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Group Title: True-story library, No. 2 ;, vol. 7
Title: Queen Margaret
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055335/00001
 Material Information
Title: Queen Margaret
Series Title: True-story library, No. 2
Physical Description: 59 p. : ill. ; 13 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wright, Julia McNair, 1840-1903
Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A -- Board of Publication ( Publisher )
Westcott & Thomson ( Stereotyper )
Publisher: Presbyterian Board of Publication
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Manufacturer: Westcott & Thompson, stereotypers
Publication Date: c1870
 Subjects
Subject: Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Reformation -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Julia McNair Wright.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055335
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002447396
notis - AMF2651
oclc - 10771556

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Content
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
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    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text


























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The Queen and Farel.
Queen Margaret. See page 19.
2







QUEEN MARGARET.






BY
MRs. JULIA McNAIR WRIGHT,
AUTHOR OF "ALMOST A NUN," ETC. ETC.












PHILADELPHIA:
PRESBYTERIAN BOARD OF PUBLICATION,
1334 CHESTNUT STREET.























Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year
1870, by

WM. L. BILDEBURN, T-xAsunan,
in trust for the
PRESBYTERIAN PUBLICATION COMMITTEE,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Eastern
District of Pennsylvania.






WESTOOTT & THOMSON,
Btereotypers, Philada.




Aftrerrirr i.wel


QUEEN MARGARET.



SHAVE told you of many
great men who helped to
keep the Church pure, but
there have been great women
also who have aided in this
good work. From the days of
Moses there have been good
women who loved and kept
the truth. You will read
5




6 QUEEN MARGARET.

about many of these in the
Bible.
I shall now tell you of one
noble woman who lived in
France some hundreds of years
ago. She was rich; she had
many friends; she was a
queen, and, with so much to
tempt her to love the world
and please herself, she loved
the Church best and tried to
please God. I shall show you
how this woman used her





QUEEN MARGARET. 7

power, her money and her
talents for good.
Her name was Margaret,
and she is known as Margaret
of Navarre. Marguerite in
French means pearl.
She was Queen of Navarre,
and was born in the year 1492.
Navarre is now a part of Spain.
It lies just south of France,
and at one time belonged to
France.
People called her the "Pearl




8 QUEEN MARGARET.

of Navarre." This was partly
because her name meant pearl,
but more because she was pure
and gentle and lovely.
Margaret was beautiful--
what is better, she was wise;
and better still, she was good.
Margaret had great friends
and relations: her grandfather,
her cousin, her brother and
her husband all were kings.
A writer says of her, "It
was the study of her life to do





QUEEN MARGARET. 9

good and prevent evil." This
was a high aim; it can be the
aim of every girl and boy who
reads this book. You can all
set your hearts to do good and
prevent evil; you can do this
if you ask the help of God,
who "works in us to will and
to do of his good pleasure."
In the days when Margaret
lived people often chose some-
thing as an emblem or type of
what they were or wished to




10 QUEEN MARGARET.

be. This object:they stamped
in wax on their books and let-
ters and on many of their
goods.
What do you think Queen
Margaret chose for her em-
blem ? A marigold.
"A marigold!" you say;
"that is a mean little flower,
indeed. Mother don't think
them nice enough to have in
our garden; and grandmother
has them under the side win-




QUEEN MARGARET. 11

dow, but she never puts them
in a bouquet because they do
not smell nice."
I will tell you why Queen
Margaret of Navarre chose this
common flower as her token;
but first, let me say that it
showed her humility that she
took this instead of some more
favorite flower, as the rose or
tulip or lily.
Margaret chose the mari-
gold l:becau.e it looks like an




12 QUEEN MARGARET.

image of the sun in its little
disk or centre, with the fringe
of leaves about it; and besides,
it turns on its stem and fol-
lows the course of the sun in
the sky. Look at marigolds,
and see how they do this.
Around her marigold emblem
Margaret wrote these words:
"I seek not things below."
She said that God was the
Sun of her soul, and she de-
sired to follow him in all her




QUEEN MARGARET. 13

life and to lay up her treasure
in heaven.
When quite young and in
much trouble once, she was
crying. A friend said to her,
SOh, my dear princess, what
can we do for you?"
She replied, "I can hence-
forth give my heart and life to
God, who will never desert nor
deceive me, and who is worthy
of all my love."
Margaret was born a Roman




14 QUEEN MARGARET.

Catholic, and during all her
early days knew nothing but
what the priests taught; she
had no Bible nor good books.
Her mother was a handsome
and witty but very wicked
worn an.
Her brother Francis, who
was afterward King of France,
was very fond of Margaret.
Margaret loved study and
books, and this love kept her
out of the company of many




QUEEN MARGARET. 15

rich but wicked people who
came to her mother's palace.
I could tell you much of
Margaret when she was a little
girl, playing with her brother
Francis in the Castle of Am-
boise, where they lived; or
when she wandered through
the gardens with her favorite
dog jumping about her,.or sat
reading under the trees, or
spent hours at her books, with
an old priest for her teacher.




16 QUEEN MARGARET.

Margaret was sharp enough
to see that the monks and
priests were not as well be-
haved as they ought to be,
and she sometimes made fun
of them and of the stories of
ghosts and witches which they
told her.
When she grew older and
had learned better, she grieved
over sin instead of laughing
at it.
Margaret had a little cousin,




QUEEN MARGARET. 17

the daughter of the king-her
name was Renee. She also
became one of the noble women
of the Church, and of her and
the good she did I will tell you
m our next book.
While Margaret was living
at the gay court of King Fran-
cis, her brother, she was very
often grieved at the wicked-
ness of her mother and of the
people about her. She was
seeking God in the dark, long-
2





18 QUEEN MARGARET.

ing for his love and peace, but
with no Bible and no teacher
to show her the way. At this
time God sent a messenger to
her.
This messenger was named
William Farel, and I shall
write you a little book about
him. Farel was preaching to
people of the love of Jesus,
telling them that he who loves
the Son of God must fly from
sin; that Jesus is the only





QUEEN MARGARET. 19

way, truth and life, and the
one door of heaven; that God
is the Father of our bodies
and our spirits, and that he is
a God of comfort.
The echoes of this preaching
crept into the court, and Mar-
garet heard them. Her heart
leaped for joy. Here was just
what she wanted.
She sent for Farel to visit
her. He came, and in that
gay, noisy, wicked court of




20 QUEEN MARGARET.

France he preached Jesus to
the beautiful sister of the king.
Margaret's heart was opened
to the love of Christ. She be-
came the humble, holy child
of God.
Lovely and good as she had
ever been, she now became
better still. She plainly told
her gay friends of her new
hope and joy.
"What!" they cried, "has
Margaret,. the greatest woman




QUEEN MARGARET. 21

in the kingdom, the woman
whom all the world praises,
become a heretic? Has she
sins to lay on Jesus? Does
she pray ?"
Some laughed; some were
sorry; some were glad.
There was a good man at
the court, a bishop named
Briconnet, to whom Margaret
talked, asking him to teach
her of the way of salvation.
He gave her a precious gift, a




22 QUEEN MARGARET.

Bible, telling her to read it
every day.
There were also at court
some pious ladies who went
to hear Farel preach; they
brought to Margaret some lit-
tle printed books, called tracts.
Early each morning, Queen
Margaret sat alone in a little
room, reading her Bible, sing-
ing hymns and praying. She
began each day by an hour or
two spent in this way.




QUEEN MARGARET. 23

Margaret wrote some very
pretty poetry and hymns. In
her letters to her friends she
wrote much of Jesus.
Some of the priests were so
angry that they went to the
king and told him that his sis-
ter was a heretic; that he
must take away her Bible,
and make her worship the
Virgin and go to mass.
They did not make much by
this, for the king said, I love




24 QUEEN MARGARET.

my sister too well to let her
be troubled by any one. Her
life is better than yours, if she
be a heretic!"
We are told that Margaret
despised no one; she was gen-
tle to the poorest; she gave
many alms to the needy."
Thus she showed what true
love to God makes us.
In these things you may be
like her if you try; and if you
have not so much money to




QUEEN MARGARET. 25

give as she had, yet you can
give your little cheerfully.
You remember what Jesus
said about the poor widow
who gave two mites, which to-
gether are less than one pen-
ny? If you forget, ask your
Sunday-school teacher to tell
you what it was.
But even the best of people
have faults. Only one person
has ever been perfect, and that
was our Lord Jesus.




26 QUEEN MARGARET.

Margaret had a fault which,
while it came from the tender-
ness of her nature, prevented
her from doing as much good
as she might. She lacked
moral courage-that is, she did
not like to say what would be
disagreeable to others even if
it were right to do so. She
had some of this courage, but
not enough.
Her brother, King Francis,
loved her so well that she




QUEEN MARGARET. 27

might have told him of his
faults, and perhaps persuaded
him to do better. But Marga-
ret loved her brother so fool-
ishly that she would not hurt
his feelings by plainly telling
him when he was wrong. She
often kept silence when it was
her duty to speak.
While King Francis permit-
ted his sister Margaret to sep-
arate herself from the Roman
Catholic Church, her mother




28 QUEEN MARGARET.

openly opposed her. She gave
her all the trouble that she
could, and urged on the priests
to persecute the Protestants,
and most of all the pastors,
who were friends of the Re-
formed Church in France.
This caused Queen Margaret
much grief.
One of Margaret's favorite
friends was a preacher named
Toussaint. I am afraid you
can never remember such a





QUEEN MARGARET. 29

long French name. It is pro-
nounced Too-sant. Toussaint
was a very holy, simple-mind-
ed man. A priest took Tous-
saint captive and shut him up
in a dark, wet dungeon. There
was in it but one spot where
he could stand out of water;
and there he had to stand,
with his back to the wet wall,
and his head bent so that it
would not hit the roof. Was
not this horrible? The dun-





30 QUEEN MARGARET.

geon smelled very badly, and
he had hardly any food; his
flesh wasted away, and pain
and fever came upon him.
He had once been rich and
had many friends; now he
was poor and a prisoner.
All this he suffered for the
sake of Jesus his Lord. He
had one friend left on earth;
this was Queen Margaret. She
heard where poor Toussaint
was, and she at once went to










''I

I'1

a I







r -






The Queen Visits the fick.
Queen Margaret. See page 46.
31




32 QUEEN MARGARET.

the king, her brother. She
knelt, weeping, at his feet,
telling him of the good man's
troubles and begging him to
order the priests to let him go
free.
"I know nothing about it,
my darling," said the king;
"but if he were ten times a
heretic I would not have you
caused to cry for him. Do as
you like; rescue this lamb of
a preacher from these wolves




QUEEN MARGARET. 33

the priests. I generally let
them have their own way, but
I can deny you nothing."
Margaret took Toussaint
from his prison, and kept him
at the palace until he got
quite strong. She then sent
him to another country, where
he could preach and write good
books without being perse-
cuted.
Margaret was married to
Henry, King of Navarre.
8




34 QUEEN MARGARET.

When she married him he was
a Catholic; he was a kind
man, and loved Margaret.
Margaret had one little daugh-
ter, named Jeanne.
Margaret and her husband
wished much to do good to the
poor people of their kingdom,
and what they did I shall
presently. tell you. But first
of all, I must tell you how
Margaret persuaded her hus-
band to become a Protestant




QUEEN MARGARET. 35

and to help the Reformed
Church. In this account you
will see how great is the power
of kindness, and how truly, as
the Bible says, a "soft answer
turneth away wrath."
The priests came to King
Henry, telling him that Mar-
garet was turning all the peo-
ple in the kingdom into Prot-
estants, and was giving all
her money to preachers and
poor people. They finally




36 QUEEN MARGARET.

made King Henry quite angry
at his good wife, and he spoke
very unkindly to her. King
Francis, of France, heard this
and flew into a rage. He trav-
eled to Navarre, and told King
Henry that Margaret was the
"Pearl of Pearls," that no one
should speak roughly to her;
that she was the noblest wo-
man in France, and should go
to his own court to live in
splendor. Francis was a far




QUEEN MARGARET. 37

greater king than Henry of
Navarre, and Henry was afraid
of him.
Now what did Margaret do?
Did she go off with her loving
brother ?
No; she said, tenderly, to
her husband, "Henry, you did
not mean to be unkind. You
were over-hasty. I know you
love me. You have been de-
ceived by these bad priests,
who hate me. I will not leave




38 QUEEN MARGARET.

you. Dear brother and king,"
she said to Francis, "do not
quarrel with my husband; for-
give him, and be his friend."
Francis could not deny his
sister's request. Tears stood
in Henry's eyes.
"Your goodness conquers!"
he cried. Is it your religion
that makes you so much bet-
ter than other people ? Then
it is a better religion than
mine, and I will study it."




QUEEN MARGARET. 39

Briconnet, who gave Marga-
ret her Bible, had said, "This
war is fought by love!" So
Margaret found it. Like Je-
sus, his people conquer by
gentleness.
Margaret's husband, King
Henry, now studied the Bible,
joined in singing the Psalms
of David, and at last became
a member of the Protestant
Church.
We cannot tell you that he





40 QUEEN MARGARET.

ever became a pious man; he
seemed to join the Reformed
Church more from love of his
wife than from love to God.
However little good such a
course did him, it was a great
help to a small, feeble Church,
which was persecuted and
poor. Henry, after this, pro-
tected the Reformers, as his
wife did.
Margaret, Queen of Navarre,
was a friend to John Calvin,




QUEEN MARGARET. 41

the great French Reformer
and teacher, about whom I
wrote for you a book.
The priests were very angry
when they found that they
had lost King Henry by their
lies and cruelty, instead of
gaining Queen Margaret.
Queen Margaret's child,
Jeanne, was educated as a
Catholic by her uncle, King
Francis, but her love of her
good mother and that mother's




42 QUEEN MARGARET,

prayers turned her heart to
the Reformed Church. When
she grew to be a woman and a
queen she was a Protestant,
and tried to serve God and
help his people.
I will now tell you some-
thing of Queen Margaret's life
in her palace.
As I told you, she did not
set her heart on the glory of
this world. To Bishop Bricon-
net she writes, "I am as a





QUEEN MARGARET. 43

sheep in a stray country." "I
am the blindest of the fold,
pity me." "The times are
cold, and my own heart also is
icy." I am the poor Marga-
ret, hungry, thirsty and frozen
for the love of God !"
King Henry had his palace
at Pau; it is a town in Beam,
on the side of some mountains
called the Pyrenees, which lie
between France and Spain.
You can find it on the map of




44 QUEEN MARGARET.

France. A beautiful river ran
through the town.
To Margaret came the poets
and the writers of history,
painters and singers and mu-
sicians. She welcomed all, for
she wished her home to be not
grand and wicked, like the
court of her brother and moth-
er, but a place where decency,
goodness and wisdom were
found.
She asked good people, pas-





QUEEN MARGARET. 45

tors and teachers, and holy
men and women, who had been
driven from their own homes
by wicked priests, to find their
home with her.
The Bible says, Blessed is
he that considereth the poor,"
and God blessed the princess
who opened her house and
heart to his friends.
The queen did not spend all
her time in her palace talking
to her visitors. She put on




46 QUEEN MARGARET.

plain, modest clothes, and
went about to the houses of
the poor people who were the
subjects of King Henry. She
would sit down in their cabins
by the bedsides of the aged,
along with the weary mothers,
take the little children on her
knee, and tell them about Je-
sus, who "loved them and
gave himself for them."
Was not this charming work
for a queen ? Margaret was




QUEEN MARGARET. 47

not ashamed of Jesus. She
felt the name of Christian to
be her highest honor.
No queen had ever treated
these poor people thus kindly.
They could hardly believe that
this kind, humble, pious wo-
man was the king's wife and
came to them from the palace.
They looked on her as little
less than an angel. Her words
sunk into their hearts. They
saw that the queen only de-




48 QUEEN MARGARET.

sired to do them good. She
gave them food and clothes.
With her own hands she tend-
ed the sick. She gave them
Bibles; she gave them tracts;
she sang sweet hymns to them,
and knelt down in their poor
cabins and prayed with the
dying.
These people had always
thought queens sat on thrones,
dressed in splendor, and wear-
ing crowns on their heads,




QUEEN MARGARET. 49

doing nothing, but devoting
their time to looking grand
and enjoying themselves; yet
here was a queen who was a
mother and friend, moreover a
Christian.
Did not they esteem a re-
ligion that made a queen so
gentle and so wise? Yes.
Margaret commended to her
people the love of God. They
called her "the good queen,"
and loved her with all their
4




50 QUEEN MARGARET.

hearts; and from her lips they
learned of Jesus, the King of
kings, who for our sake be-
came poor, who went about
doing good.
These people of Beam, Na-
varre and Vendome became
known all through the world
for their purity of life, for their
earnest piety and their zeal
for the Reformed Church.
Margaret had all the preach-
ing and church services carried




QUEEN MARGARET. 51

on in French, which was the
language of the people. Be-
fore this it had been in Latin,
which language they did not
understand, and of course it
did them no good.
Margaret had some young
ladies-daughters of great peo-
ple of France-at her palace:
these she brought up as her
own children, and every day
she spent some time in talking
to them and teaching them.





52 QUEEN MARGARET.

She desired to have them grow
up wise and noble women.
She taught them that the
fear of the Lord is the begin-
ning of wisdom; that Blessed
are the pure in heart, for they
shall see God;" and told them
"To seek first the kingdom of
God and his righteousness."
We cannot tell how much
good the queen did in this
way. These young girls grew
up and had homes of their





QUEEN MARGARET. 53

own; and we shall find, most
likely, that the good lessons of
Queen Margaret grew in their
hearts, and brought many of
them, and of their children, at
last to see God on high.
There is one thing you
should notice about Queen
Margaret- she thought no
work too small to do for Je-
sus; she despised no office, if
it led people nearer the Lord
she loved.




54 QUEEN MARGARET.

Margaret was not a dull,
sleepy Christian. She did not
believe that God had called
her for herself alone, but she
had heard him say to her soul,
" Go, work to-day in my vine-
yard," and she was ready to
obey.
Among other things which
Margaret did to help on the
cause of the Reformed Church,
she wrote a poem, called "The
Mirror of the Sinful Soul,"





QUEEN MARGARET. 55

which was printed, and was
much liked by pious persons.
The priests wished to get all
the copies of this poem so as
to burn them up, but King
Francis would not let them do
it.
King Francis, the brother
of Queen Margaret, died when
Jeanne her daughter was near-
ly twenty years old. Marga-
ret was much grieved, for she
loved her brother very dearly.




56 QUEEN MARGARET.

Margaret died quite sud-
denly, about two years after
the king, in 1549.
A few days before her death,
Margaret said to her friend,
"I am about to leave this dear
earthly home for ever, but I
am not afraid. I have a bet-
ter home on high, and God, I
am sure, will not turn me out
of doors. God will carry on
his work. He helped me to
begin something here, and




QUEEN MARGARET. 57

when I am gone he will teach
my child Jeanne to carry it
on. God loves his Church,
and will keep it to the end."
The hope of Queen Marga-
ret was not disappointed; her
daughter Jeanne became one
of the wisest, bravest and
strongest friends of the Re-
formed Church. She feared
no one; death had for her no
terror; she lived to do right.
She had a son, who became a





58 QUEEN MARGARET.

king of France as Henry the
Fourth, and who was a Prot-
estant.
It is a great blessing to a
child to have a pious mother.
Jeanne could thank God for
her mother, Queen Margaret,
who taught her the true faith
which is shown in the Bible;
who showed her that kings
and queens should be exam-
ples of piety.
A king of France, Henry,




QUEEN MARGARET. 59

the nephew of Queen Marga-
ret, said of his aunt, "If it
were not for my aunt, Queen
Margaret, I should often doubt
that there was in the earth
any real goodness; but in her
I have never been disappoint-
ed. She is ever true."
It was God who kept Mar-
garet of Navarre always true.
God kept her from yielding to
temptation, and she remained
humble and gentle to the end.





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