• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Chronicles of the three sister...
 The enchanted doll
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Fairy tales
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055327/00001
 Material Information
Title: Fairy tales
Physical Description: viii, 189 p., 6 leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lemon, Mark, 1809-1870
Doyle, Richard, 1824-1883 ( Illustrator )
Bennett, Charles H ( Charles Henry ), 1829-1867 ( Illustrator )
Slark, John ( Publisher )
Leighton Son & Hodge ( Binder )
Bradbury, Evans & Co ( Printer )
Publisher: John Slark
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Bradbury, Evans & Co.
Publication Date: [187-?]
 Subjects
Subject: Fairy tales   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1875   ( lcsh )
Leighton Son and Hodge -- Binders' tickets (Binding) -- 1875   ( rbbin )
Genre: Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Binders' tickets (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mark Lemon ; with upwards of fifty illustrations by Richard Doyle and Charles H. Bennett.
General Note: Front matter and text within a red single ruled border.
General Note: Bound by Leighton Son and Hodge.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055327
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002232926
notis - ALH3324
oclc - 06166096

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Chronicles of the three sisters
        Unnumbered ( 11 )
        Unnumbered ( 12 )
        Book I: How the ruined Baron barters away his three daughters, Wulfilda, Adelheid, and Bertha
            Page 1
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
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            Page 7
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            Page 12
            Plate
            Page 13
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        Book II: How the lady of the Baron has a son, who is named Rinaldo, the son of wonder. His adventures begin
            Page 35
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            Plate
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            Plate
            Page 71
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            Page 73
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            Page 75
            Page 76
        Book III: Rinaldo, the son of wonder, continues his adventures in search of the spell which enchants his kindred
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
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            Page 99
            Page 100
    The enchanted doll
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Chapter I: Jacob Pout's first interview with the black fairy
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
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            Page 115
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            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
        Chapter II: The enchanted doll returns to Jacob Pout
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
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            Page 125
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            Plate
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
        Chapter III: Jacob goes to a bear garden, and afterwards to a Christmas party
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
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            Page 161
            Page 162
            Page 163
        Chapter IV: Jacob parts from the enchanted doll at last
            Page 164
            Page 165
            Page 166
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    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text




























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The Baldwin Library
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FA IRY TA LE S.















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1 4( iL 1
44
































































"WHEN INSTANTLY THERE CAME TROTTING ALONG A POWERFUL BEAR, AND BEGAN A
FIERCE CONTEST WITH THE BULL."-Page 81. Frontispiece.









FAIRY TALES.


BY


MARK LEMON.




WL~it^ u nxfoairs of fiXftv flf(u.strations
BY

RICHARD DOYLE
AND
CHARLES H. BENNETT.







LONDON:
JOHN SLARK, 12, BUSBY PLACE, CAMDEN ROAD.



*




















CONTENTS.

----tHj-t-

PAGE
THE CHRONICLES OF THE THREE SISTERS (FROM
THE GERMAN). ILLUSTRATED BY CHARLES H.
BENNETT I

THE ENCHANTED DOLL. ILLUSTRATED BY RICHARD

DOYLE IOI





LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

-----

The Chronicles of the Three Sisters.

ILLUSTRATED TITLE I

INITIAL LETTER I

"HE SEES A MONSTROUS BEAR STALKING TOWARDS
HIM" 4

HE FOUND A HUNDRED- WEIGHT OF GOLD, ALL
IN DOUBLOONS" IO

"SEIZED THE BARON'S SHOULDER WITH ONE POWER-
FUL TALON, AND WITH THE OTHER CRUSHED
THE UNFORTUNATE FALCON TO DEATH" 12

SHE CROUCHED BEHIND A CLUMP OF SWEET-BRIARS 16












vi LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.




The Chronicles of the Three Sisters.PA
PAGE
"HE DISCOVERED TWO GOLDEN EGGS" I

"ROLLING THEM GENTLY ON BEFORE HIM TOWARDS
THE CASTLE" 19

"PRESUMPTUOUS MAN! WHAT ART THOU DOING
HERE .. 24

"'THE KNIGHT THEN RECEIVED THE CUP" 29

STOOD THREE NEW SACKS" 30

"MERCHANTS WHO CROWDED TO TREAT FOR THE
COSTLY PEARLS" 32

TAILPIECE 34

INITIAL LETTER 35

"SHE CLAD HERSELF IN A PILGRIM'S HABIT 37

"NURSING A LITTLE SHAPELESS CUB IN HER LAP,
WHILE A FULL-GROWN BEAR SPORTED AROUND
HER" .. .40

"LEAVE ME, I DESIRE, OR DREAD MY ANGER" 44

"LOOKING RUEFULLY TOWARDS HER" 50

"SHE GATHERED SOME BERRIES AND ACORNS. 51

THREE BEAR'S BRISTLES, AND PRESENTED THEM" 55

"A SILKEN ROPE-LADDER DESCENDED" .. 58

THREE EAGLE'S PLUMES 62

"SHE OVERTURNED THE CHOCOLATE IN AFFRIGHT" 67

"GAZING ALL THE WHILE IN SILENT ADMIRATION
WITH HIS WIDE SEA-GREEN EYES UPON HIS
BEAUTEOUS WIFE" 70









LIST OF ILLUSTRA TION.S. vii



The Chronicles of the Three Sisters. PAGE

"EMBARKING IN A GILDED BARGE, WAS ROWED TO
LAND" 75

TAILPIECE 76

INITIAL LETTER 77

"NEAR THE PORTAL WAS FEEDING A BLACK
BULL" .a 79

"WHEN INSTANTLY THERE CAME TROTTING ALONG
A POWERFUL BEAR, WHICH BEGAN A FIERCE
CONTEST WITH THE BULL" 81

"A MIGHTY EAGLE APPEARED" 82

"A LARGE FISH APPEARED ABOVE THE WAVES" 83

THE ENCHANTED KEY 84

"AND AFTER AN HOUR'S FLIGHT HIGH ABOVE THE
CLOUDS" 92

TAILPIECE I00





The Enchanted Doll.

ILLUSTRATED TITLE .. 103

INITIAL LETTER 103

"MUSHROOM THRONE" 104

"ALL GAILY DRESSED AND MARCHING 113

INITIAL LETTER 120

"HAMMERING AWAY" 121












viii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



The Enchanted Doll. PAG

"AND SAW A SWARM OF LITTLE FAIRIES BUSILY
ENGAGED IN SHAPING A LARGE BLOCK OF EBONY
INTO THE RUDE FORM OF A DOLL" 133

"THE BLACK DOLL" 137

HE SAT IN THE STOCKS". 139

INITIAL LETTER .. 140

"HE WAS JEERED AND LAUGHED AT" 142

"LADIES IN A BEAR GARDEN?" 146

THE BEAR AND THE DOGS 146

SCRATCHED THE FACE OF THE DUKE'S GENTLEMAN 149

ARRANGING HER PRETTY CURLS" J58

UNDER THE MISTLETOE". .161

PRETTY DOROTHY HAS NODDED TO HIM" 162

INITIAL LETTER 164

"AS HE DREW NEAR TO THE STILE HE SAW" 68

"A MYRIAD OF ARROWS" .

"JACOB ROARED WITH PAIN" 170

"SURROUNDED BY MYRIADS OF BATS" 173

"HE IS TO MARRY PRETTY DOROTHY KERSEY" 82

TAILPIECE-GOG AND MAGOG 189



















CHRONICLES

OF

THE THREE SISTERS.

































Illustrated

BY C. H. BENNETT.



I \















BOOK THE


FIRS T.


HOW THE RUINED BARON BARTERS AWAY HIS
THREE DAUGHTERS, WULFILDA, ADELHEID,
AND BERTHA.


HERE was a rich and
noble Baron who squan-
dered away his money
and estates, his goods
and chattels; he lived
K like a prince, kept open

house every day and all day long. Whoever pre-

sented himself, whether knight or squire of high
B


0







2 THE CHRONICLES OF


or low degree, was feasted and entertained for
three successive days, and all his guests were

sure to go contented away. His court swarmed

with comely and high-born pages, besides foot-

men and attendants in gorgeous liveries; his

stables were filled with choice horses, and his
kennels with well-bred hounds. All this extra-

vagance consumed his treasures. He mortgaged
town after town, sold his jewels and plate, and
at last turned away his servants and shot his

dogs. Of all his property and wealth there
remained only a virtuous wife, three beautiful

daughters, and an old castle, situated close by
a forest. To this castle he retired, forsaken by
all the world. The Baroness, with the help of

her three daughters, was obliged to attend to all
the household matters, and a sad mess was
made of them. The Baron was dissatisfied with








THE THR EE SISTERS. 3


his plain and wholesome fare; he grew peevish

and fretful. One fine summer's morning, in a fit

of spleen, he took up his hunting-spear and set out

for the wood, in hopes of killing a fallow deer, and

procuring for himself a more savoury meal. This

forest had long had the repute of being enchanted;

many a traveller was known to have been bewil-

dered in it, and some had never returned, having

either been strangled by malignant gnomes, or

torn in pieces by wild beasts. The Baron had

no faith in the invisible powers; he went on

boldly, crossing hill and dale, and forcing his
way through bushes and thickets, but could start

no game. Finding himself weary he sat down

under a spacious oak, took a slice or two of

bread and a little salt out of his pocket, with the

intention of eating his dinner. Before he began

he chanced to lift up his eyes, when behold

B2








4 THE CHRONICLES OF


he saw a monstrous bear stalking towards him.

The Baron shuddered at the sight; he could not

fly, and he was not pre-

pared with weapons for

bear- hunting. In his '


--~.- s --
stalking towards him.


distress he took his

hunting-spear in his

hand, and set him-

S. self in a position of

defence. The mon-

ster advanced still
He sees a monstrous bear
nearer; but at last

stopped short, and growled out intelligibly the

following salutation :-

"So you are plundering my honey-tree, auda-








THE THREE SISTERS. 5


cious robber; but be assured thy life shall pay for

thy insolence!"

"I have no intention of stealing your honey,"
answered the Baron; "I am no thief, but a true
and honourable knight. If your appetite is keen,

share my meal, I pray you, and be my guest to-
day."

But the beast disdained the Baron's fare, and
growled again in great wrath: "Do not think to
redeem thy life at so poor a purchase; but promise
me thy eldest daughter, Wulfilda, to wife this

instant, else I will eat you up."
The Baron, in the anguish of his distress, would

have promised the bear his three daughters, with

his wife into the bargain, so great was his terror,
had the brute desired them.

"She shall be yours," replied the hunter, begin-

ning to recover himself; "but only on condition








6 THE CHRONICLES OF


that you ransom and fetch her home accord-
ing to the country custom."
"A bargain! Give me your hand," replied the

bear, and held out his shaggy paw. "In seven days
I will ransom and carry home my spouse. The
sum shall be a hundred pounds weight of gold."

"Agreed, with all my heart," returned the Baron.
They then separated in peace, the bear stalking
back to his den, and the Baron, hastening out of
the terrible wood, made the best of his way to
his castle, where he arrived at starlight, weary and
out of spirits.
A bear capable of speaking and acting reasonably
can never be a natural bear, but must needs be
enchanted. And the Baron, thinking to outwit his

shaggy son-in-law, determined to fortify himself so
strongly in his castle, that the bear would not be
able to get in when he came at the appointed time








THE THREE SISTERS. 7


to fetch his bride. "Although," said he to himself,
" an enchanted bear may have the faculty of reason-

ing and speaking, he is nevertheless a bear, and
must have all the qualities of a natural bear, and
must therefore be a very undesirable son-in-law."

Next day, when the Baron related the adventure
in the wood to the Baroness and his daughters,
Wulfilda fainted away in horror, as soon as she
heard she was to be married to a frightful bear;
the mother wrung her hands ; and the sisters sobbed
and wept from fear and sympathy. 'The Baron,

however, went out and surveyed the castle walls
and moat, tried the locks and bolts of the iron
door, let down the portcullis, and raised the draw-
bridge. He then mounted to the watch-tower,

where he found a secret room under the roof; here
he shut up his daughter, who tore her golden hair,

and almost wept out her azure eyes.








8 THE CHRONICLES OF


Six days had passed, and the seventh was
dawning, when a loud noise was heard in the

direction of the wood, as though an army of

savages had been approaching with their war
whoops. The whips cracked, the horns blew, the
horses pranced, the wheels rattled. A sumptuous
stage coach, surrounded by horse-guards, rolled
forwards across 'the lawn towards the castle. All
the bolts started back, the gate flew open, the
drawbridge fell, and a young prince, fair as the

day, stepped out of the coach. He was clad in
velvet and satin, round his neck he wore a triple
chain of gold, his hat was bound with a string of

pearls and dazzling diamonds, and the button that
fixed the plume was worth a dukedom. He hurried

up the winding staircase, and in a moment the
affrighted bride was seen trembling in his arms.

The noise aroused the Baron; he opened the







THE THREE SISTERS. 9


window of his chamber, and saw horses and

chariots, knights and horsemen, in the court, and

his daughter in the arms of a stranger, who was
lifting her into the coach. As the train passed out
through the castle gate a pang pierced his heart,

and he set up a loud lamentation. "Adieu, my

daughter, dear Farewell, thou Bruin's bride!"
The Baron and Baroness were overpowered at
the loss of their daughter; they looked ruefully at

each other without speaking. The Baroness would
not believe her eyes, and concluded that the carry-
ing away was an unaccountable illusion. She
seized the key that opened the secret chamber,
but found neither her daughter nor any of her
wardrobe. But there lay on the table a silver key,

which she took up, and then looking through a

lancet window, she saw a cloud of dust arise

towards the east, and heard, the tumult and shout-








o1 THE CHRONICLES OF


ing of the bridal party until they entered the

forest. The Baroness then descended in sorrow

from the tower, put on mourning apparel, and

wept three live-long days in concert with her














"He found a hundred-weight of gold, all in doubloons."

husband and remaining daughters. On the fourth

day the Baron quitted the mourning chamber to

breathe a little fresh air, when behold, as he passed

through the court, he perceived a strong box of

ebony, locked, and very heavy to lift. He readily







THE THREE SISTERS. I


guessed the contents ; instinctively putting his hand
into his pocket he was surprised to find a key
which turned the lock, when to his further amaze-
ment he found a hundred-weight of gold, all in
doubloons, and of one coinage. In his joy at this
accession to wealth he forgot his sorrow, and in a
few days bought horses and falcons, also fine
clothes for his wife and daughters, hired servants,
and began to renew his old course of riotous
carousals, and which he continued' till the last
doubloon had made itself wings and flown out of
the strong box. He then ran into debt, and when
he had exhausted the patience of his creditors, the
sheriffs seized upon the castle and sold every-
thing the Baron possessed, except a few domestic
articles and an old hawk. The Baroness and her
daughters again took charge of the kitchen, while
the Baron traversed the fields day after day with








*12 THE CHRONICLES OF


his hawk on his hand, glad to escape the dis-
comforts of his house.

One day he loosed his hawk: and the bird rose
high in the air, nor would it return to its master's
hand, although. he. called it back. The Baron
followed it in its flight as far as he could over the
spacious plain. The bird flew towards the en-
chanted wood, which the Baron was afraid to
enter, and so gave up his old hawk for lost. On
a sudden a mighty eagle arose from out of the
wood and pursued the hawk, which was no sooner

aware of a superior enemy than it turned back to its
master for protection. But the eagle darted down
like an arrow, seized the Baron's shoulder with one
powerful talon, and with the other crushed the
unfortunate falcon to death. The affrighted Baron
tried to beat off the enraged monster with his

spear,. and struck and thrust hard at the enemy.



























o//























Is
14`
---.--- -r,< -c-- .---- -- -- ------_-__ ---__----m -_ ____^ ____---__ _


















































"SEIZED THE BARON'S SHOULDER WITH ONE POWERFUL TALON, AND WITH THE OTHER

CRUSHED THE UNFORTUNATE FALCON TO DEATH.'y-Page 12.
.I,







THE THREE SISTERS. 13


But the eagle seized the weapon, broke it like a

slender reed in two, and then screamed these words

aloud into the Baron's ear:-
"How darest thou, bold intruder, disturb my

range of air with thy sport ? Thou shalt pay for

the outrage with thy life!"

"Gently, good Eagle, gently, I pray you; do
not squeeze my shoulder so hard. 'What have I

done to you ? My hawk has suffered the punish-

ment of his rashness; satisfy your appetite."

"No, no !" rejoined the Eagle; "to-day I have

a longing for human flesh, and thou seemest a fat
and dainty morsel."
"Ah! spare me!" cried the'Baron, in distress.
"Oh! spare me, I pray thee! Ask what you will

of me, and your demand shall be satisfied, only

spare my life "

"Good !" resumed the Bird; I will take thee








14 THE CHRONICLES OF


at thy word. Thou hast two fair daughters, and I
need a wife,; promise me Adelheid, and I will let
thee go in peace. Her ransom shall be two lumps
of gold, each one hundred pounds weight. In
seven weeks I will fetch my bride home."
Having said this, he mounted aloft, and disap-
peared amongst the clouds.
In the hour of 'distress most things lose their
value, and when the father saw the sale of his
daughters brought such ample profit, he became
content with this singular disposal of his children.
He returned quite cheerful to the castle, but took
no notice of the adventure, partly to save himself
the reproaches of his wife, and partly lest he should
make his daughter unhappy before the time of the
eagle's coming.
Adelheid was the best spinster in the county;
she was, also, a skilful weaver, and had just then







THE THREE SISTERS. 15


taken from the loom a piece of costly linen, as fine

as the finest muslin, and had spread it to bleach
on a green grass plat near the castle. Six weeks

and six days had passed before the fair spinster
had any apprehension of her fate; though her
father, who grew somewhat sad at this period,
would often relate dreams that renewed the
memory of Wulfilda, who at times was quite for-

gotten. Adelheid had a light and cheerful dis-
position, and she imagined that parental love
produced these gloomy fancies in. her father.
She tripped nimbly, therefore, to her bleaching-
ground, on the day appointed for the arrival of
the eagle, and spread out her linen, that it might
receive the morning dew.

When she had arranged her bleaching-piece, and

was looking around her, she saw a gallant train of
knights and squires approaching. As she had not








16' THE CHRONICLES OF


yet.dressed her hair, she crouched behind a clump

of sweet-briars, which was now in full bloom, just







I//















raising her head, so as to see the stately cavalcade.

The finest knight among them, a slender young
^9

man, with his visor up, sprung from his horse, and,

coming towards the bushes, said in a gentle tone,-

"I come to claim thee, my love! Ah! do not







THE THREE SIS TERS. 1


hide thyself; mount up behind me, thou fair

Eagle's bride !"
Adelheid felt very strange as she heard this
address, The handsome knight pleased her well,
but the words Eagle's bride" chilled the blood in
her veins. She sank down fainting on the grass,
and on recovering found herself in the arms.

of the youthful knight, and on the road to the:
enchanted wood.
Meanwhile the Baroness, who was keeping break-
fast, missed Adelheid, and sent her youngest

daughter to see where she lingered. But, as she.
also did not return, the mother, fearing something,
amiss, went herself to. see why her daughter stayed.

so long. The Baroness went out, and came- not

back. The Baron perceived what had happened;.
his heart beat quickly in his bosom as, he walked
towards the bleachfield, where the mother and
C








18 THE CHRONICLES OF


daughter were still seeking Adelheid, and piteously

calling her by name. He joined the cry, though he

knew well search

and vociferation

were equally use-

less. He chanced

to pass by the

clump of sweet-
"- ' briars, and per-
"He discovered two golden eggs." c
ceived something

glitter. Upon closer examination, he discovered

two golden eggs, each weighing an hundred
pounds.

He could not conceal his joy but communicated

the adventure to the mother, who exclaimed,-

"Thou unnatural monster! thou murderer, and

not father! canst thou then sacrifice thy own

flesh and blood for filthy gain.?"








THE THREE SIS TERS. 19


The Baron, at other times but a poor orator, now

made an able defence, pleading in excuse the

imminent danger that threatened his life. But the

inconsolable mother still uttered the bitterest re-

proaches, and the Baron, therefore, had recourse to

his invariable practice in all conjugal altercations,

and observed a profound silence, suf-

fering the lady to proceed until she

was tired. Meanwhile he made sure

of the brace of eggs, rolling themr-















Rolling them gently on before him towards the castle."
C2








20 THE CHRONICLES OF


gently on before him towards the castle. He
then, for the sake of appearances, mourned with
his family for three days, being all the while only
intent upon renewing his former course of life.

The castle soon became, once more, the
scene of profuse revelry, and the rendezvous of
gluttons and drunkards. Balls, tournaments, and

Sumptuous feasts, had each their turn from day to
day. The younger daughter, Bertha, shone like
a bright particular star in her father's court. It
was she who distributed the prizes in the encounters
of the knights, and opened the dance every evening
with the victor.
The Baron's hospitality and Bertha's beauty at-

tracted the most distinguished knights, and many
strove to captivate the heart of the fair heiress;

but among so many wooers it was hard to decide,

and hence the beautiful Bertha was so long in







THE THREE SIS TERS. 21


inaking a choice, that the golden eggs (for the

Baron had never spared the file and the melting-

pot) were brought down to the size of hazel-nuts.

