• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 John Huss
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: True story library, No. 2 ;, 10
Title: John Huss
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055331/00001
 Material Information
Title: John Huss
Series Title: True story library, No. 2
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill. ; 13 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wright, Julia McNair, 1840-1903
Faber, Hermann ( Illustrator )
Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A -- Board of Publication ( Publisher )
Westcott & Thomson ( Stereotyper )
Publisher: Presbyterian Board of Publication
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Manufacturer: Westcott & Thompson, stereotypers
Publication Date: c1870
 Subjects
Subject: Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Reformation -- History -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Julia McNair Wright.
General Note: Illustrations by H. Faber (Hermann Faber).
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055331
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002447403
notis - AMF2658
oclc - 10771505

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    John Huss
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



























The Bal;dwn Lbrary

or f
: 3(Og"Z LA





//










-' I i


'I'


fill 'r l: :; .

I I -.
I .. ---; ,
.,-i .t ~- ,'-' ---, / ,.



Huss and the Painter.
John Buss. See page 24.
2







JOHN HUSS.






BY
MRS. JULIA McNAIR WRIGHT,
AUTHOR OF "ALMOST A NUN," ETC. ETC.












PIILADELPHIA:
PRESBYTERIAN BOARD OF PUBLICATION,
1334 CHESTNUT STREET.
























Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year
1870, by

WMf. L. HIIDEBURN, TeEAsuxEn,
in trust for the
PRESBYTERIAN PUBLICATION COMMITTEE,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Eastern
District of Pennsylvania.







WESTCOTT & THOMSON,
Stereotypers, Pl-ilada.








JOHN HUSS.



NCE, when I was far out
on the sea, looking from
the bows of the vessel I
saw a light a great way off.
It looked about as large as
the light of a penny candle.
"What little light is that?" I
asked.
"It is not a little light,"
5




6 JOHN HUSS.

the captain said, "but a very
large and bright one indeed.
It looks little because it
shines so far."
When he told me how far
off it was, then I said no
more about a little light," for
I thought how very large it
was to be seen at all over so
many miles.
In a country far away, and
many hundred years ago, was
born the man of whom I shall




JOHN HUSS. 7

now tell you. The country
was Bohemia, in Europe; the
time five hundred and one
years past; the man, JOHN
Huss.
John Huss is like the light
seen at sea-he shines afar.
But he is not like that light
in growing less with long
distance, for his name grows
brighter all the time.
John took his last name
from the place where he was




8 JOHN HUSS.

born-the small, poor village,
of Hussinetz,
What do you think his
name meant ?
I will tell you, and if it
seems funny I give you all
leave to laugh, for it will be
the only funny thing in this
book. The lives of the Re-
formers were not funny lives;
they were serious and earnest.
Huss, in the Bohemian
tongue, means "goose." John




JOHN HUSS. 9

Huss, then, is John Goose,
and Hussinetz is Goose-
town." John Goose, of Goose-
town, would be an uncom-
monly funny direction on a
letter, sure enough!
John often in his writings
alluded to his name. He
would say, "I am a poor and
humble man, and I have a
poor and humble name, yet
even if I am a goose-and
such men of my time do count




10 JOHN HUSS.

me-yet do I feel that I have
in my heart the love of God,
and I have been given wisdom
from above; and of this I write
and speak."
You see, John Huss was
neither ashamed of his name
nor of his poverty.
John's parents were very
poor; they were day-laborers;
they lived in a hovel; they
could neither read nor write.
Two nurses rocked the cra-




JOHN HUSS. 11

die of John Huss-one was
Ignorance, the other Super-
stition. One knows nothing
at all-the other believes what
is foolish and wicked. Ask
your mother to explain this.
From a childhood of such
poverty and meanness, John
Huss rose to be one of the
greatest men in the world.
He rose by two things--by
learning and by goodness.
He studied constantly. He




12 JOHN HUSS.

kept his life pure, and even
his enemies were forced to say
of him that he was a good
man.
A man who hated Huss
could only write about him,
" He is tender and gentle to
the poorest. His pale face is
mild and sweet. His life is
hard and simple. No re-
proach can come on his con-
duct. His manners are quiet
and stern. By these things




JOHN HUSS. 13

the hearts of men are drawn
after him, and when he opens
his lips they listen as if one
spoke from heaven."
When a very young man,
Huss became a master in the
great school of Prague. A
year or two after, he was put
among the wisest teachers of
the day. When he was thirty-
nine he became preacher to
the queen of Bohemia, and
for his goodness, honesty and




14 JOHN HUSS.

plain speaking the queen
loved and honored him.
Three years after he was
chosen to be the queen's
priest, John Huss began to
go about Bohemia, preaching
to the people in their own
language instead of Latin.
The people of Bohemia were
noted above others for their
sound minds and love of learn-
ing. Many good men who had
been persecuted in England




JOHN HUSS. 15

and in France fled to Bohemia
for shelter, and by teaching
the doctrines of the Bible to
the people had prepared their
minds to listen readily to such
preaching as they heard from
Huss.
Other priests preached in
Latin. They said,
"Mind us; we know every-
thing." Mind the pope; he
is to you in the place of God."
"Don't read the Bible; you





16 JOHN HUSS.

are too stupid to know what it
means." "If you sin, give us
a little money and we will for-
give you."
Now when Huss first began
to preach he had not read
much of the Bible, but he had
something better than the
other priests. He could say,
"We men are all liable to
err, but look to God to teach
you what is right." Hear
the voice of God speaking in




JOHN HUSS. 17

your hearts." Fear to sin,
my friends, for money cannot
wipe out sin, and sin is hate-
ful to God."
The people liked this.
"Ah, this does us good;
this will make us better men,"
they said.
And now, as John Huss was
trying to serve God and do all
the good he could, God sent
him more light-sent him the
Bible.
2




18 JOHN HUSS.

Two young men came from
England to Prague. Huss
loved to entertain strangers,
and asked them to stay at his
house-first out of charity, but
soon he came to love them.
When they got well acquaint-
ed, they came to him with
some written books.
Here is something good,"
they said. "These are the
books of Wickliffe, the Eng-
lishman."





JOHN HUSS. 19

"I don't want them," said
Huss.
Read them," said the
young men.
"They are vile heresy, I am
told," replied Huss.
Read them," they said.
"I cannot understand
them."
God will give you light,"
said the Englishmen.
Huss took the books and
read. They sent him to the




20 JOHN HUSS.

word of God. He took his
Bible and read. He fell on
his knees and prayed.
God gave him light. He
saw that there is but one God
and one Mediator between
God and men-Jesus only.
Here was new life to Huss.
One day the young men
said to him,
You are very good to us.
We wish to make you a re-
turn."




JOHN HUSS. 21

"I am your debtor -you
brought me good books to
read," replied Huss.
Still, let us show our grat-
itude."
"And what will you do3"
asked Huss,
The walls of your hall are
bare and ugly. If you please,
we will paint a large, beautiful
picture on each wall."
"And what will your pic-
tures be about?" asked Huss.




22 JOHN HUSS.

"Leave us to choose," said
the young men.
They began at the hall, and
painted on one side many
days. A beautiful picture
grew under their fingers. It
was a picture of our Lord Je-
sus going up the hill toward
Jerusalem, poor in dress and
meek in countenance, with
only a few poor fisher-friends
and some beggars following
him.




JOHN HUSS. 23

On the other wall they
painted a progress of the pope
through Rome. On the pope's
head was a triple crown; his
robe was velvet and silk, edged
with fur; his chariot and his
horses were like a king's. Be-
hind himi came a long train of
rich men and priests. His
head was held high, and his
face was hard and proud.
When the pictures were
done, Come," said the young




24 JOHN HUSS.

men, "see our pictures; they
are finished."
Huss looked in silence from
one wall to another.
At last the painters spoke:
"This is your Jesus, and
this is your pope. See the
difference! How much greater
is the servant than his Lord!
Is the pope like Christ, the
lovely and lowly? Ought he
not to be like Christ if he fol-
lows him? Oh, Huss, we tell




JOHN HUSS. 25

you your pope is a false man
and an Antichrist!"
I like your pictures, but I
do not like what you say about
the pope," said Huss.
"Does not the pope hate
the Bible and keep it from the
people ?" asked the English-
men. Did he not burn those
books of Wickliffe which hold
the truth ?"
He did all this," said
Huss, and he was wrong.




26 JOHN HUSS.

But I love the Bible; I love
the books of Wickliffe; and I
shall tell the people to read
the Bible."
The pictures made so much
trouble -among the people of
the city, some of whom liked
them and some not, that the
Englishmen were obliged to
leave Prague.
The bishop ordered all the
copies of Wickliffe's books to
be burned. He told Huss he




JOHN HUSS. 27

must not praise them, but
Huss would not obey the bish-
op. Huss went about Bohe-
mia preaching. He told the
people that the burnt books
were good books-no lies, but
teaching God's pure truth.
He would talk to the people
like a father, saying, Oh, my
dear Bohemians, I love you-
I love your souls. Give your-
selves to God; pray to Jesus,
and not to saints. Prove your-




28 JOHN HUSS.

selves men, and read the
Scriptures as many as have
them"-for copies of the Bible
or parts of it were very scarce
then.
The king was not a very
bad man. He was weak, and
would not stand up boldly for
the right, but he was not
cruel, and he did not want to
have his people punished for
reading what books they liked.
The king liked Huss, and tried




JOHN HUSS. 29

to keep the bishop from being
cruel to him. The bishop took
away some of the books that
Huss had and burnt them.
He said Huss must not preach
and the people must not go to
hear him. The king laughed
at this. The pope said the
bishop was right, and they
drove Huss out of the Church
and cursed him.
In spite of all the words of
priests and bishops, the people




30 JOHN HUSS.

came to hear Huss preach.
They obeyed his teachings,
and all over the country men
were turning to God-the rich
and the poor reading, hearing
and praying together.
Huss wrote books, and they
were copied and scattered
about. The bishop and his
friends wanted to get them
and burn them.
There was a little church
called the Chapel of Bethle-














, *' "




' "' '! '"
r













HUBBss at the Stake.
John Huss. See page 62.
31




32 JOHN HUSS.

hem, where Huss preached,
telling of Jesus the only Sa-
viour, the Babe born in Beth-
lehem.
The pope ordered Huss to
come to Rome to be tried for
heresy. The king'told Huss
not to go to Rome or he would
be put to death.
The people of Bohemia wept
about Huss, praying him not
to go. Now, though Huss was
willing to go, and not afraid to




JOHN HUSS. 33

die, he yielded to king and
people and stayed in Bohemia,
preaching.
By this time many of the
knights, soldiers and noble-
men had become believers in
the doctrine taught by Wick-
liffe and Huss, and had begun
to read the Bible and to be-
lieve that we ought to obey
God rather than the pope-
not pray to angels; and that
Jesus, and not the Virgin
3




34 JOHN HUSS.

Mary, is the Mediator between
as and God.
These views spread into
Germany, and among the
French, English and Germans
living at Prague; and the
teachings of Huss became to
all these nations like seed
sown in good soil, which
sprung up by and by in Cal-
vin, in Luther and in Coligny,
of whom I will write for you;
and in Wishart, Knox and




JOHN HUSS. 35

Tyndale, of whom you have
read already.
Drop a seed of wheat into
good ground and it will shoot
up in a long stalk, and a head
of many-perhaps a hundred
-grains, all come from one
little grain which you buried
in the ground. Now, if you
dig to look for that seed which
you planted, you will find it
dead and gone, but it has
lived again in all that stalk





36 JOHN HUSS.

and head of wheat. So Huss
was to die and be seen no
more, but his good life and his
good words were to rise up
and live in hundreds of peo-
ple in many lands and nations
all over Europe.
People got so excited over
Huss that they even quarreled
about him in the streets. This
worried the king, who asked
him to leave the city of Prague
and go into the country.




JOHN HUSS. 37

Huss did so. In the coun-
try he spent his time writing
many good books.
A great council was now to
meet in Germany, where the
pope and Romish priests and
bishops were to be, and the
emperor of Germany sent for
Huss to come before them to
tell what he believed and why
he believed it.
The king was brother to the
emperor. He wrote to him




38 JOHN HUSS.

that he feared the council
would kill Huss.
Never!" said the emperor.
"My life for his. They shall
not touch him. I give my
word of honor that no harm
shall come to him, but he shall
go back safely to Prague."
He also wrote this promise,
called a "safe-conduct," and
signed his name as emperor
of all Germany to it.
Then the king of Bohemia




JOHN HUSS. 39

told Huss he might go, and
sent three noblemen who
loved Huss-with him.
All through Bohemia the
people came out in crowds to
see Huss and hear him spe4ik,
and they prayed aloud for
blessings and safety for him.
His entrance into the large
cities was like the coming of
a king or a great general.
The bishops sent men be-
fore to tell the people not to




40 JOHN HUSS.

notice Huss or listen to him,
but the people would run after
him and hear the words of
truth.
At last, Constance, the city
where the council sat, was
reached. Some men there
said to Huss,
Why did you come ? They
will kill you."
They cannot," replied
Huss; "I have the safe-con-
duct of the emperor."




JOHN HUSS. 41

The emperor will not keep
his word," they said.
"Not keep his word !" cried
Huss. I, a poor, plain man,
would not break my word.
And will a king, who is to set
an example to thousands of
men, break his? You are
mistaken."
"Ah," said these men, "you
have no idea what a king will
do when he gets into the hands
of the pope."




42 JOHN HUSS.

At the council they first
gave Huss a paper, with a
great many false statements
written on it, of wicked things
which bad men said he had
spoken.
"I never said these things,"
said Huss.
"Oh, you did-you did!"
cried the false witnesses.
Huss said to his friends,
Sinners bore false witness
of Jesus my Lord. No won-




JOHN HUSS. 43

der, then, if they do the same
by me."
Run away from this place
or you may be killed," said
some fearful friends.
"I am here to do the will
of God," replied the good man.
The pope and the priests
sent a band of soldiers to
guard the house where Huss
lived, for fear the friends he
had would take him away;
and the pope said plainly that




44 JOHN HUSS.

he never would let Huss go
free or return to Bohemia.
The three noble friends of
Huss, who came with him,
went to the pope and to the
emperor to complain of this
treatment.
"He has a safe-conduct,"
they said.
"I do not care for that,"
said the pope; but the empe-
ror got red in the face.
This pope's real name was




JOHN HUSS. 45

Baltassar Corsa. He had been
a pirate when a young man,
and had not got over his evil
ways. It does not take very
good stuff to make popes.
After two weeks they threw
Huss into a damp dungeon,
without bed, fire or windows.
This made the emperor angry.
He was afraid the Bohemian
people might go to war, and
he ordered Huss to be taken
from prison. But the bishops





46 JOHN HUSS.

said "No!" and the emperor
yielded, and let them keep
Huss in this doleful place.
In prison, Huss grew very
ill, and nearly died from bad
treatment the food and air
being not fit for a brute. The
doctors had him carried out of
his prison to a house, and he
got better.
No sooner was he better
than the bishop of Constance
got him, put him in a worse




JOHN HUSS. 47

dungeon, and chained him to
the walls with irons on his
feet and hands. Huss was
sick and alone, but his heart
was strong in God. He looked
to heaven as his final home,
and was ready to die for the
Lord Jesus, as many good men
have died.
From Christmas until sum-
mer-time Huss lay in prison.
Then they brought him before
the council, and there, instead





48 JOHN HUSS.

of a quiet questioning and
hearing, they abused him and
called him names, and quar-
reled together, until Huss
plainly told them he had
never been in such an uproar.
Did you say," roared a
bishop, "that if you were in
Bohemia, we could not keep
you in prison ?"
"Even so, for I have good
and strong friends in my own
country," said Huss.





JOHN HUSS. 49

"You lie !" shouted this
polite bishop.
Huss lies not," said one
of his noble friends, standing
up, for in my land my castle
and many more would defend
him."
Here the emperor got up
and said to Huss that he
hoped he was no heretic, but
would obey the council, ask
pardon for what he had
preached, and go home quietly.
4




50 JOHN HUSS.

The emperor had never
spoken to Huss before, and
the simple, honest man was so
confused that he did not un-
derstand what was said, and
replied,
"I do humbly thank you,
sire, for your safe-conduct.'
I know it is good, and I trust
to it to protect me."
This reply made the empe-
ror very red in the face.
The guards rushed up, and,





JOHN HUSS. 51

seizing his chains, began to
drag him off like a wild beast.
The Bohemian nobleman came
to him with tears in his eyes,
clasped him tenderly in his
arms, and said,
Noble professor, sacrifice
your life sooner than give up
the truth !"
That was a good, brave
word.
"I will-I will!" replied
Huss, smiling.





52 JOHN HUSS.

When Huss was next
brought before the council,
he said,
"I am willing to do all that
is right. I am neither proud
nor obstinate. Show me the
right, and I will do it; tell me
the truth, and I will believe
it."
And what truth will you
believe ?" they asked.
"That which agrees with
the Bible," said Huss.





JOHN HUSS. 53

You must recant or die !"
cried the bishops.
And what shall I take
back?" asked Huss.
All that you preached,"
said the bishops.
"I cannot, for it is truth,
and needful to the salvation
of souls," said the brave man.
You shall be burned to
death," said the bishops.
Then two men who had
spoken again t Huss began





54 JOHN HUSS.

to be sorry. They burst into
tears, and, falling on their
knees before him, took his
hands and begged to be for-
given.
"I forgive you, and I hope
God will," said Huss, kindly.
Then the bishops, seeing
that Huss was not to be
frightened out of doing right,
began to coax him.
"If you will give up the
Bible and deny all that you





JOHN HUSS. 55

have preached, we will give
you a carriage and two horses,
two servant-men and a good
deal of money, and in two
years' time we will make you
a bishop !"
These were fine offers, but
Huss said,
I cannot sin against God.
Shall I take the world for my
soul? Oh no, I cannot! Let
me live and die the servant of
God !"




56 JOHN HUSS.

Let him die, then !" shout-
ed all the priests.
One of the bishops was now
turned to be his friend, be-
cause he saw that Huss was
so true and honest. He went
to him in prison, and even
with tears begged him to give
up to the council and not be
put to death. Huss wept.
How good is God to make
you my friend !" he said. I
love you, but do not ask me to





JOHN HUSS. 57

destroy my soul. May God
teach you, sir." Then he kiss-
ed the bishop, saying, "Go, I
am quite ready to die for my
Lord."
You remember, dear chil-
dren, how wicked Jews and
soldiers put on our Saviour a
crown and a purple robe,
mocking him. In some such
way was Huss treated. The
priests brought him to a great
church with much pomp of





58 JOHN HUSS.

procession. Then they ac-
cused him of dreadful sins.
Of these I am not guilty,
but I do read and love the
Bible," said Huss.
"Now this day you shall
die!" they said.
It was his birth-day, and he
was forty-two years old.
Huss turned to the emperor,
saying, boldly,
"You gave me a safe-con-
duct!"





JOHN HUSS. 59

"I cannot help it," said the
weak and wicked emperor,
looking down.
The priests now put on
Huss a long dress, painted in
red and black, like flames of
fire.
"Jesus wore a scarlet robe
of mockery," said Huss.
Then they put on his head
a paper cap, with horrible
figures on it and the words
"Arch heretic!"




60 JOHN HUSS.

Jesus wore a crown of
thorns for me," said Huss;
and then he fell on his knees,
crying out, Lord, forgive
these men!"
They took him to an island
in the river, a great crowd fol-
lowing and a guard of soldiers
about him; and they chained
him to a stake, piling wood
and hay about him.
"Lord, in thee do I put my
trust! 0 my Rock, into thy




JOHN HUSS. 61

hands I commend my soul!"
said Huss, loudly.
He got on his knees to pray,
but the cruel priests made
him get up from his knees.
He then stood up, but still
kept on praying.
He asked that he might
have a strong and steadfast
soul, so as to bear that death
of pain and shame at the
stake. He said that Christ
wore heavy bonds, and he




62 JOHN HUSS.

would gladly wear a chain for
Christ's sake.
When they lit the wood, he
began to sing. He did not
sing but a moment, for God
sent his angels to bear the
soul of the martyr into glory,
where his foes could hurt him
no more.
The priests burned up his
clothes and his books, and
even gathered up the earth
and ashes about the place




JOHN HUSS. 63

where he died and threw them
in the river Rhine, thus de-
stroying every part of his
earthly body. But they could
not destroy his soul, which
even now was with God and
his blessed angels in that
home which Jesus has gone to
prepare for all them that be-
lieve and trust in him.
Lately, people who love his
memory have put a great
monument there to his name,





64 JOHN HUSS.

to help the nations remember
his good life. And years after
sprung up men, like Luther
and Calvin, who taught the
very truths for which Huss
died.
John Huss died in the year
1415, at Constance.




.2j



























Ill




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs