• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Content
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: True story library, No. 2 ;, 1
Title: George Wishart
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055330/00001
 Material Information
Title: George Wishart
Series Title: True story library, No. 2
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill. ; 13 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wright, Julia McNair, 1840-1903
Presbyterian Board of Publication ( Publisher )
Publisher: Presbyterian Board of Publication
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Publication Date: c1870
 Subjects
Subject: Reformers -- Juvenile literature -- Great Britain   ( lcsh )
Martyrs -- Juvenile literature -- Great Britain   ( lcsh )
Biographies -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Biographies   ( rbgenr )
individual biography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Julia McNair Wright.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055330
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002447398
notis - AMF2653
oclc - 56903672

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Content
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text















ter

I N







8"1 <^ 8^







The Bldwmi Library
.)B Unme"enny

11 i m:'


















(1, -II I I







V -- I I













Priauiug in the Gate.
Geor e ihrt. See page 38.
2
----, --, ,







GEORGE WISHART.






BY
MRs. JULIA McNAIR WRIGHT,
AUTHOR OF "ALMOST A NUN," ETC. ETC.













PHILADELPHIA:
PRESBYTERIAN BOARD OF PUBLICATION,
1331 CHESTNUT STREET.
























Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year
1870, by

WM. L. HILDEBURN, TnxAStran,
in trust for the
PRESBYTERIAN PUBLICATION COMMITTEE,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Eastern
District of Pennsylvania.






WESTCOTT & THOMON,
Btereotypers, Philada.





!loT-riirr ^frowdel.


GEORGE WISHART.



LMOST any child knows
what it is to "make over"
anything. Mary knows
what her mother means when
she says she will make over
her hat or her coat, and Mary
herself has often made over
her doll's dress into such a
dear little tunic or its sacque
5





6 GEORGE WISHART.

into a cunning little jacket.
Did you know that the Church
often needed making over as
much as coats or dresses need
it? And the word for making
over the Church is REFORM.
Reform-that is the word. If
your father says, John Brown
is reformed," you know that
from being a bad boy John
Brown has become good; so
when we speak of a CnuuCp
being reformed, we mean that





GEORGE WISHART. 7

that Church, from being far
from God, has come to know
and love him more and try to
serve him better.
When we talk of the Church
in this way we do not mean
the building where we go to
worship, but the people-the
men, women and children that
go there to serve God. God
has always had a Church in
this world, and as that Church
has grown cold and out of




8 GEORGE WISHART.

the way, as it too often has
done, God has sent good and
wise-headed men to lead the
Church to duty again. These
good men we call REFORMERS.
It is about these Reformers
that I want to write some lit-
tle books, so that the children
of the Church which they have
lived and died to make better
shall know and love them.
How nice it will be when you
get to heaven to see and speak





GEORGE WISHART. 9

with those noble Reformers of
whom you have read!
The first of these men that
I shall tell you of is GEORGE
WISHART. He was born about
three hundred and fifty years
ago, in Scotland.
Three hundred and fifty
years is a longer time than
any little child can think. It
is very, very long; and through
all these years George Wishart
has been remembered for his





10 GEORGE WISHART.

goodness. Some men have
been remembered for their
riches, some for their wars,
some for their wickedness. It
is a very beautiful thing to be
remembered for goodness. In
those days he was called
GEORGE WISE-HART, and he had
indeed a wise heart-a heart
that was wise to choose the
love and service of God before
anything else.
George Wishart had good





GEORGE WISHART. 11

parents, who taught him the
fear of the Lord. As a child
he was gentle and obedient,
loving to do right and hating
to do wrong, and very fond of
study.
In those old times there
were fewer schools and fewer
learned people than now. The
parents of George Wishart
were not very poor, for they
sent him to the best schools
and made him a good scholar.





12 GEORGE WISHART.

When he grew up he gave his
time to two things-teaching
and preaching.
These two things he did in
Scotland, first. The fame of
his teaching spi,.--il beyond
that country, and he was ask-
ed to go to a great college in
England to teach. This col-
lege was at Cambridge. He
went there, and the people
after that called him Master
George, of Benet College.





GEORGE WISHART. 13

Among his pupils was a
young boy named Emery Tyl-
ney. This boy loved his
teacher dearly, and when he
grew up wrote many things
about him, which tell us near-
ly all we know of good George
Wishart. He says of him,
" He was polite, lowly, lovely,
glad to teach, fond of learning,
and had traveled much."
The countries where George
Wishart traveled were Scot-





14 GEORGE WISHART.

land, England and France,
and very likely he went to
Germany and Italy. He no-
ticed many strange things
while he was making his jour-
neys, and he was willing to
tell what he saw to others.
This made him a very pleasant
friend, especially when, as we
are told, he was "polite and
lowly."
Polite, lowly, lovely," says
Emery Tylney; so in these





GEORGE WISHART. 15

things George Wishart was
like Jesus, the Master he
served.
Do you want to know how
he looked ?
Emery Tylney tells us that
also. He says he was tall,
with a pleasant face and
voice; had a dark complexion,
black beard and hair, and
that the top of his head was
very bald.
Now let me tell you some





16 GEORGE WISHART.

odd things about his clothes.
To begin at his head, he wore
a round black cap of French
make-the best that could be
bought. This was the most
costly article of his clothes,
and he wore it one year. He
wore a black robe or gown
that came down to his ankles.
It was of very coarse cloth,
called frieze. He wore also a
coarse black cloak and long
black woolen stockings, and





GEORGE WISHART. 17

low shoes tied with black rib-
bon. His shirt was of coarse
white linen, and had broad
collar and cuffs.
Now for the queer part.
Every week he gave his shirt
to a poor man, and got a new
one, which he gave away the
next week. And so every
week he gave away his long
black hose; every month he
gave away his shoes; every
three months he gave away
2





18 GEORGE WISHART.

his gown and cloak, and his
cap he wore one year.
Nor did he stop his giving
at clothes. Emery Tylney
says, "His charity had never
end, night, noon nor day."
Ah, how beautiful is this!-a
charity like God's great cha-
rity, that knows no end!
Every day he gave away
one meal to the poor-two
meals he ate and one he gave
away. Every fourth day he





GEORGE WISHART. 19

ate only a piece of bread and
drank some water, and gave
all the rest of that day's food
to the poor. Thus he gave
what cost him self-denial.
In those days most people
thought they must have great
feather-beds to sleep on, but
George Wishart slept on a bed
of straw. Every week he put
on this bed a pair of coarse
white sheets, and every week
he took off the pair that had





20 GEORGE WISHART.

been on the seven days before
and gave them away.
"By his bed," says Emery
Tylney, stood a great tub of
fresh water, and, every one
being in bed and the candle
out, he would bathe in this
water."
So, you see, simple food,
cold water, plain clothes and
constant work made up his
life and kept him strong and
healthy.





GEORGE WISHART. 21

Emery Tylney slept in the
room with his dear teacher.
He loved him well, and he
cries out,
Oh that the Lord had
left him to me, his poor
boy! I should find no words
to tell his good deeds-his
love to me, to the poor; his
wisdom, his labor, his desire
to do good to all and harm to
none."
When we read these things





22 GEORGE WISHART.

we \vish we could see such a
man as George Wishart.
"He was modest, tempe-
rate, prudent, fearing God and
hating covetousness," Tylney
goes on to say, and this
makes us love George Wish-
art yet more.
When Wishart preached he
was grave and earnest. He
said what was right even
when people got angry at his
plain speaking. He dared to





GEORGE WISHART. 23

tell the truth, and in this I wish
every boy and girl were like
him, but I am afraid a great
many are not.
There were many wicked
people among Wishart's hear-
ers men who fought and
swore and even got drunk.
There were men also who
broke the Sabbath in work or
in play; men who did not
read the Bible, and men who
prayed to images and the Vir-





24 GEORGE WISHAET.

gin Mary instead of to God
and Christ.
The Church of that day had
got very far from the truth-
far from God's law and
George Wishart stood up as a
Reformer to reform, or make
over, the Church, so that it
would be a Church in which
God would have pleasure.
George Wishart was not
afraid. He cried out daily
against sin and daily his holy





GEORGE WISHART. 25

life set an example to the
Church he wished to reform.
Wicked men got very angry at
him. They said he was hard
and stern, and set himself up
as better than other people.
They wanted to kill him, but
God was his defence.
Wishart told the people
that it was wicked to pray to
saints-that the Bible said,
" Thou shalt worship the Lord
thy God, and him only shalt





26 GEORGE WISHART.

thou serve." He told them
they must not ask the Virgin
Mary to save them, for there
is only one way for the soul to
get to God, and that way is
Christ Jesus.
These truths he preached
first publicly in the town of
Ross. From Ross he went to
Dundee. Here he bade men
turn from the error of their
ways, fly to Jesus as their only
Saviour, and, as the Bible says,





GEORGE WISHART. 27

"Be converted," and God would
"heal them." He warned
them to escape the wrath to
come-the wrath of God that
falls upon the sinner and from
which he can be safe only in
Jesus, the Son of God.
This was the living truth
that should reform the Church,
bring it back to the pure faith
and life of the gospel. But
wicked men hate the truth:
they hated it when George





28 GEORGE WISHART.

Wishart preached it, and they
would not hear it. They or-
dered Wishart to leave Dun-
dee-nearly all the towns-
people bade him begone. The
officers of the city said he
must go away: they said they
did not like his preaching, it
hurt them and made them un-
happy; and besides, the bish-
ops and Cardinal Beaton, a
great Roman Catholic, who
had much power in those





GEORGE WISHART. 29

days, would persecute them
if they heard Wishart.
How badly George Wishart
felt, not over their treatment
of him, but at their treatment
of the truth of God! Tears
ran down his kind face as he
cried out,
God is my witness that I
never meant your hurt, only
your good and your comfort.
To refuse to hear God's word
and drive away me, his mes-





30 GEORGE WISHART.

senger, whom he has sent to
tell you the truth, will not
save you trouble. Oh no; it
will bring on you the great
wrath of God, who is higher
than all cardinals or bishops.
I have offered you the truth
of God. At the risk of my
life I would stay here and
preach to you, but now you
chase me away and I must
leave my case with God. You
shall not long prosper. God











I I


ii *i II ', I ji





''









The Priest Defeated.
Geo-rg Wishart, See page 42.
31





32 GEORGE WISHART.

will send sharp trouble here.
When he sends it, repent at
once, I pray you, and turn to
him, or he will visit you with
fire and sword."
The town officers would not
listen; they still ordered him
to go. Then he started from
Dundee, and out of the gate
of the town the few who loved
him and loved the truth fol-
lowed him, weeping.
"Fear not, weep not," he





GEORGE WISHART. 33

said; God will bring me
back to Dundee."
Then he went to Ayrshire.
The town officers and great
men were like those of Dun-
dee.
"We will not hear you,"
they said. "Away! you can-
not preach in our city."
Then I will preach in the
fields without the wall," said
Wishart.
So he stood in the fields and
3





.34 GEORGE WISHART.

preached; and the honest and
the sorrowful and the poor
came :out of the wicked town
to hear him tell of Jesus, as in
Judea the publicans and sin-
ners came out of the towns to
hear Jesus preach when he
was on earth.
Four days George Wishart
preached in the fields about
Ayrshire.
And now came news from
Dundee. God had sent a ter-





GEORGE WISHART. 35

rible disease there called the
" Plague." One who lived
there writes,
"Unless you had seen you
could not believe so many
people could die in twenty-
four hours. Never has the
plague raged anywhere as it
has in Dundee."
The sick people and the dy-
ing were put out of the city
on the ground beyond the
walls. No one would take





36 GEORGE WISHART.

care of them-no one would
bury the dead. The well fled
away from their sick friends.
Truly, as the Bible tells us,
"the tender mercies of the
wicked are cruel."
When this news came to
George Wishart, he said,
Now they will receive me;
now they will repent and hear
the word of the Lord."
So, for all his friends said
he would get the plague, he





GEORGE WISHART. 37

hurried back to Dundee. He
was neither afraid of death,
of disease nor of 'bad men, if
he might preach Christ Jesus.
When George Wishart came
back to Dundee hundreds
cried aloud for joy. All day
he went about nursing the
sick, persuading the well to
do their duty, and telling all
of Christ, the only Saviour.
"Preach to us-preach to
us!" said the people.





38 GEORGE WISHART.

So next day he stood in the
east gate of the city-the sick
and dying being outside of the
gate, the well inside-and he
preached from this text, "He
sent his word and healed
them."
This sermon had a wonderful
effect. The wicked were not
afraid to die when they saw
how lovely a Saviour is Jesus.
The well were not afraid of
getting sick, and they hasten-





GEORGE WISHART. 39

ed to nurse and comfort those!
that were ill.
Day and night holy George
Wishart stood by the sick and
dying, caring for body and
soul; and at last God, who in
anger had sent the plague, in
mercy caused it to stop, and
the people crowded to the
churches to hear their true
friend tell the story of the
Cross.
Could any one hate this





40 GEORGE WISHART.

good man? Yes; the wicked
hate Jesus, and they hate his
servants too.
Cardinal Beaton, the bad
man I told you of, even now
wanted to kill George Wish-
art. He gave a priest named
John Weightman a dagger,
and told him to go to church,
holding it under his gown, and
stand at the foot of the pulpit
stairs, and when Wishart came
down from the pulpit the





GEORGE WISHART. 41

priest was to reach out and
thrust the dagger into his side.
The priest took the dagger
and went to church. There
was a great crowd in the
house, and he got near the
pulpit stairs and stood during
all the sermon. When it was
over, Wishart sat down in the
pulpit, and the people began
to go away. Still the priest
stood still, saying in his heart,
"Soon they will all be gone,





42 GEORGE WISHART.

and he will come down, and I
can kill him."
But George Wishart had
sharp eyes and very quick
thoughts. He understood
what this priest meant to do.
He rose and began to go down
the pulpit stairs.
Now is my time," thought
the priest.
But George Wishart bent
quickly forward and got hold
of the dagger, saying,





GEORGE WISHART. 43

"My friend, what will you
have ?"
He spoke so quietly and
kindly that the priest was
frightened and sorry. He fell
on his knees, and said,
I came to kill you. I am
sorry. I am glad you stopped
me. Forgive me, pray for-
give me!"
Some of the people near the
church door had looked back
and had seen the man and




44 GEORGE WISHART.

the dagger. They cried out,
"Murder! murder!" and ran
back.
The people felt so angry
that any one should try to
harm their dear friend that
they rushed up, saying,
Give us this vile fellow,
and we will put him in the
prison. Give him to us, or
we will take him by force and
kill him."
Then George Wishart took





GEORGE WISHART. 45

the man in his arms, and
said,
"Who will hurt him will
hurt me! He has done me
no harm, but good, by teach-
ing me to be more careful.
My life for his."
This was like Jesus Christ,
who on his cross prayed for
those who killed him.
Even this beautiful spirit of
love and forgiveness did not
make his enemies ashamed.





46 GEORGE WISHART.

This priest, it is true, would
not again try to harm the
man who had forgiven' him
and held him in his arms to
save him, but Cardinal Bea-
ton, the wicked man who had
sent him to do the bad deed,
was as full of hate and evil
as ever.
The Bible says, "Let not
the sun go down upon thy
wrath." The cardinal let a
good many suns go down upon





GEORGE WISHART. 47

his wrath to the good Re-
former. Day after day, for
three years, he tried to kill
George Wishart- secretly at
first, for he was afraid and
ashamed openly to kill a man
just for preaching the truth
and reading the Bible.
At last the cardinal would
wait no longer. George Wish-
art was doing so much good
that the cardinal wanted to
kill him at once. He grew





48 GEORGE WISHART.

bold in his badness, and sent
some soldiers to bring Wishart
to him.
Wishart was staying in the
house of a friend. After hav-
ing family worship with the
household, he went to his
chamber and to bed. Before
midnight one of the great men
of Scotland, the earl of Both-
well, with his men, beset the
house. He told the master of
the house that it was useless





GEORGE WISHART. 49

to resist, for there were more
men near by and they would
have Wishart. But Bothwell
said that if he would give up
Wishart he would promise,
"on his honor," that he should
be safe, and that the cardinal
would not hurt him.
Open the gate," cried the
brave Wishart: "the will of
God be done!"
The earl then again pledged
his honor that he would pro-
4





50 GEORGE WISHART.

tect Wishart, and either set
him free or bring him safely
back to the castle of his
friend.
But alas for the honor of
bad men! In a few days the
earl gave Wishart up to the
cardinal. The queen prom-
ised him favors, and the cardi-
nal said he would pay him
well if he would do so.
Some of the great men cried
out against this. They told





GEORGE WISHART. 51

the queen and the cardinal
and the earl that God would
be against them if they should
slay a good man for preaching
the gospel.
But the wicked enemies of
Wishairt did not fear God, and
they hated him; so they set
about contriving to have him
tried and condemned and put
to death.
It was the month of Febru-
ary, and the cardinal went to





52 GEORGE WISHART.

a public room to have Wishart
appear before him. The car-
dinal was so afraid that Wish-
art's friends would rescue him
that he brought a great many
armed soldiers to the place.
But Wishart was not going to
make any quarrel or have a
fight. He went quietly along
to the appointed place, and
with him went a man that
loved him-John Knox, an-
other great Reformer, of whose





GEORGE WISHART. 53

life I am going some day to
write you.
On their way a beggar
came up, crying,
"Give me some help, I am
so poor!"
And Wishart threw him his
purse, saying,
"I shall never more need
money !"
He knew the cardinal meant
to kill him.
Then he said to John Knox,





54 GEORGE WISHART.

Go no farther with me."
"I cannot let you go alone,"
said Knox.
"I am not alone," said
Wishart. "Go back to your
dear scholars and teach them
the truth. Do not come with
me; one is enough to die at
this time."
Then Wishart went alone
into the room full of soldiers
and people who hated him,
and stood before Cardinal Bea-





GEORGE WISHART. 55

ton, who sat on a high seat, in
great state.
A priest named Lawder
came out with a paper full of
curses, which he read against
Wishart, saying the ground
would open and swallow him
up, for he was a heretic and a
traitor, a preacher, a liar and
a Bible-reader. But Wishart
stood calmly listening to the
end, and his mild face was
like that of the good martyr





56 GEORGE WISHART.

Stephen before the council-
" like the face of an angel."
Then Lawder spit in his
face, and said,
"Thou runagate, traitor,
thief, what answer hast thou?"
And Wishart thought how
Jews had spit in Jesus' face,
and mildly answered that he
did nothing but preach the
truth of the Lord Jesus Christ.
After this he lifted his arms
and preached.





GEORGE WISHART. 57

"Be silent," said the cardi-
nal; "I order you to hold your
peace."
And then he gave order that
next morning George Wishart
should be burned to death on
the public square before the
palace door. He told the cap-
tain of the castle to keep him
safely. The captain dared not
let Wishart go, but he took
him to his room, treated him
kindly, listened to his good





58 GEORGE WISHART.

talk of Jesus and the cross,
and let his friends come to see
him.
While Wishart was bidding
his friends Good-bye," the
bad cardinal went out on the
square and had a strong stake
driven, and chains brought to
fasten Wishart to it. He
helped pile up straw, wood
and tar about the stake, and
gave orders to put on Wishart
a long black linen gown and





GEORGE WISHART. 59

to tie bags of gunpowder to
his body.
Then the cardinal had vel-
vet curtains hung in a window
and a velvet lounge put in it
where he could lie and look at
Wishart burning.
At breakfast Wishart broke
bread and tasted wine with
his friends in memory of the
death of Jesus, holding thus
in his last hour a Lord's Sup-
per with those he loved.





60 GEORGE WISHART.

They led him out to the
stake. The gunners and the
cannon were on hand, so that
his friends could not get Wish-
art away.
Wishart knelt and prayed;
then he preached, and so well
that -the executioner fell weep-
ing at his feet and begged to
be forgiven for the deed the
cardinal made him do, saying
that he did not want to kill
him.





GEORGE WISHART. 61

Wishart kissed his cheek,
saying, "Lo, I forgive thee.
Do thy office."
They lit the fire. The pow-
der exploded, but did not kill
him. The captain rushed up,
seeing him alive in the fire,
and cried out,
"Be of good courage-be
strong in the Lord."
"The fire," cried Wishart,
"hurts my body, but nothing
can hurt my soul."





62 GEORGE WISHART.

Then he looked at the car-
dinal in the velvet-hung win-
dow, and said,
Out of that same window
that cardinal's body shall soon
be hung, when God has sud-
denly cut him off to answer
for this day's bad work."
In a moment more he died,
and these his last words were
like a prophecy and were soon
fulfilled, for the people before
long rose against the cruel





GEORGE WISHART. 63

man and killed him, and hung
his body out of the very win-
dow where he had sat to see
Wishart burned. Thus pun-
ishment sometimes overtakes
the wicked even on this earth.
From George Wishart we
can learn to fear nothing but
sin, to return good for evil,
and to be faithful to truth
even unto death, when we
shall have a crown of ever-
lasting life.





64 GEORGE WISHART.

He died in the year 1546,
loved and respected by all his
friends, hated and feared by
all his enemies.







1




































































































































..........
..........
....... -----




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs