• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Introduction
 Table of Contents
 An autumn jingle
 Little golden hair
 Little Jill Horner
 Little Teddy
 Wee Willie Winkie
 The speckledy hen
 Song of the little red hen
 The little cock sparrow
 Nursery rhyme
 The pin
 Annie's nursery song
 The rainy day song
 Robins learning to fly
 Kindness to the birds
 The tired seamstress
 Nursery rhyme
 Bessie's kind cruelty
 All the same in the end
 Fishing
 Little daisy
 Jingle
 Tree on the hill
 The blacksmith man
 Amy's alphabet
 Puss and her three kittens
 Katie's luncheon
 Three in a bed
 Thank you, pretty cow
 Katie's wants
 Pomp and I
 The little maid
 Papa's baby
 A funny fact
 The pretty little maiden
 The boasting hen
 Little Dame Crump
 The sweet little doll
 The sulky Oleander
 A little boy's pocket
 Good advice
 Little Flora
 Twenty froggies
 Susie Miller
 Watching for pa!
 The baby
 Where did you come from, baby...
 The owl and the pussy-cat
 Totty's arithmetic
 Robin Redbreast
 Little kitty
 Too foggy
 Pinkety-winkety-wee
 The three little bugs
 Eleven little pussy cats
 Dollie's doctor
 A doll's wedding
 Naughty kitty
 Little Miss Snowflake
 Saturday night
 Keepsakes
 Jesus' name
 The home of the robin
 Charley and his kitty
 The dead doll
 The smiling dolly
 All the children
 A mother's diary
 Willie's question
 Learning to pray
 Play
 Where shall baby's dimple be?
 The Sunday baby
 Minnie and Winnie
 Good for something
 The new doll
 Child-song
 Coming
 Pitty Pat's prayer
 Little tease
 Gran'ma Al'as does
 The foolish robin
 What Robin told
 The first party
 Little Molly
 Baby fingers
 Nursery song
 The changeling
 Hang up the baby's stocking
 The baby I love
 Five little chickens
 Mistress kitty
 Dick's supper
 For the baby
 Over in the meadow
 The hang-bird's nest
 The chicken's mistake
 Cause for complaint
 The little people
 The villainous spider
 Little Willie and the apple
 The lost kite
 The clean face
 The little black
 What the choir sang about the new...
 My speech
 Hoppie-oppie
 For the little ones
 The little dog under the wagon
 Spinning
 A boy's and girl's way
 A dinner and a kiss
 The rainy day
 Pride goes before a fall
 The early worm
 Kitty
 The fairy's rescue
 The donation party
 Before and after school
 Why some birds hop, and others...
 A relic of "The fourth"
 My wrens
 The motherless turkeys
 The little conqueror
 A sum in arithmetic
 The hero
 Suppose
 Whistle and hoe
 The four presents
 A complaint
 The conscientious hen
 The secret of happiness
 The robin
 God wants the boys and girls
 Magic curtains
 Santa claus and the mouse
 The foolish pansy
 Shut the door softly
 Baby in the looking-glass
 Happy birthday: A two-fold...
 True riches
 Mother
 The dandelion boy
 The lesson
 The gray swan
 The fox and the cat
 Gentle words
 Keeping his word
 Beautiful hands
 Beauty
 Not one to spare
 Muff and Tuff
 The little clam
 The true story of little boy...
 The red breast of the robin
 Nose and eyes
 The flight of the birds
 The rattle of the bones
 The grumbler
 Little Pat and the parson
 The open door
 An old Christmas rhyme
 The pet greyhound
 The vase and the pitcher
 Queen Flora's choir
 Frost
 Our Gypsy
 A pleasant Saturday night
 The fox and the hen
 Three little graves
 The family
 The story of the little rid...
 The famous battle of bumble-bug...
 The wonderful sack
 The factor
 Index to titles
 Index to first lines
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Songs and rhymes for the little ones
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055380/00001
 Material Information
Title: Songs and rhymes for the little ones
Physical Description: xi, 234 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Morrison, Mary Jane Whitney, 1832-1904 ( Compiler )
G.P. Putnam's Sons
Knickerbocker Press ( Publisher )
Publisher: G.P. Putnam's Sons :
Knickerbocker Press
Place of Publication: New York ;
London
Publication Date: 1887, c1884
Copyright Date: 1884
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1887   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1887
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: compiled by Mary J. Morrison.
General Note: Without music.
General Note: Tinted illustrated borders on every page.
General Note: Includes indexes by title and first lines.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055380
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224905
notis - ALG5177
oclc - 69242764

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Acknowledgement
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
    An autumn jingle
        Page 1
    Little golden hair
        Page 1
    Little Jill Horner
        Page 2
    Little Teddy
        Page 2
    Wee Willie Winkie
        Page 2
    The speckledy hen
        Page 3
    Song of the little red hen
        Page 3
    The little cock sparrow
        Page 4
    Nursery rhyme
        Page 4
    The pin
        Page 5
    Annie's nursery song
        Page 5
    The rainy day song
        Page 6
    Robins learning to fly
        Page 7
    Kindness to the birds
        Page 8
    The tired seamstress
        Page 8
    Nursery rhyme
        Page 9
    Bessie's kind cruelty
        Page 10
    All the same in the end
        Page 11
    Fishing
        Page 11
    Little daisy
        Page 12
    Jingle
        Page 13
    Tree on the hill
        Page 13
    The blacksmith man
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Amy's alphabet
        Page 16
    Puss and her three kittens
        Page 17
    Katie's luncheon
        Page 18
    Three in a bed
        Page 19
    Thank you, pretty cow
        Page 20
    Katie's wants
        Page 20
    Pomp and I
        Page 21
    The little maid
        Page 22
    Papa's baby
        Page 23
    A funny fact
        Page 24
    The pretty little maiden
        Page 24
    The boasting hen
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Little Dame Crump
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The sweet little doll
        Page 29
    The sulky Oleander
        Page 30
        Page 31
    A little boy's pocket
        Page 32
    Good advice
        Page 33
    Little Flora
        Page 33
    Twenty froggies
        Page 34
    Susie Miller
        Page 35
    Watching for pa!
        Page 35
    The baby
        Page 36
    Where did you come from, baby dear?
        Page 37
    The owl and the pussy-cat
        Page 38
    Totty's arithmetic
        Page 39
    Robin Redbreast
        Page 40
    Little kitty
        Page 41
    Too foggy
        Page 42
    Pinkety-winkety-wee
        Page 42
    The three little bugs
        Page 43
    Eleven little pussy cats
        Page 44
    Dollie's doctor
        Page 45
    A doll's wedding
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Naughty kitty
        Page 48
    Little Miss Snowflake
        Page 49
    Saturday night
        Page 50
    Keepsakes
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Jesus' name
        Page 53
    The home of the robin
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Charley and his kitty
        Page 55
    The dead doll
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The smiling dolly
        Page 58
        Page 59
    All the children
        Page 60
        Page 61
    A mother's diary
        Page 62
    Willie's question
        Page 63
    Learning to pray
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Play
        Page 66
    Where shall baby's dimple be?
        Page 67
    The Sunday baby
        Page 68
    Minnie and Winnie
        Page 69
    Good for something
        Page 70
        Page 71
    The new doll
        Page 72
    Child-song
        Page 73
    Coming
        Page 73
    Pitty Pat's prayer
        Page 74
    Little tease
        Page 75
    Gran'ma Al'as does
        Page 76
    The foolish robin
        Page 77
    What Robin told
        Page 78
    The first party
        Page 79
    Little Molly
        Page 80
    Baby fingers
        Page 81
    Nursery song
        Page 82
    The changeling
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Hang up the baby's stocking
        Page 85
    The baby I love
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Five little chickens
        Page 88
    Mistress kitty
        Page 89
    Dick's supper
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
    For the baby
        Page 92
    Over in the meadow
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    The hang-bird's nest
        Page 97
    The chicken's mistake
        Page 98
    Cause for complaint
        Page 99
    The little people
        Page 100
    The villainous spider
        Page 101
    Little Willie and the apple
        Page 102
    The lost kite
        Page 103
    The clean face
        Page 104
    The little black
        Page 105
        Page 106
    What the choir sang about the new bonnet
        Page 107
    My speech
        Page 108
    Hoppie-oppie
        Page 109
        Page 110
    For the little ones
        Page 111
    The little dog under the wagon
        Page 112
    Spinning
        Page 113
    A boy's and girl's way
        Page 114
    A dinner and a kiss
        Page 115
    The rainy day
        Page 116
    Pride goes before a fall
        Page 117
    The early worm
        Page 118
    Kitty
        Page 119
    The fairy's rescue
        Page 120
        Page 121
    The donation party
        Page 122
    Before and after school
        Page 123
    Why some birds hop, and others walk
        Page 124
    A relic of "The fourth"
        Page 125
    My wrens
        Page 126
    The motherless turkeys
        Page 127
        Page 128
    The little conqueror
        Page 129
    A sum in arithmetic
        Page 130
        Page 131
    The hero
        Page 132
    Suppose
        Page 133
    Whistle and hoe
        Page 134
    The four presents
        Page 135
    A complaint
        Page 136
    The conscientious hen
        Page 137
    The secret of happiness
        Page 137
    The robin
        Page 138
    God wants the boys and girls
        Page 139
    Magic curtains
        Page 140
    Santa claus and the mouse
        Page 140
        Page 141
    The foolish pansy
        Page 142
        Page 143
    Shut the door softly
        Page 144
    Baby in the looking-glass
        Page 145
    Happy birthday: A two-fold song
        Page 146
    True riches
        Page 147
        Page 148
    Mother
        Page 149
        Page 150
    The dandelion boy
        Page 151
        Page 152
    The lesson
        Page 153
    The gray swan
        Page 154
        Page 155
    The fox and the cat
        Page 156
    Gentle words
        Page 157
    Keeping his word
        Page 158
        Page 159
    Beautiful hands
        Page 160
    Beauty
        Page 161
    Not one to spare
        Page 162
        Page 163
    Muff and Tuff
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
    The little clam
        Page 168
        Page 169
    The true story of little boy blue
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
    The red breast of the robin
        Page 173
    Nose and eyes
        Page 174
    The flight of the birds
        Page 175
    The rattle of the bones
        Page 176
        Page 177
    The grumbler
        Page 178
    Little Pat and the parson
        Page 179
        Page 180
    The open door
        Page 181
        Page 182
    An old Christmas rhyme
        Page 183
        Page 184
    The pet greyhound
        Page 185
        Page 186
    The vase and the pitcher
        Page 187
        Page 188
    Queen Flora's choir
        Page 189
        Page 190
    Frost
        Page 191
    Our Gypsy
        Page 192
        Page 193
    A pleasant Saturday night
        Page 194
    The fox and the hen
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
    Three little graves
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
    The family
        Page 200
    The story of the little rid hin
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
    The famous battle of bumble-bug and bumble-bee
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
    The wonderful sack
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
    The factor
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
    Index to titles
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
    Index to first lines
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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SONGS AND RHYMES

FOR



THE LITTLE ONES




COMPILED BY

MARY J. MORRISON
(" JENNY WALLIS")





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NEW YORK AND LONDON
G. P. PUTNAM'S SONS
Ti Ehnidkerbod8er i87 ves
J 1887


















































COPYRIGHT, 1884,
BY G. P. PUTNAM'S SONS.























Pruss of
G. P. Pzctnam's Sons
New York



















ACKNOWLEDGMENTS are due to the following publishers
for kind permission given by them for the use of poems from
their several publications:-

HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN, & Co., for poems by John G. Whit-
tier, Alice and Phoebe Cary, J. T. Trowbridge, Elisabeth
Akers Allen, Marian Douglas, Annette Bishop, and Mrs.
Anna M. Wells. Also, for poems called "The Little Rid
Hin," and "The Famous Battle of Bumble Bug and Bumble
Bee."
THE CENTURY Co., for poems by Mary Mapes Dodge,
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Mrs. E. T. Corbett (author of Karl
and the Queen of Queerland "), Lucy Larcom, Emilie Pouls-
son, Alice Williams, Margaret Vandergrift; also, for poem
called Hiddy Diddy."
HARPER & BROS., for poem by Josephine Pollard.
D. LOTHROP & Co., for poems by Harriet McEwen Kim-
ball, J. L. Bates, and F. Cunningham.
DODD, MEAD & CO., for one of Aunt Effie's Rhymes.
CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS, for poems by Dr. J. G. Hol-
land and Harriet McEwen Kimball.
NURSERY PUBLISHING CO., for poems called Little Ole-
ander Slip," and Little Flora."
PERRY, MASON & Co., for poem by Earl Marble.
HUBBARD BROS., for poem by Charles Follen Adams.
The quaint ditty, "The Factor," has been handed down
wholly by word of mouth for five generations.
My warmest thanks also are tendered to the authors who
have so kindly and promptly sent permission for the use of
their poems, and for the many kind wishes that have accom-
panied them. I have given proper credit to each poem
whenever, by diligent search, I could discover its source, and
trust I shall be pardoned for any possible omissions.
M. J. M.





























INTRODUCTION.




IT has been a labor of love to collect these poems, for
the instruction and amusement of the dear children of our
home circle. They have made many a rainy day bright
with mirth, have lightened days of illness, and dried the
tears from loved eyes of every hue, each dear to the
parent heart. I have been urged to share these plea-
sures with others, and now present this volume to the pub-
lic, hoping that in each home of our loved land it may
prove a blessing.
For babies dear,
And children small;
For lads and lassies,
Short and tall;
For bright black eyes,
And tender blue,
I bring my gifts,
Both old and new.
M. J. M.





































CONTENTS.




PAGE
AN AUTUMN JINGLE I
LITTLE GOLDEN HAIR I
LITTLE JILL HORNER ... 2
LITTLE TEDDY . 2
WEE WILLIE WINKIE 2
STHE SPECKLED HEN 3
SSONG OF THE LITTLE RED HEN .. 3
THE LITTLE COCK SPARROW 4
SNURSERY RHYME 4
THE PIN 5
ANMIE'S NURSERY SONG 5
A RAINY DAY SONG 6
ROBINS LEARNING TO FLY 7
KINDNESS TO THE BIRDS. 8
TIE TIRED SEAMSTRESS 8
NURSERY RHYME.. 9
]ESSIE'S KIND CRUELTY IO
ALL THE SAME IN THE END I
SFISHING. II
SLITTLE DAISY .I. 12
JINGLE 13
TREE ON THE HILL 13
THE BLACKSMITH MAN 14
AMY'S ALPHABET . i6
PUSS AND HER THREE KITTENS 17
KATIE'S LUNCIEON .. 18
THREE IN A BED 19
THANK YOU, PRETTY COW 20
ATIE'S WANTS 20
POMP AND I .. 21
THE LITTLE MAID . 22
PAPA'S BABY .. 23

vii

























viii CONTENTS.


A FUNNY FACT 24
THE PRETTY LITTLE MAIDEN 24
THE BOASTING HEN .. 25
LITTLE DAME CRUMI' .' 27
TIHE SWEET LITTLE DOLL 29
THE SULKY OLEANDER 30
V LITTLE BOY'S POCKET 32
(;()OD ADVICE . 33
IITTLE FLORA 33
TWENTY FROGGIES .34
SUSIE MILLER 35
WATCHING FOR PA 35
THE BABY . 36
WHERE DID YOU COME FROM, BABY DEAR? 37
"''IE OWL AND THE PUSSY-CAT 38
TOTTY'S ARITHMETIC. . 39
ROIIN REDBREAST 40
IITTLE KITTY 41
Too FovGGY 42
PINKETY-W INKETY-WEE. 42
THE THREE LITTLE BUGS: ... 43
ELEVEN LITTLE PUSSY CATS .. 44
DOLLIE's DOCTOR .45
A DOLL'S WEDDING .. 46
NAUGHT ITTY .ITY 48
LITTLE MISS SNOWFLAKE .. 49
SATURDAY NIGHT ... .50
KEEPSAKES 51
fESUS' NAME 53
'IHE HOME OF THE ROBIN 53
S('HIIARIEY AND HIE KITTY 55
THEI DEAD DOLL 56
THE SMILING DOLLY .. .58
ALL THE CHILDREN .. 60
A MOTHER'S DIARY 62
WILLIE'S QUESTION 63
LEARNING TO PRAY .. 64
PLAY .. 66
WHERE SHALL BABY'S DIMPLE BE? .. 67
THE SUNDAY BABY 68
MINNIE AND WINNIE 69
























CONTENTS. 1X

GOOD FOR SOMETHING 70
THE NEW DOLL 72
CHILD-SONG .3 .
COMING .. 73
PITTrY PAT'S PRAYER 74
LITTLE TEASE 75
GRAN'MA AL'AS DOES 76
S THE FOOLISH ROBIN .77
"A -WHAT ROBIN TOLD 78 ':
THE FIRST PARTY. 79
LITTLE MOLLY 8.. . . o.
BABY FINGERS .
NURSERY SONG .. '"
THE CHANGELING ,. .. 83'
SUJANG UP THE BABY'S STOCKING 85 '. '
S THE BABY I LOVE '86
N FIVE LITTLE CHICKENS . 8. 8.
MISi'RESS KITTY 89
DICK'S SUPPER 8
FOR THE BABY 92
I' OVER IN THE MEADOW. 93 "
THE HANG-BIRD'S NEST 97
THE CHICKEN'S MISTAKE .. 98
CAUSE FOR COMPLAINT 99
THE LITTLE PEOPLE. .. 100
THE VILLAINOUS SPIDER .. 101
' LITTLE WILLIE AND THE AIPLE 102
TIHE LOST KITE .. f03
THE CLEAN FACE 04
'THE LITTLE BLACK ... IO
WHAT THE CHOIR SANG ABOUT THE NEW BONNET .07
MY SPEECH I8
I{OPPIE-OPPI.E .... 10
FOR TIIE LITTLE ONES I. .II ;
TIHE LITTLE DOG UNDER THE WAGON 112
SPINNING .. 131
A BOY'S AND GIRL'S WAY 114
A.Dp.:--r"Tr AND A KISS 115
Tr-IF r' I DAY 116
pI i. ..., ., BEFORE A FALL 117
i Wi W.ORM ........ II



\f
























X CONTENTS.


K TY 9
THE FAIRY'S RESCUE 120
THE DONATION PARTY 122
BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL ...... 123
lu trVY SOME BIRDS HorP, AND OTHERS WALK 124
A RELIC OF THE FOURTH" 125
MY WRENS 126
THIE MOTHERLESS TURKEYS . 127
THE LITTLE CONQUEROR. 129
A SUM IN ARITHMETIC . 130
THIE HER 132
SUPPOSE 133
WIlSTLE AND OE 134
THE FOUR PRESENTS 135
A COMPLAINT 136
THE CONSCIENTIOUS lIEN . 137
TIIE SECRET OF HAPPINESS. ... 137
THE ROBiN .. .. 138
GOD WANTS THE BOYS AND GIRLS ..... 139
MAGIC CURTAINS 1 .... 40
SSANTA CLAUS AND THE MOUSE ... 140
THE FOOLISH PANSY .. 142
SHUT THE DOOR SOFTLY ..... 144
BABY IN TIIE LOOKING-GLASS .. 145
'HAPPY BIRTHDAY: A TWOFOLD SONG ... 146
TRUE RICHES 147
MOTHER. . 149
THIE )ANDELION BOY .. 151
A LESSON 153
THE GRAY SWAN... . 154
TIlE FOX AND THE CAT .. 156
GIENLEI WORDS 157
KEIEPIN; IIS WORD . 158
BEAUTIFUL HANDS .. 160
BEAUTY 161
NOT ONE TO SPARE. 162
MUFF AND TUFF 164
THE LITTLE CLAM .. 168
THE TRUE STORY OF LITTLE BOY BLUE ...... 170
THE RED BREAST OF THE ROBIN ...... 73
NOSE AND EYES ., 174

























cONTR'ENS. xi


THE FLIGHT OF THE BIRDS 175
THE RATTLE OF THE BONES 176
THE GRUMBLER 178
LITTLE PAT AND THE PARSON 179
THE OPEN DOOR 181
AN OLD CHRISTMAS RHYME 183
THE PET GREYHOUND 185
THE VASE AND THE PITCHER 187
QUEEN FLORA'S CHOIR 189
FROST 191
OUR GYPSY 192
A PLEASANT SATURDAY NIGHT 194
THE FOX AND THE HEN 194
THREE LITTLE GRAVES 197
THE FAMILY ... 200
THE STORY OF THE LITTLE RID HIN 200
THE FAMOUS BATTLE OF BUMBLE-BUG AND BUMBLE-BEE 205
THE WONDERFUL SACK 209
THE FACTOR 217




















































































































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SONGS AND RHYMES

FOR THE LITTLE ONES.




AN AUTUMN JINGLE.

SKNOW a little creature in a green bed,
With the softest wrappings all around her head,
When she grows old, she is hard and cannot feel,
So they take her to the mill, and make her into meal.

--4-

LITTLE GOLDEN HAIR.

SITTLE Golden-hair, with Fritz,
See how quietly he sits,
Playing with his Christmas toys,
Is he not the best of boys?

Little Golden hair one day
Went to walk, and lost his way,
How we all were worried then,
But Fritz '-i.-igliht himi home again.
A. -


























SONGS AND RHYMES

FOR THE LITTLE ONES.




AN AUTUMN JINGLE.

SKNOW a little creature in a green bed,
With the softest wrappings all around her head,
When she grows old, she is hard and cannot feel,
So they take her to the mill, and make her into meal.

--4-

LITTLE GOLDEN HAIR.

SITTLE Golden-hair, with Fritz,
See how quietly he sits,
Playing with his Christmas toys,
Is he not the best of boys?

Little Golden hair one day
Went to walk, and lost his way,
How we all were worried then,
But Fritz '-i.-igliht himi home again.
A. -


















2 WEE WILLIE WINKIE.



LITTLE JILL HORNER.

SITTLE Jill Horner,
She sat in the corner,
Eating her birthday cake;
With fingers and thumbs,
She then picked up the crumbs,
That Jack had helped her to make.
JENNY WALLIS.


LITTLE TEDDY.

OUR boy Teddy,
Sitting in the tub,
Take the soap and flannel,
And give the boy a rub.

Turning up his little toes,
Cocking up his little nose,
Our boy Teddy,
Sitting in a tub.



WEE WILLIE WINKIE.

W EE Willie Winkie running through the town,
Up stairs and down stairs in his night gown;
Tapping at the window, trying at the lock,
All the babes are in their beds, for now 'tis ten o'clock.


















2 WEE WILLIE WINKIE.



LITTLE JILL HORNER.

SITTLE Jill Horner,
She sat in the corner,
Eating her birthday cake;
With fingers and thumbs,
She then picked up the crumbs,
That Jack had helped her to make.
JENNY WALLIS.


LITTLE TEDDY.

OUR boy Teddy,
Sitting in the tub,
Take the soap and flannel,
And give the boy a rub.

Turning up his little toes,
Cocking up his little nose,
Our boy Teddy,
Sitting in a tub.



WEE WILLIE WINKIE.

W EE Willie Winkie running through the town,
Up stairs and down stairs in his night gown;
Tapping at the window, trying at the lock,
All the babes are in their beds, for now 'tis ten o'clock.


















2 WEE WILLIE WINKIE.



LITTLE JILL HORNER.

SITTLE Jill Horner,
She sat in the corner,
Eating her birthday cake;
With fingers and thumbs,
She then picked up the crumbs,
That Jack had helped her to make.
JENNY WALLIS.


LITTLE TEDDY.

OUR boy Teddy,
Sitting in the tub,
Take the soap and flannel,
And give the boy a rub.

Turning up his little toes,
Cocking up his little nose,
Our boy Teddy,
Sitting in a tub.



WEE WILLIE WINKIE.

W EE Willie Winkie running through the town,
Up stairs and down stairs in his night gown;
Tapping at the window, trying at the lock,
All the babes are in their beds, for now 'tis ten o'clock.

















SONG OF THE LITTLE RED HEN.

Wee Willie Winkie, are you coming then?
The cat's singing briskly to the sleeping hen,
The dog lies stretched upon the hearth, I would not gie
a cheep,
For he's a wakeful laddie, that will not go to sleep.



THE SPECKLED HEN.

SPECKLEDY hen! Speckledy hen !
What do you do in my garden pen?
Mother will scold you, you know she will,
And father will beat you for doing ill;
And I'd like to know what you'll do then,
You dear little naughty speckledy hen?



SONG OF THE LITTLE RED HEN.

CLUCK, cluck, cluck,
I'm glad I'm not a duck;
Weet, weet, weet,
For then I'd have web feet;
Clack, clack, clack,
And water on my back;
Trill, trill, trill,
And such a vulgar bill.
But now I've eight free toes,
And lovely Roman nose;
Cluck, cluck, cluck,
I'm glad I'm not a duck.

















SONG OF THE LITTLE RED HEN.

Wee Willie Winkie, are you coming then?
The cat's singing briskly to the sleeping hen,
The dog lies stretched upon the hearth, I would not gie
a cheep,
For he's a wakeful laddie, that will not go to sleep.



THE SPECKLED HEN.

SPECKLEDY hen! Speckledy hen !
What do you do in my garden pen?
Mother will scold you, you know she will,
And father will beat you for doing ill;
And I'd like to know what you'll do then,
You dear little naughty speckledy hen?



SONG OF THE LITTLE RED HEN.

CLUCK, cluck, cluck,
I'm glad I'm not a duck;
Weet, weet, weet,
For then I'd have web feet;
Clack, clack, clack,
And water on my back;
Trill, trill, trill,
And such a vulgar bill.
But now I've eight free toes,
And lovely Roman nose;
Cluck, cluck, cluck,
I'm glad I'm not a duck.

















4 N.v [: I, L ;ii P 111'.


STH E I_.I TIf 1 1 ,-x_, 1 i'.-\t .'1_ \V

A LITTLE cock sparrow sat on a high tree,
And he chirrupped, he chirrupped so merrily.

A naughty little boy with a bow and arrow
Determined to shoot this little cock sparrow.

For this little cock sparrow would make a nice stew,
And his giblets would make a nice little pie too. .

" Oh, no," says cock sparrow, "I won't make a stew,"
And he fluttered his wings and away he flew.



NURSERY RHYME.

SENNY WREN fell sick
Upon a merry time,
In came Robin Redbreast
S -\nil brought her sops of wine.

Eat well of the sop, Jenny,
DIink well of the wine; i"
Thank you Robin kindly,
You shall be mine.

) Jii.i: she got well,
And stood upon her feet,
And told Robin plainly
She loved him not a bit.

















4 N.v [: I, L ;ii P 111'.


STH E I_.I TIf 1 1 ,-x_, 1 i'.-\t .'1_ \V

A LITTLE cock sparrow sat on a high tree,
And he chirrupped, he chirrupped so merrily.

A naughty little boy with a bow and arrow
Determined to shoot this little cock sparrow.

For this little cock sparrow would make a nice stew,
And his giblets would make a nice little pie too. .

" Oh, no," says cock sparrow, "I won't make a stew,"
And he fluttered his wings and away he flew.



NURSERY RHYME.

SENNY WREN fell sick
Upon a merry time,
In came Robin Redbreast
S -\nil brought her sops of wine.

Eat well of the sop, Jenny,
DIink well of the wine; i"
Thank you Robin kindly,
You shall be mine.

) Jii.i: she got well,
And stood upon her feet,
And told Robin plainly
She loved him not a bit.



















ANNIE'S NURSERY SONG.

Robin, being angry,
Hopped upon, a twig,
Saying, "Out upon you,
Fie upon you, bold faced jig."




THE PIN.

ALL and slender, straight and thin,
Shining, useful little pin;
The Graces, knowing well your worth,
Themselves have sent you down to earth;
Devoted to the female race,
To give each fold its proper place,
To bind the slender tapering waist,
And dress each lovely form with taste.

-4--


ANNIE'S NURSERY SONG.


H ERE sits the Lord Mayor,
Here sit his two men,
Here sits the cock,
And here sits the hen,
Here sit the chickens,
And here they go in,
Chippety, chippety, chippety chin.

Touching the baby in turn on forehead, eyes, cheeks, nose, mouth,
and under the chin.



















ANNIE'S NURSERY SONG.

Robin, being angry,
Hopped upon, a twig,
Saying, "Out upon you,
Fie upon you, bold faced jig."




THE PIN.

ALL and slender, straight and thin,
Shining, useful little pin;
The Graces, knowing well your worth,
Themselves have sent you down to earth;
Devoted to the female race,
To give each fold its proper place,
To bind the slender tapering waist,
And dress each lovely form with taste.

-4--


ANNIE'S NURSERY SONG.


H ERE sits the Lord Mayor,
Here sit his two men,
Here sits the cock,
And here sits the hen,
Here sit the chickens,
And here they go in,
Chippety, chippety, chippety chin.

Touching the baby in turn on forehead, eyes, cheeks, nose, mouth,
and under the chin.


















*" A R-iJvi I'.n- -,Vv:.



*.A RAINY i.-\ AY '.NG


'" D ..r ilt ,_ ii!|..' -ir...N,
Little .:l .i i ,. i' -t,
Dimpled, sweet, sweet, sweet;
Li ttle rosy lips, and baby c',C': brown,
Go to sleep, dearie, while the lairi comes down.

Old mother He:,. li: i, ''
Little mother J-.tnn \\'r.-n
Take their babies i .
Little wee ones all; :
Cover them up snug, for fear they will drown,
Under warm feathers, while the rain comes down.

Mrs. Red Mooly Cow,
Under an apple-bough
Moos to her calf- i
So frisky, you 'd laugh -
Stands in the meadow, where the grass is mown,
Keeps her baby safe, while the rain. comes down. .


Gray-coated Kitty Cat,
Gives little kits a pat;
Don't want one to get
Furry soft paws wet.
So she purrs gently, keeps them till they're grown,
Safe under shelter, while the rain comes down.



















ROBINS LEARNING TO FLY. .

So little tippy-toes,
Dear little nippy-nose,
Baby eyes so clear,
Shut them up, my dear,
Cuddle up close in your fair-white gown,
Mother'll Ih., llyou, darling, while the rain comes down.

-t-

ROBINS LEARNING TO FLY.

T WO robin-redbreasts built their nest
Within a hollow tree,
The hen sat quietly at home,
The cock sang merrily,
And all the little young ones said,
"Wee, wee,--- wee, wee,- wee, wee!"

One day the sun was warm and bright,
And cloudless was the sky,
Cock-robin said, My little dears,
'Tis time you learned to fly."
And all the little young ones said,
"I'll try, I'11 try, I'11 try!"

I know a child, and who she is
I'11 tell you by and by:
When mamma says, "Do this, do that,"
She says, "What for?" and "\hy ? "
She'd be a better child by far,
If she would say, "I 'll try."'
Aunt piels R, '. ..


















8 THE TIRED SEAMSTRESS.



KINDNESS TO THE BIRDS.

W HENEVER I see, on bush or tree,
Young birds in their little nest,
I must not, in my play, steal the birds away,
Or grieve their mother's breast.

My mother, I know, would sorrow so,
If I should be stolen away;
So I'll speak to the birds in my softest words,
Nor harm them in my play.



THE TIRED SEAMSTRESS.

I AMMA, I've lost my thimble,
And my spool has rolled away,
My arm is aching dreadfully,
And I want to go and 'play.

There's Johnny playing marbles,
And Susie skipping rope,
They've finished all their easy tasks,
While I must sit and mope.

If I could set the fashion,
I know what I would do,
I'd not be troubling people
To sit so still and sew;


















8 THE TIRED SEAMSTRESS.



KINDNESS TO THE BIRDS.

W HENEVER I see, on bush or tree,
Young birds in their little nest,
I must not, in my play, steal the birds away,
Or grieve their mother's breast.

My mother, I know, would sorrow so,
If I should be stolen away;
So I'll speak to the birds in my softest words,
Nor harm them in my play.



THE TIRED SEAMSTRESS.

I AMMA, I've lost my thimble,
And my spool has rolled away,
My arm is aching dreadfully,
And I want to go and 'play.

There's Johnny playing marbles,
And Susie skipping rope,
They've finished all their easy tasks,
While I must sit and mope.

If I could set the fashion,
I know what I would do,
I'd not be troubling people
To sit so still and sew;


















NURSERY RHYME.

I'd put some homespun on their necks,
And sew it all around,
And make them look like cotton bags,
Placed endwise on the ground.

Mamma, she's gone and left me,
And closely shut the door,
Mamma, mamma, come back again,
I will not grumble more.



NURSERY RHYME.

THERE was an old woman, as I've heard tell,
She went to the market her eggs for to sell;
She went to market all on a market day;
And she fell asleep on the king's highway.

There came by a pedler whose name was Stout,
He cut her petticoats all round about;
He cut her petticoats up to her knees,
Which made the old woman to shiver and freeze.

When this little woman first did wake,
She began to shiver, and she began to shake;
She began to wonder, and she began to cry,
"Lauk-a-mercy on me, this is none of I:

"But if it be I, as I do hope it be,
I've a little dog at home, and he 'll know me;
If it be I, he'll wag his little tail,
And if it be not I, he '11 loudly bark and wail!"


















10 BESSIE'S KIND CRUELTY.

Home went the little woman all in the dark,
Up got the little dog, and he began to bark;
He began to bark, so she '.,c_.::in t cry,
"Lauk-a-mercy on me, this is none of I!"





BESSIE'S KIND CRUELTY.

N garments white, and ribbons blue.
Our Bessie to the '. i', ,i:l flew;
There pretty, downy chickens seven,
Their mother fed from morn till even.'::


"I love ou so!" the maiden cried,
And hugged and kissed one till it died;
And so with many a hug .Ii'.. ki.,
She proved, alas, a cruel miss.


The hen quite wild and furious grew,
Of chicks alive she had but two;
"Cluck, cluck! cluck, cluck!" she cried in vain,
"Of friends like these I must complain."


Now, when you wish your love to show,
Please stop a bit, until you know
What best will please the one you love,
And thus a true affection prove.
JENNIE WALLIS.


















FISHING, 11



ALL THE SAME IN THE END.

LITTLE black Dinah, she sits in her chair,
Staring at, Lily, so dainty and fair.
Little black Din -i1 is wondering, may be,
S".What is the name of that little pale baby?"
Little Miss Lily cannot understand
Why that little girl is so "awfully tanned."

In the two little noddles, so wondrously wise,
Are a pair of round black, and a pair of blue eyes,-
I In each little body a child's pure heart,
And a white, white soul, of heaven a part;
And .hi, one day, in the heaven above,
They will both be sharing a Saviour's love.
MARY D. BRINE.



FISHING.

THREE small children were fishing,
Fishing with rod and line;
One was three, and one was six,
And one was nearly nine.

What do you think they fished for?
One of them really thought,.
Out of a nurs'ry window,
Real live fish could be caught.


















FISHING, 11



ALL THE SAME IN THE END.

LITTLE black Dinah, she sits in her chair,
Staring at, Lily, so dainty and fair.
Little black Din -i1 is wondering, may be,
S".What is the name of that little pale baby?"
Little Miss Lily cannot understand
Why that little girl is so "awfully tanned."

In the two little noddles, so wondrously wise,
Are a pair of round black, and a pair of blue eyes,-
I In each little body a child's pure heart,
And a white, white soul, of heaven a part;
And .hi, one day, in the heaven above,
They will both be sharing a Saviour's love.
MARY D. BRINE.



FISHING.

THREE small children were fishing,
Fishing with rod and line;
One was three, and one was six,
And one was nearly nine.

What do you think they fished for?
One of them really thought,.
Out of a nurs'ry window,
Real live fish could be caught.


















12 LITTLE DAISY.

One of them just pretended
Fish could be caught that way;
He stood by the window and listened,
Just because it was play.

One of them thought 't was funny
Because the others wished,
So she stood with her brothers,
And that's the way they fished.


LITTLE DAISY.

W AKE up, little daisy, the summer is nigh,
The dear little robin is up in the sky;
The snowdrops and crocus were never so slow,
Then wake up, little daisy, and hasten to grow;
Wake up !
Wake up, little daisy, and hasten to grow.

I tease pleasant sunshine to rest on your head,
The dew and the raindrops to moisten your bed,
And then every morning I just take a' peep,
To see your little face, but you 're still fast asleep;
Wake up!
Wake up, little daisy, and hasten to grow.

Listen, little daisy, and I '11 tell you what's said,
The lark thinks you 're lazy, and love your warm bed,
But I'll not believe it, for now I can see
Your bright little eye winking softly at me;
Wake up!
Wake up, little daisy, and hasten to grow.


















TIRWEE ON THE HILL. 1L




JINGLE.

SITTLE Miss Dorothy Do
Went down the street, I'd have you know,
In her mother's long-trained dinner-dress,
And she cut a queer figure, as you may guess.

She wore her sister's velvet hat,
And her auntie's travelling bag; and that
Was not enough, for she borrowed, too,
Her grandmother's veil so long and blue.

She walked until she was ready to drop,
And fell asleep in a candy shop,
What she did next I did n't hear,
But I'll let you know when I do, my clear.
MARY 1). BRINE.


TREE ON THE HILL.

SN yonder hill there stands a tree;
Tree on the hill, and the hill stood still.

And on the tree there was a branch;
Branch on the tree, tree on the hill, and the hill stood
still.

And on the branch there was a nest;
Nest on the branch, branch on the tree, tree on the hill,
and the hill stood still.


















TIRWEE ON THE HILL. 1L




JINGLE.

SITTLE Miss Dorothy Do
Went down the street, I'd have you know,
In her mother's long-trained dinner-dress,
And she cut a queer figure, as you may guess.

She wore her sister's velvet hat,
And her auntie's travelling bag; and that
Was not enough, for she borrowed, too,
Her grandmother's veil so long and blue.

She walked until she was ready to drop,
And fell asleep in a candy shop,
What she did next I did n't hear,
But I'll let you know when I do, my clear.
MARY 1). BRINE.


TREE ON THE HILL.

SN yonder hill there stands a tree;
Tree on the hill, and the hill stood still.

And on the tree there was a branch;
Branch on the tree, tree on the hill, and the hill stood
still.

And on the branch there was a nest;
Nest on the branch, branch on the tree, tree on the hill,
and the hill stood still.


















14 THE BLACKS-MITIH JlAN.

And in the nest there was an egg;
I-_ in the nest, nest on the branch, branch on the tree,
tree on the hill, and the hill stood still.

And in the egg there was a bird;
Bird in the -. egg in the nest, nest on the branch,
branch on the tree, tree on the hill, and the
hill stood still.

And on the bird there was a feather;
Feather on the bird, bird in the egg, egg in the nest, nest
on the branch, branch on the tree, tree on the
hill, and the hill stood still




THE BLACKSMITH MAN.

MlY mother puts an apron on, to keep my coaties clean,
And rubbers on my little boots, and then I go and
lean
Against the blacksmith's doorway, to watch the coal fire
shine.
The bellows heave, the hammers swing-I wish they were
all mine !
The horses bend their legs and stand; I don't see how
they can;
But I would love to shoe their feet, just like the black-
smith man.
Tang-tiddle, tang-tiddle, tang-tiddle-tan!
What a jolly noise he makes, the blacksmith man!



















ITHE BLA(J MIAfli MAN. I

When I grow up an old, big man, with whiskers on my chin,
I will not have a grocery store, or dry-goods ,-t,,, or tin;
I will not be -a farmer, or a lawyer, n.t a bit:
Or President,- all the other boys are meaning to be it -
Or a banker, with the money bills piled high upon the stan'-
I 'd rather hold the red-hot iron, and be a blacksmith man,
Tang-tiddle, tang-tiddle, tang-tiddle-tan!
Oh, what a jolly noise he makes, the blacksmith man!

The blacksmith man has got such arms; his shop is such
a place:
He gets as dirty as he likes, and no one cleans his face!
And when the lightning's in the sky he makes his bellows
blow,
And all his fires flare quickly up, like lightning down
below.
Oh, he must have the nicest time that any person can;
I wish I could grow up to-day, and be a blacksmith man!
Tang-tiddle, tang-tiddle, tang-tiddle-tan !
I wish I could grow up to-day, and be a blacksmith man!

I mean to have a little house, with vines and porches to't,
And fixed up nice and clean for me, when I get tired of soot.
I'd marry little Susy, and have her for my wife -
We've been so well acquainted with each other all our
life!
Oh, I mean to be as hearty, and as happy as I can,
And an honest, good, hard-working, jolly, rosy blacksmith
man!
Tang-tiddle, tang-tiddle, tang-tiddle-tan !
Here goes the honest, good, harcdv..'r1lin.-, jolly black-
smith man !



















1t AMY'S ALPHABET.





AMY'S ALPHABET.


A was the Apple so round and so red;
B was the Bump as it fell on my head.
C was the Cry, that every one heard;
D was my Dolly, whose pity was stirred.
E was my Eye so blinded with tears;
F was my Face, now sad for my years.
G was my Grandmother, tender and tried;
II was her Handkerchief, which my tears dried.
I was the Ivy, that grew o'er the door;
J was the Jelly, that to me she bore.
K was the Knife, that she used for the cake;
,I was the Lunch, that so soon she did make.
A[ was my Mother, who then came from town;
N was the Nut, that she brought me so brown.
O was the Orange from her pocket she took;
P was the Paper, that from it she shook.
Q was the Quail she had brought fcr my tea;
R was our Rover, who stole it from me.
S was my Sister, who soon brought it back;
T was the Turkey, whose bones we did crack.
U was my Uncle, who helped himself twice;
V was the Vane, that turned in a trice.
V the Wind, that blew down the tree;
Exactly how, I never could see.
You have listened so 1.-'n il that I must declare,
Zephyrs are really nothing but air.
TENNY WALLIS.


















PUSS AND HER THREE KITTENS. 1



PUSS AND HER THREE KITTENS.

O UR old cat has kittens three;
What do you think their names should be?
One is a tabby with emerald eyes,
And a tail that's long and slender;
But into a temper she quickly flies,
If you ever by chance offend her.
I think we shall call her this -
I think we shall call her that:
Now, don't you fancy Pepper-pot"
A nice name for a cat ?

One is black, with a frill of white,
And her feet are all white fur, too:
If you stroke her, she carries her tail upright,
And quickly begins to purr, too.
I think we shall call her this -
I think we shall call her that:
Now, don't you fancy Sootikin "
A nice name for a cat ?

One is a tortoise-shell, yellow and black,
With a lot of white about him:
If you tease him, at once he sets up his back;
He's a quarrelsome Tom, ne'er doubt him!
I think we shall call him this -
I think we shall call him that:
Now, don't you fancy Scratchaway"
A nice name for a cat ?


















18 KATIE'S LUKNCH.EOVN.

Our old cat has kittens three,
And I fancy these their names will be:
"Pepper-pot Sootikin "- Scratchaway."- There
Were there ever kittens with these to compare ?
And we call the old mother-now, what do you think?
Tabitha Longclaws Tidleywink! "
THOMAS H0oo, Jr.


KATIE'S LUNCHEON.

SNCE I had a little cake,
Which mother in a tin did bake.

Twice I thought I 'd eat it up,
And drink the milk within my cup.

Three times I raised it to my lips,
And from 1my milk I took three sips.

Four times I peeped outside the door,
Where stood a little b..._... poor.

Five times I thought, "I feel no need,
And this poor child is starved indeed. "

Six hasty steps I then did take,
And gave to her my little cake.

Seven smiles came quick, I gave her eight,
Nine times she said "Thank you, Miss Kate."

Ten times as happy now I feel,
Since I have shared with her my meal.
JENNY WALLIS.


















THREE IN A BED. 19




THREE IN A BED.

G RAY little velvet coats,
One, two, three:
Any home happier
Could there be?
Topsy and Johnny
And sleepy Ned,
Purring so cosily,
Three in a bed.


Woe to the stupid mouse,
Prowling about!
Old Mother Pussy
Is on the lookout:
Little cats, big cats,
All must be fed,
In the sky parlor
Three in a bed.


Mother's a gypsy puss;
Often she moves,
Thinking much travel
Her children improves.
High-minded family,
Very well bred;
No falling out, you see!
Three in a bed.


















20 KATAIE'S WANTS.



THANK YOU, PRETTY COW.

T HANK you, pretty cow, that made
Pleasant milk to soak my bread,
Every day and every night,
Warm and sweet and fresh and white.

Do not chew the hemlock rank
Growing on the weedy bank;
But the yellow cowslip eat,
They will make it very sweet.

Where the bubbling water flows,
Where the purple violet grows,
Where the grass is fresh and fine,
Pretty cow, go there and dine.
JANE TA\YLOR.


KATIE'S WANTS.

SE want Christmas tree,
Yes, me do;
Want an orange on it,
Lots of candy too.

Want some new dishes,
Want a red pail,
Want a rocking horse
With a very long tail.


















20 KATAIE'S WANTS.



THANK YOU, PRETTY COW.

T HANK you, pretty cow, that made
Pleasant milk to soak my bread,
Every day and every night,
Warm and sweet and fresh and white.

Do not chew the hemlock rank
Growing on the weedy bank;
But the yellow cowslip eat,
They will make it very sweet.

Where the bubbling water flows,
Where the purple violet grows,
Where the grass is fresh and fine,
Pretty cow, go there and dine.
JANE TA\YLOR.


KATIE'S WANTS.

SE want Christmas tree,
Yes, me do;
Want an orange on it,
Lots of candy too.

Want some new dishes,
Want a red pail,
Want a rocking horse
With a very long tail.



















POMP AND I. 21

Want a little watch
That says "Tick, tick!"
Want a newer dolly,
'Cause Victoria's sick;

Want so many things
Don't know what to do;
Want a little sister,
Little brother too.

Won't you buy 'em, mamma ?
Tell me why you won't ?
Want to go to bed?
No, me don't.
EVA M. TAPPAN.



POMP AND I.

OMP lies in one chair, I in another.
(Pomp's a black cat, I'm his brother.)

There we be blinkin' in the sun,
Blinkin' and thinkin'- Oh! what fun!

What d'you suppose we're thinking' 'bout?
One o' the things "no feller can't find out."

I'm so glad I 'm nothing but a cat;
Pomp he says "that's so," to that.

Fat and lazy all day long,
'Plnry to eat and can't do wrong.


-


















ITHE LITTLE MAID.

When it comes to the end o' day,
We go to sleep on the bed o' hay.

All I can say is, I 'm as happy as a cat;
"Happy as a clam" is nothing' to that.

-4-

THE LITTLE MAID.

THERE was a little maid,
And she had a little bonnet,
And she had a little finger,
With a little ring upon it.
And what's a little odd,
Her little heart was then
In love, but not a little,
With the best of little men;
For the little youth did exercise
His little flattering tongue,
And down before her little feet
His little knees he flung.
And he pressed her little hand,
In her little face he gazed,
And looked as though his little head
Was a very little crazed.
Alas! her little lover
Did with little warning leave her,
And she found him little better
Than a little gay deceiver;
So in a little moment,
(Stifling all her little wishes),


















PAPA'S BABY.

She took a little jump
All among the little fishes.
And now all little maidens
Whose little loves grow stronger,
Upon the little moral
Of this little tale may ponder.

Beware of little trinkets,
Little men and little sighs,
For you little know what great things
From little things may rise.

-4-

PAPA'S BABY.

N O little steps do I hear in the hall;
Only a sweet silver laugh,- that is all;
No dimpled arms round my neck hold me tight,
I've but a glimpse of two eyes very bright.
Two hands a wee little face try to screen;
Baby is hiding, that's plain to be seen.
"Where is my precious I 've missed so all day ?"
"Papa can't find me!" the pretty lips say.

"Dear me I wonder where baby can be! "
Then I go by and pretend not to see.
" Not in the parlor, and not on the stairs!
Then I must peep under sofas and chairs."
The dear little rogue is now laughing outright.
Two little arms round my neck clasp me tight.
Home will indeed be sad, weary, and lone,
When papa can't find you, my darling, my own.

















24 THE PRETTY LITTLE MAIDEN.



A FUNNY FACT.

TADDY POLE, and Polly Wogg
Lived together in a bog:
Here you see the very pool,
WiuLc they went to swimming-school.

By and by (it's true, but strange),
O'er them came a wondrous change:
Here you have them on a log,
Each a most decided frog.




THE PRETTY LITTLE MAIDEN.

A PRETTY little maiden
Had a pretty little dream,
And a pretty little wedding
Was its pretty little theme.

A pretty little bachelor
To win her favor tried,
And asked her how she'd like to be
His pretty little bride.

With some pretty little blushes,
And a pretty little sigh,
And a pretty little glance
From her pretty little eye,

















24 THE PRETTY LITTLE MAIDEN.



A FUNNY FACT.

TADDY POLE, and Polly Wogg
Lived together in a bog:
Here you see the very pool,
WiuLc they went to swimming-school.

By and by (it's true, but strange),
O'er them came a wondrous change:
Here you have them on a log,
Each a most decided frog.




THE PRETTY LITTLE MAIDEN.

A PRETTY little maiden
Had a pretty little dream,
And a pretty little wedding
Was its pretty little theme.

A pretty little bachelor
To win her favor tried,
And asked her how she'd like to be
His pretty little bride.

With some pretty little blushes,
And a pretty little sigh,
And a pretty little glance
From her pretty little eye,


















THiF BOASTING lIEN.

From her pretty little face
Behind her pretty little fan,
She smiled on the proposals
Of this pretty little man.

Now this pretty little maiden
And her pretty little spark
Met the pretty little parson,
And his pretty little clerk,*

A pretty little wedding ring
United them for life,
And this pretty little husband'
Had a pretty little wife.



THE BOASTING HEN.

S" E-DAW! Ke-daw!" a young hen cried,
SWhile strutting through a barnyard wide.
"Ke-daw Ke-daw!" I've done a feat,
In chickendom it can't be beat!
I've laid the finest egg to-day
That any hen in town could lay;
S:So, little chickens, far and near,
Just bow your.head when I appear.
Old mother hens, you needn't sneer;
There never was an egg so white,
I shall go frantic with delight!"
"Ke-daw Ke-daw!" rang clear and loud,
There never was a hen so proud.
Pronouncedclarx


















26 THE BOASTING HEI.

The older hens were grave and staid.
They said, "When other eggs are laid -
Six or a dozen at the most -
My child, you won't care much to boast.
Your utterance will be more soothing
When laying eggs becomes no new thing."
Each turned and called away her brood.
This young hen thought their actions rude.
"How envious these old dames are!
My triumph, though, they shall not mar;
With bitterness my heart would sicken
If I were such a jealous chicken."

Now, while this scene was going on,
Our dame had left her nest alone,
And, spying out a splendid chance,
A weasel threw a furtive glance
At this same egg.

Swift as a lance
He rolled it from its downy nest -
A wanton act be it confessed -
Its golden freshness there to test.

Back in high feather came our hen.
Her grief is not for tongue or pen!
She gazed upon the empty shell
Of that first egg she loved so well;
Had she but known enough to cry,
Tears would have trickled from her eye.

Now in this c_ ---1.:ll we may find
A simple moral left behind.



















LITTLE DAME CRUMP. 27

In boasting don't be premature,
Lest disappointment work your cure.
Ere you parade your triumph round,
Be sure your egg is safe and sound!
GEORGE COOPER.



LITTLE DAME CRUMP.

LITTLE Dame Crump
With her little hair broom,
One morning was sweeping
Her little bed-room.

When, casting her little
Gray eyes on the ground,
In a sly little corner
A penny she found.

"Odds Bobs !" cried the dame
While she stared with surprise,
How lucky am I,
Bless my heart, what a prize!

"To market I'll go,
And a pig I will buy,
And little John Gubbins
Shall make him a sty."

She washed her face clean,
And put on her gown,
And locked up her house,
And set off for the town;


















28 LITTLE .I. IMC1._UMIP. '

Where to market she went,
And a bargain she made; '.
For a white little pig
The penny she paid.

Having purchased the pig,
She was puzzled to know
How they both should get home,
If the pig would not go.

So, fearing that piggy
Might play her a trick,
She drove him along
With a little crab-stick.

Piggy ran till he came
To.the foot of a hill,
Where a little bridge stood
O'er the stream of a mill,

When he grunted and squeaked,
And no further would go:
Oh, fie little pig,
To serve the dame so!

She went to the miller's
And borrowed a sack,
Popped the little pig in,
An. took on her back.

Pig_, cried to get out,
But the little dame said,
"If you won't go by fair means
You then must be made."


,,Z


















THE SWEET LITTLE DOLL.

So she carried the pig
To his nice little sty,
And made him a bed
Of clean straw, snug and dry.

With a handful of peas
Little pig she then fed,
And put on her night-cap,
And jumped into bed.

Having first said her prayers,
Then she put out her light,
And being quite tired,
We will bid her good-night.



THE SWEET LITTLE DOLL.

SONCE had a sweet little doll, dears,
The prettiest doll in the world,
Her cheeks were so red and so white, dears,
And her hair was so charmingly curled.
And I lost my sweet little doll, dears,
As I played on the heath one day,
And I cried for more than a week, dears,
But I never could find where she lay.

And I found my sweet little doll, dears,
As I played on the heath one day,
Folks say she is terribly changed, dears,
For her paint is all washed away,


















,30 THE SULKY OLEA'NDVER.

And her arms, trodden off by tie cows, dears,
And her hair, not the least bit curled,
But for old sake's sake, she is still, dears,
The pprettiest doll in the \..l. ".
S'CHARLtES KINGSLEY.




THE SULKY OLEANDER.

L ITTLE Oleander slip
Cut from mother tree,
Was about as (i;. .'.'. l.i
A s a little -!i ... ni be.
Did n't like her pot of earth;
Said she wouldn't grow :
This was very naughty,
And foolish t,<, 'm\u know.

Little Oleander slip
A drink of water had;
Did n't do her any good;
Continued to be bad.
Sulky Oleander
Hung her little head,
And, drooping over sideways,
Pretended she was dead.

But it wasn't any good
Playing such a trick:
Tied up Oleander
To a little stick;


















T;HE SULKY OLEANDER.

Shut her in a closet,
Very dark, you know,
Till she made her mind up
To be good, and grow.

D;lak...-,, had a good effect
un Oleander's head;
"What's the use of acting so!"
To IlIrC.. lt she said.
Straightened& up her wilting stalk;
Really tried to smile:
Guess we'll have to let her out
In a little while.

Morning bright and sunny,
Air so fresh and pure;
Oleander's had enough
Of closet, I am sure;
"Be good, Oleander ?"
Yes," I heard her say,
And she's kept her promise
From that very day.

Other little flowers
Sometimes act just so,
And in darkened closets
Often have to go.
There in calm reflection,
It will not be strange,
If a short confinement
Works a wondrous cI.'hin.e.

















t2 A LITTLE BOY'S POCKET.



A LITTLE BOY'S POCKET.

DO you know what's in my pottet ?
Such a lot of treasures in it!
Listen now while I bedin it:
Such a lot of sings it holds,
And everysin dats in my pottet,
And when, and where, and how I dot it.
First of all, here's in my pottet
A beauty shell, I pit'd it up:
And here's the handle of a tup
That somebody has broked at tea;
The shell's a hole in it, you see:
Nobody knows dat I dot it,
I teep it safe here in my pottet.
And here's my ball too in my pottet,
And here's my pennies, one, two, free,
That Aunty Mary dave to me,
To-morrow day I '11 buy a spade,
When I 'm out walking with the maid;
I tant put that here in my pottet
But I can use it when I 've dot it.
Here's some more sings in my pottet,
Here's my lead, and here's my string;
And once I had an iron 1in.-,
But through a hole it lost one day,
And this is what I always say-
A hole 's the worst sing in a pottet,
Be sure and mend it when you've dot it.


















LITTLE FLORA.3



GOOD ADVICE.

W HEN the cold wind blows,
Look out for your nose,
That it does not get froze;
And wrap up your toes
In warm woollen hose.
Now this I suppose
Was first written in prose,
By some one, who knows
The effects of cold snows.

-4-

LITTLE FLORA.

ITTLE Flora is three years old,
With clustering ringlets of fine, bright gold;
For a grown-up lady she's rather small,
But still she wanted a water-fall.

So Auntie twisted the silky red
In a little knot at the back of her head;
No lady in all the country wide,
Could look more sweet or dignified.

What a baby-matron the darling is
What a soft, soft cheek to pat and kiss!
What a sparkling eye to play at care!
What a sober look the dimples wear!


















LITTLE FLORA.3



GOOD ADVICE.

W HEN the cold wind blows,
Look out for your nose,
That it does not get froze;
And wrap up your toes
In warm woollen hose.
Now this I suppose
Was first written in prose,
By some one, who knows
The effects of cold snows.

-4-

LITTLE FLORA.

ITTLE Flora is three years old,
With clustering ringlets of fine, bright gold;
For a grown-up lady she's rather small,
But still she wanted a water-fall.

So Auntie twisted the silky red
In a little knot at the back of her head;
No lady in all the country wide,
Could look more sweet or dignified.

What a baby-matron the darling is
What a soft, soft cheek to pat and kiss!
What a sparkling eye to play at care!
What a sober look the dimples wear!



















34 TWENTY FROGGIES.

Yet the only thing the least bit old,
Is that little twist of sunny gold,
And the baby with her water-fall,
Is only a baby--after all.
Fhe Nursery.
-4-

TWENTY FROGGIES.

T WENTY f...;.. went to school
Down beside a r.-li pool.
Twenty little coats of green,
Twenty vests all white and clean.

"We must be in time," said they,
First we study, then we play;"
That is how we keep the rule,
When we fi,__;, go to school.

Master Bull-frog, brave and stern,
Called his classes in their turn,
Taught them how to nobly strive,
Also how to leap and dive.

Taught them how to dodge a blow,
From the sticks that bad boys throw;
Twenty froggies grew up fast,
Bull-frogs they became at last.

Polished in a high degree,
As each froggie ought to be,
Now they sit on other logs,
Teaching other little frogs.
GEORGE COOPER.


















VA THING FOR PA! 35


SUSIE MILLER.

S USIE Miller burnt her little finger,
Susie Miller burnt her little finger,
Susie Miller burnt her little finger,
One little finger burnt.
One little, two little, three little fingers,
Four little, five little, six little fingers,
Seven little, 'eight little, nine little fingers,
Ten little fingers burnt.



WATCHING FOR PA!

THREE little forms in the twilight gray
Scanning the shadows across the way;
Two pair of black eyes, and one of blue,-
Brimful of love, and of mischief, too,-
Watching for Pa!
Watching for Pa!
Sitting by the window,
Watching for Pa!

May, with her placid and thoughtful brow,
Gleaming with kindness and love just now;
Willie, the youngest, so roguish and gay,
Stealing sly kisses from sister May,-
Watching for Pa!
Watching for Pa!
Sitting by the window,
Watching for Pa!


















VA THING FOR PA! 35


SUSIE MILLER.

S USIE Miller burnt her little finger,
Susie Miller burnt her little finger,
Susie Miller burnt her little finger,
One little finger burnt.
One little, two little, three little fingers,
Four little, five little, six little fingers,
Seven little, 'eight little, nine little fingers,
Ten little fingers burnt.



WATCHING FOR PA!

THREE little forms in the twilight gray
Scanning the shadows across the way;
Two pair of black eyes, and one of blue,-
Brimful of love, and of mischief, too,-
Watching for Pa!
Watching for Pa!
Sitting by the window,
Watching for Pa!

May, with her placid and thoughtful brow,
Gleaming with kindness and love just now;
Willie, the youngest, so roguish and gay,
Stealing sly kisses from sister May,-
Watching for Pa!
Watching for Pa!
Sitting by the window,
Watching for Pa!


















3 THE BABY.

Nellie, with ringlets of sunny hue,
Cosily nestled between the two;
Pressing her cheek to the window pane,
Wishing the absent one home again, -
Watching for Pa!
Watching for Pa!
Sitting by the window,
Watching for Pa !


Now there are shouts from the window seat,
There is a patter of childish feet;
Gayly they rush thro' the lighted hall,
"Coming at last is the joyful call, -
Welcoming Pa!
Welcoming Pa!
Standing on the doorstep,
Welcoming Pa!




THE BABY.

W HAT is the sweetest thing below
The overarching heavenly bow,
The greatest nuisance that you know?
The baby.

Who has a precious little nose,
And chubby limbs, and pinkish toes?
Who kicks and tumbles, laughs and crows ?
The baby.


















WHERE DID YOU COME FROM, BABY DEARl? 37

On whom does mother kisses press ?
Who in the night screams in distress ?
Who in the morning screams no less ?
The baby.

Who never has a word to say,
But always has his own sweet way ?
May heaven prolong his earthly stay--
The baby.


WHERE DID YOU COME FROM, BABY DEAR?

W HERE did you come from, baby dear?
Out of the everywhere into here.

Where did you get your eyes so blue?
Out of the sky, as I came through.

What makes the light in them sparkle and spin?
Some of the starry spikes left in.

Where did you get that little tear?
I found it waiting when I got here,

What makes your forehead so smooth and high?
A soft hand stroked it as I passed by.

What makes your cheek like a warm white rose?
I saw something better than anyone knows.

\W'hen-:: that three-cornered smile of bliss?
Three angels gave me at once a kiss.


















38 ITHE OWL AND THE PUSSY-CAT.

Where did you get this pretty ear?
God spoke, and it came out to hear.

Where did you get those arms and hands ?
Love made itself into hooks and bands.

Feet, whence did you come, you darling things ?
From the same box as the cherub's wings.

How did they all come just to be you?
God thought of me, and so I grew.

But how did you come to us, you dear?
God thought about you, and so I am here.
GEORGE MACDONALD.


THE OWL AND THE PUSSY-CAT.

T HE owl and the pussy-cat went to sea,
In a beautiful pea-green boat,
They took some honey, and lots of money,
Wrapped up in a five-pound note.
The owl looked up to the moon above,
And sang to his light guitar,
Oh, pussy, oh, pussy, oh, pussy, my love,
What a beautiful pussy you are, you are,
What a beautiful pussy you are.
Pussy said to the owl, You beautiful fowl,
How charmingly sweet you sing,
Come let us be married, too long have we tarried,
But what shall we do for a ring ?


















V'OTTY'S ARIITJIHMETI'C. 39

So they sailed away for a year and a day, :
To the land where the song-tree grows;
And there in a wood a piggy-wig stood,
With a ring in the end of his nose, his nose,
With a ring in the end of his nose.
"Dear pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling your
ring ?"
Says the piggy, "I will,"
So they took it away, and were married next day,
By the turkey who lives on the hill.
They dined upon mince, and slices of quince,
Which they ate with a runcible spoon;
And, hand in hand on the golden sand,
They danced by the light of the moon, the moon,
They danced by the light of the moon.
EDWARD LEAR.



TOTTY'S ARITHMETIC.

O NE little head, worth its whole weight in gold,
Over and over, a million times told.

Two shining eyes, full of innocent glee,
Brighter than diamonds ever could be.

Three pretty dimples, for fun to slip in,
Two in the cheeks, and one in the chin.

Four little fingers on each baby hand,
Fit for a princess of sweet Fairy-land.



















40 R.I;l:\L JEDBREAST.

Five on each hand, if we reckon Tom Thumb
Standing beside them, so stiff and so glum

Six pearly teeth just within her red lips,
Over which merriment ripples and trips.

Seven bright ringlets, as yellow as gold,
Seeming the sunshine to gather. and hold.

Eight tiny waves running over her hair,
Sunshine and shadow, they love to be there.

Nine precious words that Totty can say,
But she will learn new ones every day.

Ten little chubby, comical toes;
And that is as far as this lesson goes.
ELIZABETIH STUART PHELPS IN St. Nicholas.



ROBIN REDBREAST.

P RETTY Robin Redbreast,
Let me see inside your nest; -
Oh the eggs one two three -
Just as sweet as sweet can be.

I won't touch them; never fear-
I won't let my breath come near--
If I did you'd leave your nest,
Naughty Robin R.. hr...-rt.
E. A. :' .l l ., IN Our Liile Ones.


















LITTLE IITTY. 41



LITTLE KITTY.

O NCE there was a little kitty,
Whiter than snow;
In the barn she used to frolic,
Long time ago.

In the barn a little mousie
Ran to and fro;
For she heard the kitty coming,
Long time ago.

Two eyes had little kitty,
Black as a sloe;
And they spied the little mouse,
Long time ago.

Four paws had little kitty,
Paws soft as dough;
And they caught the little mouse,
Long time ago.

Nine teeth had little kitty
All in a row;
And they bit 'the little mousie,
Long time ago.

When the teeth bit little mousie,
Little mouse cried, "Oh!"
But she got away from kitty,
Long time ago,.


















42 PINKETY- IVIKETY- WEE.

Kitty White so shyly comes,
To catch the mousie Grey;
But mousie hears her softly step,
And quickly runs away.
E. PRENTISS.
-4--

TOO FOGGY.

T WO little birds started out to sing
When f:'._- was the weather,
They cleared their throats, and whetted their bills,
And coughed and wheezed together.
They wheezed and coughed as hard as they could,
In this dreadful f. -.;y weather,
Till they spoiled their notes, and split their throats,
And turned up their toes together.

-4-

PINKETY-WINKETY-WEE.

PINKETY-winkety-wee!
Ten pink fingers has she,
Ten pink toes,
One pink nose,
And two eyes that can hardly see,
And they blink and blink, and they wink and wink,
So you can't tell whether they are blue or pink.

Pinkety-blinkety-winkety !
Not much hair on her head has she;
She has no teeth, and she cannot talk;
She is not strong enough yet to walk;


















42 PINKETY- IVIKETY- WEE.

Kitty White so shyly comes,
To catch the mousie Grey;
But mousie hears her softly step,
And quickly runs away.
E. PRENTISS.
-4--

TOO FOGGY.

T WO little birds started out to sing
When f:'._- was the weather,
They cleared their throats, and whetted their bills,
And coughed and wheezed together.
They wheezed and coughed as hard as they could,
In this dreadful f. -.;y weather,
Till they spoiled their notes, and split their throats,
And turned up their toes together.

-4-

PINKETY-WINKETY-WEE.

PINKETY-winkety-wee!
Ten pink fingers has she,
Ten pink toes,
One pink nose,
And two eyes that can hardly see,
And they blink and blink, and they wink and wink,
So you can't tell whether they are blue or pink.

Pinkety-blinkety-winkety !
Not much hair on her head has she;
She has no teeth, and she cannot talk;
She is not strong enough yet to walk;



















THREE LITTLE BUGS. 43

She cannot even so much as creep;
Most of the time she is fast asleep;
Whenever you ask her how she feels,
She only doubles her fist and squeals.
The queerest bundle you ever did see,
Is little Pinkety-winkety-wee.

o-t


THE THREE LITTLE BUGS.

THREE little bugs in a basket,
And hardly room for two,
And one was yellow, and one was black,
And one like me, or you -
The space was small, no doubt, for all,
But what should three bugs do?

Three little bugs in a basket,
And hardly crumbs for two,
And all were selfish in their hearts,
The same as I or you,
So the strong ones said, "We'll eat the crumbs,
And that's what we will do."

Three little bugs in a basket,
And the beds but two would hold;
So they all three fell to quarrelling,
The white, the black, and the gold,
And two of the bugs got under the rugs,
And one was out in the cold !


















44 F LE I1. LITTLE P1LSISY-CATS.

So he that was left in the basket,
Without a crumb to chew,
Or a thread to wrap himself withal,
When the winds across him blew,
Pulled one of the rugs from off the bugs,
And so the quarrel grew.

And so there were none in the basket -
Ah, pity 't is, 't is true !
But he that was frozen and starved, at last
A strength from his weakness drew,
And pulled the rugs from both the bugs,
And killed and ate them too.

Now when bugs live in a basket,
Tlh'i.-lh more than it can hold,
It seems to me they had better agree,
The white, the black, and the gold,
And share what comes of beds and crumbs,
And leave no bug in the cold.



ELEVEN LITTLE PUSSY-CATS.-

E LEVEN little pussy-cats invited out to tea,
Eleven cups of milk they had, as sweet as milk could
b e,,
Eleven 'little silver spoons, to stir the sugar in,
Eleven little napkins white, each tucked beneath a chin.
Eleven little meows they gave, eleven little purrs,
Eleven little sneezes, too, though wrapped up in their furs,



















DOLLIE'S DOCTOR. 45

Eleven times they washed their paws, when all the milk
was out;
Eleven times they bobbed their heads, and said it was, no
doubt;
Eleven times they thought they heard the squeaking of a
mouse;
Eleven times they curtsied to the lady of the house;
Eleven times they promised to drive away the thieves,
That picked the grapes upon the vines, and hid among the
leaves.
They kept their word, and one day shook eleven bunches
down,
To this same girl of evenn years, who caught them in her
gown.



DOLLIE'S DOCTOR.

"COME and see my dolly dear,
Doctor, she is ill, I fear;
Yesterday, do what I would,
She would taste no kind. of food;

"And she tosses, moans, and cries,
Doctor what would you advise?"
Hum ha! good madam, tell me, pray,
What have you offered her to-day?

"Ah! yes, I see, a piece of cake,
The worst thing you could make her take;
Ah, let me taste,- yes,. yes, I fear
Too many plums and currants here.


















46 A DOLL'S WEDDING.

But stop, I must just taste again,
For that will make the matter plain."
But doctor, so much Y!,n- you ti:c:,
I se you've eaten all the cake.

"I thank you, kindly for your cai,:,
But surely, that was hardly fair."
S,, "Ah, dear me, did. Ieat the cake ?
Well, it was for dear baby's sake.

S"But keep her in her bed quite warm,
And you will see she 'll take no harm;
At night and morning-use once more
Her draught and powder as before.

"And she must not be over-fed,
But she may have a piece of bread;
To-morrow then I dare to say
She'll be quite well, go--d':-day, good-day,"



A DOLL'S WEDDING,

SAYS Ivanhoe to Mimi:
"It is our wedding day;
And will you promise, dearest,
Your husband to obey ?"

And this is Mimi's answer:
"With all my heart, my dear,
If you will never cause me
To drop a single tear;


















A DOLL'S WEDDING. 47

"If you will ask me nothing
But what I want to do,
I '11 be a sweet, obedient,
Delightful wife to you."

Says, Mr. Fenwick, giving
His brown mustache a twist:
"I shall command you, madam,
To do whatever I list!"

Miss Miii answered, frowning,
His very soul to freeze:
"-Then, sir, I shall obey you
Only just when I please!"

Says Ivanhoe to Mimi:
"Let us to this agree,-
I will not speak one word to you,
SIf you'll not speak to me;

"Then we shall never quarrel,
But through our dolly life
I'll be a model husband,
And you a model wife!"

And now all men and women,
Who make them wedding calls,
Look on, and almost -envy
The bliss of these two dolls.

They seem so very smiling,-
So graceful, kind, and bright!
And gaze upon each other
Quite -pc:.1le-~' with delight.


















48 NAUGHTY KITTY..

Never one cross word saying,
They stand up side by side,
Patterns of good behavior,
To every groom and bride.

Sweethearts, it is far better,-
This truth they plainly teach,-
The solid gold of silence,
Than the small change of speech!
Lucy LARCOM in St. Nicholas.



NAUGHTY KITTY.

"(OH! mother, you comb my hair in my eyes,"
SSo peevish-tempered Miss Kitty cries.
"And you've hurt my ears so awful bad,
I'11 just scream and kick, I feel so mad!

"I hate to be washed, you know I do;
And combing my hair puts me all in a stew;
You make the old soap go into my eye,
And then you scold me because I cry.

"I wish I had never got out of bed;
What do I care if I have a rough head?
And all soap alid water I do despise;
I think it was made to smart people's eyes."

"Why, Kitty!." her mother said, I'm in fear
That this naughty talk the neighbors should hear;
And then I don't know what I should do,
I should feel so bad for myself and you."


















LITTLE MISS SNOWFLAKE. 49

"Well, I just don't care," naughty Kitty cried;
"No other gifl ever was so much tried;
I don't care what they say about me or you."
And she cried out aloud, Boo-oo, boo-oo!"

Oh! naughty Miss Kitty, indeed you're not pretty,
And you make my heart feel very sadly.
Little girls, all take warning, and watch every morning,
That you never behave so badly.
JULIA A. SHEARMAN.



LITTLE MISS SNOWFLAKE.

SITTLE Miss Snowflake came to town
All dressed up in her brand-new gown,
And nobody looked as fresh and fair
As little Miss Snowflake, I declare!

Out of a fleecy cloud she stepped,
Where all the rest of her family kept
As close together as bees can swarm,
In readiness for a big snowstorm.

But little Miss Snowflake couldn't wait,
And she wanted to come in greater state;
For she thought that her beauty would ne'er be known,
If she came in a crowd, so she came alone.

All alone from the great blue sky,
Where cloudy vessels went scudding by,
With sails all set, on their way to meet
The larger ships of the snowy fleet.


















50 SATURDAY NIGHT.

She was very tired, but could n't stop
On tall church spire, or chimney top;
All the way from her bright abi-:,l:
Down to the dust of a country road!

There she rested all out of breath,
And there she speedily met her death,
And nobody could exactly tell
The spot where little Miss E!!no:.. fi fell.
JOSEPHINE POLLARD.


SATURDAY NIGHT.

LACING the little hats all in a row;
Ready for church on the morrow, you know;
Washing wee faces, and little black fists,
Getting them ready and fit to be kissed;
Putting them into clean garments and white;
That is what mothers are doing to-night.

Spying out holes in the little worn hose,
Laying by shoes that are worn thro' the toes,
Looking o'er garments so faded and thin-
Who but a mother knows where to begin?
Changing a button to make it look right -
That is what mothers are doing to-night.

Calling the little ones all round her chair,
Hearing them lisp forth their evening prayer,
Telling them stories of Jesus of old,
Who loves to gather the lambs to his fold;
Watching, they listen with childish delight-
That is what mothers are doing to-night.


















KEKEEPSAKES.51

Creeping so softly to take a last peep,
After the little ones all are asleep;
Anxious to know if the children are warm,
Tucking the blanket round each little form;
Kis.in; each little face, rosy and bright-
That, is what mothers are doing to-night.

Kneeling down gently beside the white bed,
Lowly and :ncekly she bows down her head,
Praying as only a mother can pray,
"G-d. guide and keep them from going astray."

-4-t

KEEPSAKES.

TWO little baby boys I own;
The elder scarcely walks alone;
His sunny hair, and large brown eyes,
His earnest look of sweet surprise,
His funny ways, and joyous shout,
I could not tell all about,
If I should try a year.

He creeps so fast to catch his toys,
And then he sets up such a noise;
His horse and dog, and book and bell,
He throws them all about, pell mell.
Oh, Mother Goose, if you could see
This little boy so full of glee,
Your sides -would ache, I fear.



















2 KEEPSAKES.

He watches with a rueful face
The baby, who usurps his place.
My darling boy, your little nose
Had to be broken, I suppose.
'Tis very odd sometimes the way
You love your "bubber" in your play,
And bring a smile or tear.

In hammock low among the trees,
Rocked back and forth by passing breeze,
The baby swings, and coos to see
The gentle rustle of the tree.
The lights and shades, the leaves that fall,
The sunshine breeding over all-
'T is Indian Summer here.


Way overhead, in the blue sky,
Downy clouds float softly by;
A lullaby fair nature sings,
And through the air its music rings;
My little one falls fast asleep,
As sun and shadow o'er him creep,
His mother watching near.


Two baby boys! a God of love
Sends us a gift from heaven above;
And like the shifting rainbow bright,
Tinging and drifting clouds with light,
Their souls, so fine and sweet, shine out,
Breaking through mists of grief and doubt,
And make my pathway clear.


















THE HOME OF THE ROBIN.



JESUS' NAME.

A LITTLE girl, with golden head,
Asked me to read a minute,
"A pretty story," as she said,
"For Jesus' name was in it."

The pleasant task was soon complete,
But long I pondered of it,
That Jesus' name should be so sweet,
That e'en a child should love it.

O, sweetest story ever told !
What tongue would dare begin it,
If it were riven of its gold,
And Jesus' name not in it?
S. B. LEVERICH.



THE HOME OF THE ROBIN.

SAID little Cock Robin
One bright day in March,
"Let's build our spring nest
In this beautiful larch."

Said his dear little mate,
"To this I agree,
I see nowhere around
Such a suitable tree."


















THE HOME OF THE ROBIN.



JESUS' NAME.

A LITTLE girl, with golden head,
Asked me to read a minute,
"A pretty story," as she said,
"For Jesus' name was in it."

The pleasant task was soon complete,
But long I pondered of it,
That Jesus' name should be so sweet,
That e'en a child should love it.

O, sweetest story ever told !
What tongue would dare begin it,
If it were riven of its gold,
And Jesus' name not in it?
S. B. LEVERICH.



THE HOME OF THE ROBIN.

SAID little Cock Robin
One bright day in March,
"Let's build our spring nest
In this beautiful larch."

Said his dear little mate,
"To this I agree,
I see nowhere around
Such a suitable tree."


















54 THE HOME OF THE ROBIN.

Said little. Cock Robin,
Now quickly we'll work,
I ].1 bring some fine twigs,
And these pieces of cork."

Said his dear little mate,
"Your work I :.1,. ,
To be your help-r .i; ..
I :I fondly aspire.

These pieces of cord
\Ve'll weave '~t.nii .. ti.;l.,
And fasten them firmly,
Before it is night".

Then down in the meadow.-
They found some nice clay,
S.And plastered their walls,
.:, On one fine sunny day.

Three bonny blue eggs
There soon do we see,
In this nest lined with down,
On a branch, in the tree.

The sun rose and set,
The days longer grew,
Peep! peep cried the chicks,
From those bonny eggs blue.

As love ruled the parents,
So love ruled the three
Little soft downy nestlings,
In this noble larch tree.


















tIHARKLEY AND HIS KITTY. 55.

Each took in its turn,
From its dear parent's bill,
A fly, bug, or worm,
Or little bread pill.

Said little Cock Robin,
*" "Wherever I look,
I find nothing so nice
As our. own little nook."

Said his sweet little mate,
"To this I agree,"
So love and content
Ruled this home in the tree.
JENNY WALLIS.


CHARLEY AND HIS KITTY.

"W HERE is my little basket gone ?"
Said Charley boy, one day.
"I guess some little boy or girl
Has taken it away."

"And kitty too, I can't find her,
Oh dear, what shall I do!
I wish I could my basket find,
And little kitty too.

"I'll run to mamma's room, and ldok,
Perhaps she may be there,
For kitty loves to take a nap
SIn mamma's ::ii.ir.


















00 THE DEAD DOLL.

Oh, mamma, mamma, come and look,
See what a little heap,
.i kitty's in the basket here,
All cuddled down to sleep."

He took it very carefully,
And carried it in a minute,
And showed it to his mamma dear,
With little kitty in it.
ELIZA FOLLEN.



THE DEAD DOLL.

OU needn't be trying to comfort me-I tell you my
dolly is dead!
There is no use in saying she is n't, with a crack like that
in her head.
It's just like you said it wouldn't hurt much to have my
tooth out, that day;
And then, when the man 'most pulled my head off, you
had n't a word to say.

And I guess you must think I'm a baby, when you say
you can mend it with glue!
As if I didn't know better than that! Why, just suppose
it was you?
You might make her look all mended-but what do I
care for looks?
Why, glue's for chairs and tables, and toys, and the backs
of books!


















THIE DEAD DOLL. 57

My dolly! my own little daughter! Oh, but it's the awful-
est crack!
It just makes me sick to think of the sound, when her
poor head went whack
Against that horrible brass thing, that holds up the little
shelf.
Now, Nursey, what makes you remind me ? I know that
I did it myself!

I think you must be crazy-- you'll get her another head!
What good would forty heads do her? I tell you my dolly
is dead!
And to think I had n't quite finished her elegant new
spring hat!
And I took a sweet ribbon of hers last night, to tie on
that horrid cat!

When my mamma gave me that ribbon-I was playing
out in the yard -
She said to me most expressly, Here's a ribbon for Hilde-
garde,"
And I went and puit it on Tabby, and Hildegarde saw me
do it
But I said to myself, Oh, never mind, I don't believe
she knew it ?"

But I know that she knew it now, and I just believe, I
do,
That her poor little heart was broken, and so her head
broke too.
Oh, my baby, my little baby! I wish my head had been
hit!
For I've hit it over and over, and it has n't cracked a bit.



















08 TIIE SMILING DOLLY.

But since the darling is dead, she'll want to be buried, of
course;
We will take my little wagon, Nurse, and you shall be
the horse,
And I'll walk behind and cry; and we'll put her in this,
you see -
This dear little box--and we'll bury her then under the
maple tree.


And papa will make me a tombstone, like the one he made
for my bird;
And he'll put what I tell him on it--yes, every single
word i
I shall say :-"Here lies H-ildegarde, a beautiful doll who is
dead;
She died of a broken heart, and a dreadful crack in her
head."
MARGARET -VANDEGRIFT in St. Nicholas.



THE SMILING DOLLY.

I WHISPERED to my dolly,
And told her not to tell,
( .l-.'s a really lovely dolly-
Her name is Rosabel).

"Rosy," I said, "stop smiling,
For I've been dreadful bad!
You must n't look so pleasant,
As if you feel real glad!


















THE SMILING DOLLY. 59

"I took mamma's new ear-ring--
I did, now, Rosabel--
And I never even asked her-
Now, Rosy, don't you tell!

"You: see I'll try to find it
Before I let her know;
She 'd feel so very sorry
To think I'd acted so."

I had wheeled her round the garden
In her gig till I was lame;
Yet when I told my trouble,
She smiled on just the same!

H-er hair waved down her shoulders
Like silk, all made of gold.
I kissed her, then I shook her,
Oh, dear! how I did scold!

"You're really naughty, Rosy,
To look so when I cry.
When my mamma's in trouble
I never laugh-not I."

And still she kept on smiling,
SThe queer, provoking child!
I shook her well, and told her
Her conduct drove me wild.

When--only think! that ear-ring'
Fell out of Rosy's hair!
When I had dressed the darling,
I must have dropped it there.


















60 ALL THE CHILDREN.

She doubled when I saw it,
And almost hit her head;
Again I whispered softly,
And this is what I said:

"You precious, precious Rosy!
Now I'11 go tell mamma
How bad I was-and sorry-
And, 0, how good you are!

"For, Rose, I had n't lost it;
You knew it all the while,
You knew I'd shake it out, dear,
And that's what made you smile."
MARY MAPES DODGE in St. Nicholas.


ALL THE CHILDREN.

I SUPPOSE if all the children
Who have lived through the ages long,
Were collected and inspected,
They would make a wondrous throng.
Oh! the babble of the Babel!
Oh, the flutter and the fuss!
To begin with Cain and Abel,
And to finish up with us.

Think of all the men and women
Who are now, and who have been -
Every nation since creation,
That this world of ours has seen.


















ALL THE CHILDREN. 61

And of all of them, not any
But was once a baby small;
While of children, oh, how many
Have not grown up at all!

Some have never laughed or spoken,
Never used their rosy feet;
Some have even flown to heaven
Ere they knew that earth was .w\vccet '
And, indeed, I wonder whether,
If we reckon every birth,
And bring such a flock together,
There is room for them on earth.:"

Who will wash their smiling faces?
Who their saucy cars will box?
Who will dress them and caress them?
Who will darn their little socks ?
Where are arms enough to hold them ?
Hands to pat each shining head?
Who will praise them? Who will scold them ?
Who will pack them off to bed?

Little happy Christian children,
Little savage children, too,
In all stages, of all ages
That our planet ever knew-
Little princes and princesses,
Little beggers wan and faint:
Some in very handsome dresses,
Naked some, bedaubed with paint.


















62 A MOTHER'S DIARY.

Only think of the confusion
Such a motley crowd would make,
And the clatter of their chatter,
And the things that they would break!
Oh, the babble of the Babel!
Oh, the flutter and the fuss!
To begin with Cain and Abel,
And to finish up with us.
T'e Welcome.


A MOTHER'S DIARY.
M ORNING!-Baby on the floor,
'.! mg for the fender;
Sunlight seems to make him sneeze,
Baby "on the bender;"
All the spools upset and gone,
Chairs drawn into file,
Harnessed strings all strung across,
Ought to make one smile.
Apron clean, curls smooth, eyes blue,
(How these charms will dwindle!)
For I rather think, don't you ?
Baby is "a swindle."
Noon!-A tangled silken floss,
Getting in blue eyes,
Apron that will not keep clean;
If a baby tries !
One blue shoe untied, and one
Underneath the table;
Chairs gone mad, and blocks and toys,
Well as they are able,


















WILLIE'S QUESTION. 63

Baby in a high chair, too,
Yelling for his dinner.
Spoon in mouth; I think, don't you?
Baby is a sinner.

Night! Chairs all set back again,
Blocks and spools in order.
One blue shoe beneath the mat,
Tells of the maurauder.
Apron folded on a chair,
Plaid dress torn and wrinkled;
Two pink feet kicked pretty bare,
Little fat knees crinkled;
In his crib, and conquered, too,
By sleep, blest evangel;
Now, I surely think, don't you?
Baby is an angel!
BERTHA SCRANTON POOL.




WILLIE'S QUESTION.

WILLIE sat and watched his grandpa
When he came to visit him,
With his spectacles a-glisten,
O'er the eyes with age grown dim;
And the child-eyes filled with wonder,
And a sense of envy rose,
When he took them off to wipe them,
And replaced them on his nose.


















64- LEARTNNG TO PRAY.

When his grandpa's visit ended,
Willie sought for some advice.
"Papa," said he "can I ever
Do like grandpa with my eyes ?
Can I string 'em, just like grandpa,
On a wire -and when I cough,
Just like grandpa did, you 'member,
Can I take my two eyes off ?"
EBEN E. REXFORD.
__.-C---


LEARNING TO PRAY.

KNEELING, fair in the twilight gray,
A beautiful child was trying to pray;
His cheek on his mother's knee,
His bare little feet half hidden,
His smile still coming unbidden,
And his heart brimful of glee.

"I want to laugh. Is it naughty? Say,
O mamma I 've had such fun to-day,
I hardly can say my prayers.
I don't feel just like praying;
I want to be out-doors playing,
And run, all undressed, down stairs.

"I can see the flowers in the garden bed,
Shining so pretty and sweet and red:
And Sammy is -. i _!i-. I guess.
Oh! everything is so fine out there,
I want to put it all in the prayer.
(Do you mean I can do. it by 'Yes'?)


















LEARNING TO PRAY. 65

"When I say, 'Now I lay me'- word for word--
It seems to me as if nobody heard.
Would 'Thank you, dear God,' be right?
He gave me my mammy,
And papa, and Sammy--
O mamma! you nodded I might."
Clasping his hands, and hiding his face,
Unconsciously yearning for help and grace,
The little one now began.
His mother's nod, and sanction sweet,
Had led him close to the dear Lord's feet,
And his words like music ran.

"T1i;k you for making this home so nice,
The flowers, and folks, and my two white mice.
(I wish I could keep right on.)
I thank you, too, for every day-
Only I'm most too glad to pray.
Dear God, I think I am done.
"Now, mamma, rock me -just a minute -
And sing the hymn with darling' in it.
I wish I could say my prayers!
When I get big I know I can.
Oh! won't it be nice to be a man,
And stay all night down stairs!"

The mother, singing, clasped him tight,
Kissing and cooing her fond "Good-night"
And treasured his every word.
For well she knew that the artless joy
And love of her precious, innocent boy,
lW. re a prayer that her Lord had heard.
MARY MAI'ES DODGE.

















66 PLAY.




PLAY.

PLAY you were a princess,
And this was your diamond throne
Play I was a fairy -
That is the truth, my own! "

Play you were a giant,
And I was a poor lost girl;
Play this was your castle;
"Think I could harm one curl ?"

Play this was my carriage,
And I was a lady grand;
Play that was a ball room:
Lady, I kiss your hand !"

Play the sun was a kite,
And this was the yellow string;
Play I was a robin;
"Sing, little birdie, sing?"

Play you were a shepherd,
And searching with weary feet;
Play I was your lambkin;
Come to your fold, my sweet! "

Soon eyelids are drooping,
And that was a sigh, so deep;
Play this was the night, ma:
And play I had gone to sleep!
GEORGE COOPER.


















WHERE SHALL BABY'S DIMPLE BE? 67



WHERE SHALL BABY'S DIMPLE BE?

OVER the cradle a mother hung,
Softly crooning a slumber song,
And these were the simple words she sung
All the evening long:

"Cheek or chin, or knuckle or knee,
Where shall the baby's dimple be?
Where shall the angel's finger rest
When he comes down to the baby's nest?
Where shall the angel's touch remain
When he awakens my babe again?"

Still as she bent and sang so low,
A murmur into her music broke,
And she paused to hear, for she could but know
The baby's angel spoke:

"Cheek or chin, or knuckle or knee,
Where shall the baby's dimple be?
Where shall my finger fall and rest
When I come down to the baby's nest?
Where shall my finger's touch remain
When I awaken your babe again?"

Silent the mother sat, and dwelt
Long on the sweet delay of choice,
An I then by her baby's side she knelt,
And sang with pleasant voice:


















THIE SUNDAY BABY.

"Not on the limb, 0 angel dear!
For the charms with its youth will disappear;
Not on the cheek shall the dimple be,
For the harboring smile will fade and flee;
But touch thou the chin with an impress deep,
And my baby the angel's seal shall keep."
DR. J. G. HOLLAND in fours at Home.
-4-

THE SUNDAY BABY.
Y OU wonderful little Sunday child!
Half of your fortune scarce you know,
Although you have blinked and winked and smiled
Full seven and twenty days below.

"The bairn that is born on a Sabbath day"-
So say the old wives over their glass-
"Is bonny and healthy, and wise and gay!"
What do you think of that, my lass ?

Health and wisdom, and beauty and mirth .'
And (as if that were not enough for a dower),
Because of the holy day of your birth,
Abroad you may walk in the gloaming's hour.

When we poor bodies, with backward look,
Shiver and quiver and shake, with fear
Of fiend and fairy, and kelpie and spook,
Never a thought need you take, my dear--

For Sunday's child" may go where it please,
Sunday's child shall be free from harm!
Right down through the mountain-side it sees
The mines unopened where jewels swarm!


















MINNIE AND WINVNIE. 69

0 fortunate baby! Sunday lass!
The veins of gold through the rocks you'll see;
And when o'er the shining sands you pass,
You can tell where the hidden springs may be.

And never a fiend, or an airy sprite
May thwart or hinder you all your days;
Whenever it chances in mirk mi.il,iht,
The lids of your marvellous eyes you raise.

You may see, while your heart is pure and true,
The angels, that visit this lower sphere,
Drop down the firmament, two and two,
Their errands of mercy to work down here.

This is the dower of a Sunday child;
What do you think of it, little brown head,
Winking and blinking your eyes so mild,
Down in the depth of your snowy bed?
ALICE WILLIAMS in St. Nichlolas.


MINNIE AND WINNIE.

MINNIE and Winnie
Slept in a shell.
Sleep, little ladies!
And they slept well.

Pink was the shell within,
Silver without;
Sounds of the great sea
Wander'd about,



















To GtOOD FOR SOMETHING.

Sleep little ladies!
Wake not soon!
Echo on echo
Dies to the moon.

Two bright stars
Peep'd into the shell.
"What are they dreaming of?
Who can tell? "

Started a green linnet
Out of the croft;
Wake, little ladies,
The sun is aloft!
ALFRED TENNYSON iln VS. Aich/olas.



GOOD FOR SOMETHING.

"DOOD-FOR-NOSSIN littlee son,
Papa tells me, jes for fun,
I duess--fer, ma, oo say
I dood for sumsin all ee day."
And so you are, my precious one,
Full of mischief, love, and fun;
Good to fill our hearts with joy,
Our darling blue-eyed little boy!
Good to clutter up the room;
Good to ride astride the broom;
Good to tip my basket o'er,
Rolling spools about the floor;
Good to pull the baby's hair,
And make a horse of every chair;




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Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs