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Group Title: True story library, No. 2 ;, 7
Title: John Knox
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055332/00001
 Material Information
Title: John Knox
Series Title: True story library, No. 2
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill. ; 13 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wright, Julia McNair, 1840-1903
Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A -- Board of Publication ( Publisher )
Westcott & Thomson ( Stereotyper )
Publisher: Presbyterian Board of Publication
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Manufacturer: Westcott & Thompson, stereotypers
Publication Date: c1870
 Subjects
Subject: Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Reformation -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Julia McNair Wright.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055332
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002447399
notis - AMF2654
oclc - 10771463

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Content
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
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    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text

























M 1







The Baldwm Lbrary









































John Knox going to school.
Jo0hn Knox. See page 7.
2






JOHN KNOX.






RY
MRS. JULIA McNAIR WRIGHT,
AUTHOR OF "ALMOST A NUN," ETC. ETC.












PHILADELPHIA:
PRESBYTERIAN BOARD OF PUBLICATION,
1331 CHESTNUT STREET.























Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year
1870, by
WM. L. HILDEBURN, Tx.ABUBm,
*i a~. ftr t~
PRESBYTERIAN PUBLICATION COMMITTEE,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Eastern
District of Pennsylvania.






WzsTCOTT & THoxaSx,
Stereotypes, Philada.





t\ortuwt A.(growffl.


JOHN KNOX.



OHN KNOX was another
of the great Reformers.
J He was a Scotchman, born
in the town of East Lothian,
three hundred and sixty-five
years ago. His parents were
good people, and had enough
money to send their son to
school and to college, which
5.




6 JOHN KNOX.

was a great thing in those
days, when many men and
women could not even read.
The chief study was Latin,
and John Knox could read it
very well when he was a small
boy.
John was fond of study, but
there was one great Book that
was scarcely ever studied-
that book was the BIBLE. We
are not told much of John
Knox when he was a boy:




JOHN KNOX. 7

the great deeds of his life
when he was a man fill up
all his histories. We do not
know so much as we would
wish of the bold, healthy,
honest little boy who played
about Lothian, and went to
school with his leather bag of
old Latin books slung over his
shoulder. A funny little figure
he must have been in winter,
in his black fustian cloak, his
big hat, his long woolen hose,




8 JOHN KNOX.

his wooden shoes, and his
short leather breeches coming
only to the knee. And then
you should have seen him on
Christmas and Easter days,
and on saints' days-for they
kept saints' days then-going
grandly to church with lace
ruffles at his neck and wrists,
ribbons at his knees tied in
bow-knots, and silver buckles
shining in his shoes. Ah, you
say, this boy had a chance to




JOHN KNOX. 9

learn something good if he
went to church. But his
church was not like ours. It
had a plenty of pictures and
images, and the prayers and
sermons were in Latin, hurried
off as fast as could be, and no
matter whether any one under-
stood them or not. And when
this sort of service was over,
the people rushed off to amuse
themselves. Very poor amuse-
ment it was. They went to




10 JOHN KNOX.

ale-houses to drink beer and
play cards; to the green, or
public square, to dance and
wrestle. They sang and feast-
ed and got drunk, and were
neither sorry nor ashamed.
The parents of John Knox
taught him to prefer study to
these rude sports, and to be
brave and speak the truth.
John had a kind, loving heart,
but a gruff manner and a stern
face. His lot had fallen in




JOHN KNOX. 11

hard and bitter days, when
strength and courage were
needful, and to John Knox
God gave them both.
John's parents meant him
to be a priest, but when he
grew up he said that he did
not think priests had done
him much good, but that he
had received great benefit
from wise teachers; and this
benefit he wished to return
to the world by becoming a




12 JOHN KNOX.

teacher himself. He then be-
came a teacher at the College
of St. Andrews, and was much
liked. Here he met George
Wishart.
At St. Andrews, in reading
old Latin books, Knox found
much mention of the "Bible,"
and determined to read the
Bible for himself. As he read,
he found there was something
more and better than teachers
had taught him or priests had




JOHN KNOX. 13

preached. God's good Spirit
came into his heart, and made
him know and love the truth.
Knox saw himself a poor sin-
ner, and Jesus the sinner's
Saviour.
After this, no more closed
and forbidden Bible for John
Knox; no more Virgin to be
prayed to; no more saints to
come between his soul and
God. Knox was REFORMED
himself, and his brave, earn-




14 JOHN KNOX.

est nature rose up to try and
reform the Church.
Of all the Reformers, we
will admit Knox to be the
least winning and amiable in
his manners. His was a rug-
ged nature, its better and
tenderer feelings hidden under
ways as bluff and sharp as
the winds that whirled from
the chilly Highlands and ruf-
fled the waters of his own
Scotch lakes.




JOHN KNOX. 15

George Wishart was like
the lovely Apostle John, but
Knox was more like John the
Baptist, who cried out to those
who came to him, 0 genera-
tion of vipers!"
But you know, dear chil-
dren, God makes men to differ.
In his Church he has places
for the stern and the bold, as
well as for the sweet and en-
treating.
We do not want you to




16 JOHN KNOX.

think John Knox had no love
in him. He loved the Bible;
he loved God; he loved his
family and friends; he loved
the Church, and Scotland, his
dear native land. Indeed, for
the Church and for Scotland
John Knox was ready to die.
When Knox had found what
a blessed book the Bible is, he
at once began to praise it and
to teach it. When his pupils
came to their classes, Knox




JOHN KNOX. 17

took the Bible and read and
questioned and explained, and
begged them to do as it taught
them. All through the town
went the report of the earnest
words Knox uttered, telling
them things which would help
them to live well and die
happy. The people crowded
in to listen to the new doc-
trine, and as they heard,
some were sober, some were
glad, and some went away an-
2




18 JOHN KNOX.

gry at themselves and angry
at the Bible, which held such
plain truths.
About this time Knox lost
his dear friend Wishart, who,
as another book of your little
library tells you, was burned
on the public square of St.
Andrew's. For a while after
this people were afraid to hear
Knox talk, for fear the bishop
would be angry at them; and
those who hated Knox would




JOHN KNOX. 19

snap their fingers, and say he
should be burned too.
But you know if the Lord is
on our side we need not fear
what man can do unto us, and
it was not the Lord's will that
Knox should be burned. By
and by the bishop was killed,
and the people who had the
castle and kept its great guns
said that everybody might do
as they liked and say what
they thought about religion.




20 JOHN KNOX.

Knox was not sorry that
the wicked bishop was out of
the way, and he said so-said
so too freely, perhaps, for his
enemies began to say that
Knox was glad the bishop
had been killed, and even that
he had told people to kill
him.
This storm blew over before
long, and the friends of Knox
took courage and crowded to
hear him teach; and found




JOHN KNOX. 21

themselves so much profited
that they urged him to preach
on Sunday to them. This
Knox did not wish to do. I
am not fit," he said; "I have
not the meek and holy heart
-I am not wise enough for so
great an office. Find some-
body else."
But the people would not
get anybody in the place they
wanted Knox to fill; they
already had one good Chris-




22 JOHN KNOX.

tian preacher, and they want-
ed Knox for another.
One Sunday they were all
at church; Knox was in one
of the pews. The preacher
had a very good sermon about
how the Lord calls some men
to spend their lives in telling
the good news of a Saviour.
He spoke of the four fisher-
men Jesus called from their
nets to preach, and of Amos
called from tending the herds,




JOHN KNOX. 23

and of Moses called from the
care of the flocks in Midian.
Then he turned and looked
down at Knox.
"John Knox, my dear
brother," said the preacher,
" God, through the mouths of
these people, is calling you to
preach the y-.,pel; and do not
you let Satan hinder you of
bringing men into glory. You
know the truth: open your
lips and tell it to those who




24 JOHN KNOX.

are perishing in their igno-
rance."
Over John's rough face the
tears were streaming. He
dared not refuse; he felt that
he had a great duty to do,
but he was so shy and modest,
in view of the greatness of a
minister's work, that he dread-
ed to enter upon it. However,
that very afternoon he went
into the pulpit, and in much
self- distrust and humility




JOHN KNOX. 25

preached a sermon that God
blessed. The people cried as
they heard it, and when John
Knox saw all through the
great crowd solemn faces and
tearful eyes, he felt that God
had called him to preach the
gospel to the poor.
Satan is the enemy of all
good; he was a great enemy
of John Knox, and never let
him have any peace of his life.
I suppose it aggravated Satan




26 JOHN KNOX.

dreadfully to have John keep
telling the truth so earnestly
and never being afraid. And
if any of you do not know
what that long word aggravated
means, just ask your mother.
Satan stirred up many priests
to dispute with Knox and to
preach agiiist him; and by
their means, when St. An-
drew's was taken in war by
the French, Knox and some
other good men were taken




JOHN KNOX. 27

captive and carried to France.
They were not treated like
ordinary prisoners, but were
sent to horrible punishment in
" the galleys," where none but
very wicked folks, as robbers
and murderers, were usually
sent. This was done because
they would not worship the
Virgin Mary.
None of these good men
would go back from serving
Jesus, but endured all their




28 JOHN KNOX.

hardships, trusting in him.
Knox was in the galleys for
nineteen months. He was
very weak and ill from the
hard usage he had received.
As soon as he was set free he
went to England, where there
was much need of honest
preaching. The people had
heard of his preaching at St.
Andrew's, and they came in
crowds to hear him.
For six years Knox remain-




JOHN KNOX. 29

ed in England, going from
place to place, teaching,
preaching and praying. He
also wrote many little books,
showing the people their
faults and the way in which
they ought to walk. The peo-
ple heard him gladly. Priests
and bad men who hated him
dared not lay hands on him.
God was keeping his servant
for a good work, and no harm
came to him.




30 JOHN KNOX.

The king of England was a
good young man; he liked
Knox, and offered him money
and honors, but Knox had a
work to do, and would not be
hindered. His work was to
go like the apostles from place
to place, rooting up errors and
showing the people what was
right. During this time Knox
married a pious young lady of
Berwick. He hoped to have
at least the comfort of a hap-















II






















t'he priest and ProLestant.
John Kwnox See page 37.
31




32 JOHN KNOX.

py home, but just then the
good king died, and the ene-
mies of Knox took away all
he had, and would not allow
any money to be paid him for
his work. So he had no
money for his wife, and she
had to stay at home with her
parents.
The enemies of Knox were
now so strong that his wife
feared he would be killed, and
she persuaded him to cross




JOHN KNOX. 33

the sea and go to Switzerland.
At Geneva he found the good
and wise John Calvin, about
whom I will write you another
little book. Calvin was a
great help to Knox, just as
George Wishart had been.
And another man who had
done much for the Reforma-
tion was William Tyndale,
about whom you will hear in
one of these little books. One
after another come the Re-
3




34 JOHN KNOX.

former of the Church in dif-
Iferent ,countries- God never
leaving himself without a wit-
ness.
In the foreign country
where he had gone Knox was
not idle. He wrote, studied
and preached.
After some time spent in
Germany and France, Knox
wished much to see his wife
and to visit the pious people
in Scotland :and England, who




JOHN KNOX. 35

were trying to serve God even
when they had no preachers,
could meet in no churches and
were not allowed Bibles. The
only way they kept Bibles
from the priests was by read-
ing them in secret and having
them hidden.
In those days a good man
about whom I have read kept
his Bible fastened by straps
to the under side of a stool,
and when he wanted to read




36 JOHN KNOX.

it he placed the stool upside
down on his knees and turn-
ed the pages over under the
straps. His children stood
about to listen as he read,
and one sharp-eyed little boy
was put at the door to watch
if any strangers came. If one
came near, the boy would give
the alarm by saying, softly,
" Father I" and the father
would put the stool on the
floor and put his feet on it,




JOHN KNOX. 37

and so hide the book from
sight.
One of these good men was
a prisoner on the galleys with
Knox. One day a priest came
up to him, holding an image
of the Virgin Mary in one
hand and a club in the other.
He said the man must kiss
the Virgin or he would knock
him on the head with the club.
The man took the image in his
hands, and, instead of kissing




38 JOHN KNOX.

it, flung it over into the water,
saying, "Let our lady swim
and save herself-she is light
enough !"
The priest was in such a
hurry to save his image that
he forgot to hit the man's
head.
To such resolute and God-
fearing people went Knox, and
from house to house he passed,
preaching. When his enemies
heard that he was back, they




JOHN KNOX. 390

sent orders for him to appear
at court on a certain day, to,
be tried for his doctrines.
Knox went-one humble
preacher all alone-but none
of the wicked judges were in
their places. They were afraid
of the poor Scotchman who
always spoke the truth. They
did not dare to go where he
could reproach them for their
evil deeds. This proved true
what the Bible says, that




40 JOHN KNOX.

"One thousand shall flee at
the rebuke of one," and Five
of you shall chase a hundred."
Also, "The wicked flee when
no man pursueth, but the
righteous are bold as a lion."
A few weeks after this
Knox took his wife and her
mother and went back to Ge-
neva. When his enemies
found that he was out of the
country, they ordered him to
come before them. Knox




JOHN KNOX. 41

knew nothing of this order,
for he was at sea in a ship.
Then the cowardly judges
came together, and said, as
John Knox had not obeyed
their order, he should be burn-
ed alive, and said some dread-
ful. things besides. And as
Knox was not on hand to be
burned, they made an image
of him and burned that on
the public square. How fool-
ish and wicked they were!




42 JOHN KNOX.

For two years Knox stayed
in Geneva, but he did not for-
get his Scotch churches. He
wrote to them, guided their
conduct and prayed for them.
And when trouble came to
them, and a good old man
named Walter Milne was
burned for reading the Bible,
Knox said he must go home
to his people, so he left his
quiet life in Geneva and went
to his native land.




JOHN KNOX. 43

Oftener and plainer now
than ever Knox preached
against idolatry, images, Sab-
bath-breaking and neglect of
the Bible. Up and down the
country he went, forming bands
of Christians into churches and
teaching the ignorant. High
and low, rich and poor went
to hear him; and so much
good did he do, and so many
churches did he form, that the
wicked queen and judges of-




44 JOHN KNOX.

fered a reward to any one who
would kill him.
God has promised to keep
them in perfect peace whose
minds are stayed on him, and
John Knox was in perfect
peace as he went about his
duty-even while several hun-
dred dollars had been prom-
ised to any one who would
shoot him.
When every one else was
frightened and distressed,




JOHN KNOX. 45

Knox was calm and happy.
"God," he said, "often lets
the wicked triumph for a little
while to try us, to make us
humble and full of faith; but
be not afraid -God is ever
true to his people; his arm is
strong, and he will rise up and
help us."
Knox was now settled as
pastor in Edinburgh, the capi-
tal of Scotland; and here, as
his enemies could not frighten




46 JOHN KNOX.

him, they meant to coax him;
and as they could not get him
killed, they would hire him to
be silent.
Queen Mary came to live in
the palace of Edinburgh. She
was one of the most beautiful
women in the world. She was
also a queen, and of a lovely,
graceful manner; and it was
thought that if she invited
Knox to see her and spoke
pleasantly to him, and prom-




JOHN KNOX. 47

ised him rewards, he would
agree to keep silent and not
oppose sin in public. But
when Knox went to see his
queen, he felt he had a duty
to her, and that was to speak
the truth. He told her a
queen should be an example
of all that was noble and good;
that she should fear and serve
God, protect the good and pun-
ish the bad. He told her that
her court was full of wicked




48 JOHN KNOX.

men and women, whom she
should send away, and that
the land was full of vice, which
she should make to cease. He
gave her a Bible, and begged
her to read it. He went so
far as to find fault with some
of her acts, and tell her they
were unworthy 'of a child of
God, and that God's anger
would be on her if she did not
do better.
You see, Knox was not like




JOHN KNOX. 49

Samson, who let a pretty
woman coax him out of his
strength and lead him to for-
get the work God had given
him.
Queen Mary had never been
spoken to so plainly. She be-
gan to cry, and said Knox was
the greatest bear she had ever
seen; that he was rough and
rude and frightened her, and
she hoped she would never see
him again.
4




50 JOHN NOX.

Many people have said Knox
was very cruel to talk so to
Queen Mary, but Mary was
more cruel to herself than
Knox was. If she had taken
his advice she would have
been a wise and prosperous
queen and have died a happy
death.
The queen never forgave
Knox for his plain speech.
She sent for him several times,
and he always held the same




JOHN KNOX. 51

firm language. She became
still more angry when he
preached against the evil do-
ings at her court. She had
him tried for treason, hoping
that the judges would find him
guilty and order his head to
be cut off. Instead of this the
judges said he was not guilty
of treason, but was a good
subject and an honest man.
So, you see, God made even
his enemies to be at peace




52 JOHN KNox.

with him. But Mary, Queen
of Scots," as she was called,
would not listen to his re-
bukes. She loved her own
way too well. So when Knox
bade her send away the bad
men who were in her court,
she was angry and displeased.
After some years her enemies
drove her out of Scotland.
She went to England, and
there Queen Elizabeth shut
her up in a castle, and at last




JOHN KNOX. 53

sent an order to have the head
of Mary cut off, which was
done.
The preaching of Knox was
so plain and to the point that
once when the king went to
hear him he thought Knox
meant him, and was so angry
that he went home scolding
and would not eat his dinner.
After Mary ceased to be
queen, Scotland was governed
by a good nobleman who was




54 JOHN KNOX.

so wise and kind that he was
called "the good regent," or
ruler. Knox loved him very
much, but this good man was
cruelly killed by an enemy,
and this grieved Knox so
much that he became ill.
Knox was growing old; his
life had been one of trouble
and hard work; he was not
strong, and his sorrow at the
regent's sudden death wore
upon him so much that he




JOHN KNOX. 55

had a fit, and every one
thought he would die. His
foes were glad over this, and
rejoiced and shook hands and
sent merry letters to each
other; but they were soon dis-
appointed, for Knox began to
get well.
He was again able to preach
on the Sabbath day, and
though he preached in weak-
ness and in pain he would
keep on, for he said God had




56 JOHN KNOX.

called him to his work and he
would not stop so long as he
lived.
Some bad people threw let-
ters in at his windows, saying
if he did not hold his tongue
they would kill him; but these
letters he took into the pul-
pit, saying, as he read them
aloud, that he did not fear
man nor death-all he feared
was sin.
James Melville writes of




JOHN KNOX. 57

Knox at this time: "I see him
every day going out to take a
walk. He is very weak; he
goes slowly and wearily, and
has a fur on his neck. He
leans with one hand on a staff,
and good Richard Balanden
holds him up by the other
arm. He went to church on
Sunday, and was so feeble
that Richard had to lift him
to the pulpit; and there he
leaned on the desk and spoke




58 JOHN KNOX.

feebly and slowly for half an
hour: then he warmed up and
grew strong, and spoke so loud
and so earnestly that he made
me thrill and tremble so I
could not hold my pen to take
notes."
The last sermon John Knox
preached he signed at the
end,
John Knox, with my dead
hand and warm, glad heart-
praising God who leaves such




JOHN KNOX. 59

light and mercy to bless us in
his Church."
The illness of Knox had
made his hand weak and fee-
ble, as if it were dead, but his
heart was warm and glad in
love to his God.
Soon after this Knox was
taken worse, and knew that
he must die. The Bible bids
us "owe no man anything,
but to love one another;" so
he told his wife to call the




60 JOHN KNOX.

servants and pay them their
wages. To one whom he loved
the best he gave about five
dollars more than was due
him.
He then spoke to them all,
and told them to meet him in
heaven. He then had his
friend Richard order his coffin
to be made.
As he lay on his bed he
said so many things about his
peace, his joy, his hope in




JOHN KNOX. 61

God that half of them could
not be remembered. He had
his wife read to him from the
Bible, and told his friends to
be kind to her and to his chil-
dren.
After prayers in the even-
ing he fell asleep. When he
woke up, he said, softly, "Now
it is come!"
Do you trust in Jesus?
Are you happy?" asked his
friend Richard.




62 JOHN KNOX.

Knox could not speak, but
he pressed his hand, smiled,
looked up, and was gone home
to God.
A great many people fol-
lowed his body to the grave,
and among them was the
ruler or regent of the country,
and this man, as he looked
into the open grave, said,
" There lies he who never
feared the face of man."
Knox was sixty-seven years




JOHN KNOX. 63

old. To his firmness, honesty
and holy life the Church of
God in Scotland-and indeed
in all the world-owes very
much.
I hope my little friends will
not forget what I have told
them of the lion-hearted Re-
formers, but try to live by the
faith which upheld them in
all the trials and pain they
had to suffer a suffering
which is richly rewarded by




64 JOHN KNOX.

the one only Mediator that
stands between our sins and
God's wrath-his well-beloved
Son, Jesus Christ.




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