• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 When the wind is in the East
 The turtle-dove's nest
 Peter White
 The frog's chorus
 What's the news of the day?
 "Ding, dong, bell"
 Nursery rhyme alphabet
 Swam, swan, over the sea
 The old woman must stand at the...
 "Hickety, pickety, my black...
 I love sixpence
 There was a fat man of Bombay
 Sing a song of sixpence
 The King was in his counting-h...
 The Queen was in the parlour
 The maid was in the garden
 Little Polly Flinders
 Poor old Robinson Crusoe
 Bat, bat, come under my hat
 The old woman and her pig
 Dickery, dickery, dock
 A diller, a dollar, a ten o'clock...
 Leg over leg
 There was an old man of Tobago
 Mother goose's nursery rhymes
 Good Dobbin
 The diverting history of John...
 Twinkle, twinkle, little star
 Up hill and down dale
 To market, to market
 Georgie Porgie
 I love little Pussy
 Taffy was a Welshman
 A farmer went trotting
 This mischievous raven flew laughing...
 A man of words and not of...
 As I was going up Pippin Hill
 Old woman, old woman, shall we...
 Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's...
 Needles and pins
 Three children sliding on...
 My lady wind
 Mother gooses nursery rhymes
 Rain, rain, go to Spain
 Mother gooses nursery rhymes
 Rain, rain, go away
 The rose is red, the violet's...
 Valentine, oh, Valentine
 Little Bo-Peep
 Back Cover






Title: The turtle dove's nest and other rhymes
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055367/00001
 Material Information
Title: The turtle dove's nest and other rhymes
Alternate Title: Mother Goose's nursery rhymes
Physical Description: p. 190-288 : ill., music ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McConnell, William, 1833-1867 ( Illustrator )
Zwecker, Johann Baptist, 1814-1876 ( Illustrator )
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Crane, Walter, 1845-1915 ( Illustrator )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Publication Date: [1887?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1887   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1887   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1887   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1887
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with eighty-nine illustrations by McConnell, Zwecker, H. Weir, W. Crane, and others.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055367
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002238957
notis - ALH9481
oclc - 69242733

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
    When the wind is in the East
        Page 191
    The turtle-dove's nest
        Page 192
        Page 193
    Peter White
        Page 194
    The frog's chorus
        Page 195
    What's the news of the day?
        Page 196
    "Ding, dong, bell"
        Page 197
        Page 198
    Nursery rhyme alphabet
        Page 199
        Page 200
    Swam, swan, over the sea
        Page 201
    The old woman must stand at the tub
        Page 202
    "Hickety, pickety, my black hen"
        Page 203
        Page 204
    I love sixpence
        Page 205
    There was a fat man of Bombay
        Page 206
        Page 207
    Sing a song of sixpence
        Page 208
    The King was in his counting-house
        Page 209
    The Queen was in the parlour
        Page 210
    The maid was in the garden
        Page 211
    Little Polly Flinders
        Page 212
    Poor old Robinson Crusoe
        Page 213
    Bat, bat, come under my hat
        Page 214
    The old woman and her pig
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
    Dickery, dickery, dock
        Page 229
    A diller, a dollar, a ten o'clock scholar
        Page 230
    Leg over leg
        Page 234
    There was an old man of Tobago
        Page 235
        Page 236
    Mother goose's nursery rhymes
        Page 237
    Good Dobbin
        Page 238
        Page 239
    The diverting history of John Gilpin
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
    Twinkle, twinkle, little star
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
    Up hill and down dale
        Page 260
    To market, to market
        Page 261
    Georgie Porgie
        Page 262
    I love little Pussy
        Page 263
    Taffy was a Welshman
        Page 264
    A farmer went trotting
        Page 265
        Page 266
    This mischievous raven flew laughing away
        Page 267
    A man of words and not of deeds
        Page 268
        Page 269
    As I was going up Pippin Hill
        Page 270
    Old woman, old woman, shall we go a-shearing?
        Page 271
    Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man
        Page 272
    Needles and pins
        Page 273
    Three children sliding on the ice
        Page 274
    My lady wind
        Page 275
    Mother gooses nursery rhymes
        Page 276
        Page 277
    Rain, rain, go to Spain
        Page 278
    Mother gooses nursery rhymes
        Page 279
    Rain, rain, go away
        Page 280
    The rose is red, the violet's blue
        Page 281
    Valentine, oh, Valentine
        Page 282
    Little Bo-Peep
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text

<: THE

TURTLE DOVE'S NEST

. .. ...

























WITH 89 ILLUSTRATIONS
I U AT
' i', "' '" = "'' ".*:i" "'.. i i -" : IIII]II I I i W

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The Blldwm ibnry







THE

TURTLE DOVE'S NEST


AND OTHER RHYMES






P













WITH EIGHTY-NINE ILLUSTRATIONS BY
McCONNELL, ZWECKER, H. WEIR, W. CRANE, AND OTHERS


LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS
BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL
NEW YORK: 9 LAFAYETTE PLACE






MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 191







S/-
i
.. ,I A.













When the wind is in the East,
'T is neither good for man nor beast;
When the wind is in the North,
The skilful fisher goes not forth;
When the wind is in the South,
It blows the bait in the fishes' mouth;
When the wind is in the West,
Then 'tis at the very best.



Cry, baby, cry,
Put your finger in your eye,
And tell your mother it wasn't I.














." \: :.. t 4
~-
-^ '^ -*-*
r- -'. .,.. .'- _.' v ri, i-*;-,' y;s





THE TURTLE-DOVE'S NEST.


VERY high in the pine-tree,
The little Turtle-dove
Made a pretty little nursery,
To please her little love.

She was gentle, she was soft,
And her large dark eye

Often turned to her mate,
Who was sitting close by.


"Coo," said the Turtle-dove,
"Coo," said she;
"Oh, I love thee," said the Turtle-dove.

"And I love THEE."
192







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 193

In the long shady branches
Of the dark pine-tree,
How happy were the Doves
In their little nursery!


The young Turtle-doves
Never quarrelled in the nest;
For they dearly loved each other,
Though they loved their mother best:
"Coo," said the little Doves.
"Coo," said she.
And they played together kindly
In the dark pine-tree.


In this nursery of yours,
Little sister, little brother,
Like the Turtle-dove's nest-
Do you love one another?
Are you kind, are you gentle,
As children ought to be?
Then the happiest of nests
Is your own nursery.
13







194 PETER WHITE.

Peter White
Will ne'er go right,
Would you know the reason
why ?
He follows his nose
Wherever he goes,
And that stands all awry.


He that would thrive,
Must rise at five;
He that hath thriven,
May lie till seven;
And he that by the plough
would thrive,
Himself must either hold or
drive.














Hush-a-bye, baby,
Daddy is near;
Mamma is a lady,
And that's very clear.












THE FROG'S CHORUS.

"YAUP, yaup, yaup !"
Said the croaking voice of a Frog:
"A rainy day
In the month of May,
And plenty of room in the bog."

"Yaup, yaup, yaup !"
Said the Frog as it hopped away:
The insects feed
On the floating weed,
And I'm hungry for dinner to-day."

"Yaup, yaup, yaup \"
Said the Frog, as it splashed, about:
"Good neighbours all,
When you hear me call,
It is odd that you do not come out,"

"Yaup, yaup, yaup!"
Said the Frogs; "it is charming weather;
We'll come and sup,
When the moon is up,
And we'll all of us croak together."
195 13-2







196 WHAT'S THE NEWS OF 7HIE DAY?



What's the news of the day,

Good neighbour, I pray?

They say the balloon

Is gone up to the moon. A .,




Cross-Patch,
Draw the latch,
Sit by the fire and spin;
Take a cup,
And drink it up,
And call your neighbours in.




There was an old Crow

Sat upon a clod.

There's an end of my song,

That's very odd.















-- "'














I I ,
II -





























"DING, DONG, BELL,"
197






198 DING, DONG, BELL.

Ding, dong, bell, Pussy's in the well.
Who put her in? Little Tommy Green.
Who pulled her out? Little Tommy Trout.
What a naughty boy was that,
Thus to drown poor Pussy Cat.








: ,,, ~ -' '" "'
.v..










-_ -
,., ,










NURSERY RHYME ALPHABET.

A was the Archer who shot at a frog.
B was Bo-peep, with her crook and her dog.

C was the Cow that jumped over the moon.
D was the Dish that ran off with the spoon.
E was Elizabeth, Betsey, and Bess.
F was the Forest where stood the bird's-nest.
t Gaffer Longlegs; downstairs he'd a fal!.

H Humpty Dumpty that sat on the wall.
I was that "I" who was going to St. Ives.

J Jacky Horner, on plum-pie he thrives.
K was King Cole with his fiddlers three.

L Little Gold-Hair, peeping, you see.
M Mother Hubbard who thought her dog dead.
N Little Netticoat, with a red head.
199






200 NURSERY RHYME ALPHABET

0 the old Woman "upon market day;"

P was the Pedlar" who passed by that way.

Q was the Queen of Hearts, tartlets she makes.

IR was Red Riding Hood carrying the cakes.

S Simple Simon, the pieman beside.

T Tommy Tucker, for supper who cried.

U was the Unicorn, "beat round the town;"

V was Victoria-he fought for her crown.

TW Whittington, who turned again,
Over great London as Lord Mayor to reign.

X is a letter that here we can spare.

Y "Yankee Doodle," that went to the fair;

Z is the Zany who laughed at him there.







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 201

Swan, swan, over the sea;
SSwim, swan, swim.
Swan, swan, back again;

.. / Well, swan, swam.



One misty moisty morning,

When cloudy was the weather,

I I met a little old man,
'/-F Clothed all in leather,

Clothed all in leather,
With a strap below his chin.
SHow do you do ? and how d-

you do ?
.i And how do you do again ?




Deedle, deedle, dumpling, my son John,
He went to bed with his stockings on;
One shoe off, and one shoe on,
Deedle, deedle, dumpling, my son John.






202 THE OLD IVOAL4N MUST STAND AT THE TUB.




























The old woman must stand at the tub, tub, tub,

The dirty clothes to rub, rub, rub;

But when they are clean, and fit to be seen,

I '11 dress like a lady and dance on the green.
The ~ ~ ol omnmutstn a hetbtbtb













I '11 dress like a lady, and dance on the green.













-i Ji l






\ll, ,













































HICKETY, PICKETY, MY BLACK HEN.

203
80.1







204 HICKETY, PICKETY, MY BLACK HENI

Hickety, pickety, my black hen,
She lays eggs for gentlemen;
Gentlemen come every day
To see what my black hen doth lay.





















I '11 tell you a story,
About John-a-Nory:
And now my story's begun.
I '11 tell you another,
About Jack and his brother:
And now my story's done.












I LOVE SIXPENCE.

I LOVE sixpence, pretty little sixpence,
I love sixpence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And took fourpence home to my wife.


Oh, my little fourpence, pretty little fourpence,
I love fourpence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took twopence home to my wife.


Oh, my little twopence, my pretty little twopence,
I love twopence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took nothing home to my wife.


Oh, my little nothing, my pretty little nothing,
What will nothing buy for my wife ?
I have nothing, I spend nothing,
I love nothing better than my wife.
205







206 THERE WAS A FAT M1AN OF BOMfBAY






















____ I2_










There was a fat man of Bombay,

Who was smoking one sunshiny day,

When a bird called a Snipe flew away with his pipe,

Which vexed the fat man of Bombay.
;Sj- 1






















NNI






































"WHEN THE PIE WAS OPENED, THE BIRDS BEGAN TO SING."

207
LJ
























SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE.

Moderato.


mf Sing a song of six pence, A bag. full of rye;

^--^=-'------ --- -- -^----i------>-
i.N -- -r- --





Four and twen ty black birds; Baked in a pie;



___0 -- -- -- -_--
__ -* ____





When the pie was o pen'd, The birds be gan to sing,





_-9P __f____* e-o- ----- -- --

Was not that a dain ty dish To set be fore the king ?
-- -9- -


-- --- -20------
208








MOTHER GOOSES NURSERY RHYMES. 209






































The King was in his counting-house,
o14
, I ,,,,I ,I .- --I
The Kn w in hiscoutin-hose








210 SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE.








IN














.. I.' ..

















The Queen was in the parlour,

Eating bread and honey;






MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 211

,- -- -



t .. : -^ ,r -,' -








A 'I
I :-- .-:-'- "1'l




1.__ -.,






















And snapt off her nose.
14-2
I-2






212 LITTLE POLLY FLINDERS.





-_ !I -


i, --' --\ *







Little Polly Flinders
Sate among the cinders
Warming her pretty little toes!
Her mother came and caught her,
And whipped her little
daughter,
For spoiling her nice new
clothes. '- \ ,


Great A, little A, ( '
Bouncing B,
The cat's in the cupboard, '
And she can't see.







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 2T



h I






















Poor old Robinson Crusoe! poor old Robinson Crusoe!
They made him a coat of an old Nanny goat,
I wonder how they could do so!
With a ring-a-ting-tang, and a ring-a-ting-tang,
Poor old Robinson Crusoe!
They made him a coat of a od anygot
I woner ho theycoulddo so
Wit arin-atin-tng an arin-atin-tng
Poarold obinon Cusoe







214 BAT. BAT, COME UNDER MY HAT.










-A




Bat, bat, come under my hat,
And I '11 give you a slice of bacon,
And when I bake I '11 give you a cake,
If I am not mistaken.


The North Wind doth blow,
And we shall have snow,
And what will poor Robin
do then? ?.
Poor thing !


And to keep himself warm,,
Will hide his head under -
his win, -
Poor thing! -



















.. .




.. "" ,I:
L, r '/ I



.14,.!";^ ^ z .- .

































THE OLD WOMAN BUYING HER PIG AT MARK.



215
THE OL OA UIGHE I TMR'"































THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.

AN old woman was sweeping her house, and she found a
little crooked sixpence. "What," said she, "shall I do with














pig." As she was coming home, she came to a stile: the

piggy would not go over the stile.

She went a little farther, and she met a dog. So she said

to the dog-
216







MOTHER GOOSES NURSERY RHYMES. 217

Dog, dog, bite pig;

Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."

But the dog would not.

She went a little farther, and she met a stick. So she
said-
Stick, stick, beat dog;
Dog won't bite pig;

Piggy won't get over the stile,
And I shan't get home to-night."

But the stick would not.
She went a little farther, and she met a fire. So she

said-
"Fire, fire, burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog;

Dog won't bite pig;

Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."

But the fire would not.

She went a little farther, and she met some water, So
she said-







2 8 7HE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.










-


























FIRE, FIRE, BURN STICK."


Water, water, quench fire;

Fire won't burn stick;







MOTHER GOOSES NURSERY Y ~HVYMES. 219

Stick won't beat dog;
Dog won't bite pig;

Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."

But the water would not.
She went a little farther, and she met an ox. So she
.said-
"Ox, ox, drink water;
Water won't quench fire;
Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog;
Dog won't bite pig;

Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."

But the ox would not.
She went a little farther, and she met a butcher. So she
said--
Butcher, butcher, kill ox;
Ox won't drink water;
Water won't quench fire;
Fire won't burn stick;







220 THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.







































Dog won't bite pig;







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 221

Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to night."

But the butcher would not.
She went a little farther, and she met a rope. So she

said-
"Rope, rope, hang butcher;
Butcher won't kill ox;
Ox won't drink water;
Water won't quench fire;
Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog;
Dog won't bite pig;

Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to night."

But the rope would not.
She went a little farther, and she met a rat. So she

said-
"Rat, rat, gnaw rope;
Rope won't hang butcher;
Butcher won't kill ox;
Ox won't drink water;







222 TIE OLD WOMAN AND fELR PIG.


-- --_ -


l- : i -,



























"RAT, RAT, GNAW ROPE."


Water won't quench fire;

Fire won't burn stick;
jj P










T; RAT RAGAWRP

Water on't qench fr ;
Fire on'tburn t;ck







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 223

Stick won't beat dog;

Dog won't bite pig;

Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."

But the rat would not.
She went a little farther, and she met a cat. So she

said--
"Cat, cat, kill rat;
Rat won't gnaw rope;
Rope won't hang butcher;
Butcher won't kill ox;
Ox won't drink water;
Water won't quench fire;
Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog;
Dog won't bite pig;

Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."

But the cat said to her, If you will go to yonder cow,
and fetch me a saucer of milk, I will kill the rat." So away

went the old woman to the cow, and said-







224 THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.


S" :' ^', -- -~~~ ,.
f, ' '-_--"-- --"-"' '

p i










i, ,- ,



















SCOW, COW, GIVE ME A SAUCER OF MILK.


Cow, cow, give me a saucer of milk;

Cat won't kill rat;







MOTHER GOOSES NURSERY RHYMES. 225

Rat won't gnaw rope;
Rope won't hang butcher;
Butcher won't kill ox;
Ox won't drink water;
Water won't quench fire;
Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog;
Dog won't bite pig;
Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."

But the cow said to her, If you will go to yonder hay-
makers, and fetch me a wisp of hay, I '11 give you the milk."
So away the old woman went to the haymakers, and said-

Haymakers, give me a wisp of hay;
Cow won't give me milk;
Cat won't kill rat;

Rat won't gnaw rope;
Rope won't hang butcher;
Butcher won't kill ox;
Ox won't drink water;

Water won't quench fire;
1 ;,







26 THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.































HAYMAKERS, GIVE ME A WISP OF HAY."

Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog;
Do won't bite pig;
-_= --- '.


'" ": ?----._ 2_ :- ---
-, ,_ __ __ ....__i .. -
-...---. ~~ ~ ~ ~ ::' .-_- -__-:_--_-._ :..
HAMAKRS GIEM IPO A.-,

Fire wo' bun ti








MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 227

Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."

But the haymakers said to her,-" If you will go to yon-
der stream, and fetch us a bucket of water, we'll give you
the hay." So away the old woman went; but when she got
to the stream, she found the bucket was full of holes. So
she covered the bottom with pebbles, and then filled the
bucket with water, and away she went back with it to the
haymakers; and they gave her a wisp of hay.
As soon as the cow had eaten the hay, she gave the old
woman the milk; and away she went with it in a saucer to
the cat. As soon as the cat had lapped up the milk--

The cat began to kill the rat;
The rat began to gnaw the rope;
The rope began to hang the butcher;
The butcher began to kill the ox;
The ox began to drink the water;
The water began to quench the fire;
The fire began to burn the stick;
The stick began to beat the dog;
The dog began to bite the pig;








22? THE OLD VWO.MAN AND HER PIG.








7 -._ ,e





I




















STHE CAT BEGAN TO KILL THE RAT.


The little pig in a fright jumped over the stile;

And so the old woman got home that night.
....: .-...--:=.- :--- .._.,,,,,..~l;
_.. .

~~~~~~~' TH CA EGNTOllL IA.

Th itl pginafrgtjupd vr h sie

_And o th oldwoma got ome hat ight













JI









DICKER, DICKERY, DOCK.

Allegretto. _


Dick e ry, dick e ry, dock! The








1-------^----- ----- --------
I =- ---s- -, I--- -- -n =F
mouse ran up the clock; The








W=='==v=------"--i---- -- u==
clock struck one, and down the mouse ran,






sf sf Sf
Dik e ry, dick -e y,


I SfI sf I.2
229







230 A DOLLAR, A DOLLAR, A ENV O'CLOCK SCH1O1AR.






















A diller, a dollar, a ten o'clock scholar,
What makes you come so soon ?
You used to come at ten o'clock,
But now you come at noon.


Jacky, come give me thy fiddle,
If ever thou mean to thrive.
Nay, I '11 not give my fiddle
To any man alive.

If I should give my fiddle,
They'll think that I 'm gone mad;
For many a joyful day
My fiddle and I have had.







234 LEG OVER LEG.

Leg over leg,
As the dog went to Dover,
When he came to a stile,
Jump he went over. ."



Ladybird, Ladybird,
Fly away home,
Your house is on fire,
Your children will burn.




1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
I caught a hare alve;
6, 7, 8, 9, o;
I let her go again.




is the way the ladies go-
Nim, nim, nim.
Ti' is the way the gentlemen go-
Trot, trot, trot.
This is the way the hunters go-
Gallop, gallop, gallop.











I II
'll Ii1 ,11 ll,
i ,TI ,E WA OD M








:I ... I ,,~ ,!, -
J i l l i I I -




h- 1 1. . ,1 _I I















ii



'A I











THERE WAS AN OLD MAN OF TOBAGO."

235







236 THERE WAS AN OLD MAN OF TOBAGO.
There was an old man of Tobago,
Who lived on rice, gruel, and sago;
Till, much to his bliss,















"To a leg, sir, of mutton you may go."



Little Miss Muffett
She sat on a tuffett, "
Eating of curds and whey;
There came a little spider, "
Who sat down beside her, /r'
And frightened Miss Muffett
awVay.







110OTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 237

As Tommy Snooks and Bessy
Brooks,
Were walking out one Sun-
day,
Says Tommy Snooks to Bessy
Brooks,
Wilt marry me on Monday?




The cat sat asleep by the side
of the fire,
The mistress snored loud as a

pig,
Jack took up his fiddle by
Jenny's desire,
And struck up a bit of a jig.




Here am I,
Little jumping Joan,
When nobody's with me,
I 'm always alone.












GOOD DOBBIN.

OH! thank you, good Dobbin, you've been a long track,
And have carried papa all the way on your back;
You shall have some nice oats, faithful Dobbin, indeed,
For you've brought papa home to his darling with speed.


The howling wind blew, and the pelting rain beat,
And the thick mud has covered his legs and his feet,
But yet on he galloped in spite of the rain,
And has brought papa home to his darling again.


The sun it was setting a long while ago,
And papa could not see the road where he should go,
But Dobbin kept on through the desolate wild,
And has brought papa home again safe to his child.


Now go to the stable, the night is so raw,
Go, Dobbin, and rest your old bones on the straw;
Don't stand any longer out here in the rain,
For you've brought papa home to his darling again.
U38













^ -L -', ..-i - i .' ^ - --- -- -;



-..------- --;









t J'i - -- : -, 2 .








-W --~


"A A Y ,W---A-- AT lS HEEL ."














THE DIVERTING

HISTORY OF JOHN GILPIN,


SHOWING HOW HE WENT FARTHER THAN HE INTENDED,
AND CAME SAFE HOME AGAIN.


JOHN GILPIN was a citizen
Of credit and renown,
A train-band captain eke was he,
Of famous London town.


John Gilpin's spouse said to her dear,
Though wedded we have been
These twice ten tedious years, yet we
No holiday have seen.


"To-morrow is our wedding-day,
And we will then repair
Unto the Bell" at Edmonton,
All in a chaise and pair.
240







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RRYiES. 241

My sister, and my sister's child,
Myself, and children three,
Will fill the chaise; so you must ride
On horseback after we."


He soon replied, I do admire
Of womankind but one,
And you are she, my dearest dear,
Therefore it shall be done.


"I am a linendraper bold,
As all the world doth know,
And my good friend the calender
Will lend his horse to go."


Quoth Mrs. Gilpin, "That's well said;
And for that wine is dear,
We will be furnished with our own,
Which is both bright and clear."


John Gilpin kissed his loving wife;
O'erjoyed was he to find,
That though on pleasure she was bent,
She had a frugal mind.
16






242 THE DIVERTING HISTORY OF JOHN GILPIN.




-,w,' Il.-




















To drive up to the door, lest all
Should say that she was proud.
So three doors off the chaise was stayed,
Where they did all get in;
g+++,.,--+i
ia++ ,

-Z-j
">.m@












Where they did all get in;







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 243

Six precious souls, and all agog
To dash through thick and thin.

Smack went the whip, round went the wheels,
Were never folks so glad!
The stones did rattle underneath,
As if Cheapside were mad.


John Gilpin at his horse's side
Seized fast the flowing mane,
And up he got, in haste to ride,
But soon came down again.


For saddletree scarce reached had he,
His journey to begin,
When, turning round his head, he saw
Three customers come in.


So down he came; for loss of time,
Although it grieved him sore,
Yet loss of pence, full well he knew,
Would trouble him much more,


'T was long before the customers
Were suited to their mind,
16-2






244 -2HE DIVERTING HISTORY OF JOHN GILPIN.

When Betty screaming came downstairs,
The wine is left behind!"

Good lack!" quoth he, "yet bring it me,
My leather belt likewise,
In which I bear my trusty sword
When I do exercise."

Now Mistress Gilpin (careful soul!)
Had two stone bottles found,
To hold the liquor that she loved,
And keep it safe and sound.

Each bottle had a curling ear,
Through which the belt he drew,
And hung a bottle on each side,
To make his balance true.


Then over all, that he might be
Equipped from top to toe,
His long red cloak, well brushed and neat,
He manfully did throw.

Now see him mounted once again
Upon his nimble steed,







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYiMES. 245

Full slowly pacing o'er the stones,
With caution and good heed.

But finding soon a smoother road
Beneath his well-shod feet,
The snorting beast began to trot,
Which galled him in his seat.


"So, fair and softly!" John he cried,
But John he cried in vain;
That trot became a gallop soon,
In spite of curb and rein.

So stooping down, as needs he must
Who cannot sit upright,
He grasped the mane with both his hands,
And eke with all his might.

His horse, who never in that sort
Had handled'been before,
What thing upon his back had got,
Did wonder more and more.

Away went Gilpin, neck or nought;
Away went hat and wig;







246 THE DIVERTING HISTORY O JOHN GILPIn.





































At last it flew away.
7 T~IP









i- ---;;;-:;- ---







He little dreamt, when he set out,
Of running such a rig.


The wind did blow, the cloak did fly
Like streamer long and gay,
Till, loop and button failing both,
At last it flew away.







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 247

Then might all people well discern
The bottles he had slung;
A bottle swinging at each side,
As hath been said or sung.


The dogs did bark, the children screamed,
Up flew the windows all;
And every soul cried out, "Well done "
As loud as he could bawl.


Away went Gilpin-who but he?
His fame soon spread around:
"He carries weight! he rides a race!
'T is for a thousand pound!"


And still as fast as he drew near,
'Twas wonderful to view
How in a trice the turnpike-men
Their gates wide open threw.


And now, as he went bowing down
His reeking head full low,
The bottles twain behind his back
Were shattered at a blow.







248 THE DIVERTING HISTORY OF JOHNA GILPIN

Down ran the wine into the road,
Most piteous to be seen,
Which made the horses flanks to smoke
As they had basted been.


But still he seemed to carry weight,
With leather girdle braced;
For all might see the bottle-necks
Still dangling at his waist.


Thus all through merry Islington
These gambols he did play,
Until he came unto the Wash
Of Edmonton so gay;


And there he threw the wash about
On both sides of the way,
Just like unto a trundling mop,
Or a wild goose at play.


At Edmonton his loving wife
From the balcony spied
Her tender husband, wondering much
To see how he did ride.







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 249

"Stop, stop, John Gilpin!-Here's the house!"
They all at once did cry;
" The dinner waits, and we are tired;"
Said Gilpin--" So am I !"


But yet his horse was not a whit
Inclined to tarry there;
For why ?-his owner had a house
Full ten miles off, at Ware.


So like an arrow swift he flew,
Shot by an archer strong;
So did he fly-which brings me to
The middle of my song.


Away went Gilpin out of breath
And sore against his will,
Till at his friend the calender's,
His horse at last stood still.


The calender, amazed to see
His neighbour in such trim,
Laid down his pipe, flew to the gate,
And thus accosted him:







250 THE DIVERTING HISTORY OF JOHN GILPIN:




.. ----0











N-0













"What news ? what news ? your tidings tcll;
Tell me you must and shall-
Say why bareheaded you are come,
Or why you come at all ?"

Now Gilpin had a pleasant wit,
And loved a timely joke;







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 251

And thus unto the calender
In merry guise he spoke:


"I came because your horse would come:
And, if I well forebode,
My hat and wig will soon be here,
They are upon the road."


The calender, right glad to find
His friend in merry pin,
Returned him not a single word,
But to the house went in;


Whence straight he came with hat and wig,
A wig that flowed behind,
A hat not much the worse for wear,
Each comely in its kind.


He held them up, and in his turn
Thus showed his ready wit,
"My head is twice as big as yours,
They therefore needs must fit.


SBut let me scrape the dirt away,
That hangs upon your face;







252 THE DIVERTING HISTORY OF JOHN GILPIN.



























And stop and eat, for well you may
Be in a hungry case."

Said John, "It is my wedding-day,
And all the world would stare
If wife should dine at Edmonton,
And I should dine at Ware."
... .. -- ' ' -- --- '''







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 253

So turning to his horse, he said,
I am in haste to dine;
'T was for your pleasure you came here,
You shall go back for mine."


Ah! luckless speech, and bootless boast!
For which he paid full dear;
For while he spake, a braying ass
Did sing most loud and clear;


Whereat his horse did snort, as he
Had heard a lion roar,
And galloped off with all his might,
As he had done before.


Away went Gilpin, and away
Went Gilpin's hat and wig:
He lost them sooner than at first,
For why-they were too big.


Now Mistress Gilpin, when she saw
Her husband posting down
Into the country far away,
She pulled out half-a-crown;








254 TIE DIVERTING HISTORY OF JOHN GILPIN.



























And thus unto the youth she said
That drove them to the "Bell,"
This shall be yours when you bring back
My husband safe and well."

The youth did ride, and soon did meet
John coming back amain;
John coming back amain;







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 255

Whom in a trice he tried to stop,
By catching at his rein;


But not performing what he meant,
And gladly would have done,
The frighted steed he frighted more,
And made him faster run.

Away went Gilpin, and away
Went postboy at his heels,
The postboy's horse right glad to miss
The lumbering of the wheels.

Six gentlemen upon the road,
Thus seeing Gilpin fly,
With postboy scampering in the rear,
They raised the hue and cry.


"Stop thief! stop thief! a highwayman!"
Not one of them was mute;
And all and each that passed that way
Did join in the pursuit.

And now the turnpike-gates again
Flew open in short space;






256 IHE DIVERTING HISTORY OF JOHN GILPIN.









--








The toll-men thinking, as before,
That Gilpin rode a race.

And so he did, and won it too,
For he got first to town;
Nor stopped till where he had got up,
He did again get down.

Now let us sing, Long live the King,
And Gilpin, long live he;
And when he next doth ride abroad,
May I be there to see.







MOITHIER GOOSES NURSERY RHYMES 257





,,t ", ', r












.. ,; ..._ .. .










A Hl.\ Ir \ n.l r hat u ar.


SY Like a diamond in the sky.

17








258 TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR.

When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.

Then the traveller in the dark
Thanks you for your tiny spark:
How could he see where to go,
If you did not twinkle so?

In the dark blue sky you keep,
Often through my curtains peep,
For you never shut your eye,
Till the sun is in the sky.

As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveller in the dark,
Though I know not what you are,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star.




Charley, Chariey, stole the barley
Out of the baker's shop;
The baker came out, and gave him a clout,.
And made poor Charley hop.








MOTHER GOOSE NURSERY RHYMES. 259
















A, B, C, tumble down D,
The cat's in the cupboard and can't see me.















Elizabeth, Elspeth, Betsy, and Bess,
They all went together to seek a bird's nest,
They found a bird's nest with five eggs in;
They all took one, and left four in.
17-2









260 UP HILL AND DOWN DALE.




c14



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\IT / ,>* 91,^ H(J 8if~fli




















Up hill and down dale,





Is a good girl,
She shall have a spouse,

And make butter anon,

Before her old grandmother

Grows a young man.







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 261















To market, to market, a gallop, a trot,
To buy some meat to put in the pot;
Threepence a quarter, fourpence a side,
If it hadn't been killed it must have died.


Apple-pie, pudding, and
pancake,
All begins with A.


My little old man and
I fell out;
I '11 tell you what 't was
all about,-
I had money and he -
had none,
And that's the way the
noise begun.

























GEORGIE PORGIE.
S Allegro moderato.


Geor gie Por gie, pud ding and pie,

________. -, - .---__




Kiss'd the girls and made them cry.
._.__ ________ ____ ,,. ___ ._,__,
4 _. --- ---_ -- :__= '-
-----,-------y----- ----=-].----------- -----^



When the girls came out to play,





.1-- ~-- _--_-. _
Geor gie Por gie ran a way.



262








MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 203

I love little Pussy, her coat is so warm,

And if I don't hurt her, she'll do me no harm.

I I'll it ,, th fir". and give

,,i ,r s :me 1

'" .-\~nI Priss\y w\\ ill love Inte, be-
JCLiSC alm .,.l.


I '0
I.',

'W caus -i















.. ,, ..








264 TAFFY WAS A WELSHZMAN

Taffy was a Welsh-

man,
Taffy was a thief,
Taffy came to my
house,
And stole a leg of
beef. : I I Ill I


I went to Taffy's
house,

Taffy was not at
home;
Taffy came to my
house
And stole a mar-
row-bone.


I went to Taffy's
house,
Taffy was in bed;
I took the marrow-bone,
And broke Taffy's head.


















<_, [.! ..| ; -



,










X--I


_


- >*, ,-J








'" -_i2--

. --'_ i-,-- r-' ."- I i *; ''"Hi-"- -








"A FARMER WENT TROTTING UPON HIS GREY MARE,"

265







266 A FARMER WENT TROTTING.

A farmer went trotting upon his grey mare,
Bumpety, bumpety, bump
With his daughter behind him so rosy and fair,
Lumpety, lumpety, lump!

A raven cried croak! and they all tumbled down,
Bumpety, bumpety, bump!
The mare broke her knees, and the farmer his crown,
Lumpety, lumpety, lump!









R7
,' l "


_- '-----. I '\







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 267

The mischievous raven flew laughing away,
Bumpety, bumpety, bump!
And vowed he would serve them the same the next day,
Lumpety, lumpety, lump!




Little Betty Blue
Lost her holiday shoe,
| What can little Betty do ?
Give her another
To match the other,
And then she may walk
in two.




Hush-a-bye, baby, lie still
with thy daddy,
Thy mammy is gone to the mill,
To get some meal to bake a cake,
So pray, my dear baby, lie still.




You shall have an apple,
You shall have a plum,
You shall have a rattle-basket,
When papa comes home.











A MAN OF WORDS AND NOT OF
DEEDS.

A MAN of words and not of deeds
Is like a garden full of weeds;
And when the weeds begin to grow,
It's like a garden full of snow;
And when the snow begins to fall,
It's like a bird upon the wall;
And when the bird away does fly,
It's like an eagle in the sky;
And when the sky begins to roar,
It's like a lion at the door;
And when the door begins to crack,
It's like a stick across your back;
And when your back begins to smart,
It's like a penknife in your heart;
And when your heart begins to bleed,
You're dead, and dead, and dead indeed.






268







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 269


rl R



Iil












Poor Dog Bright,
Ran off with all his might,
Because the cat was after him,
Poor Dog Bright.

Poor Cat Fright,
Ran off with all her might,
Because the dog was after her,
Poor Cat Fright.







270 AS I WAS GOING UP PIPPIN HILL.















As I was going up Pippin Hill,
Pippin Hill was dirty,
There I met a pretty miss,
And she dropped me a curtsey.














Early to bed, and early to rise,
Is the way to be healthy, wealthy, and wise.







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 271



















Old woman, old woman, shall we go a-shearing ?
Speak a little louder, sir, I am very thick o' hearing.
Old woman, old woman, shall I kiss you dearly
,1 S: -.. .















The Cuckoo's a bonny bird,
She sings as she flies,
She brings us good tidings,
._::u i ---__ -"




















And tells us no lies.
She sucks little birds' eggs,
To make her voice clear,
And never cries "Cuckoo!"
Till spring-time of the year.








272 PAT-A-CAKE, PAT-A-CAKE, BAKER'S MAN.







.\II -
-" ,' ~" ~.















Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man,


Prick it and pat it, and mark it with G;

And put it in the oven for Teddy and me.



Pussy-cat ate the dumplings, the dumplings;
Pussy-cat ate the dumplings.
Mamma stood by, and cried, Oh, fie!
Why did you eat the dumplings?"








MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 273














Needles and pins, needles and pins,
When a man marries his trouble begins.

















For every evil under the sun,
There is a remedy, or there is none.
If there be one, try and find it;
If there be none, never mind it.
18







274 THREE CHILDREN SLIDING ON THE ICE.















Three children sliding on the ice,
All on a summer's day,
As it fell out they all fell in,
The rest they ran away.


Now had these children been at home,
Or sliding on dry ground,
Ten thousand pounds to one penny
They had not all been drowned.


You parents all that children have,
And you, too, that have none,
If you would have them safe abroad,
Pray keep them safe at home.








AIY LADY WIND. 275




















Went round about the house, to find
A chink to get her foot in;
She tried the keyhole in the door,
She tried the crevice in the floor,
And drove the chimney soot in.

And then one night when it was dark,
She blew up such a tiny spark,
That all the house was bothered;
From it she raised up such a flame
As flamed away to Belting Lane,
And White Cross folks were smothered.
18 -







276 MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES.
And thus when once, my little dears,
A whisper reaches itching ears,
The same will come, you'll find;
Take my advice, restrain your tongue,
Remember what old Nurse has sung
Of busy Lady Wind.




Bow-wow-wow!
Whose dog art thou ?
Little Tom Tucker's dog,
-- Bow-wow-wow!




Let us go to the woods, says
this pig.
What to do there ? says this
pig.
To seek mamma, says this
pig.
What to do with her? says
this pig.
To kiss her, to kiss her, says
this pig.







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYIES. 277















Nievie, nievie, nicknack,
Which hand will ye tak'?
Tak' the right, or tak' the wrang,
I '11 beguile ye, if I can.















Oh, mother, I'm to be married to Mr. Punchinello;
To Mr. Pun, to Mr. Chin, to Mr. Nel, to Mr. Lo,
Mr. Pun, Mr. Chin, Mr. Nel, Mr. Lo, to Mr. Punchinello.







278 RAIN RAIN, GO TO SPAIN.
/ / / II / /










to


Rain, rain, go to Spain,
And never come back again.















Up hill spare me,
Down hill 'ware me,
On level ground spare me not,
And in the stable forget me not.







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 279

S When little Fred went to
- bed,
He always said his
prayers;
He kissed mamma, and
then papa,
And straightway went









If it be to-morrow day,
Take your wings and fly away.




Jack Sprat's pig,
He was not very little,
Nor yet very big;
He was not very lean,
He was not very fat,
j wHe'll do well for a grunt,
Says little Jack Sprat..







280 RAIN, RAIN GO AWAY.
Rain, rain,
Go away,
SCome again
S- April day;
Little Johnny
.' Wants to play.


-. A little cock sparrow sat on
a tree,
AF-_--" Looking as happy as happy
could be,
Till a boy came by with his bow and arrow,
Says he, I will shoot the little cock sparrow.
His body will make me a nice little stew,
And his giblets will make me a little pie, too.
Says the little cock sparrow, I '11 be shot if I stay,
So he clapped his wings, and flew away.





f, ,








MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 281
















The rose is red, the violet's blue;
The pink is sweet, and so are you.















" We'll go a-shooting," says Robin to Bobbia,
" We 'll go a-shooting," says Richard to John;
" We 'll go a-shooting," says John, all alone;
" We '11 go a-shooting," says every one.







282 VALENTINE, Oil, VALEN VINE.






















Valentine, oh, Valentine,
Curl your locks as I do mine;
Two before and two behind;
Good morrow to you, Valentine.



Mr. Isbister, and Betsy his sister,
Resolve upon giving a treat;
So letters they write,
Their friends to invite
To their house in Great Camomile Street.
































































"LITTLE BO-PEEP HAS LOST HER SHEEP, AND CAN'T TELL WHERE
TO FIND THEM."



283
























LITTLE BO-PEEP.
,-- Andante.


Lit tle Bo peep has lost her sheep, And



-1, I, .


can not tell where to find them;

-1 --------I=:--,





Leave them a lone, and they'll come home, And
,-" a L -- --





bring their tails be hind them.



284







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHlYMElS. 85




























Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep,

And dreamt she heard them bleating;

But when she awoke she found it a joke,

For still they all were fleeting.
For still they all were fleeting.







286 LITTLE BO-PEEP.






F1












-7-







Then up she took her little crook,

Determined for to find them;

She found 'em indeed, but it made her heart bleed,

For they'd left their tails behind 'em.







MOTHER GOOSE'S NURSERY RHYMES. 287





























It happened one day, as Bo-peep did stray

Unto a meadow hard by,

There she espied their tails, side by side,

All hung on a tree to dry.







88 LITTLE BO-PEEPo




'0..-


















Then she heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye,

And ran o'er hill and dale-o,

And tried what she could, as a shepherdess should,

To tack to each sheep its tail-o.
Tokoe pa





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