Blessed One, The, Readings from Mrs. Gaskoin... 448-452 Jesus, Lover of my .Soul, 589; Love Divine, all
Bible Studies................................ 453-466 Love Excelling, 590; The Lord my Pasture shall
Key to Bible Studies.......................... 467 Prepare, 590; Retrospect of the Year, 591; Mission-
Bible Geography, with Map Lessons.............468-483 ary Hymn, 591 ; There is a Fountain Filled with
Elmwood Palestine Class, The, Chaps. I to VIII.. .484-498 Blood, 592; 0 could I Speak his Matchless Worth,
Books and a Book ........................... 499-501 592.
Books of the Bible ............................... 502
PART SEVENTII ..... ....... .............. 503-6-147
Books of the Old Testament ....................... 503
the N Tes eut ..S....4 ories of Mythology..........................594-647
Books of the New Testament .................... 504-
S s fo s................Introductory, 594; Prometheus, 594; The Four Ages,
Tiny Texts for Daily Use. ................... ..u05-o08
isper Songs (Words and Music)............... 509-512 595; The Grecian Story of the Flood, 596; The Con-
test of Athena and Poseidon for the Naming of the
Loving Faith in Jesus, 509; Light on the Way to Cit, 597 Latona an Rstics, 59; Te Adet-
I l 9 ; S Cilt, 597: Latona and Rustics, 597 ; Thle Advent-
Heaven, 509; Soldiers True, 510; Our Leader Goess of Hcrakles in Search of Golden Fruit, 598-
ures ohr ]-erakles in Search of Golden Fruit, 598;
Before Us, 510; Listen, Listen, 510; InWisdom's Way, Theseus-tlhe Story of a Brave Prince, 599; The Fall
511; Tree of Life, 511; In the Sunlight, 511; Lamp of of Icarus, 600; The Quest of the Golden Fleece, 601;
Truth, 512; Hand of Love, 512; Shining Light, 512. Orpheus and Eurydice, 601; Castor and Pollux, 602:
Who Taught the Birds? ......................... 513 Cadmus and the Dragon, 603; (Edipus and the
Lord's Prayer in ... .... ,. ..............514-516 Sphinx, 604; Antigone, 604; Perseus and Androm-
The Time (On Temperance).................... 517-529 eda, 605; The Judgmentof Paris, 606; How a Wooden
Procrastination, 517; Whiskey and Tobacco, 517 I Horse Destroyed a City, 606: Iphigenia at Aulis,
The Placard and the Jug, 518; Hlow a Bad Habit 607; Laodamia, 608; Penthesilea, 609; The Lotus
Grows, 51; A Sad Sto, 51 5,19; A Well-Preserved Eaters, 609; Odysseus and the Cyclops, 610; Odys-
Man, 520; Diary of a Rumseller, 522; "Stingeth seus and the Sirens, 611; The Escape of Telemaclius
Like an Adder," 523; A Drunkard and his Little from the Island of Calypso, 612; The Rescue of An-
Child, 524; A Sorrowful Experience, 525; Which is chyses, 613; )Encas and the Harpies, 613; Echo and
Better? 526; The Working-man's Glass, 526; Facts Narcissus, 614; Narcissus, 614; The Death of
Worthy of Notice, 527 ; How the Habit Grows, 528; Adonis, 615; The Escape of Arion, 616; Nero and
Martin Luther on Beer, 528; The Drunkard's Will, Leander, 617; Baucis and Philemon, 617: Camilla,
529; The Devil's Business, 529. 618; Aurora, 619; Daphne, 620; Sisyphus, 620;
Where the Cross-Roads Meet, (Poetry,) by J. P....530-533 Phaeton, 621; Ixion and his Wheel of Fire, 622;
A Garland of Stories .......................... 532-581 Midas's Choice, 622; Midas's Ears, 623; Cupid and
The Day of Rest, 532; The Collier Family, 545; Psyche, 624; The Crow and the Fox, 627 ; The Oracle
Feed my Lambs-a Christmas Story, 547; The Le- at Delphi, 628; For the Wisest, 628; Wisdom and
gend of St. Catherine, 554; The Holy Giant-the Wealth, 629; i: i.,. .. ,:. 630; The Good Luck of
Story of St. Christopher, 556; A Legend of St. Polyerates, 630; A Mild Chastisement, 631; School
Christopher, 558; Three Beautiful Deeds, 559; The Days at Sparta, 631 ; Brave Women, 632; The Battle
Sailor Boy of Havre, 560; The Brave Boy-- Capital of Marathon, 633; The Fight at Ti...... i ... 634;











THE HOME BOOK. v


PAGE PAGE
Two Heroes at Spara, 635; The Wooden Wall that Spanxter's Remedy, 663 ; A May-Day Story, 667;
Saved a City, 635; Phidias, the Sculptor at Athens, Fred's Opportunity, 670; The Thief and the Silver
636; Cimon, 638; Lysander, 633; Nicias, 638; The Ducats, 673; Fishing for Boots, 675; The Goose
Thirty Tyrants, 639; Alcibiades and his Teacher, Girl, 676; The Sparrow and his Young Ones, (81 ; A
640; Demosthenes, 641; Phocion, 641 ; The Cumi- Cheerful Temper, 683; The Cow that Lost her Tail,
an Sybil, 642; Aristides, 643; Tarpeia's Treason, 685; The Twelve Brothers, 690; The Wonderful
644; Iloratius at the Bridge, 645; The Story of Mu- Fiddler, 693; The Queen Bee, 695; The Magic Mir-
tius, 645; A Son's Devotion, 646. ror, 697 ; The Philosopher's Stone, 102.
Wonder Stories...............................648-710 Finale: A Household Idyl of Memory. By Rev. W.
The Straw, the Coal, and the Bean, 648; The Fairy C. Wilkinson............................... 711
Pool, 648; The Wild Swans, 650; An Eastern Fable, Closing Words.......................... ....... 714
659; Her Majesty the Washerwoman, 660; Doctor General Index.................. ................... 715























A- I _l'
Ttx.\

:I i:'IFN.










vi THE HOME BOOK.







CONTRIBUTORS


-AND-



AUTHORS AND COMPOSERS QUOTED.

-----**- r-----


PAGE PAGE
ADDISON, JOSEPI ................................ 590, 591 MEDLEY, SAMUEL................................... 592

AINSLIE, IEW ..................... ................. 165 MOORE, THOMAS .................................... 168

BEEDE, LUCY L................... 113, 114, 115, 116, 118 MORRIS, GEO. P.................................... 166

BEMIS, MARY A. ................................... 170 NEWTON, JOHN ......... ......................... 591

BERNARD OF CLAIRVAUX. ........................... 582 NORxrNo, O. H ................................... 159

BERNARD OF CLUNY .................. ... ........ 53, 584 PAYNE, JOHN HOWARD.............................. 145

BLOCKLEY, J. ...................................... 156 POLLARD, JOSEPHINE ...................45, 46, 48, 194, 530

BRIGHAM, MRS. S. J......96, 98, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 ROSSINI, GIOACCHIMO ................... .......... 154

BUTTS, MRS. M. F ....................... 94, 95, 96, 97 RUSSELL, HENRY................................. 57, 166

COWPER, W ILLIAM .................................. 592 RYSE, SHERWOOD ............................... 94, 396

DODDRIDGE, PIIILIP ..............................587. 588 SPRING, EDWARD A. ................................ 202

ENGELBRECIIT, J. C ................ ............... 161 SWAIN, CHARLES................................... 146

GASKOIN, MRS ..... .............. .............. 448 TAYLOR, ALFRED.................................... 117

GERIIARDT, PAUL .................................... 587 TAYLOR, JANE ................... .............. 157

GLOVER, C. W..................................... 165 TIORNE, OLIVE .................................... 186

GIOVER, S......................................... 167 WATTS, ISAAC ..........................118, 585, 586, 587

GREENE, ALBERT G................................ 151 WEBER, KARL MARIA FRIEDRICI ERNST, ON............ 156

HEBER, REGINALD.. ............................ 591, 592 WESLEY, CHARLES...........................588, 589, 590

HUTCIIINSON, ABnY. ................. .............. 164 WILKINSON, W. C. ................................ 711

KEN, T OMAS ..................... ....... .. .......... 585 W ILLARD, EMMA. ................ ......... .. 158

KNIGHT, J. P. ................... .................. 158 WOODWORTH, SAMUEL.................... .. ..... 160

LATHBURY, MARY A ..........................51, 103, 104 WRIGHTON, W. T .................. ......... .... 163

LUTHER, MARTIN ................................ 585











THE HOME BOOK. vii






LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.




PAGE PAGE PAGE
Baby's Observation Lessons: Baby's Picture Pages-Continued. John Peterson's Menagerie........ 91
Playing School ................ 13 Feeding the Chickens. ......... 23 Iorn Book of the 18th Century.... 119
Two Pets, The................ 14 Learning to Slide.............. 23 New England Primer, Specimen I1-
Feeding the Calf .............. 15 Cleaning the W alk............. 23 lustrations from.......... 119, 120
Baby's Picture Pages: Late for School................ 24 Webster's Spelling-Book, Specimen
See-Saw....................... 16 An Esthete................... 24 Illustrations from.........121-121
Going to Town ................ 16 Young Dressmakers ........... 24 A Chapter on the Kindergarten:
Feeding the Piggies........... 16 Let the Old Cat Die............. 24 Froebel's First Gift-The Second
"Oats, Peas, Beans.".......... 16 A Balloon Ascension........... 24 Gift-The Third Gift-A Cross-
Out for an Airing............. 16 Feeding the Chickens............ 25 Double Staircase-Fourth Gift-
Pet Rabbits................... 16 Young Naturalist, The........... 26 Well with Four Steps-Staircase
Baby's First Steps............. 17 "I went Hurt It."................ 27 -The Fifth Gift-Gateway-The
Infant Class, The.............. 17 The Receiver is as Bad as the Thief! 28 Sixth Gift Colonnade Tri-
A Stranger................... 17 A Lively Steed.................. 29 umphal Column Monument-
A Bite ....................... 17 Going to Market................. 30 Figs. 15-25, Various Designs-A
Punch and Judy .............. 17 Cherries are Ripe!............... 31 Water-Wheel-A Rake-An An-
Playing Horse ................ 17 A Greedy Boy .................. 32 chor-A Cross-A Steamboat-
Selling Off Cheap............. 18 Pretty Poll! "................. 33 A Chicken- An Air Balloon-An
Blackberrying...... ............ 18 Sugaring Off.................... 34 0. 1 .* ;.. 34-55, Various
A Slow Horse................. 18 Holly Berries.................... 35 Designs................... 171-184
SGood-morning, Doggy."....... 18 A Carrier Pigeon ............... 36 Little Housemaids:
Goosey, Goosey, Gander........ 18 What's That?"................ 37 "These are the Little Breakfast
At the Pump................. 18 W ho' Afraid?"....... ......... 38 Tables"..................... 188
Wading...................... 19 Many Dogs of Many Minds........ 39 Washing Dishes............... 189
"Don't Cry."................. 19 Return of the Dove, The.......... 40 Making the Bed................ 189
Milking Time................. 19 Shoe Family, The. .............. 46 "Under the Brooms they Skip,
An Important Position......... 19 In Blossom Time................ 48 Two by Two." ............. 190
Country Cousin, The ........... 19 Pictures and Words: "This is the way we Wash our
A Cold Morning............... 19 Fifty-eight Illustrations...... 54-65 Clothes.".................. 191
"I Want my Dolly."........... 20 Pictures of Nouns: Ready to Go to Market......... 191
Little Model, Thl .............. 20 Eighty Illustrations...........75-80 Clay Modeling at Home:
Butterfly Hunters.............. 20 Nouns, Singular and Plural: Ten Illustrations............ 203-206
On the Fence................. 20 Sixteen Illustrations ........... 81 First Lessons in Free-Iland Draw-
A Boat Race.................. 20 Nouns with Adjectives: ing: Twelve Illustrations.... 208, 209
A Company of Infantry......... 20 Twelve Illustrations............ 82 Railways: Two Illustrations..219, 224
Fast Friends ................. 21 Nouns and Verbs: Famous in History, Portraits of Per-
Young Travelers .............. 21 Twelve Illustrations ........... 83 sonages:
Ship Builders ................. 21 Nouns, Verbs, and Prepositions: Arettus-Hadrian-Plato-Socra-
Culprit, The .................. 21 Twelve Illustrations............ 84 tes-Agrippa-Alexander-Titus
On an Errand.................. 21 Lesson in Counting.............. 86 -Elijah-Peter Nero C:csar
A Lesson in Natural History.... 22 First Lesson in Geometry: -John -'.i- 1 ,-P, ;.1-- .i.
Call Off the Dog............... 22 Straight Line-Crooked Line- pho Tiberius Burns Peter
A Young Shepherd............ 22 Horizontal Line-Vertical Line- the Great Robert Fulton -
Waiting for Santa Claus........ 22 Left Oblique-Right Oblique- Cromwell Milton-Tennyson-
First Skates, The.............. 22 Parallel-Curve Convex-Con- Lafayette- Bonaparte Michael
First Voyage, The ............. 23 cave-Circle-Spiral-Serrated-- Angelo-Carlyle-John Knox-
Bird's Funeral, The....... .... 23 Right Angle-Triangle-Square. 89 Longfellow--Victoria -Webster
3











viii THE HOME BOOK.


PAGE PAGE PAGE
Famous il History- COnUntmcd. Shadow Pictures............... 271 Slate Games:
-Raphael-Goldsmith-Calvin- Fifteen other Illustrations....... 273 Eight Illustrations ......... :00, 301
Wesley- -Luther Columbus Noah's Ark: Paper Pictures.. .275, 27 Puzzles:
Shakespeare Franklin 1Emcr- Toy Games: i- ii, Illustrations .. .302-313
son-Isaac Newton .........233-235 Targetta-Animated Serpent- Horseshoe Magnet, The........... 314
Presidents of the United States, Apple Woman-Bottle Imps- All Sorts of Puzzles:
Portraits of the : Cupolette-Decimal Game-De- Twenty-five Illustrations....31;6-345
Washington John Adams- mon Butle-Loto-Flying Cones Puzzle Pictures:
Thomas Jefferson-James Madi- -Pegasus in Flight-Quintain- Eight full-page Eingravings.346-353
son-James Monroe-John Q. Magic Figure-Magician of' Mo- Indoor and Outdoor Recreation:
Adams-Andrelw Jackson-Mar- rocco, Figs. 1 and 2-Steady Tar Ninoteen Illustrations ....... .55-393
tin Van Buren-W. II. Harrison -Moorish Fort-Navette-Pala- Lawn-Pool, The Game of......... 395
-Jolm Tyler-James K. Polk- da-Obedient Soldier-Solitaire Lawn Tennis .................... 397
Zachary Taylor-Millard Fillmore -Nine Men's Morris........277-289 Picture Bible Lessons......... 400-412
-Franklin Pierce-James Bu- Paper Toys: Bible Stories Illustrated....... -113-422
clhanan-Abralham Lincolu-An- Paper Bellows, four Illustrations Bible Geography:
drew Johnson-Ulysses S. Grant --Paper Boat, five Illustrations- AMountains of the East .......... 469
-Rutherford B. Hayes-James Paper Boxes, five Illustrations- Plains of Jericho and the Dead
A. Garlield-Chester A. Arthur- Paper Chinese Junk, twelve I1- Sea......................... 471
Grover Cleveland ..........238, 239 lustrations-Paper Dart-Paper David with the Sling........... 472
Lines, Surfaces, and Solids: Hat-Paper Parachute, four Illus- Maps of Palestine.......... 474, 477
Twenty-cight Illustrations ...... 241 trations-Paper Purses, five II- The Flight into Egypt.......... 475
A Lesson in Geography: lustrations-Magic Fan, nineteen Topography of Jerusalem....... 482
Natural Divisions in Land and Illustrations-Paper Ball Baskets Jews' Wailing-place............ 483
Water...................... 242 -The Three Crosses, four Illus- Who Taught the Birds?
Capitol at Washington, D. C....... 247 trations-Paper-Rosette Baskets Twelve Illustrations........... 513
Outlines of General Iistory: -Paper Mats-Flower Dolls, four Temperance Lessons Illustrated. 517-530
Fourteen Illustrations .......249-256 Illustrations .............. .291-299 Tail-pieces, Initial Letters, etc.












COLORED LITHOGRAPHS.




BEES IN THE CLOVER ....................................................... ................................ 43, 44
B eUBBLES .............................................................................................. 4 9, 50
U NDER TIE M ISTLETOE................ ........................ ............................. .......... 101, 102
W AITING FOR SANTA CLAUS..................... ................... ............................ ..... 105, 106
MAP OF PALESTINE............................ ......................................... ............... 479, 480








THE HOME BOOK.




INTRODUCTION.


I-HIS volume aims to be a Home-Teacher. Our book believes in the power of
It is Mother's book. It is Baby's Home. It sings the old refrain,
book. It is a book for the Child, and "There is no place like home."
for the full-grown Youth. It is Sunday-
school at home. It is Day-school at home.
It is Play-ground at home. It is intended "East and west,
to be a Light to fill home with brightness; At hame's the best."
a Garden of flowers to fill home with It says, with Southey, concerning Home,"
fragrance and beauty; a Well of water for "There is magic in that little word."
thirsty lips; an Easy-chair for weary bod- it believes
And with Young, it believes that
ies; a Comforter for aching hearts.
Here are things which mothers may "The first sure symptom of a mind in health
teach to little people. Here are things Is rest of heart and pleasure felt at home."
which mothers may read to little people. And with Goethe, that He is happiest,
Here are devices by which mothers may be he king or peasant, who finds peace in
set little people at work and get help from his home ; and with Channing, that
them in the hours of toil when mothers Home is the chief school of human virt-
needs assistance and when children need ue;" and with Hare, that "To Adam
nothing so much as useful occupation. Paradise was home. To the good among
It was not easy to find a name for the his descendants home is Paradise."
book. Many titles were proposed. Nearly The traveler in Switzerland, while at
every body consulted had a name to sug- Geneva, and before he visits Chamouni,
gest. Here are some of the names offered: should drop into the Jardin Anglais and
"First Years;" "The Home School;" study Sene's Model of Mont Blanc.
"Mother's School;" "Early Years at There, on a low table, is spread out in
Home ;" "Early Home Years;" "At miniature the whole region he purposes to
Home;" "The Best Years;" "Happy visit. At a glance he comprehends the
Home Hours ;" The Mother's Garden ; situation. He sees the "monarch of mount-
"The Home School and Play Room," and ains and his snow-robed attendants. He
" The Best Years-a Home Book." Finally understands the relations of the ranges,
the compiler concluded to call it simply and peaks and valleys and glaciers. With
this: THE HOME BooK. Under this sim- his finger he traces the half-dozen routes
ple and comprehensive title it goes forth from Geneva to Chamouni, and decides
to help home do its work. which to take. A moment's thought, at








S4 THE HOME BOOK.

any time during his journey, recalls the skillful and judicious management in the
topography of a region he can never see at family. It is a great work. It devolves
one glance. The model aids him. Savoy immense responsibility. It requires time
and Piedmont are in his mind. And al- and patience and self-denial. But it will
though the mountains more than compensate for all it costs. It
"Have pinnacled in clouds their snowy scalps, will render home a beautiful model of true
And throned eternity in icy halls living, and a type of eternal blessedness.
Of cold sublimity," It will give to childhood a most effective
he comprehends them and their relations, series of object-lessons on the most impor-
thanks to the Genevan miniature. tant of all subjects. And without this
The illustration may assist us in defining much of our teaching is wasted. The
the peculiar work of home. It should put definitions of the Catechism are not suffi-
the vast, invisible, spiritual truths of relig- cient to counterbalance the practical contra-
ion into practical, visible, and comprehen- dictions which a lawless or ill-governed
sible forms. It may illustrate the divine home affords. The practical life and ad-
government in the faithful, firm, uniform ministration are worth more than the
maintenance of parental authority. The preaching. The child looks at and imitates
father and the mother may daily set forth the one, the other he listens to and loses.
by example the truth, justice, stability, As is the mother, .so is her daughter."
gentleness, long-suffering, and mercy of Ezek xvi, 44. The preparation for teach-
God. To be sure, the model will be very ing "thy sons and thy sons' sons," which
defective at best, and there will always be Moses recommended, was this: Only take
a discouraging contrast between the maj- heed to thyself, and keep thy soul dili-
esty and the infinitude of the reality and gently." Deut. iv, 9.
the feebleness and littleness of the shadow. The swing of the switchman's arm in a
But this is the parent's mission. IIe is to Chicago railway station may send a train
be a follower (an imitator) of God. Home to the Atlantic sea-board, or place it on a
may, in the disappointments and str,1'-1-le-, track that sweeps to the westward and
incident to the child's life, train it for the climbs the Rocky Mountains. Let travel-
greater difficulties of after-life. The seri- ers study the placards, and be sure to take
ous work of the student and business man the right car; and let our switchman be
may be anticipated, and the child prepared careful on which track he turns the start-
for it by sundry pleasant devices in the ing train.
family circle. The baleful consequences Home is the first station-house one finds
of self-gratification, the certainty of pun- in making the tour of this life. There,
ishment, even though for a time postponed ; usually, the directions are given and the
the blessedness of implicit and cheerful selections made which determine the im-
obedience, the delights of heavenly reunion mortal destiny. There the question is
-all these may be clearly illustrated by answered, Shall the soul enter the "city








THE HOME BOOK. 5

of God" or "stumble upon the dark is of greater value, the cordial co-operation
mountains ? How sacred, beyond our of the parent, for there is no place like
powers of representation, is the scene of home for religious instruction. The first
such decisions ? Do pastors and parents place, in this case, is the best place by far.
fully appreciate it? Not that homes would be sufficient in
This is an age of organized philan- themselves, under the best social and relig-
thropies. Appliances for mental and re- ious conditions, for all educational purposes.
ligious improvement are multiplied. One If homes were all right in all respects we
can exercise his charity as the Chinese should still need the public sanctuary and
offer their prayers, by proxy and by the public service of Bible study, as we
machinery. The personal effort which should still need the public school and col-
tests the genuineness and increases the lege. Man sanctified would still be man
value of devotion is in danger of displace- social. While there will doubtless be in
ment by our substitutionary way of per- heaven something akin to the distinct fam-
forming religious duties. And no interests ily circles on earth, the multitude which no
are so imperiled by this tendency as those man can number, in their chorus of praise
pertaining to family religion. We fear that and tributes of honor and majesty and wis-
many parents excuse themselves for this dom and power to God, represent the sancti-
omission from the fact that the Church, and fled and glorified social estate which the
especially the Sunday-school, are religiously good shall inherit; the earnest of which in
educating their children. If they give all Christian fellowship they foster and en-
money to support these agencies, it is joy below.
enough. We desire to enter our protest But all these earthly and heavenly soci-
against all this. Because we believe in eties, with their burdens of philanthropic
and love and urge forward the Sunday- zeal and choruses of celestial praise, must
school work, we make this protest, and add not lead us away from the homes that now
to it an earnest plea in behalf of the fam- are. A man's religion may be so public
ily, that older and divine institution, with- and diffusive and large-hearted as to keep
out whose co-operation so much Sunday- him away from his family. His religion
school labor has been lost. needs reconstruction. We plead for work
Our homes make us. They place us on in the homes of the people, at once the
the right or the wrong road, and may in- primary and most potent of all schools.
crease or neutralize the influence of the THE HOMiE BooK is not wholly original.
educational and religious aids which are It is a compilation. Nor is it wholly this.
given us by the pulpit, the pastorate, and Many authorities have been consulted in
the school. Parents, look to your homes, its preparation, and many pens and pencils
Pastors and teachers, in your work remem- employed. The aim has been to provide,
ber the importance of home and while in available form, the first lessons needed
you teach the child, somehow secure what by every little life. Pictures and songs,








6 THE HOME BOOK.

lessons on many subjects, and stories in The "kitchen garden," the "kindergar-
great variety have been brought into serv- ten," and "clay modeling are explained.
ice, that baby's eyes may be trained to see, Here are puzzles to be dissected with scis-
its brain early accustomed to observe and sors, games to be made and played, lessons
to think, its memory enriched by cheerful in free-hand drawing, sports for in-door and
and useful passages, its imagination grati- out, experiments in chemistry, and stories
fled, and its activities generally turned into of all sorts, but this introduction cannot
profitable lines of occupation. give the whole list of exercises and enter-
Here are to be found lessons in the al- tainments which fill the pages of this
plhabet; drills in observation ; practice book.
in finding words in pictures and in recog- The compiler desires to acknowledge his
nizing the same words in printed sen- indebtedness for many suggestions to the
tences. Here the little fellow will learn admirable publications of Cassell & Co.,
what "nouns are, when "singular" and (Limited,) New York and London-a
when "plural," what words are "verbs," house which has made a speciality of edu-
and what words adjectives"-all this and national illustration, and whose juvenile
much more before he ever asks what and scientific books deserve the widest cir-
" grammar" is. He begins to count, also, culation. He acknowledges also the court-
in these early years, and he finds out what esy of the publishers of St. Nicholas,"
figures mean when used to indicate-2 Harper's Young Folks," and the Wide
chimneys, 5 windows, 10 stones, 12 birds, Awake," in allowing the use of copyrighted
etc. He learns to pick out" figures and and illustrated articles, and of E. Steiger
to put them together," and can tell what & Co. for the use of cuts on kindergarten.
X and VI stand for, and soon recognizes The following writers and artists have
simple geometrical forms, given valuable assistance: Miss JOSEPHINE
Here are "jingles" and rhymes, couplets, POLLARD, Miss MaRY A. LATIMURY, Miss
songs of science and of love for the nur- LILLA BRIGHAM, Mrs. S. J. BRIGHAMC Mr.
sery, lullabies with words and music (that JosEPI B. PIIIPPS, Mrs. M. F. BUTTS, Mrs.
nurse and. mother may teach and thus F. BURGE SMITII, and Miss M. A. BEMIs.
they themselves be taught;) and here It is my earnest hope that this home
" Mother Goose Melodies have place. text-book may prove to parents a useful
With all the rest come Bible lessons in companion, to young people a repository
which pictures, maps, songs, and stories of helpful hints for leisure hours, and to
are employed to bring the great Book very little people a guide into the great
within the grasp of mother and child. world of knowledge and delight.
Choice old sacred hymns, tiny Scripture
texts, temperance lessons, puzzle pictures, J. H. VINCENT.
give work for Sunday hours in the nursery. PP.,..';, IV J









THE HOME BOOK. 7




PART FIRST.


IN teaching a child, the alphabet is not the first than his powers of articulation can give them
thing. A child learns a great deal before it true utterance. What a world of fun to older
can recognize a single letter. It knows some- folks are his infantile efforts to call off the names
thing about light and warmth and food before it and get out the thoughts lie is mastering!
knows the first letter of the alphabet. It knows Where parents speak accurately, and correct his
rattle and ball and bottle and nurse's ribbons ; it faulty essays at expression, how soon does our
knows mother's face and father's beard and little English pupil, who does not know one let-
brother Robbie's hand and the sweet lips of ter of his alphabet, speak in good style his
sister Mamie long, long before it can point to A mother-tongue Ah, who can estimate the value
or 0. It knows the shining of the sun, the soft of the 1home school that is always in session ?
light of the moon, the bark and tail of Pug, the And what sad failures are made by children
arch of kitty's back, the low music of her pur- whose fathers and mothers, brothers and sisters
ring, the mad dash of rain on the window, the are careless in these respects, at home. The
ring of dinner and door bell. 0 how many boy goes to public school five hours a day for
things does baby know before its finger rests, five days in the week, and if teachers do correct
with set purpose and correct aim, on S and Z in his false pronunciations and wretched grammar,
the long row of the twenty-six elements of all the lesson is nearly, if not altogether, lost upon
English literature. him because of the nineteen hours a day for
And the more baby knows about people and seven days in the week during which time
things before it knows its letters the better for home influence and example violate all the laws
bjaby. With a big fund of ideas to draw upon, of the recitation room!
language, when once it is mastered, will have But I have sent the boy from school to school
something to use. too soon. Here he is at home. He knows so
It is folly to suppose that a child's education many words already. He has whole pages of
begins when he begins to spell and read. It be- sentences at his command, and is framing new
gins long before. It begins when he first feels ones every day. Now he begins to take his
the air, sees the light, hears the sound of mother's speech apart-to put it from the air on which
voice, and takes his first drop of food. It goes lie speaks it to the paper on which he looks at
on constantly. He is in school all the time- it-and then to take it apart. He finds that the
every minute. He is being educated when he cat lie has looked at and stroked and frightened,
is three hours old. Indeed, he is well along by the cat by which he has been scratched so often,
that time. His school has no vacations. You when put on paper, is a harmless little word:
cannot suspend him. You cannot turn him out. cat. He takes it apart and finds a c and an a
You cannot excuse him nor graduate him. How and a t. At some time he must know the look of
the ideas spring up within his little brain! They the word, as he now knows the sound of it. At
grow like daisies and butter-cups. His little some time he must know the letters that form it.
fists and fingers seem to lay hold of ideas, and Thus he studies his alphabet. It does not
sometimes fists and fingers express them. After make much difference when, if only he does not
awhile words come. They come fast-faster come to think that with the learning of his let-









S THE HOME BOOK.

ters he is beginning his education. IIe must know charge hin to remember what he sees. Then
the meaning of many words before he knows the close tile book or cover the picture, and have
names of the letters which compose them. him tell you what he saw. Do this again and
Now lie begins to learn letters--the small ones again. Take some minor feature of the picture
in the first and seventh column on the page, and which he has over-looked, and while the book
thle the large ones on the following pages. The is closed, ask him about it. IIe will look for
different sizes of the capital letters will help him. the matter thus indicated at the first opportu-
lie will soon find O among the capitals on all nity. Take, for example, the picture on page
the pages. Then he will recognize the small o 13. The first observation of the picture may
wherever it occurs. Thus the alphabet--" cap- not have taken in the doll on the chair, or the
ital," small," and script," will be under the in- little shingle cart down in the left-hand corner.
dex finger of the young student, and not one of When, after lie has looked at the page for a few
them will be able to escape the glance of his eye seconds, you close the book and ask him what he
or the cover of his touch, and in due time you saw ; he will probably tell you every thing ex-
will enjoy the fun he finds in fishing for letters cept doll and cart. The first chance he gets lie
in the Mixed-up Alphabet," on page 12, and will glance at the articles omitted before.
be surprised at his ability to dissect the Obser- Another good exercise will be to reproduce
ovation Lessons," (pp. 13--15,) make up his own the picture by imagination in the room in which
stories on the "Picture Pages," (1;.---.'1, and you are sitting. Give each of the four girls in
listen, with eyes and ears all open, at the the picture a name, "Anna" and "Bessie,"
"rhymes on pages 41-51. Carrie and Daisy (A, B, C, D.) Now,
Do not crowd him. Make him hungry, and if we had real Anna, Bessie, Carrie, and Daisy
feed his hunger. To a limited degree hold him here in this very room, where would they sit
to the lesson as a task, but to a very limited de- Go and show over there by the wall where Daisy
gree. Just enough to give his will a little ex- would sit, and how she would sit," etc. Eagerly
ercise, but not enough to create antipathy to the the little learner would enter into the panto-
book and the study of it. mimic movement, and thus fix definitely in his
In the Observation Lessons" test him fre- mind all the features of the picture. He would
quently. Give him a look at the page and acquire the habit of accurate observation.




--n
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.- ."1- -..I ...'"- '-






T .I ,. ,' '? .' .


-- -, ." '
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THE HOME BOOK. 9

BABY'S LETTER-PAGES.

A a 28 N n
B b 7 0 o
c / P p
D d q Q q
E e e ? R r
F f f / S s
G g t T t
H u / U u
I i / (V v

J j j c' W w
K k L 1 / 0 Y y
] m i Z z
3S ~




10 THE HOME BOOK.
A B C D E F

G H I J K L

M N 0 P Q R

S T U V W X
Y Z &





Pages
11 12
Missing
From
Original









THE HOME BOOK. 13


BABY'S OBSERVATION LESSONS.









INI






























What are the rest doing ? How many chins ?
What has the little one in her hand ? How many chairs ?
What has she on her head ? How many dolls ?
i ,'







_- -_




-D1


WHAT do yOll see in this picture? What has the next one in her arms .
How many girls are there What has the large girl in her right
What does one of them sit oil? hand?
What do the rest sit on ? What has she in her left ?
What has the girl on the bench in her How many eyes can you see ?
hand ? How many noses ?
What is she doing ? How many feet ?
What are the rest doing ? How many chins ?
What has the little one in her hand 9 How many chairs ?
What has she on her head ? How many dolls ?








-14 THE HOME BOOK.



i~ ''' ,il '' '!: I' C' I ': ."

,I P II, III.

'I
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TELL all you see in this picture.
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TELL~~~~~ all yo e nti it...







THE HOME BOOK. 15







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., ,4- 4

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What are these irls doing ?
,:: ,il ,-., .



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-


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TELL all you see8 in this pictur~e.
WThat aire these gSirls doing?








16 THE HOME BOOK.



BABY'S PICTURE PAGES.





I "I

.. _,-------, r --



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-- -, ;'""- .. Oats, Peas, Beans."

See-Saw.



.. ._,_g th PIigi Pe, R' abbit.
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J-
S1 ,, .'. ,..-- -- Out for an Airing.
Going to Town.






I/ i" / t



e-_ th' Pig s P -'bit

Feeding the Piggies. Pet Rabbits.








THE HOME BOOK. 17


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Baby's First Steps. -
A Bite.




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Th PInfant Cl ss
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The Infant Class. 0W'" .954%'1""' ~ I
Punch and Judy.


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A Stranger. Playing Horse.
4









18 THE HOME BOOK.




0-1







Selling Off Cheap. "Good-morning, Doggy!"
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Blackberrying. Goosey, Goosey, Gander.




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Selling Off Cheap. '"Good-morning, Dog'gy :"


























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A l' o' se. At ,,, the ,
A. lo Horse. A'tthePump
















.& .ow Horse. .At the Pump.








THE HOME BOOK. 19




F.' '. SI










Wading. An Important Position.




-I










Don't Cry." The Country Cousin.
"V ...... T i e.....- ,'old 'or


















2 All
Mli Time A _ii CI_. ,n.t


"Wadingt. An Important Position.
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Milking Time. A Cold Morning.








20 THE HOME BOOK.




: ,, \ 4 -- ....t.








-J
B-t'.-' Hunt s A C p ay o n .


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"I Want my Dolly!" On the Fence.






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The Little Model.








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Btutterfly Hunters. A Gompany of Infantry.







THE HOME BOOK. 21


I .. 41; '


". "' 'W y' "k .-- s ',-I-
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Fast Friends. The Culprit.
,:,'+, ,Li,( '', v -
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Yo n g r .......... .... "- a E
Ship Builders.



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Young Travelers. On an Errand.








22 THE HOME BOOK.



A- L- i i 'N H W',t" 'fau
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Cal Off-
.' -,' ;.''





A Lesson in Natural History. Waiting for Santa Claus




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-~--
S_ 'j ... -- /;./

A Young Shepherd.















Call Off the Dog. The First Skates.







THE HOME BOOK. 23


S.... .. ......... .-
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--a /, --- '-

.--I, ---:--i'" Fun Clan: t-e .
---. .:-' ,: -- .-'i^+ r -

The First Voyage. Learning to Slide.



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Feeding the Chickens.


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The Bird's Funeral. Cleaning the Walk.








24 THE HOME BOOK.



\\





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Late for School. Let the Old Gat Die.


1



41.
" ,
AzseA.B-loA--.cnso-._
"-'kv s- Young Dress-makers. _-





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An J]sthete. A Balloon Ascension.









THE HOME BOOK. 25











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- -- , .. "








I ',-.








FEE DING
,iSN,,, T C K
>










26 THE HOME BOOK.







-. --











IC
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T'HTE YO G NATURALIST.
: I.,
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THE YOUNG NATURALIST.










THE HOME BOOK. 27






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"I WONT HURT IT,"








28 THE HOME BOOK.





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THE HOME BOOK. 29












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A LIVELY STEED.








30 THE HOME BOOK.



I I i~! i~



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1GOING T MARKET.
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.,___ _ __ ______... __" - ..._ ; __-__- : -j







GOING TO-MARKET
., ~ ~ ~ ~ ON .. ,' ' .';,.,








THE HOME BOOK. 31





t* ,' 1;






















CHERRIES ARE RIPE










32 THE HOME BOOK.



d









III





A G YM
































A GREEDY BOY.






THE HOME BOOK. 33

















SL-"
I









,-.- -i ---










"PRETTY POLL!"

e______________________________








34 THE HOME BOOK.




















_.- .4 ".
,'; S 'UGA I OFF.



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XUG __,._, F










THE HOME BOOK. 35


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HOLLYJi BERRIE
l llilt
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W
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HOLLY BERRIES.







36 THE HOME BOOK.

1 '!' 'i' '.1 | 1l ||i ' || |i l i |
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"A CARRIER PIGEN..
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a CBIRIEI% PIGEON.










THE HOME BOOK. 37















it~
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38 THE HOME BOOK.















IT


























W-O---7i--. rI-




"WHO'S AFRAID?"








THE HOME BOOK. 39










I I
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V "5

--, . --T -






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> MOunc--- L(,9



MANY DOGS OF MANY MINDS.









40 THE HOME BOOK.






i" -' .



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V. 1 /7
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-f-:: .. :. ..-...
-- I 7-:: rI. -:







THE HOME BOOK. 41

THE RETURN OF THE DOVE.


THE waves ran deep and dark,
When from the sheltering ark
The dove was sent,
Nor found a place of rest;
For one wide sea possessed
The world's extent.
Again she started out,
And beat her wings about
In search of land;
Then back she came in haste,
Over the trackless waste,
To Noah's hand.
Into the ark she brought
The record that she sought,
For faith's reward.
The olive-branch she bore
Told that the storm was o'er,
And peace restored.
When over death's dark sea
I journey, may there be
A hand of love
Stretched out beyond the foam,
To meet and welcome home
The wandering dove.-J. P.
\ __________







42 THE HOME BOOK.



BEES IN THE CLOVER.


FTUMMING--humming--
Are the honey-bees among the crimson clover;
Coming-coming-
Are the children, for the lesson hours are over.
Blue and gold is the laughing sky,
Green and gold are the maples high,
White and gold is the daisy's eye,
Where it shines in the crimson clover.

Humming-humming--
Hang the honey-bees above the dewy clover;
"Coming-coming !"
Call the children, for the sunny hours are over.
Mother stands in the western glow,
Come !" she calls, for the sun is low;
Come, for the bees come, weary and slow,-
Come home through the dewy clover !"
MARY A. LATHIBURY.




































lo


44
































,f4
. EES IN TE CLO


- .r "











THE HOME BOOK. 45


OUT ALL NIGHT.

BY JOSEPHINE POLLARD.

A LITTLE chicken, such a soft All other chicks as young as I,
And fluffy little thing, Are safely stowed in bed;
The only place just fit for it And if I walk about much more,
Was neathh its mother's wing- I'll surely drop-down-dead!
In haste to travel off alone,
e to t l "Peep, peep!" it cried; then all at once
Without a warning peep
W i h u a, w a rii i p e I t fell d o w n in a h e a p
Stole out at dusk, when all the rest t e d n i a
Sleep. Beneath a rose-bush standing near,
Had cuddled down to sleep. '
And soon was sound asleep;
It ran about awhile in play, When morning came the mother hen
And flapped its wings with glee; Was almost wild with fright,
Went under fences, over fields, When, counting o'er her brood, she found
Delighted to be free; One had been out all night.
But when the sky grew dark, so dark Cluck, cluck!" she cried, and started off
It could not see to roam, The absent one to find,
This little chicken cried Peep, peep! While all the other baby chicks
I wish I'd stayed at home !" Went following close behind;
"Cluck, cluck peep, peep cluck, cluck !
The moon came out; its silver rays p ,
peep, peep !
The truant's pathway crossed, They cried Cluck, cluck! peep, peep !"
And yet it sadly cried "Peep, peep! Until they reached the rose-bush where
I'm lost !-I'm lost !-I'm lost !" he trat a asee.
The truant lay asleep.
With every feather up on end,
And not a bit of pluck, And then, O what a fuss they made!
It listened-O, it listened hard- How great was their delight
To hear a friendly cluck. At having in their family
One who'd been out all night!
"0 dear! why did I run away? And soon the naughty little chick
Why did I go so far? Was so puffed up with pride
My voice is almost gone; and O, It would not for a living scratch,
My legs so weary are And so, of course, it died.






46 THE HOME BOOK.


THE SHOE FAMILY.












THERE was an old woman who lived
,i : ii,\ "i' '








Sin a shoe;
'te had so many children she didn't
Sr! know what to do;

bread,
And whipped them all soundly and sent them to bed."

These children were healthy as could be desired,
The broth and the whippings were what they required;
And out through the doors and the windows they went,
Because the old lady had not paid her rent.
... '-- o-__-7--., ,







THE HOME BOOK. 47

The babies were all crowded into the toe,
The larger ones capered above and below;
While the mother pursued, with remarkable zeal,
The troublesome ones who ran down at the heel.

She lived in a shoe-and, of course, you'll agree
A cross and commanding step-mother was she;
The broth might be scarce, but 'twas commonly found
There were whippings and scoldings enough to go round.

One day a great giant whom every one feared,
In a populous portion of England appeared,
And finding a shoe on the road, in a minute
Without asking questions, he put his foot in it!

And that is the last, I guess, any one knew
Of the famous old woman who lived in a shoe.
Did the children escape where the leather was loose ?
Shoo! Shoo! I don't know. Go and ask Mother Goose.
-J. P.








48 THE HOME BOOK.



IN BLOSSOM-TIME.




N 6.. ... -ti -" -- _' .
l.. ... 1O
















-An allele, in "los.ui-time.








On every leaf, in letters clear, In blossom-time new hopes we build
The promises of God appear, On promises yet unfulfilled,
And faith, in ecstasy sublime, And toward celestial regions climb,
Sings with the birds in blossom-time. Courageously, in blossom-time.
The cherry-trees are all in flower, A newer gospel then is writ,
Their blossoms drop in fragrant shower, And birds and blossoms herald it,
And orchards flaunt the augury And all the bells of heaven chime
Of happy harvests yet to be. With Easter joy in blossom-time.
-J. P.
..' ,








And ai ] i -A :t t ,c, i h rl uni- time.
On every leaf, in letters clear, In blossom-time new hopes we build
The promises of God appear, On promises yet unfulfilled,
And faith, in ecstasy sublime, And toward celestial regions climb,
Sings with the birds in blossom-time. Courageously, in blossom-time.
The cherry-trees are all in flower, A newer gospel then is writ,
Their blossoms drop in fragrant shower, And birds and blossoms herald it,
And orchards flaunt the augury And all the bells of heaven chime
Of happy harvests yet to be. With Easter joy in blossom-time.
-J. P.


















































-- 10,l

























BUBBLESS.







THE HOME BOOK. 51


BUBBLES.



UBBLES-bubbles-lighter than air!
I toss you into the every-where.
You are little worlds; you must spin and glow
Around and around like a planet-so!

I see within you, 0 little worlds,
A crystal window, and little girls
Look out at me. 0 tell me true,
Are the children real that live in you ?

0 dear-a-me, dear-a-me, pretty worlds!
You break,-and where are the little girls?
.And how do I know that the crystal sky,
And the shining planets that hang so high,

And the silver moon, and the great gold sun,
May not break and vanish as you have done ?
But these were my worlds, and those belong
To God, who is loving, and wise, and strong.
MARY A. LATHBURY.

'?,








52 THE HOME BOOK.




PART SECOND.



T IE little student now begins to recognize recognition of them in a body of printed matter
Swords. The object-whatever it be-a is the next step. From page 60 to page 74 the
clomd, a house, a fence, or a bridge, must have a little pupil has hard work to do. But it will be
given word to represent it. Object and word paying work. He will learn how the word
are brought together. The eye rests on both at "papa" looks, and then will find it on the full
the same time. lie sees the picture of a reality, printed page. The word "tongue" will be
IHe next sees the word-representation of both found in the same way, and thus with a. little
the reality and the picture. It may be a cloud. patient effort on teacher's part our tiny student
Ie recognizes in the picture what he has often will begin to read words by the dozen and by the
seen in nature. Ile discovers in the picture a score. The teacher reading the story may pause
word which stands for the thing lie calls a cloud. at the appointed words for baby's recognition
Thus by a little drill lie becomes master of these and pronunciation, and thus the juvenile pow-
thought-forms in type. IHe knows them when- ers of attention and concentration will be devel-
ever and wherever lie sees them. oped.
By means of the labeled pictures on page 54, Just here much patience may be needed.
mother may make the child familiar with a ninu- The teacher will need it. Our little student
her of words : MOUNTAIN, SCIooL, WAGON, wants to go on to the other pictures. It will
BRIDGE, STORE:, ROAn, IHOISE, CHIMINEY, ROOF, linger reluctantly over mere print when concrete
etc., etc. The object lie knows. He soon also things in pictured lines await the turning of a
knows the word. The exercises, continued few leaves. If baby rules, the printed pages will
through pages 55-59 in another form, put the be turned rapidly. If mother rules, the baby
pictures in one place on the page, and the word will find that something must be done before
already framed into a short sentence in another the advance is made. And if mother persists,
place on the same page. The pupil sees a pict- baby will give up. And if baby persists until
ure of a TOP. Hie is then taught the word TOP. mother surrenders, a great opportunity is lost.
HIe says, voluntarily, "I see a top." Mother The child should not be kept too long at one
shows his little speech in words. So through time on the word-study and recognition, but
the following pages words are recognized, put some time, and that just a few minutes beyond
into sentences, and by picture and print the its own preference, it should be exercised on the
child's ideas are made more definite, and his mastering and finding of words. The value of
thoughts are embodied in fully framed sentences such control will be seen in many ways through
which he can read and reread. the years of his early life. Naturally lie shrinks
While this process is going on pupil or teacher, from hard work. He is willing to be a recipient,
or both together, may construct stories in which but not a laborer. He is willing to be enter-
two or more, or all, of the pictures on a page may trained, but rebels against entertaining, if there
be employed. Thus the power of imagination is be the slightest demand for effort against incli-
cultivated. nation in such entertaining. Therefore mother
The study of words without pictures and the should see to it, that inclination does not sway









THE HOME BOOK. 53

the child's life. lIe must learn in the very begin- prepositions," be carried on until in the reading
ning that many things must be done because it lesson, on page 85, our little fellow cannot only
is RIGIT AND FOR THE BEST. Children thus read the accounts of "hlen,"" cat," bear," etc.;
trained before they are two years of age, in little but can tell which words are nouns," which
things, will show the blessed fruits of it when adjectives," etc. Other objects than those in
they are ten and twenty, and in school, and in soci- the pictures--objects in the room, or to be seen
ety, and in business, will be greatly the gainers outside of the house-may be used as further
over those whose lives have been lives of prefer- illustrations of the parts of speech. Little peo-
ence and impatience. The root of intemperance ple will soon grow accustomed to the exercise,
is in this region of a child's life. When lie and will take delight in it.
finds out that there is a power of will outside Following this may come the lessons in
of him, and in another who has authority over counting," and in geometrical figures, some of
him, and that that will never flinches nor fails, them beyond the youngster's reach just now,
lie will acquire the habit of surrender to the but what lie cannot just yet master lie can omit
force in command. Thus in this little drill may for the time being. Carefully he may be trained
be developed elements of character which will tell to study the arithmetical picture on page 86
in wider spheres and larger ways later on in life. can learn the figures on page 87 ; pick them out
In this same spirit of patience and persever- on page 88; learn the geometrical figures on
ance let the first lessons in nouns," in "nouns page 89; apply the power of observation and of
singular and plural," in nouns with adjectives," counting to the rough and obscure (and all the
in "nouns and verbs," in "nouns, verbs, and more useful) picture on page 91.


























8







54 THE HOME BOOK.


PICTURES AND WORDS.


( -' -1- -

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FINGER BOAR

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-.": 1 .- : [ -- O:_ i .'. ': i _g . "
I' '" ': = i"'! : [ :1 ; > .







THE HOME BOOK. 55





^, .
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I see a top.. I have a red box.

It is a nice top. Here is a cage.

It will spin well. Is there a bird in it ?

Make a little story of your own from these pictures.






56 THE HOME BOOK.

















Ned is a big boy. The hoop is round.







He has a kite. Can you row a boat ?
The girl has a hoop. Will the bee sting ?

Make a little story of your own from these pictures.
I \x











Ned is a big boy. The hoop is round.
He has a kite. Can you row a boat?






THE HOME BOOK. 57









i 'II















Look at that box. Can you play ball ?
What is in it? Ned has a big ball.
What an old well! It is red and blue.

Make a little story of your own from these pictures.






58 THE HOME BOOK.












She keeps it in a box.I












Fred found some plums on a tree.
'4k'4"


S--- -

i --_---- -r-" -









Jane has a nice hat.
She keeps it in a box.
She loves to go to church.
There is a bench in the pew,
Fred found some plums on a tree.
They were quite sour.

Make a little story of your own from these pictures.







THE HOME BOOK. 59




























Is it not a queer bird?
Make a little story of your own from these tures.
: ,-1 ,^ l i.









, ,- ....
Is i a queer bi















Makee ; story of yor own from these pictures.
.ic ,o ,o ,.i,,. '"
Ca" ,o clm a fec i "'''






60 THE HOME BOOK.


Our baby stooped to
take a smell,
Basket. And


-- -]-c-own- It


Steps. ,

Gardener.

Rake. 7

Fell. fell.

To mamma the sad
Babyr. ,









news they tell,
\ And mamma's care
makes baby well.






THE HOME BOOK. 61

Our Tom goes

to church like

Sa man; sings

_. When sister

S sings; keeps



.,,-

quiet during prayer -

and sermon; and

after church walks

home with his sis- ./, "i;

ter9






62 THE HOME BOOK.





A who

baby cannot

sweet row.







I\ J
Tw o that
-- .,- U ,J-';"- -1..]".,

wooden \--. "1 wouldn't
/' ,' -i'
steeds j\ .. go.
S I 1 "






THE HOME BOOK. 63

May.
T, !, ,I ,,' .
Johnnie.
T, I .l '.N
Blocks. ,

Fort.


May and Johnnie, just for fun,
Build a fort, and make it high;
But below here is a gun,
That would send it to the sky.


Tom.

Jenny.

.Ct ABaby.

S_.- Gun.
AA>.i ...






64 THE HOME BOOK.
Co' Boss, Co' Boss, 'tis milking time,
The table-cloth is spread;
Three,,
.ZL little bowls stand

4Lj, empty yet



1 < .,,- 7 -

|~ I 'Beside the

,. plate of bread;

And we must have our own sweet milk,
Before we go to bed.

Co' Boss, Co' Boss, 'tis supper time,
What makes you stay so late ?
The little birds have gone to bed,
And we are on the gate
Watching across the clover lot;
How long have we to wait ?
S. J. BRIGHAM.






THE HOME BOOK. 65
Here we find

them wash-

ing dishes,

As happily as

one could

ask,

r / But below

2 2 here Tom-

~,~~m / my wishes,
/ t],/ I ",- <-" TThat he had

a lighter

task.






66 THE HOME BOOK.


WORDS.

horse bark put smaller

will cage oxen or

do funny which man

what larger dog does

than at bird ox

loads an how pig

it will strange the

great pig is draw

squeals heavy best in

like you much can


elephant woman caught a






THE HOME BOOK. 67



SENTENCES.


SN elephant'is much larger than an ox.
A pig is much smaller than a horse.
A dog will bark at a strange man.
A man and a woman caught a bird.
Put the bird in the cage.
Oxen will draw great heavy loads.
I-ow funny the pig squeals!
Which do you like the best-
The ox, the elephant, or the horse ?
What a heavy bird-cage!
Can you draw a big dog ?
Can you draw an elephant ?
Can the man put the pig in a cage ?
The pig squeals at the man.
The dog will bark at the pig.
The man is much larger than the woman.

See how many more sentences you can make out of the words on opposite page.






68 THE HOME BOOK.


WORDS.

some good peaches are

on rude nice learn

must your that tear

play here be games

books not find do

to clothes with will

those shelf so new

in bad John to-day

for well boys very

are they you easy

James eat many hard







THE HOME BOOK. 69


SENTENCES.



O not be so rude in your play.
Here are some nice easy games for you to learn.
On that shelf you will find some good books.
Do not tear your nice new clothes.
John and James are not very well to-day.
They must not eat so many hard peaches.
Good boys will not read bad books.
Bad boys will play many rude games.
John, do not tear those books.
Here are some very nice peaches.
You must learn to read well.
Do not eat the peaches on that shelf.
Find some good books and some nice games.
James, here are your new clothes.
Are you not well to-day ?
Well, you must find some easy games to play.


See how many more sentences you can make out of the words on opposite page.
10






70 THE HOME BOOK.


WORDS.

we ocean somile can


apples you and day

to window see go


will come parlor the


beach hark I what

visit would kitchen hear


noise me eat home


in that is for


strange my from cloud

like there pleasant blue


not sky a shells
t ____________________________






THE HOME BOOK. 74


SENTENCES.


COME and visit me in my pleasant home.
I should like you to see my parlor.
We will eat apples in the kitchen.
From that window you can see the ocean.
Some day we will go to the beach for shells.
Hark! what is that strange noise I hear ?
There is not a cloud in the blue sky.
Would you not like to see my kitchen ?
Hear the noise of the ocean.
We can see strange shells there.
Come to the window. See how blue the sky is.
We will not eat apples in the parlor.
I like my home. It is pleasant there.
There is a noise in the kitchen.
It is a pleasant day to visit the ocean.
Come, we can eat the apples on the beach.

See how many more sentences you can make out of the words on opposite page.






72 THE HOME BOOK.


BABY'S WORD PAGE.

papa dog lamb swing

father cat cow nose

mamma horse sheep eyes

mother cart calf mouth

grandpa hen goat hands

grandfather chicken kid feet

grandma duck sun cheek

grandmother goose moon ears

window nurse stars hair

door man sky teeth

bed woman house tongue

chair lady church arm

table bird rock leg

pig nest cradle knee






THE HOME BOOK. 73


A DAY ON THE FARM.
CONTAINING ALL THE WORDS ON WORD-PAGE.


ONE summer May went with her father and mother to visit
her grandfather and grandmother, who lived a long way off
on a nice farm. Mayhad never been so far from home, or seen so
many strange sights, and she had to ask great many questions.
She had a chair of her own, and would sit at the table just
like a little lady. One bright day, when the sun shone, her
grandpa took her out of doors, and introduced her to the
cow and the calf, who were in the barn, and let her pat the
nose of the horse. Then they went out where the sheep
were, and it was great fun to pull the wool on their backs,
and to hear them cry "baa!" One dear little lamb ran up
to May and rubbed its nose on her arm.
Down by the pond they met a duck and a goose, and a
hen with one chicken. The duck and the goose went right
into the water, and swam off, like pretty boats. But the hen
and chicken had to stay on shore, for they could not swim.
When May came home her tongue ran fast and her eyes
shone like stars. There was so much to tell. First, mamma had
to be told, then papa, and then grandma; and then it had to be
all told over again to the nurse, when she was putting May
to bed. As the little girl could not call all the animals by
name, she made the noises they made, and every body
understood.
___________________________________________________________






74 THE HOME BOOK.

Moo-oo-oo said the cow.
Baa-aa-aa! said the sheep and the lamb.
SQuack quack said the duck.
Hike hike !" said the goose.
"Nuf! nuf!" said the pig, who never seemed to get
enough.
When May made these funny noises the dog and the cat
pricked up their ears.
Bow-wow !" said the dog, and showed his teeth.
"Mew mew !" said the cat.
This made the baby laugh, and the cat and dog curled
around on the mat and went to sleep again.
Later in the day nurse put May in the swing and let
her rock slowly, as if it were a cradle. Up in the tree was
a bird on a nest. A bad boy climbed the tree. He took
the nest in his hands. There were five eggs in it. His feet
slipped and he fell, and broke his leg near the knee. He
was sick for a long time.
When it grew dark May stood by the window or door to
see the moon and stars come out in the sky. Away off was a
church. Hark! Here comes a horse and cart. A man is
driving. A woman sits beside him. They must be going to
sell the goat and the kid they have in the cart.
May is tired. She puts up her mouth to be kissed. Her
eyes begin to droop. Mamma strokes her hair and her cheek,
sings a low by-by, and the dear little girl is soon fast asleep.
It had been a long day, but a very happy one, and there
were more days just like it.








THE HOME BOOK. 75



PICTURES OF NOUNS.









S '



"I' ,Q. I".I
Boy. Bee. Church.








Boat. Bird. Comb.







Pipe. Fish. Knife.



O i Nes r. .... '



ONG

Owl. Nest. Girl.










76 THE HOME BOOK.
















House. Lamp. Tree.






[ ; U I





Top. Cage. Key.








--- --_


Cart. Shoe. Box.













Leaf. Slate. Well.










THE HOME BOOK. 77


-.....- :, ", ,, _r.,,\ II/ l 1} 1,i; "














Tree. Flag-staff. Water-fall.














Clouds. Rock, Tent.
S -- '






































,r
Lake. Bridge. Brook.
u\n I- Moon---r
iSi.


















Clouds Rock Tent.



,,- --- -.-








Lake. Bridge. Brook.
---
~2 If













- --,' -- -- ------,,. . ... ,

i o -s-









78 THE HOME BOOK.





SIIf I I I



I I


I i i


Statuette. Curtain. Easel.













ork-box. Chair. Mirror.
~-. C .-- =- ~ ;



____-- :
,Work-box. Chair. Mirror.










Ottoman. Table. Stool.







oP1 r
__' __ ,_ '
Sof.a.... Pituec re;


Sofa. Picture. Screen








THE HOME BOOK. 79


., .





j. ^fat ,...-



Grapes. Currants. Cherries. Figs.










Pomegranates. Lemon. Apple. Peach.









Orange. Strawberry. Plums. Pear.








aaaa rr. Q

Baannas. Raspberries. Quince. Olives.







80 THE HOME BOOK.


-t
-; .
II 4
/Z
i, 3 -- -- .

S. A

,.-- ,- *t- -
Carrot. Beans. Peas. Beet.

S a L t u. ,



.,.* .... \ ... y ,, '



Squash. Lettuce. Cabbage. Celery.









Egg-plant. Peppers. Asparagus. Cucumber.








Tomato. Potatoes. Onions. Cauliflower.
,V ,j i ~ ) , -

4_- -
Egg-plant. Peppers. Asparagus. Cucumber.









THE HOME BOOK. 8



NOUNS, SINGULAR AND PLURAL.












Cherry. Cherries. Flower. Flowers.




i, -:" -^





Plant. Plants. Butterfly. Butterflies.

.i .-. V ; ,




Ball. Balls. Head. Heads.











Feather. Feathers. Swallow. Swallows.








82 THE HOME BOOK.


NOUNS WITH ADJECTIVES.

/
,A T A L L T r e A. S A B i r d A C R O O K E D F e n ce-- -

"-s- tr "



S,-. -.






A--T- B-ox 'A OP-E B'- A UA, F, -- .'
A TALL Tree. A SMALL Bird. A CROOKED Fence.





-^



A SHORT Tree A LARGE Bird. A STRAIGHT Fence.
i I',
.... I ---- .]-_. -:. ; .---







B''- i : ,Z .' _
A SHORT TreeBox. A LARGE Booird. A STRAIGHTAPPY Fnce.






-1 ..' ) ,

A SQROUNDARE Box. An CLOSED Book. An UNHAPPY Face.
_"-- .-- -_---__ ___








THE HOME BOOK. 83


NOUNS AND VERBS.



!Ip
,.:- ., \,,,, .' "' 7 I i- '1 ?

Y l '. i' ;
-I :, f'i )





The Children SLIDE. The Girl JUMPS. The Child SWINGS.










The H S. T Bb C. Th Girl WRITES.
The -:_ S. The Far RAKES The o .. AS.
.. '-



The Man READS. The Bird FLIES The Bird DRINI(S.



(i ( :-.- ---" I -~ __
,-' 1"-'--- -


The Hen SITS. The Baby CRIES. The Girl WRITES.


_. i11.-! t-


"' ./ /-1 _I. ,1(
^,I .- -i '



The Lady SEWS. The Farmer RAKES. The Boy PLAYS.








84 THE HOME BOOK.

NOUNS, VERBS, AND PREPOSITIONS.



I, -
.



dC-




jI --I I i







li e
c / \ ".* .-, 7 b






-:: -, - f-- '_. _ -. -- I I i
The Maid Came INTO the Gar- The Ball Went THROUGH the The Stick Leans AGAINST the
den. Glass. Tree.



I, --



The Fish Swims IN the Water. TheHorse Goes BEFOREthe Cart.TheBookwasLaid ON the Table
1- ~- 1-



1- / --


B W--- _. iT W 'n B -I --eI

The Boy Rode WITHOUT a Saddle. The Girl Jumps OVER the Rope. The Dog Went BEHIND the Man.








THE HOME BOOK. 85



BABY'S READING LESSONS.


A HEN. A DUCK.
A IEN. A white hen. An old, white A DUCK. A nice duck. A nice, fat duck.
hen. A nice, fat duck set sail, quack quack!
An old white hen is in the hay. One, two; one, two, three ; one, two, three,
An egg. A nice egg. A nice round egg. four;
A nice round egg she means to lay. With four fat duck-lings at her back.


A CAT. A COW.
A CAT. A fine cat. A fine, large cat. A cow. A red cow. A good red cow.
A fine large cat with soft, smooth fur. A good red cow went down the lane.
SThe dog. The dog can. The dog can bark. At night. At night-fall. At night-fall she
The dog can bark, but cannot purr. came.
At night-fall she came home a-gain.
A BEAR.
A BEAR. A big bear. A big black bear. A HORSE.
A big black bear is in the wood. A ioRsE. A lean horse. A long, lean
lie robs. He climbs trees. Why does he horse.
climb ? A long, lean horse will win the race.
He loves to rob the bees for food. The deer. The rein-deer. The swift rein-
deer.
The rein-deer has as swift a pace.
AN OWL.
AN OWL. A small owl. A small gray
owl. THE hen clucks. The dog barks.
A small gray owl with great, round eyes. The cat purrs. The bear growls.
No bird. No bird looks. No bird I know. The owl hoots. The duck quacks.
No bird I know can look more wise. The cow lows. The horse neighs.
12








86 THE HOME BOOK.


A LESSON IN COUNTING.






























1 One House. Seven D.ucks.
2 Two Chimneys 1 8 Eight Trees.:.--- .,- ...

.3 Three Men. 9 Nine Posts--- in fence.-
4 Four Mountains. J i 11 10 Ten Stones.. I- -..
..,.. ;. . .-- "- -. .. .......... _".--
-- S: ---,. -^ i! -. .' ",s- -- --'















5 Five Windows. Ii!11 11 Eleven Sheep. IIII lll
6 Six Pieces on line. lil 12 Twelve Birds. III I
.. -1






THE HOME BOOK. 87


PUT THEM TOGETHER.


1 and 7 17 Seventeen.
2 and 0 20 Twenty.
2 and 5 25 Twenty-five.

4 and 3 43 Forty-three.

7 and 6 76 Seventy-six.
8 and 3 83 Eighty-three.

5 and 7 57 Fifty-seven.

6 and 9 69 Sixty-nine.

9 and 3 93 Ninety-three.

3 and 2 and 9 329 Three hundred and twenty-nine.

6 and 1 and 5 -. 615 Six hundred and fifteen.

4 and 2 and 8 428 Four hundred and twenty-eight.

5 and 9 and 7 597 Five hundred and ninety-seven.

1 and 0 and 0 100 One hundred.

1 and 0 and 0 and 0 1,000 One thousand.






88 THE HOME BOOK.

PICK THEM OUT.

46 4 8 3 0 3 3 0 1
1 2 6 5 25 4 59 3 9 7 0
S 0 18 2 2 4 9
36 1 m 0 L 5 8 g V 3 6
4 o 9 9 2 2 p 1
8 0 2 4 9 5 0 3 t O T
s 1 3 4 4 0 2 4
7 62 5 0 7 4 0 4 2 5
7 2 3 8
0 6 8 0 7 7 4 g 1 6
5 4 1 9 8 7
g L 5 2 $ 9
7 3 5 g 40 4 8 8
9 5 $ 3 9 4 0
S 8 7 4 6 1 2 4 65
S 1 3 2 5 9 6 7 0
7 2 t 3 $ 1 9 0 3 8
1 8 0 1 8 4 OD 2 $ 4
1 0 2 9 5 3 5
8 6 9 4 2 9 7 0 7 2
$ c 6 t 8 3 $ 7
0 10 9 5 2 1 9 3









THE HOME BOOK. 89




FIRST LESSON IN GEOMETRY.










A Vertical, or
A Straight Line. A Crooked Line. A Horizontal Line. Perpendicular, Line.










Left Oblique. Right Oblique. Parallel. Curve.










Convex. Concave. Circle. Spiral.









Serrated. Right Angle. Triangle. Square.
_i~.







90 THE HOME BOOK.


JOHN PETERSON'S MENAGERIE.


OJIN PETERSON kept a menagerie. He made it all
himself. It was in a scrap-book, and all on one page,
and you would not have supposed that such a collection of
birds, beasts, and creeping things could be crowded into so
small a space. I will mention the contents of John Peter-
son's menagerie, and see if you can find them on the oppo-
site page.
There were several birds, and one white carrier-pigeon,
two large flies, and three small ones, four old hens, and one
fat spider. There were at least three horses, one snail, an
eagle, a swalloio, an adjutant bird, which looks like a stork,
an elephant, a black cat, and a white cat, an owl, a lion, an
ostrich, a camel, a lobster, a pig, an ox, an armadillo, a squir-
rel, a goat, a dog, a swoord-fish, a reideer, a a whale, two
dreadful looking snakes, a great grasshopper, and a butter-

To show how tame these creatures were, John Peterson
put in a man, three women, three boys, and a girl, and if you
want to see a "happy family," take a look at John Peter-
son's menagerie.











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Ir~'I

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.,




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.k~. :. ,..,' ., .,. _. i .. :
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