• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 How Flaxie was found
 Amy's great fault
 One or the other will win
 My sick brother
 Why they didn't take the voyag...
 Little Carl and Hilda
 Milly's "piece"
 Edie's prayer
 Jim's holiday
 A morning canter
 An intruding truant
 A peaceful scene
 A summer song
 Six geese
 Cat's cradle
 A tired mother
 Mamma's letter
 Dottie's picture letter
 Two little pets
 The lobster pot
 In the bird store
 The apple stand
 How Polly found the kitten
 Milly's fairies
 The quarrel
 Good for evil
 Misfortune
 At the watering place
 The generous lambs
 Captain Brown's story
 The freed bird
 Greedy Tom
 The race
 In the woods
 Susie's pets
 The fresh air fund
 Victorious
 To market
 Recess
 The lambs of the flock
 The young huntsman
 Be kind to the pets
 What geese
 The street singer
 For sale
 A vocalist, not pianist
 Hal's punishment
 The quartette
 Helpful Maggie
 A risky voyage
 At school
 Dance Jim Crow
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Twilight fancies for our young folks
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055346/00001
 Material Information
Title: Twilight fancies for our young folks
Physical Description: 80 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Brine, Mary D ( Mary Dow )
Hollidge, W ( Engraver )
Cassell & Company ( Publisher )
W.L. Merson & Co ( Printer )
Publisher: Cassell & Company
Place of Publication: New York ;
London ;
Paris and ;
Melbourne
Manufacturer: W.L. Mershon & Co
Publication Date: c1887
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1887   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1887   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1887
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
France -- Paris
Australia -- Melbourne
United States -- New Jersey -- Rahway
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mary D. Brine.
General Note: Prose and poetry.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by W. Hollidge.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055346
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222881
notis - ALG3127
oclc - 13463085

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    How Flaxie was found
        Page 5
    Amy's great fault
        Page 6
        Page 7
    One or the other will win
        Page 8
    My sick brother
        Page 9
    Why they didn't take the voyage
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Little Carl and Hilda
        Page 12
    Milly's "piece"
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Edie's prayer
        Page 15
    Jim's holiday
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    A morning canter
        Page 19
    An intruding truant
        Page 20
        Page 21
    A peaceful scene
        Page 22
    A summer song
        Page 23
    Six geese
        Page 24
    Cat's cradle
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    A tired mother
        Page 27
    Mamma's letter
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Dottie's picture letter
        Page 31
    Two little pets
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    The lobster pot
        Page 35
    In the bird store
        Page 36
    The apple stand
        Page 36
        Page 37
    How Polly found the kitten
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Milly's fairies
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The quarrel
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Good for evil
        Page 44
    Misfortune
        Page 45
        Page 46
    At the watering place
        Page 47
    The generous lambs
        Page 48
    Captain Brown's story
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The freed bird
        Page 52
    Greedy Tom
        Page 52
        Page 53
    The race
        Page 54
        Page 55
    In the woods
        Page 56
    Susie's pets
        Page 57
    The fresh air fund
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Victorious
        Page 60
        Page 61
    To market
        Page 62
    Recess
        Page 62
        Page 63
    The lambs of the flock
        Page 64
    The young huntsman
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Be kind to the pets
        Page 66
        Page 67
    What geese
        Page 68
    The street singer
        Page 69
    For sale
        Page 70
    A vocalist, not pianist
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Hal's punishment
        Page 74
    The quartette
        Page 75
    Helpful Maggie
        Page 76
    A risky voyage
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    At school
        Page 79
    Dance Jim Crow
        Page 80
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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OUTt PET.










TWILIGHT FANCIES




FOR OUTR YOUNG FOLKS




BY
MARY D. BRINE
AUTHOR OF ROM GOLD TO GRAY," A MOTHER'S SONG," "STORIES GRANDMA TOLD,"
MERRY O ROUND," "JINGLES AND JOYS," "PAPA'S DAUGHTERS," FOUR
FRIENDS," "HITHER AND THITHER," ETC., ETC.


















CASSELL & COMPANY, LIMITED,
NEW YORK, LONDON, PARIS AND MELBOURNE.















































COPYRIGHT,

1887,

BY O. M. DUNHAM.





All rights reserved.



























Press W. L. Mershon & Co.,
Rahway, N. J.













TWILIGHT FANCIES.



HOW FLAXIE WAS FOUND.

PooR FLOSSIE! She was in g.reat V
trouble. Flaxie, the b:,eautiful Christmas
doll, wnas missing. The little mamnua bad
searched high and 1:,w fo:'r her waxen chilMl,
and now had .rone disonsolatelv
to her room. I knu:,w Bob ha, ,
hidden her to tease me. I just Z







.-.










kow it," said she to herself. He's a l:ad,
bad boy, and I sha'nt mend his ball for
him. So there! But then -he lbean to
think that she m..l -, e wr,:,ng, -naut
wouldn't it. bel t:, bihl to disappoint him.
when the l:,no' looked for .'ame of ball









6 YAMY'S GREAT FAULT.

is to come off to-morrow!" So the little sister seated herself and
patiently sewed the jagged rip in Bob's ball. Bob himself suddenly
appeared. Now, on his face was a very peculiar expression, and on the
tip of his tongue was this question-" Say, Floss, why aren't you playing
with your fine doll as usual ?" But the words did not leave his mouth,
and, instead of approaching his sister, he stood very silently just where he
was. Presently he saw a big tear roll slowly down Flossie's cheek and.
drop right on his ball. That was too much for Bob's heart, which was
tender in spite of his teasing propensities, and out of the room he darted,
and out of the house and away to a certain tree he knew of.. Then he
scrambled up that tree, and there, just as he had left her, he found Miss
Flaxie reposing with closed eyes amid blossom-laden boughs.
It was but the work of a moment to take her from her tower, and
soon Flossie was startled by the violent opening of her door, and then
there was Flaxie in her loving clasp once more.
"My ball all fixed!" exclaimed Bob; "well, you are real good, any
way, Floss, if you are so fond of flimsy dolls," and Bob ran off, but not.
before he had left a big kiss on Flossie's cheek.

:o:-

AMY'S GREAT FAULT.

WHERE is Amy? I can not find her anywhere!" asked Maud of her
mother.
Amy Gray was Maud's cousin. She had arrived the night before in
answer to her aunt's loving invitation.
Poor Amy had just lost her dear mamma, and Maud had felt so very
sorry for her. But now no Amy could be found, and Maud sat down to
think whether or not she had offended her cousin in any way. "Why
maybe it was because I did not ask her to go with me on that errand this
morning," she suddenly thought, and straightway ran up to Amy's room,
and there found her perched on the bed crying.
"Why, Amy dear, what can be the matter with you ? asked Maud,.
gently, touching her cousin's arm.
Just keep away from me," was the ungracious answer, I am sorry to
say.
But what have I done ?" asked Maud.
"You are real mean to me, you went off this morning and didn't ask








AMY'S GREAT FAULT. 7

me to go or tell me where you were going, and you neglected me, and I
miss my dear mamma, I do," was Amy's sobbing reply.


































Poor Maud did not know what to do, and so called her mother, and
told her about her cousin.
"It's so queer, mamma, for her to get hurt on such a little thing.
Why, I thought of asking her, but decided that she would rather stay
comfortably in the house. Indeed I didn't mean to neglect her."









8 ONE OR THE OTHER WILL WIN.

Mrs. Moore then talked with Amy, and showed her how foolish a
thing it is to be so ready to imagine oneself injured, when a little thought
and inquiry would discover the fact that no injury was intended. Amy
tried to overcome this, her greatest fault, and though she often failed, still
before long every one noticed how much sweeter her disposition had.
grown.
If I am a better girl," she once said to Mrs. Moore, with arms about
her neck, "it is all through you, dear auntie, and the remembrance of
how my own mamma tried to break me of that bad habit."
It is many years since this happened, but Amy has never forgotten
her great fault, and often talks with her little children on this subject
with warning voice.
-----::----

ONE OR THE OTHER WILL WIN.

"I T I could only 7,arn this bothering old lesson,
I wouldn't mini stulvyin-.' it a reasonable time," says
SHZIay, whib ad b1,en f'..r th1, last half hour kicking his
b heel. Up an do-n at imamina's side.
"Wha t Lindrl- tlhe l.arnling, do you imagine "

tt heir hn tudeut doesn't see.
Oh, lots of things,
mamma; in the first
Place, it's a mile too
long, and it's no end too
hard; an' there's no
sense in it, and I don't
see through it a bit:
and besides a fellow
don't want to be wast-
ing all his afternoon
over a book."
"No doubt those
are excellent reasons,
dear, looked at from your-at present rather low point of view. But I
know of something which in my opinion is far more hindering than any
thing else. Can you guess it ?"









MY SICK BROTHER. 9

"No indeed," is the reply, and mamma explains.
"You are letting your lesson conquer you, Hal, whereas you should
conquer your lesson, and while you are floored in that way, you never will
win the battle. Get up, and go at it like a man, and see who'll win."

:o:-

MY SICK BROTHER.

THERE was a shadow on our house,
And shall I tell you why ?
My little brother Hal is ill,
We feared that he would die.

But yesterday the doctor said
"The danger now is past."
Oh, then how very glad we were,
And we could smile at last.

And, now dear Hal is sitting up,
And I'm his little maid.
I found these splendid strawberries
A-growing in the shade,

And picked the beauties for his lunch,
He'll relish them, I know.
Oh yes, I'm very happy now,
I love my brother so.
_- :o:

WHY THEY DIDN'T TAKE THE VOYAGE.

"COME Sue," called out little Sam, Sue's next door neighbor, "let's
take a voyage for our health." That's what I heard one of our boarders
say to another otherr day. She looked real healthy and fat, but she said
she felt run down, and was agoin' to go on an ocean trip for her health.
So, tho' you don't look delicate, maybe you need a voyage too, so come
on," and Sam hurried down the beach toward one of the many row-boats
lying in the cove.









MY SICK BROTHER. 9

"No indeed," is the reply, and mamma explains.
"You are letting your lesson conquer you, Hal, whereas you should
conquer your lesson, and while you are floored in that way, you never will
win the battle. Get up, and go at it like a man, and see who'll win."

:o:-

MY SICK BROTHER.

THERE was a shadow on our house,
And shall I tell you why ?
My little brother Hal is ill,
We feared that he would die.

But yesterday the doctor said
"The danger now is past."
Oh, then how very glad we were,
And we could smile at last.

And, now dear Hal is sitting up,
And I'm his little maid.
I found these splendid strawberries
A-growing in the shade,

And picked the beauties for his lunch,
He'll relish them, I know.
Oh yes, I'm very happy now,
I love my brother so.
_- :o:

WHY THEY DIDN'T TAKE THE VOYAGE.

"COME Sue," called out little Sam, Sue's next door neighbor, "let's
take a voyage for our health." That's what I heard one of our boarders
say to another otherr day. She looked real healthy and fat, but she said
she felt run down, and was agoin' to go on an ocean trip for her health.
So, tho' you don't look delicate, maybe you need a voyage too, so come
on," and Sam hurried down the beach toward one of the many row-boats
lying in the cove.









10 WHY THEY DIDN'T TAKE THE VOYAGE.

Sue followed as fast as her little feet would carry her, grasping her
doll-Belinda.
"All aboard!" shouted Sam, and Sue took the tiller-rope in her
hand, as she had seen others do, and waited for the boat to move.






. --



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SBut no move came, and Sam pushed and tugged. with the handle of
an oar, but all in vain, the boat would not budge.
"My! this old thing won't move," panted Captain Sam. "'Tisn't
'cause I'm not strong, but cause-cause-the thing won't go, that's all!
So come on Sue, we'll travel by land, I guess."

























































lk&-.c~apWp~//N~

























MY SIK, BRTHER









12 LITTLE CARL AND IILDA.

LITTLE CARL' AND HILDA.
LITTLE Carl and Hilda lived with their mother, father and grand-
mother in a farm-house in Germany, which you know is a country on the
other side of the ocean. They were all very happy together until a day
of parting came, and grandmamma left them to join their Uncle Hans in
America. Ach, Grossmutter, Grossmutter," cried the children, do not
leave us," but she had to leave her German home, and soon the wide sea
divided them. But pretty soon 'a letter came that made the children and
their parents happy. Their Uncle Hans had sent for them all to come to
America. How happy they were as the big ship, which was to carry
them, moved away from the pier.
But soon they were all feeling pretty sick, though Carl and his sister
got over their sickness of the sea in a short time, and were called pretty
good sailors. At length they touched the pier in New York and were
clasped in Grossmutter's loving arms.
Uncle Hans showed them all the sights of the great city, and in a
little while they begvn to feel quite like little Americans.
B, But they never forgot their pretty German home, nor how they used
to feed the chickens and ducks with Grossmutter's help.
:o:
MILLY'S "PIECE."
GRANDMA dear, will you let me speak my piece now? I have
studied it so hard and must speak it in school to-morrow."
Grandma put down her book and spectacles.
Yes, dear, speak away."
So Milly stood in front of grandma's chair and began her "piece."
The next day there was to be held in Milly's school a Washington's Birth-
day celebration and Milly was to open the exercises. She was very proud
of her piece," as it was taught her by grandpa, who had learned it when
a boy at school, and," said he, I do not believe there is another person
at this day who knows it." It is a grand old verse and I advise my little
readers to learn it. Here it is:
Fame spread her wings and through her trumpet blew :
Great Washington is come ; what praise is due?
What title shall we give ?' she paused and said -
Not one his name alone strikes every title dead.' "
"That is, a fine thing, Milly," said grandma, and you say it beautifully."
Out ran Milly to her favorite swing, in which she had learned this









12 LITTLE CARL AND IILDA.

LITTLE CARL' AND HILDA.
LITTLE Carl and Hilda lived with their mother, father and grand-
mother in a farm-house in Germany, which you know is a country on the
other side of the ocean. They were all very happy together until a day
of parting came, and grandmamma left them to join their Uncle Hans in
America. Ach, Grossmutter, Grossmutter," cried the children, do not
leave us," but she had to leave her German home, and soon the wide sea
divided them. But pretty soon 'a letter came that made the children and
their parents happy. Their Uncle Hans had sent for them all to come to
America. How happy they were as the big ship, which was to carry
them, moved away from the pier.
But soon they were all feeling pretty sick, though Carl and his sister
got over their sickness of the sea in a short time, and were called pretty
good sailors. At length they touched the pier in New York and were
clasped in Grossmutter's loving arms.
Uncle Hans showed them all the sights of the great city, and in a
little while they begvn to feel quite like little Americans.
B, But they never forgot their pretty German home, nor how they used
to feed the chickens and ducks with Grossmutter's help.
:o:
MILLY'S "PIECE."
GRANDMA dear, will you let me speak my piece now? I have
studied it so hard and must speak it in school to-morrow."
Grandma put down her book and spectacles.
Yes, dear, speak away."
So Milly stood in front of grandma's chair and began her "piece."
The next day there was to be held in Milly's school a Washington's Birth-
day celebration and Milly was to open the exercises. She was very proud
of her piece," as it was taught her by grandpa, who had learned it when
a boy at school, and," said he, I do not believe there is another person
at this day who knows it." It is a grand old verse and I advise my little
readers to learn it. Here it is:
Fame spread her wings and through her trumpet blew :
Great Washington is come ; what praise is due?
What title shall we give ?' she paused and said -
Not one his name alone strikes every title dead.' "
"That is, a fine thing, Milly," said grandma, and you say it beautifully."
Out ran Milly to her favorite swing, in which she had learned this










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LITTLE CAIRL AND HILDA.









14 MILLIE'S "PIECE."

This is where Milly learned her verse-in the swing-her favorite
place of study.






































At the thought of Washington every heart thrills, for he was a good,
a noble, and a brave man.









EDIE'S PRA YE. 15

EDIE'S PRAYER.

LITTLE Edie was so tired. Bedtime was at hand, and mamma said
" Come darling." But tired as she was, Edie wanted to sit up longer and
watch brother Fred and Dick play marbles on the floor. So she said,
"No, Edie not do to bed yet." But when mamma said "yes," forty "no's"
couldn't interfere, because mamma knew she was right. So the little
tired, sleepy, cross and unwilling figure was led up-stairs, undressed and
made sweet and clean with her bath. Then said mamma, "Now Edie























must say her little prayer," drawing her wee darling to her knee, and
expecting to hear. the "Now I lay me" as usual. Alas! there was still
the queer little scowl on the chubby face, and presently mamma listened
in amazement to these words. "P'ease dear Jesus, mate my mamma a
better dirl an' let her 'member littlee dirls is littlee dirls, an' now I lay me down
to s'eep, an' b'ess mamma an' papa, an' ise so s'eepy p'ease scuse Edie
f'om any more p'ayer, dood-night. I mean Amen." Dear little lamb!
She was tired, and we know the loving Shepherd above understood better
than she did what she wanted to say.









16 JIM'S HOLIDAY.

JIM'S HOLIDAY.
COME on, Pete, what are you about ? Always business business
and no time for pleasure. I'm just tired of it and so I've taken Neddy
here and am going to have a holiday. I got away splendidly. Old farmer
Jones didn't see me slip off from behind the barn, and now you come
along too."
Oh no, I'm not going to do that sort of thing. It doesn't pay in
the end at all. But what have you in your basket ?" said Pete, preparing
to move on his way.
Well, as I came along I met an old woman carrying this basket
with the goose in it, and as I was going .to pass her house I told her I'd
take it and leave it home for her."
You're a good fellow, Jim," said Pete, what's the use of going off
like this any way. You'd better turn back."
No, sir, I'm going to have a holiday for once, so good-by," and the
boys parted.
As Jimmy rode along he began to feel he wasn't doing right, and to
wish he had gone back with Pete.
Well," thought he to himself, "if I'm going to feel uncomfortable
like this, what's the use of having a holiday after all."
He was nearing the old woman's house now, when the old donkey
suddenly cocked one ear and then frisked up her heels and ran as fast as
her four legs could scamper. The goose joggled out of the basket and
Jim found himself on the ground, and couldn't think, for a minute, how
he got there. And there stood Neddy meekly watching him.
You're a queer animal," said Jim to the donkey as he took his seat
again on the brown back, empty basket on his arm, "a body can't tell
what you'll do next."
Jim decided to go back to farmer Jones and take up his usual work.
His holiday was not beginning pleasantly at all, and his shoulder was
aching. And the goose had fallen into a creek close by. So Jim turned'
Ned's nose toward home, and started to cross the creek; but where was
the bridge Broken and useless. Well Ned must ford the stream. But
Ned would not budge an inch. In spite of all coaxing he stood still
until, made cross by constant urging, he kicked up his heels again and
into the water went poor Jim.
The dripping boy forsook donkey and basket and hurried home on
foot. Mrs. Jones put him to bed, gave him hot ginger-tea a drink Jim
























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JIJI'S HOZII)AY.









18 JIM'S HOLIDAY Y.

disliked extremely and then scolded him a little. On the whole, Jim
had not enjoyed his holiday one bit, and did not take another for a long
time, and then not without the permission he ought to have had in the
beginning.
Pete could not help smiling when he saw Jim in bed and then said,


































It doesn't pay, you see, to do mean things, and farmer Jones is too good
to us-bbys for us to be mean with him," and Jim answered, "That's so,
Pete."










A MORNING CANTER. 19

The old woman never found her goose,, but she forgave Jim when he
told her all about his unfortunate holiday.
It is true that ways of deceit never "pay."
\
--:o0:

A MORNING CANTER.


































OVER the meadow, and over the field,
Down to the rose-hedged lane,
Susie is cantering. Ho, little girl,
How soon will you come with a rush and a whirl
To give us a greeting again ?









20 AN INTRUDING TRUANT.

Pony is merry, is kind, and is true,
Susie is never afraid;
The sunbeams are shining, the skies are so blue,
The sweet, fragrant breezes blow merrily, too,
And follow the dear little maid.


So canter, brave pony, yes, canter away.!
So swift o'er the meadow you go,
That soon, very soon, with a rush and a whirl,
You'll bring back your rider, our dear little girl,
With her heart full of pleasure, I know.


--:o:--


AN INTRUDING TRUANT.



WELL, sir, what are you doing here ? Tommy looked scared, and
didn't reply. "How came you inside of our gate ?" Tommy drew up
against the garden wall, and furtively wiped a frightened tear from his
eyes. The ladies pitied the boy, and their faces grew less stern as they
went on: "Tell us about it, little boy. Don't be afraid to tell the truth,
only speak quickly."
"I-I-was going to school, and-and-boo-hoo-some boys said
would I go fishing, and I liked it better'n going to school, and-and-so
I-I-went fishing, and they didn't go fishing after all, but-but played
ball, and the ball fell over here, and-boohoo-hoo-oo-they-they boosted
*me up 'cause I was the littlest fellow of 'em, and they dropped me over
the wall, and laughed 'cause I couldn't get back, and said you'd lick me
if you found me, and-and-I couldn't find the ball, and they ran away
and said they'd tell the cop I was here in the ladies' garden a stealing,
and-and I got a chair from the piazza, a-a-and tried to climb over,
and I could-couldn't do-do it, and you came and caught me here and,
oh dear, I wish I'd go-gone to school, I do! Are you going to lick
me "











AN INTRUDING TRUANT. 21

























0-- M






b .- ---v. '






No, my boy, we do no such things, and particularly when we feel
as sorry for a little boy as we do for you. You didn't mewa to be naughty
and play truant, but you made the.mistake of going with bad, naughty com-
panions, and whenever a boy or girl does that, he or she is sure to be sorry for
it, because trouble always follows wrong-doing. You may go out the gate
now, and I hope you'll never play truant again."









22 A PEACEFUL SOENE.

A PEACEFUL SCENE.
TWILIGHT shades are falling from the shadowy sky,
Birds are flying nest-ward, night is drawing nigh,
Down the lane they're coming, all the gentle cows,
Stopping at the wayside lazily to browse,





























Now the brook lies rippling in the shadows gray,
See, the cows are thirsty, turning from their way
In the cooling waters they are glad to wade,
Grateful for the coming of the evening's shade.
Let us, too, be grateful that when work is done,
We may sleep in safety till the morning sun.









A SUMMER SONG. 23

-A SUMMER SONG.





SSnrG a song for summer,

Happy summer, sweet and fair,

Sing a.'song for summer

And all its blossoms bright and rare.

Sing for cooling breezes,

For merry soIlg of happy birds,

Sing for skies of azure,

And fit your song to grateful words

Of praise to Hir n who giveth birth,

To all the joys we love on earth.




X- V










24 SIX GEESE.

SIX GEESE.

Six geese? why there are but five. Who says there are six? Ah,
but Dan, Maggie's brother, would tell you so. He has told. Maggie so
already and she doesn't seem to see it the sixth goose any more than
you do. Dan isn't as polite as he is affectionate, and he is apt to speak
his mind freely when vexed about any thing.
He knows that Maggie isn't strong. He loves her dearly, and is
always ready to help her in her work that she may the sooner rest.
She is a kind, careful girl, and has her hands full of duties all the
time, but one day she promised a friend and neighbor that during the
latter's absence from home she would feed and care for the five especially
fine geese which were the pride of their owner's heart, and had taken a
prize once at the county fair. Of course it was considerable trouble. and
care for Maggie, but she kept her promise faithfully, and took upon herself
the addition to her many other cares with a willing heart. So Dan, who
felt sorry for her (though he admired her unselfishness and loved her for it)
persists even yet in declaring that there are six geese around whenever he
finds Maggie feeding them. But I see only five geese, and one "deer" (deer).
---:0:--

CAT'S CRADLE.

WHERE's your cat, if you've the cradle?
Silly Tom and silly Bess!
You will soon grow tired of sawing
On that piece of string, I guess.
Can't you find some better work ?
Something better worth your time?
Something giving better subject
For this effort at a rhyme ?
Now if you were reading, may be,
I could praise your industry.
Or if you were writing, I might
Guess what letter it might be.
But to be so, very busy
O'er cat's cradle when you know
You've no sign of cat or kitten
In that cradle queer to go !










24 SIX GEESE.

SIX GEESE.

Six geese? why there are but five. Who says there are six? Ah,
but Dan, Maggie's brother, would tell you so. He has told. Maggie so
already and she doesn't seem to see it the sixth goose any more than
you do. Dan isn't as polite as he is affectionate, and he is apt to speak
his mind freely when vexed about any thing.
He knows that Maggie isn't strong. He loves her dearly, and is
always ready to help her in her work that she may the sooner rest.
She is a kind, careful girl, and has her hands full of duties all the
time, but one day she promised a friend and neighbor that during the
latter's absence from home she would feed and care for the five especially
fine geese which were the pride of their owner's heart, and had taken a
prize once at the county fair. Of course it was considerable trouble. and
care for Maggie, but she kept her promise faithfully, and took upon herself
the addition to her many other cares with a willing heart. So Dan, who
felt sorry for her (though he admired her unselfishness and loved her for it)
persists even yet in declaring that there are six geese around whenever he
finds Maggie feeding them. But I see only five geese, and one "deer" (deer).
---:0:--

CAT'S CRADLE.

WHERE's your cat, if you've the cradle?
Silly Tom and silly Bess!
You will soon grow tired of sawing
On that piece of string, I guess.
Can't you find some better work ?
Something better worth your time?
Something giving better subject
For this effort at a rhyme ?
Now if you were reading, may be,
I could praise your industry.
Or if you were writing, I might
Guess what letter it might be.
But to be so, very busy
O'er cat's cradle when you know
You've no sign of cat or kitten
In that cradle queer to go !


































































































SIX GEESE.










B2 CAT'S CRADLE.

Oh I'll cease my words about you,
"Let you pass as Ben would say,






-- "- .I


































Leave you sawing at cat's cradle
While the moments slip away.









A TIRED 1'OTHIEl. 27

A TIRED MOTHER.

No DOUBT she is very tired, for she has sewed all the morning for
dolly, and has taken dolly to walk beside, and now her cares are too
much for her, and she sleeps beside her baby's bed. Listen, Nellie!
When you were a dolly -a little live baby no bigger than a dolly, I
mean-your dear mamma's cares were more than you even now can
imagine. Day and night she watched you and' loved and tended you, and
























bore you in her patient arms, and sat up with you through long nights of
sickness and pain. Think you she was never tired and weary enough to
sleep at her post ? You should think of all this, and try to be a dutiful,
obedient little daughter to that dear mamma who has surely earned the
right to- your highest respect and gratitude, and when you play with your
dollies, think how much more pleasure a live, little real girl can give her
mamma, if she is good and faithful, than even the best and prettiest Paris
doll can give you.










28 MAMMA'S LETTER.



A SHEPHERD boy is Willie Brown,
And the sheep know well his care,
And know that whatso'er he has
They also get a share.
He calls them all by name, and knows
The good sheep and the bad,
And wisely deals with all his flock,
For he's a careful lad.

Dear little people like wee lambs
Are you, and from 'above
The blessed Lord is watching you
With His most holy love.
He guides and guards you day and night,
And gives you home and food,
And all he does-you must be sure-
Is only done for good.

Then trust and love Him all your lives,
And listen for his voice,
Because you may believe His words
Will make your hearts rejoice.
And by and by in His own time,
To His safe fold above,
The tender Shepherd of us all
Will welcome you with love. -

--:o:-

MAMMA'S LETTER.
MOLLIE has just come from the post-office with a letter. It is a nice
thick one, and she reads it aloud while her sister Pollie listens, broom in
hand. It begins:
"DEAR MOLLIE AND POLLIE:
"I shall be again with you, my children, by to-morrow afternoon. I
am sure you will be as glad as I when we are together again."


























































































WILLIE BROWN^ AND HIS SHEEP.









30 MAMMA'S LETTER.

The girls are glad indeed. During mamma's absence, they have
been good little housekeepers for papa; and now will set briskly to work,








































that the little home may look very neat and orderly for mamma's eyes,
to-morrow.








DOTTIE'S PICTURE LETTER. 31

DOTTIE'S PICTURE LETTER.







































PooR little Dot. She has been trying all the morning to write papa
a nice letter. She can think what to say, but does not know how to write
a word, except these two-dear papa. Finally, just as tears begin to








32 TWO LITTLE PETS.

fall, she decides to make a picture letter. So on one side of her paper
she draws a man. She tries to make him very handsome, for he is to be
the picture of papa. Over his hat she writes "dear papa." Then on the
other side of the paper she draws a little girl crying into her handker-
chief. "There!" says she, "He will know that I cry for him to come
home." Mamma puts the letter in an envelope and away it goes. And
Dot got an answer. What do you think it was? Why, papa himself.
He had come home to answer his little girl's letter in person.

----:o:---

TIT FOR TAT..

SERVES you right for teasing the cat, naughty girl! You know she
was never meant to be a horse, and she isn't in the least fond of dolls.
The scratch she gave you was her only mode of defense, and it meant "I
won't play," just what you said to your little brother this morning. Kitty
has rights as well as you, and if you were turned into a horse against your
will on this hot day, you would "scratch" with your tongue, I am very
sure. Learn a reasonable lesson, my dear, from your poor wounded
little finger.
-:o:--

TWO LITTLE PETS.

THE shaggy little pony pet,
The pet with tail so long,
And waving mane, and easy back,
And four stout legs so strong.

The dainty little baby pet'
With loving eyes of blue,
And golden hair, and rosy lips,
And slippered footies two.

Mamma has given tender care
To both her pets, but oh,
How fondly loved is one above
The other, well we know.
























































































TI'T J'O1 TAT.









34 TWO LITTLE PETS.

For pony is her baby's pet,
And wise and strong is he,
While baby is her very own,
Too weak and small to be


































Without mamma's most constant care,
And ever constant love,
And both mamma and baby thrive
In God's kind, patient love.










THE LOBSTER POT.

THE LOBSTER POT.




-- ----- ---




































POOr old lobster, we are sorry
For the scrape you're in to-day.
We've no doubt you'd like it better
Were you in the sea at play










36 IN THE BIRD STORE.

With a little brother lobster,
Stretching out your little claws.
But, alas e'en fish must sometimes
Yield themselves to human laws.
So because you were so curious
Prying into strange affairs,
You were caught, and when you're cooked, sir,
Eating you -we'll all go shares.

----:o:----

IN THE BIRD STORE.

W Y is Polly on the perch, like Polly on the floor ? Give it up ? "
asks Harry. "Yes," replies Mary, we give it up." But little Polly her-
self will not give up so queer a riddle, so she replies, "'Cause. she's
smart." "No," from Harry. "' Cause she likes cracker ?" No."
"' Cause she's a pretty bird ?" Ho, there's conceit for you! try again,
you're wrong there." Well, it shan't be 'cause she's green," pouts Polly,
" an' so I give it up." "Well, I'll tell you. Any one might guess it's
'cause you're both chatter-boxes, hi !"
:o:---

THE APPLE STAND.

"How much are your apples, granny ?"
"Two cents each, sir."
Oh no, I can't pay you that price."
"Oh, sir, indeed they're cheap at that. They're the nicest I could
find, sir, an' I only gets a quarter of a cent profit on 'em, sir, indeed."
"Well, I can't help that you know. I can't pay you any such price.
I'd rather never have an apple."
"Ain't they nice ones, sir ?"
"Yes, they're the nicest I've ever seen; round and rosy, and no doubt
as nice tasting as nice looking, but I can't pay you your price for them,
all the same."
"Ah, me I'm a poor woman an' I only makes a thin livin'. But
take one at whatever price you feel you can afford, sir. You're poor like
myself, no doubt, an' a penny goes far with ye."










36 IN THE BIRD STORE.

With a little brother lobster,
Stretching out your little claws.
But, alas e'en fish must sometimes
Yield themselves to human laws.
So because you were so curious
Prying into strange affairs,
You were caught, and when you're cooked, sir,
Eating you -we'll all go shares.

----:o:----

IN THE BIRD STORE.

W Y is Polly on the perch, like Polly on the floor ? Give it up ? "
asks Harry. "Yes," replies Mary, we give it up." But little Polly her-
self will not give up so queer a riddle, so she replies, "'Cause. she's
smart." "No," from Harry. "' Cause she likes cracker ?" No."
"' Cause she's a pretty bird ?" Ho, there's conceit for you! try again,
you're wrong there." Well, it shan't be 'cause she's green," pouts Polly,
" an' so I give it up." "Well, I'll tell you. Any one might guess it's
'cause you're both chatter-boxes, hi !"
:o:---

THE APPLE STAND.

"How much are your apples, granny ?"
"Two cents each, sir."
Oh no, I can't pay you that price."
"Oh, sir, indeed they're cheap at that. They're the nicest I could
find, sir, an' I only gets a quarter of a cent profit on 'em, sir, indeed."
"Well, I can't help that you know. I can't pay you any such price.
I'd rather never have an apple."
"Ain't they nice ones, sir ?"
"Yes, they're the nicest I've ever seen; round and rosy, and no doubt
as nice tasting as nice looking, but I can't pay you your price for them,
all the same."
"Ah, me I'm a poor woman an' I only makes a thin livin'. But
take one at whatever price you feel you can afford, sir. You're poor like
myself, no doubt, an' a penny goes far with ye."










THE APPLE STAND. 37

"Well, this is what I can pay you," laying a dollar gold-piece on the
stand.








































"A dollar, sir, so many apples as that will buy ?"
"Oh, no, only one apple, granny: I don't forget when I was only a









38 HOW POLLY FOUND THE KITTEN.

ragged newsboy five years ago, and your stand was here just as it is now,
and you felt sorry for me because the larger boys gave .me no chance to
earn any thing, and I was cold in winter and sick in summer, and had
finally to beg for food because I couldn't sell papers. And you always
gave me an apple when I passed your stand, and kind words beside, and
then I went away and finally found employment with a kind man who
let me attend evening school, and paid me well for my services through
the day. And now I am back here again, and I shall pay you a dollar
for one apple, and five dollars for a smile of welcome. And God bMess
you, dear granny."
-:O:-:
HOW POLLY FOUND THE .KITTEN.
(A TRUE STORY.)
SuCH a pretty little mother,
And her child a "silken ball."
So the children said who saw her,
Polly, Alice, May and all.
It was in the wood-house dreary
That the kitten oped her eyes.
At the kindling-wood around her
Pussy looked with great surprise.

All day long this baby kitten
Slept as all wee babies do.
And at night slept just as soundly,
And-just think-all next day too.
I do wish she wouldn't sleep so,"
Little Alice said one day,
She's just like my baby brother,
He would rather sleep than play."
Weeks passed by, and little pussy
Quite forgot to take her naps.
Spent the time in being cuddled
In the children's little laps.
Soon she noticed that her mother
Had a long and pretty tail;
Straightway tried to seize and bite it,
Tried-but always seemed to fail.










HOW POLLY FOUND THE KITTEN. 39

Her own tail she next discovered;
How the children laughed to see
Her vain efforts quick to catch it-
Nothing funnier could be.
Polly felt quite ill one morning,
Had to spend the day in bed;
"Let me have the little kitten,
She will 'muse me so," she" said.















0 ,l I '









So wee pussy made a visit,
And her mother found her not,
Though with mews most sad and mournful,
She went searching every spot.
Much she missed her little daughter,
All her cries were vain, until
Polly heard them, and sent kitty
Back-the mother's fears to still.










40 MIfLLIE'S FAIRIES.

Next day naught was seen of kitty.
Each child hunted high and low,
Asked the maids and asked the farm-boys,
"Where's the kitten, do you know ? "
Suddenly a shout came ringing
From within the wood-house loft,
Polly in her thorough searching,
There discovered, warm and soft,

Cuddled happily together,
Mother-cat and kitty too.
Polly quickly stooped to raise her,
But the another's anxious mew
Seemed to say, Oh do not take my
Little daughter far away.
Yesterday I sorely missed her-
Can you not stay here and play ? "

So it happened. that the children
Played in Kitty's nursery,
While the mother, quite contented,
Watched and purred most happily.
Now this story true is ended.
Little readers, you can see
That our dumb pets can feel sorry,
And feel glad as well as we.
----:o--
MILLY'S FAIRIES.

MILLY did love fairy stories! And what little girl does not. She
had heard so many of them that at -last her little brain was full of fairy
ideas, and she determined to go to the woods all alone some evening and
see for herself whether or not fairies and fays danced by moonlight and
whether or not the lilies rang silver bells.
Yes, I shall just see for myself," thought she.
So one moonlight night she slipped away from her mother's side,
where she loved to be most of the time, and sped away to the woods just
back of the house.










MILL Y'S FAIRIES. 41

It seemed very lonely indeed, but she pushed on until she found her-
self within the shadows of the great trees. She looked about her with a
feeling of awe, and expected to see little fairy faces peeping at her from
behind each leaf and flower, but no, she could not see one. So she sat
down under an oak to wait until the fays and gnomes should form their
ring for a dance.
The wind sighed gently through the leaves and the great moon
looked down upon her and seemed to say, "Little girl, little girl, hasten




















home. Each bird is in its warm nest and you should be in your downy
cot."
Ah," sighed Milly, "why will my eyes keep closing when I want
to be wide awake," and even as she spoke her eyes closed tightly and -
Milly slept.
Mamma, papa and brother Ben were much worried all this time and
searched high and low for the missing girl. At last they found her at
the entrance to the woods, and bore her gently home. She felt mamma's
kiss, and as she nestled in her snug little bed, she murmured:
The fairies, the fairies did not dance and I was so sleepy
I could not watch, dear mamma I-"
And mamma felt so thankful that her own little fairy was safe at
home again.









42 THE Q BARREL.



THE QUARREL.

A QUARREL between
two friends and all be-
cause of a selfish disposi-
tion on the part of puss.
It takes two to make a
quarrel and if Dick, the
puppy, had treated puss
with scorn, and declined
to lower his self-respect
by following her example
and losing his temper also,
why, don't you see, there
couldn't possibly have been
a quarrel, and puss would
have had her rage for her
pains, which would have
been poor satisfaction, I
think. But he has become
as bad as puss, -and the re-














111411::: M ,Q71/f/: A PIMYROW, 1










THE Q UARREL. 43

suit is that Ethel has no sympathy for either of them, and both of her
pets will have to be punished.
The "bone of contention" will be removed, and both will have to
go hungry for awhile. That is always the way a selfish disposition hurts
others within reach of it, unless we remember that it takes too to make
a quarrel," and remembering that, decline to be one of the "two." Let
the beginner go and quarrel by himself, and with himself, and see if he
or she doesn't feel cheap and mean when the sport is finished.



















IiARMONY.

Here is a puss of a different character. I know this pussy, and she
has lived with my little dog three years. She never snarls at or scratches
him, and he is never so impolite as to bark at her. When she goes hunt-
ing for mice, Pompey gravely watches over her family, and allows no one
to meddle with a kitten. He shares his bone and meat with her, and politely
wags his tail as she takes the first bite. It is better to live in harmony,
isn't it? and if a quarrel begins to show itself, run as far as possible
from the one who begins such trouble, and see how much happier
you'll be.-










44 GOOD FOR EVIL.


GOOD FOR EVIL.

"MOTHER, mother Oh, oh oh!
Here's a great dog barking so !





























IV-










Come, come quickly; don't you see
We're as frightened as can be !










MISFORTUNE. 45

Now he's growling-snapping too !
Mother dear, oh, where are you ?

We're alone, and he can swim!
Come let's join and sing to him.

It may calm him-touch his heart,
Now begin, each do her part.

Why He smiles He's gentle now!
Form in line and make a bow.

Now this dog and little we
Are firm friends because you see,

When he growled we growled not back,
But sang sweetly quack-quack-quack.

Learn from this, our simple tale,
Gentle actions never fail

To bring smiles to any face
On which frowns have held a place.

We small ducks have found this true,
Little readers, so will you.

:o:-


MISFORTUNE.

THIS is a very sad picture, is it not ? The home of these girls is to
be sold and their hearts ache at the thought. Emma the elder sister is
to be a mother to little Bessie, mother and father too, for they are now
orphans.









46 MISFORT TNE.

How thankful ought all children to be who have still a loving father
and mother, Old Dobbin must go too. The ticket has been fastened






































to his halter. He does not realize that he no longer belongs to
these two young mistresses, and enjoys being fed by their gentle
hands.









AT THE WATERING PLACE.

AT THE WATERING PLACE.








































Hurry o'er your way, Boss, we'll be late, I fear.
Never mind your thirst, Boss, shut your mouth up tight.
Shut your eyes, too, Bossie, put temptation out of sight.









48 THE GENEROUS LAMBS.

So, Boss! go, Boss! shades are falling fast,
Hasten o'er the meadow, quicken pace at last.
Milking-time is coming, Katie waits, I know.
Trot along then, Bossie, can't you faster go ?
:0:
THE GENEROUS LAMBS.

Two dear little lambs were resting under the shade of a tree, one
afternoon, when they heard a sweet voice say:
"Dear lambs, will you spare us some of your fleece ? We want to
build a nest, and would so like to line it with your pretty soft fleece."
They looked up, and there sat some birds in the branch overhead.
Oh, yes, if you want some you can come and get it," said one lamb.
And some of mine, too," said the other. So the little wife flew
down and alighted upon one lamb's back, while the little husband flew to
the other lamb's back and gathered some of the downy fleece, and then
both flew away saying, Thank you, thank you, kind lambs." And so
we all ought to help each other as readily and as gladly.
---:o:--
CAPTAIN BROWN'S STORY.

KITTY and Fred were very fond of old Captain Brown and fonder
still, if possible, of his sea-yarns."
Kitty would say "No not yarns', for yarns seem like stories, and
I'm sure that all Captain Brown's tales are true."
The captain was happy when he could gather all the little ones about
him and watch the brown, blue and gray eyes open in astonishment at his
words. I am afraid that he sometimes exaggerated, and that is a bad habit
for any one to get into. When a person undertakes to repeat a true inci-
dent, "the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth," should be
told.
But there was one tale of the captain's which was really true. This
is it:
One day," said he, I was sitting by my cabin-table reading when
suddenly I heard a loud scratching noise in the closet near by.
"' A rat!' said I to myself.
"And sure enough it was a rat. You would not expect to find those
little animals in a ship at sea, would you ? But there is generally plenty









48 THE GENEROUS LAMBS.

So, Boss! go, Boss! shades are falling fast,
Hasten o'er the meadow, quicken pace at last.
Milking-time is coming, Katie waits, I know.
Trot along then, Bossie, can't you faster go ?
:0:
THE GENEROUS LAMBS.

Two dear little lambs were resting under the shade of a tree, one
afternoon, when they heard a sweet voice say:
"Dear lambs, will you spare us some of your fleece ? We want to
build a nest, and would so like to line it with your pretty soft fleece."
They looked up, and there sat some birds in the branch overhead.
Oh, yes, if you want some you can come and get it," said one lamb.
And some of mine, too," said the other. So the little wife flew
down and alighted upon one lamb's back, while the little husband flew to
the other lamb's back and gathered some of the downy fleece, and then
both flew away saying, Thank you, thank you, kind lambs." And so
we all ought to help each other as readily and as gladly.
---:o:--
CAPTAIN BROWN'S STORY.

KITTY and Fred were very fond of old Captain Brown and fonder
still, if possible, of his sea-yarns."
Kitty would say "No not yarns', for yarns seem like stories, and
I'm sure that all Captain Brown's tales are true."
The captain was happy when he could gather all the little ones about
him and watch the brown, blue and gray eyes open in astonishment at his
words. I am afraid that he sometimes exaggerated, and that is a bad habit
for any one to get into. When a person undertakes to repeat a true inci-
dent, "the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth," should be
told.
But there was one tale of the captain's which was really true. This
is it:
One day," said he, I was sitting by my cabin-table reading when
suddenly I heard a loud scratching noise in the closet near by.
"' A rat!' said I to myself.
"And sure enough it was a rat. You would not expect to find those
little animals in a ship at sea, would you ? But there is generally plenty





































.
M Y:, ,.












eil















TN'E LAMBS.









50 CAPTAIN BROWN'S STORY.

of them and mice too. They get on board when the vessel is in port,
you see.
Well, as I watched and listened I saw an enormous rat come creep-
ing out of that closet. He was a grandfather rat as gray as I am now.
On he came toward home crumbs near the table and I kept perfectly still.
Pretty soon there came creeping after him a smaller-sized rat, then another
and another, and many more smaller ones until at last there came a tiny
grandchild rat, and he was much less cautious than the rest of his family.
Now there was a dangerous object near a steel trap all baited.
But the big rats went slowly by it. They all seemed to know what it

















2- i- -.


was, and were too wise to get into trouble by trying to taste the nice
cheese inside.
"Suddenly the little rat noticed it. It went nearer and nearer.
Grandpa rat now stopped eating the crumbs and watched the little one.
'I guess I'll go inside this little house and eat that nice cheese,' the
little rat seemed to be thinking as he stuck his nose in the door of the
trap.
Whizz, scrabble, bound, and over the backs of the other rats sprang
the old one, and landed almost upon the little one's back. That saved
its life.
"Then the grandfather stood with his nose almost touching the nose










CAPTAIN BROWN'S STORY. 51

of his little grandchild for fully a minute; and then he returned to his
crumbs while the grandchild, wiser now, kept as far from that wire
house as it could.
"Then I laughed out at the funny sight and away scampered the
whole family. That wise old fellow had probably explained to the
young one the danger of the wire house, and tempting cheese, and the
little fellow ought certainly to have loved his old grandfather.
"Yes," chimed in the children, "just as much as we love ours.
That is a splendid story, Captain Brown."

----:o:----

GATERING flowers, little one dear,
Oh, we're glad that the flowers are here.
























Beautiful buttercups golden bright,
Pretty new daisies so fair and white.
The beautiful world is all in tune
With the royal gifts of the generous June.









52 THE FREED BIRD.

We breathe the fragrance of bud and flower,
And grow so happy and glad each hour.
And I'll make wreaths for a crown, and you
Shall be the queen of the blossoms, too,
While over our heads the birdies sing
And the grand old woods with melody ring.

:o:----

THE FREED BIRD.

SING, sweet bird, sing loud and clear,
And do not fly from me in fear,
I would not hurt you, birdie, no,
Nor keep you when you wish to go
Thro' azure space like winds so free
Far, far from Rover and from me.
Dear little bird, I loved you well,
But now your little heart will swell
With triumph and with freedom glad,
Tho' Imust miss you, and be sad.
So fare you well, sing loud and clear,
That I your happy thanks may hear.

:o:--

GREEDY TOM.

ToMnY was given a piece of nice plum-cake by his mother, who
said, Give some to your sister, Tom." But greedy Tom went away to
the barn and climbed into the haymow to eat the treat himself. "There
isn't enough for me and Lucy too," said he.
As he was thinking how good it would taste, he fell fast asleep. A
rooster came pecking near him, spied the cake and quickly made way
with it, and still Tom slept on.
When he awoke, no cake was in his hand, and he thought he had
eaten it, but then remembered he had not. Finally there, in the corner,
he discovered the old rooster swallowing the last morsel of cake. Tom
ran at him. The rooster hopped to the ground, and Tom after him. The









52 THE FREED BIRD.

We breathe the fragrance of bud and flower,
And grow so happy and glad each hour.
And I'll make wreaths for a crown, and you
Shall be the queen of the blossoms, too,
While over our heads the birdies sing
And the grand old woods with melody ring.

:o:----

THE FREED BIRD.

SING, sweet bird, sing loud and clear,
And do not fly from me in fear,
I would not hurt you, birdie, no,
Nor keep you when you wish to go
Thro' azure space like winds so free
Far, far from Rover and from me.
Dear little bird, I loved you well,
But now your little heart will swell
With triumph and with freedom glad,
Tho' Imust miss you, and be sad.
So fare you well, sing loud and clear,
That I your happy thanks may hear.

:o:--

GREEDY TOM.

ToMnY was given a piece of nice plum-cake by his mother, who
said, Give some to your sister, Tom." But greedy Tom went away to
the barn and climbed into the haymow to eat the treat himself. "There
isn't enough for me and Lucy too," said he.
As he was thinking how good it would taste, he fell fast asleep. A
rooster came pecking near him, spied the cake and quickly made way
with it, and still Tom slept on.
When he awoke, no cake was in his hand, and he thought he had
eaten it, but then remembered he had not. Finally there, in the corner,
he discovered the old rooster swallowing the last morsel of cake. Tom
ran at him. The rooster hopped to the ground, and Tom after him. The
















~41:










W-X
,--F.



































"ItI
kil


















.- "-",1 VIP.t.









-- ,1' '________l___',____'______, 1'.
THlE FI1, IIIf I" '
n~ --.,,,,_ : -_- _:_~-~ ..,, i~~








PI, I,
'Al l ,
'THE FREED BIRD.









54 GREEDY TOM.

rooster scampered out into the yard and Tom too. Here he was met by
Lucy, who held in her hand a piece of plum-cake.





























"Tom, Tom, stop a minute," she called. "Well, what is it," said
Tom. "I want to give you a piece of my cake. Mamma gave it to me
a minute ago, and I want you to have some."
Then was not greedy Tom ashamed of himself Ah, yes indeed!

-:o:-

THE RACE.

A FUNNY kind of race, you say,
When the donkeys walked the whole of the way,









THE RACE. 55

Wagging their ears with saucy glee,
As if they were chuckling so mischievously,
"You can't hurry us, for we're only donkeys,
And never were meant to cut capers like monkeys."

































But Teddy came in ahead of his brothers,
And John was the lad who "crowed over" the others.
For walking or not, he had won in the race,
And that is the cause of his good-humored face.









IN THE WOODS.







IN the woods neathh shady trees,
Where the merry summer breeze
Rustles 'mid the leaves on high,
Skips and dances gayly by,
Through the ferns and grasses sweet,
Where the brook and mosses meet,
Birds are singing merrily,
Sunbeams shimmer cheerily.
Sweetest peace seems dwelling here,
Truest thoughts seem ever near.
All is sweet and true and fair -
Summer scenes and summer air -
In the quiet woods where we
Daily love in peace to be.










SUSIE'S PETS. 57


A STINT.

ONE-two-three-four-
Five-six-one more
Makes seven-two more nine-
SI must set them straight and fine-
S Ten-eleven-when they're done
SThere'll be plenty time for fun.
_------:0:


SUSIE'S PETS.
PEOPLE call her the little "Pet collector;" and
why? Well, because Susie has the kindest heart in
the world, and because for that reason she never
can pass a sick kitty or wounded bird or dejected
little dog or puny chicken
without stopping to care
for it, and if possible take
it home with her. So she
is called "Pet Collector"
by her family and friends,
and her indulgent papa
has had a large space of
ground inclosed with a
pretty railing of iron, _. ._
within which shrubbery









58 THE FRESH AIR FUND.

and green grass beds, and beds of vegetables such as animals like to pick
at or nibble- are growing in profusion, and nice hard gravel paths are
Made, and little houses for pets to
live in are built. And he has given
orders that his loving-hearted little
daughter shall have her pets undis-
turbed there as long as she may
please. There they live all together,
taken care of when sick, and given
the chance to go free if they wish.
But they never seem to care about.
leaving their new home, and there
are little ponds for the ducks or
geese, and hutches for the rabbits, and conveniences for all her pets.
Some day you may find it convenient to go and see the home of this
little Pet Collector."
T EF S A:R:----U D
THE FRESH AIR FUND.


" Co~r one, come all! the farmer cries,
With hearty welcome in voice and eyes.
The fields are wide, and the flowers are
free,
And breezes blow right merrily.










Mi
_V -.
1_-- =___




--n ? .. i,... t Q









THE FRESH AIR FUND. 59

And there's plenty of sunshine to be had
For browning the cheek of lass and lad.


So the children gather in wild delight,
With eager hearts and with faces bright.
Good-by to the squalid homes of woe
Where pain and hunger together grow.
Good-by to the sights that make them sad,
'Tis time the little ones should be glad.


Glad in the freedom of country life
Away from the city's noise and strife,
Glad for the breath of fragrant air
And the sight of flowers fresh and fair.
Glad for the joys of merry days
Where summer itself with the children plays.


Oh the Fresh Air Fund, may its years be long,
Its friends be many, its influence strong.


F f i iI-- ii'b.

- ------Andl t1A I cml,.,f thL fl -ck







; lJ 47
i; ,









60 VICTORIOUS.


















VICTORIOUS.

AN easy victory, sure enough
For pugilistic little Fluff.
A bloodless battle, for, you know-
He fought- a canton flannel foe.

-::----

MOTHER Hen is thinking -" What a lovely little chick !
Something will befall it if its mother come not quick.
What a careless mother to leave it there alone !
She doesn't treat her little chick as I would treat my own."

Baby chick is lying all so snug within her nest,
Watching careful mother here in fluffy feathers dressed,
Watching little chickabiddies running to and fro,
Following the mother-hen where'er she plans to go.

Out comes baby's mother soon with bread and milk so sweet,
Better food than mother-hen could give her chicks to eat.
Wise old mother tho' she is, her children ne'er can know
The half of loving mother-care which comes to baby Joe.




















I?










~gi



~-~J












~. ~~,~k~
~
















~ ,













c.;-~-~

~^
_---~- 7-
--~-~- ~r~

cjS
----
r~F ~---- -- --~--









WIl~T a LOVELY LITTL~: CHICII."









62 TO MARKET.

s _ ... Ld-:''=

_.a --; -- a_ _-__1-





P1 I.
4-




TO MARKET.
To MARKET, to market, a hoppity hop.
Hurry on, good folks, don't linger or stop.
I've butter and eggs here all ready to sell,
And a queer little hopper girl thrown in as well.
Run ahead, doggie, just tell them we're near,
Bringing our wares to sell, prices not dear.
Butter and eggs all so yellow and white,
And a small blue-eyed hopper girl merry and bright.
Tell them we're coming as fast as we can,
Butter and eggs, I, and hoppity Nan !
Tell the good people they'll find if they buy
That no one can sell such sweet wares as I.
To market, to market, a hoppity hop,
Never a minute to linger or stop.
Butter and eggs and a hopper girl, too.
Oh, when I've sold, pray what shall I do ?
-:o:---
RECESS.
BATTLEDORE and shuttlecock,
Such a merry game, you know,
Tossing the white feathered bird
Up and down, to and fro.









62 TO MARKET.

s _ ... Ld-:''=

_.a --; -- a_ _-__1-





P1 I.
4-




TO MARKET.
To MARKET, to market, a hoppity hop.
Hurry on, good folks, don't linger or stop.
I've butter and eggs here all ready to sell,
And a queer little hopper girl thrown in as well.
Run ahead, doggie, just tell them we're near,
Bringing our wares to sell, prices not dear.
Butter and eggs all so yellow and white,
And a small blue-eyed hopper girl merry and bright.
Tell them we're coming as fast as we can,
Butter and eggs, I, and hoppity Nan !
Tell the good people they'll find if they buy
That no one can sell such sweet wares as I.
To market, to market, a hoppity hop,
Never a minute to linger or stop.
Butter and eggs and a hopper girl, too.
Oh, when I've sold, pray what shall I do ?
-:o:---
RECESS.
BATTLEDORE and shuttlecock,
Such a merry game, you know,
Tossing the white feathered bird
Up and down, to and fro.









RECESS.

This is recess hour, I think,
Boys and girls are out for play.






































Then to study once again,
Ere the rules are done for day.









64 THE LAMBS OF THE FLOCK.

Up above the skies are blue,
Down below the hearts are true,
God's sweet gifts are all around,
Love for Him should now abound.
:0:

A PRAYER FOR THE LAMBS OF THE FLOCK.

OH, do not forget the lambs, dear Lord,
In thy loving watch o'er the sheep.
Do not forget the thoughtless lambs
Which often neglect to keep
As close to the fold, and Thee, dear Lord,
As the sheep who have learned to know
Thy tender voice, and to follow Thee
Wherever Thou choosest to go.
The children are Thine to guide each day.
The children are Thine to bless.
Oh, watch them well with a shepherd's care
And patient tenderness.
--:o:----

THE YOUNG HUNTSMAN.

READY for a ride, they are,
'Cross the meadows, and afar !
Harry sits his saddle well,
Proudly does his bosom swell
With the pride of his eight years.
Little knoweth he of fears,
Or of doubts; ah, no! not he!
No such coward will he be!
He's a huntsman brave and gay,
He is going to hunt to-day.
There are hours of fun, you know,
To be caught. And the warm glow
Of the sunbeams; and the shine
Of the azure sky divine.









64 THE LAMBS OF THE FLOCK.

Up above the skies are blue,
Down below the hearts are true,
God's sweet gifts are all around,
Love for Him should now abound.
:0:

A PRAYER FOR THE LAMBS OF THE FLOCK.

OH, do not forget the lambs, dear Lord,
In thy loving watch o'er the sheep.
Do not forget the thoughtless lambs
Which often neglect to keep
As close to the fold, and Thee, dear Lord,
As the sheep who have learned to know
Thy tender voice, and to follow Thee
Wherever Thou choosest to go.
The children are Thine to guide each day.
The children are Thine to bless.
Oh, watch them well with a shepherd's care
And patient tenderness.
--:o:----

THE YOUNG HUNTSMAN.

READY for a ride, they are,
'Cross the meadows, and afar !
Harry sits his saddle well,
Proudly does his bosom swell
With the pride of his eight years.
Little knoweth he of fears,
Or of doubts; ah, no! not he!
No such coward will he be!
He's a huntsman brave and gay,
He is going to hunt to-day.
There are hours of fun, you know,
To be caught. And the warm glow
Of the sunbeams; and the shine
Of the azure sky divine.













































il















THE PET LAMB.









66 THE YOUNG HUNTSMAN.

Happy times and lots of laughter,
These are things our huntsman's after.



7'-

























Speed away, then, Master Harry,
On the road no longer tarry.

--:0:---

BE KIND TO THE PETS.

DEAR little baby dog You look at us all with such trusting eyes !
How could any one touch you roughly. Show me the boy or girl who is
always gentle and loving with their pets and I will trust that boy or gir)










BE E IND TO THE PETS. 67

implicitly, for I shall know that he or she owns a true and honest heart.
When we think that our dumb pets can feel, just as readily as we could,
each sharp blow or rude kick, how can we bear to deliberately hurt them.



































For kindness to our pets we receive full reward in their humble devotion
to us.
Then, boys and girls, love your pets as they deserve to be loved, and
guard their tender bodies from pain as far as it lies in yobir power.
















"WHAT GEESE."
HAPPY little lazy geese,
With nothing else to do all day
But in the water swim about,
And dip and duck, and dive and play,


What care they for toil and work ?
What care they for busy pen?
What know they of cares that come,
Come and go, and come again,


With a never-ending round
Day by day for us? Ah, me!
Who can blame us if, sometimes,
Geese we make ourselves to be?










TIE STREET SINGER. 69

THE STREET SINGER.




















-XI
















SINGING of home, the dear, dear home,
'Neath far Italia's sunny skies!
Singing of "home," for food to eat,
Singing with tears in her dark eyes.









70 FOR SALE.

Hark to the strains of melody
So soft and sweet upon the air;
Hark to the low sad voice of her
Who sings of distant "home so fair!"

Pity the poor young singing girl
Who wanders now from door to door.
Give to her kind assistance, and
Kind words to cheer the heart so sore.

:0:
---:o:---


FOR SALE.

FOR sale, a couple of genuine pigs !
Do buy them if you can,
For Jack is trying hard to be
A busy little man.
He loves his pets, as who would not ?
But tho' his heart should break,
Yet he must sell them both to-day
For poor sick mother's sake.
So give him price as generous
As generous heart may prompt in you,
And Jack will wear a happy smile,
And give you happy thank you," too.

-:-:

A VOCALIST, NOT PIANIST.

You never can make a fine pianist of puss,
So you might as well let her alone.
She prefers, when she sings, all her comrades to meet
And join a soiree of their own
On the high back-yard fence, where the neighbors can hear
And admire their style and their tone.









70 FOR SALE.

Hark to the strains of melody
So soft and sweet upon the air;
Hark to the low sad voice of her
Who sings of distant "home so fair!"

Pity the poor young singing girl
Who wanders now from door to door.
Give to her kind assistance, and
Kind words to cheer the heart so sore.

:0:
---:o:---


FOR SALE.

FOR sale, a couple of genuine pigs !
Do buy them if you can,
For Jack is trying hard to be
A busy little man.
He loves his pets, as who would not ?
But tho' his heart should break,
Yet he must sell them both to-day
For poor sick mother's sake.
So give him price as generous
As generous heart may prompt in you,
And Jack will wear a happy smile,
And give you happy thank you," too.

-:-:

A VOCALIST, NOT PIANIST.

You never can make a fine pianist of puss,
So you might as well let her alone.
She prefers, when she sings, all her comrades to meet
And join a soiree of their own
On the high back-yard fence, where the neighbors can hear
And admire their style and their tone.














111111 1Il M l

11 1


























"FOR SALE."










72 A VOCALIST, NOT PIANIST.

She's fond of soprano, but now and then takes
The tenor for harmony's sake.




































And can manage a bass, tho' her efforts at that
Are apt your sweet slumbers to break.
And the generous applause of the neighbors is such;
As makes every musician to quake.
















CAN any one say what fun there is
In the thoughtless use of a gun .
Which takes its aim at an innocent life
And lo! that life is done.


When I was a boy I banged away
With no thought of the pain I gave--
At many a deer whose life I now
Would make an effort to save.


Oh, boys, be kind to the little birds,
Nor use your brand-new gun
To take the life of bird, or beast,
Only for cruel "fun."








74 iHAL'S PUNISHMENT.

