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Group Title: True story library, No. 2 ;, 8
Title: William Tyndale
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055337/00001
 Material Information
Title: William Tyndale
Series Title: True story library, No. 2
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill. ; 13 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wright, Julia McNair, 1840-1903
Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A -- Board of Publication ( Publisher )
Westcott & Thomson ( Stereotyper )
Publisher: Presbyterian Board of Publication
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Manufacturer: Westcott & Thompson, stereotypers
Publication Date: c1870
 Subjects
Subject: Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bible -- Translating -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Julia McNair Wright.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055337
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002447404
notis - AMF2659
oclc - 10771490

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Content
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
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        Page 40
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        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
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        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



















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Tyndale with the Children.
WilliaU Tyndale. Sco page 21.
2








WILLIAM TYNDALE.






BY
MRs. JULIA McNAIR WRIGHT,
AUTHOR OF "ALMOST A NUN," ETC. ETC.













PHILADELPHIA:
PRESBYTERIAN BOARD OF PUBLICATION,
1334 CHESTNUT STREET.

























Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year
1870, by

WM. L. HILDEBURN, TREASUnrn,
in trust for the
PRESBYTERIAN PUBLICATION COMMITTEE,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Eastern
District of Pennsylvania.






WESTCOTT & THOMSON,
8tereotypers, Philada.






tIoretnrr e.

WILLIAM TYNDALE.



SSHALL tell you in this
little book of a man whom
every English speaking
child ought to love well.
Do you ask me why?
Because he was the first
man who tried to give Eng-
lish children a Bible in their
own language.
5





6 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

Before Tyndale's time the
Bible was written in Hebrew
and Greek and Latin, which
only wise people could read.
Many of you, I know, scowl
and pout out your lips at
having to learn your Bible
lessons. One very bad little
boy whom I knew, said, "I
wish I didn't have any Bible,
so I do!"
No Bible, indeed! Which
of you would be willing never





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 7

to read of Moses, of Joseph, of
Samuel, of Elijah, or of the
Babe of Bethlehem; of the
widow's son, and of the girl
who was raised from the dead ?
How many of my little
friends would like never to
have learned "The Lord is
my Shepherd," He shall car-
ry the lambs in his bosom,"
and Suffer the little children,
and forbid them not, to come
unto me?" I know you love





8 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

these verses! I know you
would not part with them
when you sit and think so-
berly over what they are worth
to you. They are worth more
than gold or toys or story-
books, or anything else that
you have.
And now look up to the top
of the page at the name-
WILLIAM TYNDALE--and think
if he was not a good man who
first gave to the people our





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 9

dear Bible in our own English
words.
When I tell you how, to do
this work, he had to be poor,
homeless, almost friendless-
how he had to hide from wick-
ed men, and have no rest night
or day, and grew old and bent
and gray while he was yet
young, and all for the sake of
the work God called him to
do-then you will think him
better and greater still.





10 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

About three hundred and
fifty years ago there was a
young man at school in Cam-
bridge, England, who was
spoken of very much, simply
because he behaved well.
TWhen boys are at school we
expect them to behave well.
Some silly lads get spoken of
a good deal because they be-
have ill; but when William
Tyndale was at college, at
Cambridge, the students were





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 11

for the most part a rude, noisy
set, who carried knives and
swords in their belts, and
were ready to pull them out
and fight at the first word
they did not like. They stud-
ied little, and drank beer and
brandy so freely that they
often got drunk. Besides this,
the most of them gambled,
and swore loudly over their
losings and winnings.
If these students went to





12 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

church, it was to hear some
priest talk Latin as fast as he
could speak, and so soon as he
got out of his pulpit he acted
as badly as they did. Their
Bibles and good books were in
strange languages, Latin and
Greek, which, as the students
were idle, they could not read
very well; and thus, you see,
without books or preachers,
they were little likely to be-
come better.





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 13

Among this throng of noisy
youths were to be found a few
who kept much together, who
were quiet and gentle, and
who spent their time over
their books. To these young
men God was very good. The
Holy Spirit-the teacher of all
the sons of God-turned their
minds to the study of the
Holy Bible, and showed them
wonderful things in his Law.
With the Bible they read the





14 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

works of pious men who lived
long ago-soon after the time
of Christ and his apostles.
Their hearts grew soft and
tender; they learned to love
God and fear sin, and this
love and fear shone brightly
out in their lives.
All good and honest men
respected these young stu-
dents. They were sometimes
invited to visit at different
houses about the country, and





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 15

they were always glad to go
for two reasons: First, they
could talk of what they had
learned in the word of God,
and thus be the means of do-
ing good. The other reason
was that, as they were poor
men and books in those days
were scarce and costly, they
owned scarcely any them-
selves, but they found at the
houses where they went, here
one book, there two or three,





16 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

and at other, places seven or
eight, and on rare occasions
quite a number. These books
they would read over and over
again, and even copy out large
parts of some to carry with
them.
Among the books Tyndale
found were some written with
a pen, and which had never
been printed. They were
about two hundred years old,
and were parts of the Bible





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 17

put into English by a good
man named Wickliffe. These
parts had been copied by dif-
ferent people at great trouble
and expense, and were kept
rolled up in linen and silk and
shut in boxes. Children were
no more allowed to touch them
than they would have been to
make a plaything of a fine
watch or a diamond ring.
These written books set
William Tyndale thinking,
2





18 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

wishing, praying. The fire of
love and of hope which had
burned in Wickliffe's heart lit
a like flame in the breast of
Tyndale, and day by day he
grew into the true spirit of a
Reformer.
Tyndale was poor. He
could not spend all his time
in study and in visiting; he
must do something to earn his
food and clothes, and he said
to his friends that he would




WILLIAM TYNDALE. 19

like to get a place as tutor, or
teacher, in some rich man's
family.
Such a place was found for
him. where there were several
young people. At first, they
were afraid of the new master,
he was so grave, so silent-
he looked so different from
other people in his black tas-
seled cap and his long black
gown. And then he was so
wise-he knew so many lan-





20 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

guages and had read so many
books.
Yes, indeed, the children
and young folks were afraid
of him. They got on the far-
ther side of the room; they
turned red in the face, and
forgot how to answer when
they were spoken to. They
twisted their buttons and
ground their heels into the
floor, all because they were so
afraid of the new master. Butoy-





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 21

in a very few days all was
changed; these same young
folks were leaning over their
teacher's shoulders, holding
his hands, sitting on his knee,
and talking to him of books
and plays.
And how came this?
Oh, he loved them. His
heart was so full of love to
God that it flowed over with
love to all people, and es-
pecially to little children, of





22 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

whom Jesus said, Of such is
the kingdom of heaven."
The Bible tells us, Perfect
love casteth out fear," and the
love of William Tyndale cast
out fear from the hearts of his
pupils.
You may think that Wil-
liam Tyndale might be proud
because he was so wise-be-
cause he had read so many
books, and men listened to his
words with respect. And





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 23

then he was of a family long
well known and held in honor
-a family that had been rich
and famous, but had lost their
home and their property in
war. But no; Tyndale was
meek and humble as a little
child-a good child, for I have
seen some proud children.
Tyndale spent much time
with his pupils, and was
always ready to talk with
them. When not with them





24 WILLIAI TYNDALE.

he liked best to be alone
thinking and studying.
Sometimes his pupils would
quarrel, and he would say,
"God says, 'Little children,
love one another.' Some-
times they were lazy, and he
would tell them, God says,
' Go to the ant, thou sluggard;
consider her ways and be
wise.' Sometimes they
would not learn, and he said,
" God says, Get wisdom.' "




WILLIAM TYNDALE. 25

Again, they were selfish, and
his word was, Do unto others
as ye would that they should
do to you."
Oh, Master Tyndale," the
children would say to him,
" how do you know what God
says ?"
"I read in his Bible," said
Tyndale.
"Ah, but we have no Bible.
We never saw one. We could
not read it if we had it. How





26 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

do you expect us to do what
God says ?"
How, indeed !" thought
Tyndale, his eyes filling with
tears "how can they hear
without a teacher ? The way
of truth have they not known,
and God's law is a sealed
book."
Then would Tyndale go by
himself to his little room high
up in the stone tower, or to
the solemn shade of the thick





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 27

woods, and pray to God," Oh,
help me to help these chil-
dren; help me to open to them
thy word !"
Besides being meek, Tyn-
dale was brave. He was not
afraid to speak the truth and
say out what he thought.
Said a great officer to him
one day,
"You talk of the need of
having God's law. We have
much more need of the laws





28 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

of the pope. God's law may
be .good enough, but the
pope's is better."
"Oh foolish and wicked
thought !" cried Tyndale, bold-
ly. "The pope is but a man
like other men. His laws are
full of human weakness and
folly. But God is high and
lifted up above all the crea-
tures he has made, and his
law only is fit to lead the soul
in wisdom and peace."





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 29

"Have a care!" said the
officer, angrily. "Those words
can be punished. If you
speak against the holy pope,
you may get into trouble."
For the sake of the truth,"
said Tyndale, "I am ready to
go to prison and to death, as
good men have done before
me. You may send me out of
the country with but ten
pounds" (fifty dollars) "a year
to live on, and so I can study





30 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

God's law, pray to my Father
in heaven, and teach little
children, I will be content."
"Look out-look out! you
may lose your life," said some-
body.
"That will be as God wills,"
said Tyndale. "If I have a
work to do for him, he will
keep me alive until I finish
it."
"You are a heretic," said
people to him..












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Willim Tanak. ee pae 63




32 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

"I am a servant of God, and
believe his word," said Tyn-
dale, nothing alarmed.
""What!" cried those who
heard him, "do you pretend
to be wiser than rich men, who
have more money in a day
than you do in half a year ?"
"It is not money," replied
our Reformer, "that makes
men wise, but it is the work
of God's Holy Spirit in the
heart; and the Holy Spirit
/ I





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 33

is given to those who ask
him."
"Don't talk of the Bible,"
said a Romish priest. The
Bible is the source of all the
evil and mischief that has
been done in the world."
Never !" cried Tyndale.
"The law is holy, just and
good, and, by God's grace, I
hope before maiy years to put
that same Bible in the hands
of every plough-boy, of every
3




34 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

day-laborer and every little
child in all the land."
'This giving the Bible to his
(countrymen became the great
desire of Tyndale's heart. He
preached and he taught, but
ever this one thought was
chief in his mind, "The Bible
-free and plain and cheap-
the Bible for the poor."
A good and wise man
named Erasmus talked to
Tyndale of this translating





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 35

the Bible into English, and
Tyndale resolved to give up
all other work and devote
himself entirely to that, trust-
ing to God to provide him
food and shelter while he did
this labor of love and faith.
There was in London a
bishop named Tonstal, a man
who loved books and was kind
to students, often giving help
and home to poor scholars.
To him went Tyndale to





36 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

ask for a preaching- place,
where he might preach Sun-
days and earn enough to sup-
port himself while he worked
on his translation of the Bible.
The bishop met him kindly at
'first, saying he was happy to
see so good a scholar and so
wise a man; but when Tyn-
dale told him what he wanted
and what he meant to do, the
bishop was not quite so
friendly. He put him off from





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 37

day to day, saying, Come
again-come again; I'm busy,
I'm tired, I'm sick come
again."
Ah, dear children, in put-
ting off Tyndale, Bishop Ton-
stal was putting off Jesus and
his work; and you know Jesus
says, "Inasmuch as ye have
done it unto the least of one
of these my brethren, ye did
it unto me."
After several weeks spent in





38 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

this kind of waiting, the bish-
op told Tyndale he could not
do anything for him-he had
too many people to take care
of.; and if he looked about
London, very likely he would
find safer and better-paying
work than translating the
Bible.
As you may suppose, Tyn-
dale felt very sad at this; but
he left his cause in God's
hands, and God' raised him





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 39

up a friend who was neither
afraid nor cold-hearted, as the
bishop was. This new friend
was a rich merchant of Lon-
don. When he heard how the
bishop had treated Tyndale,
he went to the Reformer and
said, "Never fear; keep up a
good heart-all will be well.
Come to me; I have in my
house a safe and quiet little
room. It shall be to you the
prophet's chamber. I love





40 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

learning, and I love the word
of God, and I am willing to
bear your expenses while you
write the Bible in our native
tongue."
Tyndale went to live with
this merchant. He also found
some churches where he could
preach the gospel on Sabbath
days; and there were good
people who met in secret to
pray, and with them he met,
and at the houses he could





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 41

teach the little children. His
friend, the merchant, had a
copy of Wickliffe's part of the
Bible, written on vellum, and
made very beautiful in gilt
and blue letters.
Tyndale wrote busily on his
Bible day after day. It was a
great work, you know, to put
the exact meaning of the
Greek and Hebrew into the
English tongue, and have it
such good, pure English that





42 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

the wise would like it, and yet
so plain that the poor and
ignorant would know the full
meaning of it.
Tyndale would soon have got
weary and discouraged had he
not had help and comfort from
God, and felt that he was
doing his service.
Tyndale had a friend named
Fryth, who was a man of like
feeling with himself; and
Fryth went every day to Tyn-





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 43

dale's little room in the house
of the rich merchant to help
him write. Tyndale was so
glad of the merchant's kind-
ness, so glad of his little room,
so glad of Fryth's help, that
he said he was almost too
happy, and that his heart
sung all day long.
These two friends had one
chief desire. They said the
" one wish of their hearts was
that all the English people





44 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

could have that good word of
God which is able to make
men wise unto salvation."
These were days when men
were being killed for speaking
the truth. These were days
when men could not trust
each other-days when bish-
ops and priests were killing
people for no other reason
than because the people want-
ed to pray in their own words,
and could say the Command-





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 45

ments, the Lord's Prayer and
some of the Psalms,
For some time Tyndale kept
on his work in the very centre
of London, out of everybody's
way, safe and unfearing in his
little room; but as the book
grew and grew under his
hands, his safety passed away,
his enemies found him out,
and good William Tyndale fled
across the sea, that he might
end his great work in peace.





46 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

He took with him his books
and his papers, and left Eng-
land in a vessel loading for
Hamburg. The merchant with
whom he stayed paid his fare,
and gave him fifty dollars to
bear his expenses in the land
where he would be a poor
stranger. So you see what
Tyndale had said about being
an exile, with fifty dollars a
year and liberty to teach chil-
dren and to write, came true.





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 47

Other friends raised fifty
dollars for him, but he left it
with the merchant for the
time of his need. "Ah," he
said, "the priests of the Jews
had our Lord buried; the
priests of Rome bury the
Bible, his last will and testa-
ment, but the resurrection is
at hand, and from the banks
of the Elbe it shall come forth
of its grave in power."
At Hamburg, William Tyn-




48 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

dale began his writing again,
but he had no friend like
Fryth ; and while he was
wanting some one to help
him, there came along a priest
named Roye, who said he
loved God and the Bible and
wanted to help, and he knew
Greek and would work hard.
Tyndale was in a great
hurry to get his work done, for
he felt that hundreds were
dying without the word of life.




WILLIAM TYNDALE. 49

He told Roye he might help
him. Roye was a bad man;
he was a great rascal, and was
telling lies. But this Tyndale
did not know; he thought evil
of no one, and he believed
Roye.
Roye was idle; he would
not work. He robbed Tyndale
of his small amount of money,
and when the books of Mat-
thew and Mark were ready for
the printer, Tyndale's money
4





50 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

was gone. He took a room in
a mean little garret, and ate
but one meal a day.
He wanted to send his book
to England to be printed.
Just then a vessel came in,
and the captain brought Tyn-
dalefifty pounds more.
"This is from God!" cried
Tyndale. Now I can pay all
I owe, and can go to Cologne,
where the best printers may
be found."





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 51

He went to Cologne, but
after him went Roye, who
would not leave him while he
had some money. Roye want-
ed to help spend the other
fifty pounds.
At Cologne the bishop had
just forbidden the printing of
the Bible or good books, but
our Reformer was not going to
turn from his purpose. He
went secretly to a printer and
engaged him to print six





-52 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

thousand copies of the Bible
in square form. Then he was
afraid so large a number
might be seized, and he con-
cluded to have only half so
many. The printer did his
work at night. As page after
page of the Bible in English
went to Tyndale, his heart
was full of joy; all his trou-
bles were forgotten. He sang
hymns, and could not sleep for
happiness.





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 53

But now his smiles were
turned to tears and his songs
to weeping. A wicked priest
named Cochloeus, a man who
hated the Bible, was at Co-
logne. He found through a
drunken printer see what
mischief strong drink is
always doing!--that the Bible
Was being printed. This
priest, finding by careful ques-
tions where and how this was
being done, got an order from





54 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

the town council to stop the
work and burn the leaves
printed.
But just in time the printer
heard this. He told Tyndale.
Tyndale hurried to the office
and began to gather up the
printed leaves, more valuable
than gold. They were ready
for binding. It was night.
Tyndale told Roye to get their
clothes and books and come to
the river. While all his ene-





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 55

mies were asleep, Tyndale,
guarded by his Father in
heaven, found a boat belong-
ing to a friend, who gave it to
him gladly, put his Bible
leaves in, and quickly began
to row with Roye up the great
river Rhine, carrying with
them the best blessing and
hope for England.
Five days they rowed or
sailed before the mild, warm
breezes. At night they drew





56 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

their boat to some shelter on
the bank, and slept and
watched by turns. At last
they reached Worms, another
great city. On a summer
morning, Roye tied up the lit-
tle boat at Worms, and Tyn-
dale, sitting down on the
bank, laid his precious leaves
down upon a stone. Here he
sat while Roye went through
the city looking for a room
where they might live.





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 57

At Worms, Tyndale found a
pious printer, who was glad to
help print the Bible for Eng-
lishmen, and who advised
Tyndale how best it should be
done. The Bibles were bound
at last, and now they could
not be openly sent to England,
for the priests would get them
and burn them.
They were hidden in vessels
under silk and lace and velvet,
and so taken to England and





58 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

hidden in the storehouses of
Tyndale's merchant friend.
Good men sold them through
the country, and some they
gave away. Still, the books
kept coming from Worms; and
as the good men in England
spread them more and more
the priests were very angry,
and put some of these men in
prison, fined others, and sent
others still exiles far from
their homes. Fryth was put





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 59

in prison, but he got away and
went to Tyndale in Germany,
saying, Good news All
England is reading the word
of God!"
Bishop Tonstal offered to
buy all the Testaments Tyn-
dale had-he wanted to burn.
them. Tyndale sold them for
a great sum of money, saying
to Fryth, "Let him burn
them; then everybody will
hear and wonder and wish to





60 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

have one, and I can print ten
times as many with the pay,
and send them all over Eng-
land." This he did. Thou-
sands of Bibles and Testa-
ments were bought and
burned by the bishop, and
tens of thousands more were
printed and sold by Tyndale
or given away to the poor who
were not able to buy them.
At this time a famine broke
out in England, and the Ger-





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 61

mans se# over shiploads of
corn, and under the corn they
hid Bibles, so that their ves-
sels brought food both for
souls and bodies.
In Germany, Tyndale spent
two days of the week in visit-
ing the sick and the schools,
four in attending to his Bible
business, and Sabbath in
preaching. At last, when he
had nearly finished translat-
ing the Old Testament, Tyn-




62 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

dale was seized put in
prison by means of a bad Eng-
lishman named Phillips, who
went over to Germany.
He was kept in prison a
year, but he had his pen, pa-
per and books, and got ready
an edition of the Bible in a
cheap form fit for the poor.
Then when this was done, he
said, "Now is my work finish-
ed, and I wait only for dis-
missal." He meant dismissal





WILLIAM TYNDALE. 63

from earth, and this came
right soon.
The court of Brussels con-
demned him to be burned as a
heretic, and on the sixteenth
of October he was led out to
the public square, and first
strangled and then his body
burned.
"0 God," said Tyndale, as
he died, "be pleased to open
the eyes of the king of Eng-
land."





64 WILLIAM TYNDALE.

The good man was gone-
gone from earth to heaven.
He had done what he could,
and the Lord blessed his do-
ings until he made ready our
English Bible.




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