HAL'S PUNISHMENT,





































"OH! oh! oh!" cries poor Hal. "What's the matter with me ?
Why I should think you could see without asking. I've got a terrible
toothache I have, and will give it to you if you want it. How did I
get it? Well, I hate to tell, but I will, because I never mean to do









THE UARTETTE. 5

such a thing again; you see I've been visiting my grandma and she is so
good. Now, mamma said before I left home, 'Hal, remember I do not
want you to eat any honey or jam. Such things are not good for you.'
Well, I love honey, and when grandma put some before me I just didn't
say honestly that I had been forbidden to eat it, but sat down and
devoured every bit. That was yesterday, and I had to come home and
am now suffering for my disobedience. Oh, my tooth, my tooth."
:o:-
THE QUARTETTE.
MILLY is a milkmaid, Josie is the boy
Who's going to be a sailor, but finds his present joy
(While home on his vacation), in going to and fro
With Milly on her errands at milking-time, you know.
\- ,






I, 1-0 /1A,



y ~ *
";-. ,'i,,, '





Mooly is the brown cow, sober, meek and steady,
Bossie is the gray cow for mischief always ready;
'Twas Mooly got the grasses from Josie's eager hand,
'Twas Bossie didn't get them because-she wouldn't stand.
Mooly, Bossie, Millie, and Joe, now don't forget,
They are the kind comrades'which form the full quartette,
Grasses, milk and mischief they will furnish you,
And undertaking business will put that business through.









76 HELPFUL MAGGIE.


HELPFUL MAGGIE.

HELPFUL Maggie She is home from school on her vacation, but she
doesn't idle all her time away under the trees or on the piazza. Oh, no.
A poor woman lives not far from her father's house, and the woman has
several children, all under nine years of age. One of them, three years
old, is crippled, and can only creep about the door-yard and. cry a good
deal because he can't follow his brothers when they play in the meadow.
He longed for the daisies and the clover blossoms, and wanted to dabble
his little hot hands in the cool, green grass, but mamma was too busy to
take him over to the meadows, and so he could only pine and cry and
fret, and became a very cross baby, indeed.
But when Maggie came home she heard all about it, and one day she
went over to see the woman and took little Jo in her strong young arms
to the pretty daisy fields and let him creep about in the grass under the
trees, and pull as many daisies as he chose. How he rolled over, and
played, and crowed with delight when he found that he could really
lie down amid his treasures and be with them as long as he liked, while
Maggie told him stories and played with him !
And how happy a little girl she was in being kind and helpful!
Her vacation was a pleasure to her and a blessing to others. Mamma was
happy in seeing her little daughter's unselfish disposition, and she was
happy, and little Jo and his mother were happy as well. And all that
happiness sprang from a kind impulse.
Try it yourselves some time, when chance offers, and see how it feels.
---:0:

A RISKY VOYAGE.

THEY were only "city boarders," as the country children said, and
Didn't know B from a bull-frog." (I don't quite understand the meaning
of that phrase, but the children did, so I suppose it contains a consider-
able amount of wisdom.) The names of the two little city boarders"
were Alice and Annie, and -they were very intimate friends, and very
exclusive," as they had heard their elder sisters say. They didn't care
much to play with the little country children who went about with bare
feet and gingham sun-bonnets, and talked through their noses, and said









76 HELPFUL MAGGIE.


HELPFUL MAGGIE.

HELPFUL Maggie She is home from school on her vacation, but she
doesn't idle all her time away under the trees or on the piazza. Oh, no.
A poor woman lives not far from her father's house, and the woman has
several children, all under nine years of age. One of them, three years
old, is crippled, and can only creep about the door-yard and. cry a good
deal because he can't follow his brothers when they play in the meadow.
He longed for the daisies and the clover blossoms, and wanted to dabble
his little hot hands in the cool, green grass, but mamma was too busy to
take him over to the meadows, and so he could only pine and cry and
fret, and became a very cross baby, indeed.
But when Maggie came home she heard all about it, and one day she
went over to see the woman and took little Jo in her strong young arms
to the pretty daisy fields and let him creep about in the grass under the
trees, and pull as many daisies as he chose. How he rolled over, and
played, and crowed with delight when he found that he could really
lie down amid his treasures and be with them as long as he liked, while
Maggie told him stories and played with him !
And how happy a little girl she was in being kind and helpful!
Her vacation was a pleasure to her and a blessing to others. Mamma was
happy in seeing her little daughter's unselfish disposition, and she was
happy, and little Jo and his mother were happy as well. And all that
happiness sprang from a kind impulse.
Try it yourselves some time, when chance offers, and see how it feels.
---:0:

A RISKY VOYAGE.

THEY were only "city boarders," as the country children said, and
Didn't know B from a bull-frog." (I don't quite understand the meaning
of that phrase, but the children did, so I suppose it contains a consider-
able amount of wisdom.) The names of the two little city boarders"
were Alice and Annie, and -they were very intimate friends, and very
exclusive," as they had heard their elder sisters say. They didn't care
much to play with the little country children who went about with bare
feet and gingham sun-bonnets, and talked through their noses, and said














': ',;i \ i ]: "7




I ) tt,:.




































HELPFUL MAGGIE.






S









78 A RISKY VOYAGE.

"naow" for "now," and "caow" for cow," etc., etc. It was very silly
and foolish for the city children to put on such airs, of course, and if they
had only remembered that the country children were such as their circum-
stances had made them, and that they-Alice and Annie-were such as
their circumstances had made them, they would have discovered that the
faces of the country children were just as pretty as their own, and that
they had sweet, merry voices, and were just as well made little people, too,
so far as chubby limbs and graceful motions went. But Alice and Annie
were blind to all the good things, and only persisted in seeing the faults
of the little bare-footed country children, and so ill-feeling grew up
between them, of course. And that is why, by and by, Alice and Annie
got into trouble.
"You can't do so and so," said Sammie one day to them, "but we
children can."
"Pooh, we can do anything you can," was the proud reply, and the
city noses went up in the air.
We can sail in a tub," cried Sammie, can't we, children ?" turning
to his mates, who replied with great gusto: "Yes, indeed! we can sail
clear to China or to Boston in our tub !"
"Humph who couldn't! exclaimed Alice. Any goosie could sail
in a big old wash-tub like yours here. Ow, tubs at home are fastened to
the wall and have faucets and things, and are twice as nice as yow old
things."
"Let's see you sail in a tub I'll bet you can't do it even in the little
pond over there," cried Sam, with a taunt in his tone.
"I'll bet we can," from Annie, her little nose again going skyward.
"Come on, Alice, let's jus' show 'em we can do it," and she marched very
grandly to the pond, Alice following, of course. So the country children
brought the tub and held it while the city girls stepped in. They were
nicely dressed for the afternoon, and looked very stylish, indeed, compared
to the other children; and Alice felt it was a grand thing to hail from
New York, and wear blue kid boots and fine white mull dresses with blue
and pink sashes.
They stepped confidently into the tub, never stopping to think how
dangerous it was, and in a minute the mischievous. Sammie pushed the
tub from shore, and the way poor Alice and Annie wobbled about was
pitiful to see. They clung to each other and used their little sticks,
which Sammy had given them for oars, as well as they could to keep the









AT SCHOOL. 79

tub from upsetting, because, you know, it was a shallow little pond, and
the poles could push into the mud and help balance the tub a little.
But oh dear how the queer boat did rock to and fro! and how Alice
did finally scream with fear, while Sammie and his comrades laughed on
the safe shore! And alas! finally the tub went over, and Alice and
Annie went out, and all wet and miserable they crawled to the bank
crying and begging to be helped up. Sammie pulled on the blue and
pink sashes, and finally hauled their owners to dry land.
Well, the result of this scrape was a good sound spanking for Alice
and Annie (which, because the country children knew it, humbled their
pride very much), and a bread and water supper for the country children,
whose mothers hadn't the heart to punish them more severely on account
of "them two snubby citygals, who put on sech airs."
Alice and Annie are now very unwilling to converse about their
"voyage across the pond," nor do they boast of being able to do every thing
that was ever done.
:o:

AT SCHOOL.

"SPELL 'cat,'" says the teacher, Fred.
"P-u-s-s," says Ted.
"Oh, stupid child, that's not the way.
You'll have to go down foot to-day,"
With a solemn shake of his head.

You spell it, Susie, now."
M-e-o-u, meou !"
"Oh, what a stupid Susie, you
Must go down foot, I tell you, too !"
With a frown. upon his brow.

"Now, Katie, you spell 'cat,'
You're clever enough for that."
S-c-r-a-t-c-h," she said,
With a comical droop of her curly head.
And' then she, too, down foot" was sent,
And the teacher's patience all was spent,
"For you're all at the foot of the class," he said,
"And I am the only boy 'up head.' "









80 DANCE JI~i CRO W.




DANCE JIM CROW.


I).ANE Jim C(lOW, and away you go,
Wheij I pull the string at your back, just so.
You'le alway merry, and always glad,
For I.l -e -:u no time, sir, to be sad.



Dance and.be gay
The live long day,
Dance the tiresome blues
away.
Dance, Jim Crow, and away
you go,
And all through the string
at your back, you know.


Oh, when I'm tired, and
when I'm sad,
.And when I'm cross, and
naughty and bad,
I wish ,my mother would
find by chance
A string at my back to make
me dance.


I'd dance the troubles that
make me bad
Out of. my heart, till mamma
DANCE JIM CROW. grew glad.
And I'd smile like you, my dear Jim Crow,
It's 'cause you're happy, I love you so.











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