The Baron's finances soon dwindled away, and his
affairs fell into their former perplexity; the tourna-

ments were discontinued, the knights and squires
gradually dispersed, the castle again assumed the

appearance of a hermitage, and the reduced

household were once more put on potato diet and
skim milk.

The Baron again ranged the fields in ill humour,

wishing heartily for a new adventure, but met with

none, for he was afraid to enter the enchanted

forest.
One day, however, he pursued a covey of part-

ridges close to the side of the forest, and though he

durst not venture in, he followed the skirt of the

wood for some distance, and at last came to a








22 THE CHRONICLES OF


great pond, connected with a running stream, and

which he had never seen before. Within the

crystal water he perceived trouts innumerable, and

congratulated himself highly on the discovery.

The pond had a perfectly unsuspicious aspect,
so he hied him home, mended one of his old

nets, and the next morning went to the pool side
with an intention of making a cast. He luckily
found a little boat among the reeds, into which
he leaped and rowed himself into the middle of

the water, and threw his net. The first cast he
caught more trouts than he could carry, and he

rowed back to the shore well pleased with his

success.

About a stone's throw from the water's edge the
boat was suddenly checked, and then became im-
movable, as though it were aground. The Baron,
imagining that he was upon a shallow, laboured







THE THREE SISTERS. 23


with all his might to get the boat afloat again, but

it was all to no purpose. The water at length

began to run over on all sides, and yet the boat

appeared to rise gradually with the surface of the
pool, which now expanded itself into a large
lake; the waves began to curl and foam, and

the affrighted Baron perceived that he and his

boat were resting upon the back of a monstrous

fish. After a while the fish suddenly plunged

downwards, leaving the boat floating, and then

again almost instantly appeared on the surface,
opening a pair of tremendous jaws. As he

seemed about to close them upon the poor
Baron and his boat, the following words were

heard to issue from what appeared to be a dusky

cavern:-

"Presumptuous man! what art thou doing

here ? Dost thou dare to murder my subjects ?








24 THE CHRONICLES OF


Thy life this instant shall pay forfeit for thy

crime !























"Presumptuous man what art thou doing here ?"


The Baron, from his former experience in adven-

tures, knew very well by this time how he was to

conduct himself upon such occasions. He -soon







THE THREE SISTERS. 25


recovered from his first surprise, and, finding the

fish was likely to listen to reason, replied, with

great presence of mind,-
"I pray you, do not think of violating the laws
of hospitality, nor grudge me a dish of fish out of
your pool: my kitchen and cellar are very much
at your service, whenever you will do me the

honour of a visit."
"Nay, excuse me," said the monster; "we are

not yet on such an intimate footing as your words

imply. Art thou not acquainted with the right of
the stronger to eat up his weaker neighbour?
Thou hast been stealing my subjects with a view

to swallow them, and therefore I will swallow you

this instant!"
The angry fish here stretched his jaws still wider,

and seemed intent on swallowing up man and boat

at one gulp.








26 THE CHRONICLES OF


"Ah! spare me! spare my life!" cried the
Baron. "I am but a slender breakfast for you;
spare my life!"

At this exclamation the fish paused.
"Well, then," said he, "thou hast a daughter;
promise to give her to me for my wife, and take
thy life in return."
"My daughter," replied the Baron, "is perfectly
at your service; there is no refusing her under the
present circumstances. Yet you should comply
with the custom of'the country."
"I possess neither silver nor gold," replied the

fish; "but there is at the bottom of this pool an
immense store of pearl oysters; therefore you have
only to ask."

"Very well,"' replied the Baron; "three bushels
of fine pearls cannot be thought too much for a
handsome bride."







THE THREE SISTERS. 27


"The pearls are thine, and the bride mine!"
answered the fish. In seven months I will take
my sweetheart home."
He then lashed the water violently with his tail,
and drove the boat on shore.
The Baron carried his trouts home, and had
them boiled, and enjoyed the meal with his wife
and the beautiful Bertha, who little dreamed how
dear it was to cost her.
The moon went on to grow full and wane, and
at the sixth change the Baron had nearly forgotten
what had happened. But when she approached to
a circle the seventh time, he remembered his bar-
gain with the fish, and to avoid being an eye-
witness, or rather to avoid the anger of the Baron-
ess, he quitted the castle, and made a short journey
into the country.
At the sultry hour of noon, on. the day of the full








18 THE CHRONICLES OF


moon, a stately train of horsemen approached the
castle. The surprise of the Baroness at such a
cavalcade was great in the extreme, and she was

undecided whether she should open the gates, or
let down the portcullis. But when a knight she
knew well announced himself, she readily admitted
him. He had often visited the castle in the days
of plenty and festivity, and had entered the lists
both in jest and earnest, receiving many a knightly
prize, from the fair Bertha's hand, and had opened
many a dance with her. Since the Baron's mis-
fortunes, however, he had disappeared with the rest
of their friends.

The worthy lady expressed her regret to the
noble knight and his train, that her poverty pre-
vented her offering them any refreshment. He,
however, addressed her kindly, begging only a
draught of water from the cool spring which flowed








THE THREE SISTERS. 29


from a rock in the castle, for he never drank wine,

and thence had got the name of the Water-Knight.

The beautiful Bertha, at her mother's command,

hastened to the spring, filled a pitcher, and drank




I
1 -*

d6








The knight then received the cup."


to the knight out of a horn cup. The knight then

received the cup, and, setting it to his mouth at the

place where her ruby lips had pressed it, pledged

her with respectful homage.

The Baroness meanwhile was much distressed








30 THE CHRONICLES OF


that she could not offer more to her guest; but

suddenly recollecting that she had a ripe water-

melon in the garden, she hurried out and brought

back the melon, laid it upon an.earthen plate, and

garnished it with vine-leaves and sweet-smelling

flowers. On her return from the garden, however,

she found the court-yard silent and empty, not a

horse or rider could she see there. In the chamber

there was neither

S-- knight nor squire.
S"~--i 2 She called out

"Bertha," but in

,I vain; she searched

the whole house,

--s. a but no Bertha was
"Stood three new sacks." there. In theante-

chamber stood three new sacks, which she had

not seen in her first alarm; she felt them, and








THE THREE SISTERS. 31


they seemed as if they were full of peas, but her

affliction did not permit her to examine them more

closely.
She now resigned herself altogether to her dis-
tress, and lamented aloud till evening, when her
husband returned and found her in this melancholy
situation. She could not conceal from him the
adventures of the day, although she dreaded his
reproaches for admitting a strange knight into the
castle. But the Baron affectionately consoled her,
and only inquired after the sacks of peas, which he
then went out to survey, and brought one and
opened it before her. How great was the amaze-
ment of the afflicted Baroness at seeing pearls, and

nothing but pearls, as large as garden-peas, per-
fectly round, skilfully bored, and of the first water.

She perceived clearly that the lover of her daughter
had paid a pearl for every maternal tear which she








32 THE CHRONICLES OF


had shed, and hence she drew a very favourable

conclusion as to his wealth and station, consoling

herself with the reflection that this son-in-law was

no monster, but a courteous knight; a soothing

idea, of which the Baron was careful not to

bereave her.








Merchants who crowded to treat for the costly pearls."


The parents had now, indeed, lost all their beau-
tiful daughters, but they were in possession of

inexhaustible treasures. The Baron soon turned

part of them into current coin; from morning till

night the castle swarmed with merchants who

crowded to treat for the costly pearls. The Baron








THE THREE SISTERS. 33


redeemed his lands, re-established his court, and

lived no more as a spendthrift, but as a careful

economist, for he had now no other daughter to

barter for the means to supply his extrava-

gance. The Baroness, however, could never be

comforted for the loss of her daughters: she

constantly wore mourning, and seemed always

dejected. She hoped for some time that Bertha

with the Pearl Knight would return, and when-

ever a stranger was announced she gave way

to the hope that it was her son-in-law. The

Baron at last could not continue to deceive her

with false hopes, and he disclosed to her that this

illustrious son-in-law was no other than a mon-

strous fish.

"Alas !" sighed the Baroness, "what a miserable

mother I am. Have I borne children only that

they might become the prey of frightful monsters !
D







34 THE CHRONICLES OF

Ah, what avails all earthly property and wealth to
a childless mother!"
These reflections distressed her so much that
she became quite disconsolate, and no visitor
could now have proved half so welcome to her
as Death.







tooktbceirt













I








THE THREE SISTERS. 35






BOOK THE


SECOND.


HOW THE LADY OF THE BARON HAS A SON,
WHO IS NAMED RINALDO, THE SON OF
WONDER. HIS ADVENTURES BEGIN.


LL the maidens in waiting and about
the court were much affected by
Sithe sorrow of their lady; they wept
V -and lamented along with her, and
at times tried to divert her with music and
singing, but her heart was dead to enjoyment.
The damsel to whose care her private chamber
was committed was distinguished above her fel-
D 2







36 THE CHRONICLES OF


lows for sense and sedateness. Her mistress

entertained for her a great regard, for she

had a sympathising heart, and her lady's sor-

row had drawn many a tear from her eyes.
That she might not appear intrusive she had

hitherto kept silence, but could no longer resist the
internal impulse to propose her advice also.

"Gracious lady," she began, "would you but
listen to me, I could suggest to you the means of
obtaining consolation."
The Baroness desired her to say on.

"Not far, then," she resumed, "from your resi-

dence there dwells a pious hermit in a gloomy

cavern of the rock; many a pilgrim has recourse to

him in his necessity. Suppose you also were to seek

consolation and assistance from the holy man: his

prayers will at least restore peace to your bosom."

The Baroness was pleased with the proposal;









THE THREE SISTERS. 37


she clad herself in a pilgrim's habit,

walked to the pious hermit,

opened to him her distress,

presented a rosary of pearls .. -

and begged his

blessing, which

was so efficacious,

that before a year

had passed away 7
the Baroness was

relieved of her

sorrow and afflic-

tion by the birth
"She clad herself in a pilgrim's habit."
of a fine boy.

Great was the joy of the parents at the arrival

of this fair fruit of the autumn of their old age.

The whole barony was converted into a scene

of exultation, rejoicings, and jubilee, for the birth







38 THE CHRONICLES OF


of an heir. The father named him Rinaldo,

the Son of Wonder.

The boy was beautiful as love himself, and his

education was conducted with great care. He

grew up the joy of his father and the consolation

of his mother, who guarded him as the apple of
her eye. Though he was the darling of her heart,

she did not lose the memory of her daughters:

often as she pressed the little smiling Rinaldo in
her arms, a tear would drop upon his cheek, and

when the dear boy grew older he would sorrowfully

ask, My good mother, why do you weep ?"
Though she carefully suppressed the occasion of

her secret sorrow, Rinaldo at last, by a thousand

coaxing arts, wound the secret from his mother.

She told him the adventures of his three sisters,

and he laid up every syllable of the wonderful
story in his heart. He felt no other wish but to be








THE THREE SISTERS. 39


of an age to carry arms, that he might sally forth,

seek his sisters in the enchanted forest, and break
the spell that held them there.

As soon as he was dubbed knight he asked his
father's permission to make a campaign, as he pre-

tended, to Flanders. The Baron was rejoiced at
the knightly courage of his son, furnished him with

armour and horses, squires and servants to carry
his baggage, and dismissed him with his blessing,
notwithstanding the mother's unwillingness to con-

sent to his departure.
Scarce had the young knight turned his back
upon his native place when he quitted the high
road, and full of chivalric courage made his way to

the castle near the wood, where he was honourably

entertained by his father's vassal. Early in the

morning, when everything in the castle was sunk

in deep sleep, he saddled his horse, left his train







40 THE CHRONICLES OF


behind, and galloped to the enchanted forest. The

deeper he penetrated into it the thicker it became,

and the stony road re-echoed to his horse's hoofs.
All around him was waste and wild: the trees

seemed, by growing close to one another, to oppose

the passage of the young adventurer. He dis-

mounted, and leaving his horse to graze, cut a

road through the forest with his sword, climbed up
precipices, and slided down chasms. After much
toil he arrived at a valley watered by a crystal

brook; following the windings of the stream he

saw at a distance the entrance to a subterraneous

cavern, in the front of which laid something that

had the appearance of a human figure. The un-

daunted youth at the sight quickened his steps,

and, peeping between the lofty oaks; perceived a
beautiful lady sitting on the grass nursing a little

shapeless cub in her lap, while a full-grown














-A) t



-7-S
--~- c ',/I->~







Z, -4 w


/ '- A L
'f3 i~ '7c c 77 -p









\,th,
..._ x--'k% M3
" Z. - <' ,../ .








,'L - #_. A.
-. ~~~j I u -,,-







-- .- .*




























"NURSING A LITTLE SHAPELESS CUB IN HER LAP, WHILE A FULL-GROWN BEAR SPORTED
AROUND HER."-Page 40.








THE THREE SISTERS. 41


Bear sported around her, sometimes standing on

his hind-legs, dancing and tumbling, by which the

lady seemed highly amused, until, being ignorant

of the proximity of the stranger, the Bear went

his way.

Rinaldo knew, from his mother's description,

that the lady was his sister Wulfilda, and he came

from his lurking-place in order to make himself

known to her. But as soon as she was aware of

his presence she gave a loud shriek, threw the

young bear into the grass, moved hastily forward

towards Rinaldo as he approached, and cried out

in a sorrowful voice, and with apparent anxiety:-

"What ill-fated star leads thee into this wood,

O noble youth ? Here dwells a wild Bear, who

devours every human creature that approaches his

den. Fly, and save thyself!"

He bowed respectfully before the beautiful








42 THE CHRONICLES OF


speaker, and answered: "Be not afraid, dear lady.
I know this forest and all its dangers, and am come

hither to rescue you from the spell which holds you

in captivity."

"And who art thou," she asked, "who darest
adventure to break this mighty spell, and how

canst thou accomplish it ?"

"With this arm and by this sword. I am
Rinaldo, surnamed the 'Son of Wonder'; my
father is the Baron whom this wood.has robbed of

three fair daughters. Art not thou Wulfilda, his

first-born ?"

This speech amazed the lady still more, and she

regarded her brother with silent admiration. He

made use of this pause to identify himself by so

many family particulars, that she could no longer

doubt that Rinaldo was her brother. She em-
braced him tenderly, but her knees trembled on








THE THREE SIS TERS. 43


account of the imminent danger that threatened
his life. She conducted him into the cavern, and

pointed out an inner cavern where he could conceal
himself. In the outer cave lay a heap of moss,
which served the bear and his cub to lie upon;
opposite stood a sumptuous bed, with hangings of

red damask for the lady.

Scarcely had the adventurous Rinaldo got into

his place of refuge when the dreadful bear came

growling into the cavern, and snuffed all round
with his snout. He had winded the noble steed
belonging to the knight, and just devoured him.
Wulfilda sat upon her state bed as uneasy as if

she had been upon burning coals. Her heart was

oppressed and faint, for she perceived that her

bearish lord and master was in a bad humour,
probably being aware of the stranger in his den.

She did not cease caressing him, she stroked his








44 THE CHRONICLES OF


back gently down, and rubbed his ears with her?

velvet hand; but the intractable Bear paid small

attention to her caresses.
















SLeave me, I desire, or dread my anger !"


"I smell human flesh," murmured the ravenous

creature from his capacious throat.

My dear Bear," replied the lady, "thou

art mistaken; how is it possible that a human

being would venture into this dreary desert ?"







THE THREE SISTERS. 45


"I scent human flesh," repeated the Bear, and

peeped about the bed of his spouse.

The young knight, who overheard what was

said, felt a cold sweat, in spite of his courage,

break out on his forehead. Her brother's danger,

however, made the lady bold and resolute.

"Dear Bear," said she, "you begin to grow

troublesome, and I beg of you to leave me. Leave

me, I desire, or dread my anger! "

The Bear, however, disregarded her threat, and

went on snuffing about the hangings of the bed.
Nevertheless, Bear as he was, he was still under

subjection to his wife; and at last Wulfilda took

courage, and gave him such a thrust in the loins

that he crept away with great humility to his
straw, and lying down, began, after the manner of

his kind, to suck his paws and lick his cub, growl-

ing all the time. Soon after he fell asleep, and







46 THE CHRONICLES OF


snored as only a bear can snore. Hearing this,
the tender sister refreshed her brother with a cup

of clear water and some fruit, desiring him to be

of good cheer, for now the chief danger was over.
Rinaldo was so weary from his adventure, that

he fell into a deep sleep, and snored as loud as if

he had been snoring with his brother-in-law for a

wager. On awaking next morning, he found
himself in a gorgeous bed of state; his chamber

was hung with silken tapestry; near the bed lay
his clothes and armour; and on a stool, covered

with velvet, there was a silver bell to summon the

servants. Rinaldo had no idea how he had been

translated out of a dreary cavern into a sump-

tuous palace, and was in doubt whether he

was now dreaming, or had dreamed before of
the adventure in the wood. To solve the diffi-

culty he rung the bell. A servant in splendid







THE THREE SISTERS. 47


livery came to inquire what he would please to

have, and mentioned that his sister Wulfilda, and

Albert the Bear, were expecting him with im-

patience.

The young Baron was more and more over-

whelmed with astonishment, and, dressing himself

quickly, he went into the antechamber, where he

found noble pages, valets, and livery servants in

waiting, and then proceeded, through a series of

state chambers, to the audience-room, where his

sister received him with the dignity of a princess.

She had beside her a noble-looking youth, about
seventeen years old, and a charming girl, some

year or so younger. A moment afterwards came
in Albert the Bear, who had now cast off his fright-

ful shaggy appearance, as well as the attributes of

a bear, and assumed the form of the most amiable

prince in the world. Wulfilda presented her







48 THE CHRONICLES OF


brother, and Albert embraced his relation with all

the warmth of friendship and brotherly love.

Wulfilda then informed her brother that the prince

her husband, with all his subjects, had been en-

chanted for so many days by the malicious sorcerer
of the wood. Once every week, from the dawn of

one day to the next, he was released from his en-

chantment; but as soon as the silver stars in the

firmament began to fade, the castle then changed

into a craggy rock, the charming park around into
a dreary desert, the springs and cascades into

stagnant unwholesome pools, the prince himself

into a shaggy bear, the knights and squires into

badgers and polecats, whilst the maids of honour

took the shape of owls and bats, moaning and

shrieking all the day long.

It vas on a day of disenchantment, and not, as

it happens in common life, of enchantment, that







THE THREE SISTERS. 49


Albert carried home his bride. The fair Wulfilda,

who had for six days wept over her fate in being
married to a shaggy bear, laid aside her sorrows at

finding herself, on the seventh, wife of a handsome
and youthful prince, who embraced her with much
affection, and led her into a glorious palace, where
a splendid bridal procession awaited her. She was
received by beautiful damsels, crowned with gar-
lands of myrtle, singing and playing, and clad in
splendid robes. Though she was far from vain, yet

she could but feel some secret exultation. A
sumptuous feast succeeded the marriage, ceremony,
and a ball closed the solemnities of the festive

day.
In the morning the bride awoke, but what was

her surprise when she found no husband by her
side, and, on drawing the curtain, saw herself

transported into a dusky vault, where the day gave







50 THE CHRONICLES OF


her only light enough to perceive a frightful bear,

looking ruefully towards her from a dark corner.

She sunk back upon
the bed, and swooned

'. la. away in affright. After
S~a long interval she
came to herself, and

in her distress uttered

a loud scream, which
the shrill voices of a

Lokiig ruefully towards her. hundred owls returned
from without. The

sympathising Bear could not endure to be a spec-
tator of her alarm and distress, so, with a heavy

heart, he left his lair, and went out into the wood,

whence he did not return till the seventh day, the

day before his transmutation. The six intervening
days seemed years to the unhappy lady.







THE THREE SISTERS. 51


In the bridal festivity, it had been forgotten to

provide the apartments of the bride with provi-

sions and refreshments, for the charm had not

power over inanimate things immediately in con-

tact with the fair Wulfilda. For the first two days













"She gathered some berries and acorns."


Wulfilda had not cared to eat or drink; but at

last nature demanded support, and she went out

in search of sustenance, as no food of any kind

could be found in the cavern. She took a little

water in the hollow of her hand from the brook

E2







52 THE CHRONICLES OF


that murmured by, and refreshed her parched and
burning lips. She gathered some berries and

acorns; she brought them into the cavern almost
by instinct, as she longed far more ardently to
die than to live.
With this wish in her heart, she went to sleep on
the sixth day, and awoke early in the morning in
the very chamber she had entered on her bridal
night. She found everything just as she had left
it, and by her side the most beautiful and hand-
some of husbands, who testified in the most
touching manner his sorrow for her sad situation,
to which his irresistible passion had reduced her,
and with tears in his eyes begged for her forgive-
ness. He explained to her the nature of the spell
-how every seventh day destroyed its power, and
restored everything to its natural form. Wulfilda
was touched by the tenderness of her husband;








THE THREE SISTERS. 53


she considered that her married lot might still be

happy, as every seventh day was to be a bright
one, and the happiest marriage was sure to have

its clouds. She therefore resigned herself to her
fate, and made her Albert the happiest Bear under

the sun.

The happy day of disenchantment passed but

too rapidly. After dinner the courtiers walked

with the ladies in the park, and amused themselves

with sports and gallantry, till the trumpet sounded
for supper, which was served in a gallery sur-

rounded by mirrors, and illuminated by innu-

merable wax-lights. The company ate, drank, and

were merry until midnight, and then Albert whis-

pered in his wife's ear, who thereupon took her

brother on one side, and, in a mournful voice, thus

addressed him,-

"My dear brother, we must part; the hour of








54 THE CHRONICLES OF


change is at hand, when this beautiful palace will
vanish. Albert is concerned for thee; he fears for
thy life. He will not be able to resist the brutal
instinct of his bearish nature, which will prompt

him to devour thee, shouldst thou here await the
approaching change. Leave, then, this dreadful
forest, and never' more return to us "
"No, my dear sister!" replied Rinaldo; I
cannot leave you! To seek thee, my sister, was
the purpose for which I left our home; and, now I
have found thee, never will I leave this wood
without thee! Tell me how I can dissolve this
wicked spell ?"
Albert having heard this resolve of his brother-
in-law, pressed him with so much earnestness to
desist from his purpose, that at last, in compliance
with the request of his brother, and the tears and
entreaties of his sister, Rinaldo prepared for his








THE THREE SISTERS. 55


departure. Albert affectionately embraced the
valiant youth, and when he had kissed his sister,
and was on the ,-- .
eve of departing,
Albert took from
his bosom three ,

bear's, bristles, and

presented them to
the young knight.
Do not de- "Three bear's bristles, and presented them."

spise these trifles. Should you ever be in distress
and want assistance, rub these bristles between
your hands and await the consequences."
In the court stood a noble horse, with a num-
ber of mounted attendants. "Adieu, my brother,"
cried Albert the Bear; "hasten to be gone, I im-
plore you."
"Adieu, my brother," returned Rinaldo, the Son








56 THE CHRONICLES OF


of Wonder, and the horses' hoofs rattled over the

drawbridge.

The golden stars still twinkled bright in the

heavens, the cavalcade proceeded at full speed over

the stocks and stones, up hill and down, through

woods and wildernesses, meadows and fields.

After a good hour's riding the sky-began to turn

grey, and on a sudden all the torches went out.

Rinaldo found himself roughly thrown to the

ground, and knew not how it happened; the whole

cavalcade had vanished, but he perceived a number

of glow-worms hurry away to the enchanted wood.

The undaunted knight now could easily explain

the adventure, and waited patiently for sun-rise;

and as he was still within the enchanted precincts,

he determined to seek for his two younger sisters,

although he might not succeed in breaking the

spells which he believed held them also in thrall.
L. I
k*







THE THREE SIS TERS. 57


For three days he wandered to no purpose about
the thicket, nor did any adventure fall in his way.
He had just consumed the last remains of a cake
brought from the table of his brother Albert the
Bear, when he heard something rustle high over his
head in the air, just like a ship in full sail cutting
through the waves. He looked up and perceived a
mighty eagle descending into its nest, which was

built on the side of a rugged rock. Rinaldo was
rejoiced at this discovery; he concealed himself in
the brushwood, and watched till the eagle should
take wing again. In seven hours the bird quitted
the nest, and then Rinaldo quitted his hiding-
place and called out, "Adelheid, my beloved sister,
if thou dwellest on this rock answer me, I pray.
I am thy brother Rinaldo, the Son of Wonder. I
am seeking thee, in hopes of breaking the wicked
spell that hath power over thee."








58 THE CHRONICLES OF


I When he had

Done speaking, a

soft female voice

From above, as if

from the clouds, re-

plied: "If thou art
Rinaldo, the Son of

Wonder, thou art

welcome to thy sis-

ter Adelheid. Make

"' '"i haste hither, climb

up, and embrace the
solitary mourner."

Rejoiced at this

kind invitation, the

knight attempted

Sr to climb the rock;

but in vain. As he
"A silken rope-ladder descended."
mnsome







THE THREE SIS TERS. 59


was anxiously meditating on the means of ascend-

ing, a silken rope-ladder descended, by the help of
which he soon reached the eyry of the Eagle,
which he found was spacious and firmly built. His
sister was seated under a canopy, covered against
the weather with waxed cloth, and lined within

with rose-coloured satin. The meeting on both
sides was very tender; as Adelheid had an exact
acquaintance with her father's family affairs, she
knew that Rinaldo had been born after she was
carried away.
Edgar the Eagle, her husband, was enchanted
by weeks: every seventh week he was free from
the power of the spell. In this interval he had
often in disguise visited the court of his father-in-
law, 'and brought intelligence from time to time of
the Baron and his family. Adelheid invited her

brother to stay until the next change, to which he








60 THE CHRONICLES OF


willingly consented, though the term was now six

weeks. She concealed him in the hollow of the
rock, and fed him daily with coarse food, always

leaving him with this admonition:-
"As thou values thy life, keep from Edgar's

eagle-eye. Should he see thee, thou art lost; he
will tear out thy eyes, and eat thy heart, as he
yesterday served.three of thy squires." .
Rinaldo shuddered when he heard the fate of
his servants, and promised to take good care
of himself; and thus continued to abide in the

hollow rock for six long and tedious weeks.

He enjoyed, however, the satisfaction of chatting
with his sister whenever the Eagle took his flight

abroad.
He was abundantly recompensed for his trial of
patience by seven joyous days; as he was received
with as much cordiality by his brother the Eagle,







THE THREE SISTERS. 61


as he had before been by his brother the Bear.

Edgar's castle, court, and all accessories, were just
the same as those he had quitted; every day was a

festival, and the time of the fatal change came on

but too quickly. On the evening of the seventh

day Edgar dismissed his guest with the tenderest

embraces, but warned him at the same time not to
come near his chace.

"Shall I," said Rinaldo, sorrowfully, "part from
you for ever, my dear friends ? Is it impossible to
burst the fatal spell which holds you here in cap-
tivity ? Had I a hundred lives to lose, I would
risk them all to redeem you."
Edgar affectionately pressed his hand. "Thanks,
generous youth, for your love and devotion, but

abandon the rash attempt; it is indeed possible to
break our enchantment, but you must not, shall

not, attempt to do so. Whoever makes the trial







62 7HE CHRONICLES OF


in vain, loses his life, and you shall not be sacrificed

for us."

Rinaldo's youthful courage was but the more

incited to attempt the adventure; his eyes sparkled

with eagerness, a ray of sanguine hope brightened

his face. He pressed his brother Edgar to reveal

the secret, and instruct him how to dissolve the

spell; but Edgar refused to gratify him, for fear of

exposing the life of

the gallant youth.

"All I dare say.is,
that you must find the
key of the charm, if

you are to succeed' in
breaking it. If you
"Three eagle's plumes."
are fated to be our

deliverer, the stars will show you the way to find

it; if not, your attempt would be folly."







THE THREE SIS TERS. 63


On this he drew out of his bosom three eagle's

plumes, and gave them as a token of remembrance

to the knight; telling him, that whenever he was
in distress, he was to rub them between his fingers

and await the consequences.
They then took a friendly leave, Edgar's seneschal

and-courtiers attending Rinaldo through a long walk,

planted with pines and yews, as far as the bounds of

the chace ; and when he had crossed them his atten-

dants hastily shut a huge door, and were seen no more.

Rinaldo sorrowfully seated himself under a large

oak; the full moon shone bright and clear, and he
yet saw the turrets of his sister's castle rising above
the lofty trees. At dawn he was enveloped in a

thick mist, and as soon as this had been dispersed

by the rising sun, castle, park, and huge door had
all vanished; and he found himself in a dreary

desert on the edge of a precipice, from which he







64 THE CHRONICLES OF


looked down into a dark abyss. The young knight
searched around for a way to depart, and discern-
ing afar off a lake whose unruffled surface was
sparkling with the reflection of the sun, he made
for it; but as he walked on, wild bushes and lofty
trees sprung up on every side, and the lake
vanished before his eyes. Towards sunset, how-
ever, he again saw. the surface of the water glim-
mering through the trees, and the underwood grew
thinner; yet he could not reach the shore before
the fall of night. He laid down under a forest
tree, and did not awake until the sun stood high

in the heavens. He found himself refreshed by
sleep, and his limbs restored to their full vigour;

and springing nimbly up he walked along the
shore, devising how to obtain an interview with his
sister, who he now felt assured inhabited the lake.
In vain he raised his voice and called to her:-







'THE THREE SISTERS. 65


Bertha, dear sister, if thou dwellest in this pool,

answer me. I am Rinaldo, surnamed the Son of

Wonder. I am seeking thee, to break the spell,

and redeem thee from thy watery prison."

He received no answer, except from the sur-

rounding echoes. My dear fishes," he proceeded,

as shoals of spotted trout swam to the margin of

the lake, and seemed to gaze at the young stranger,

"say to your mistress that her brother is waiting

for her on the shore."

But Rinaldo perceived that he was'pleading to

the fishes in vain. As an accomplished knight he

was expert in all exercises; he could swim like a

water-rat, therefore he doffed his armour, but

his bright sword he kept in his hand; and

without removing his undercoat of quilted silk,

plunged boldly into the waves in search of his

sister Bertha. "Her husband," he thought, "will
F








66 THE CHRONICLES OF


not swallow me up directly, but say a civil word
first, as he did by my father."

He pursued his watery way without meeting
any adventure; but as he began to tire he looked

towards the shore, and saw a thin mist ascend near
him, and which seemed to rise from a large mass
of ice. He swam with all his might to take a

nearer view of the phenomenon; and a pillar of

mountain crystal projected out of the water,
seemingly hollow, as there arose out of it a re-
freshing balsamic scent, with little curls of vapour,
which the breeze spread over the surface of the
water. The adventurous swimmer conjectured
that this might be the entrance of the subter-
raneous dwelling of his sister; he therefore ven-
tured down it. It led direct into the chamber of
the beautiful Bertha, who was just then employed
in boiling her chocolate over a little fire of sandal-







THE THREE SISTERS. 67


wood. On hearing the noise, and seeing a strange

knight enter her chamber, she overturned the cho-
colate in affright, and then fainted away; but

(I,




i11n11'1




i,!






She overturned the chocolate in affright."

Rinaldo shook her gently until she came to herself,

When a little recovered, she said, in a low tone:-

"Unfortunate man! whoever thou art, how

darest thou attempt to enter this subterranean
F2








68 THE CHRONICLES OF


abode? Art thou ignorant that this audacity will
cost thee thy life ?"

"Fear nothing, my dear," replied the dauntless

knight. "I am thy brother Rinaldo, surnamed

the Son of Wonder, who willingly braves danger

or death to rescue his beloved sister from the

wicked spell in which she is bound."
Bertha tenderly embraced her brother, her deli-
cate frame trembling all the while. The Dolphin,

Ufo, her husband, had also visited her father's
court at different times unknown; and he knew
that Rinaldo had gone in quest of his sisters. He

had often lamented the rash undertaking of the
young man; For," said he, "if brother Bear

should not devour him, or brother Eagle not pick
out his eyes, yet I, the Dolphin, may not be able
to resist swallowing him. And shouldst thou, my

dear, even clasp him in thy arms to protect him, I







THE THREE SISTERS. 69


should dash thy crystal dwelling to pieces, so that
the waters would rush in and drown thee."

The beautiful Bertha repeated all this to her
brother, but he replied, ".Canst not thou hide me
from the monster as thy sisters did, that I may re-

main here until the cessation of the enchantment ?"
"Alas!" replied she, "how can I hide thee?
See'st thou not that this habitation is of crystal, so
that its walls are as transparent as glass ?" .
At last, however, she remembered that there was
a pile of wood, and Rinaldo cheerfully accepted
this place of refuge, which his sister arranged as
a beaver constructs his subterraneous lodgings.
When Rinaldo was. concealed, Bertha repaired to
her toilet, set herself off as handsomely as possible,
selecting the gown she thought best calculated to

display her elegant shape, and then proceeded to

the presence-chamber...








70 THE CHRONICLES OF


Now, during the period of enchantment, Ufo the
Dolphin could enjoy the society of his amiable

spouse no further than by making her a visit
daily; looking from without into the crystal
house, and feeding upon the sight of her beauty
Scarce had the charming Bertha taken her station,

when the enormous fish came swimming towards
her; the water was heard to roar from afar, and

the waves curled in circles round the crystal
palace.
The monster rested without, before the chamber,

drawing in streams of water and spouting them out
again from his capacious nostrils, gazing all the
while in silent admiration with his wide sea-green

eyes upon his beauteous wife. However much
Bertha strove to affect an air of unconcern, she was
not able to hide her anxiety; hypocrisy and cun-
ning were quite foreign to her; her heart fluttered















Ij


-_-------












_i ,













GAZING ALL THE WHILE IN SILENT ADMIRATION WITH HIS WIDE SEA-GREEN 'EYES UPON
HIS BEAUTEOUS WIFE."-Pag'e 70.








'THE THREE SISTERS. 71


arid beat, her bos6m heaved, her cheeks would

glow and suddenly turn pale again. The Dolphin,
for all his gross fishy nature, had still so much
physiognomical perception, that he concluded from
these signs there was some foul play, and he made
angry questions, shooting away like an arrow, and
encircling the place, raising such a disturbance in
the waters that the crystal dwelling trembled
throughout, and the terrified Bertha believed that
he would dash it to pieces. The excited Dolphin
could not, however, discover anything, and he be-
came gradually more quiet. Luckily his motions
had so muddied the water that he could not
perceive the alarm of the anxious Bertha, so he

swam away.
Rinaldo kept quite still among the wood till

the time of transformation; and although to all

appearance brother Dolphin had dismissed his








72 THE CHRONICLES OF


suspicions, he never failed at his daily visit to swim
thrice round the crystal dwelling, although he

never behaved so outrageously as at first.
The hour of change at length delivered the
patient prisoner from his uncomfortable conceal-
ment. One morning when he awoke he found
himself in a royal palace situated on a small island.
Buildings, ,pleasure-grounds, market-places, every-
thing in short, seemed to float on the water. A
hundred gilded barges passed and re-passed each
other, and the castle of brother Dolphin was re-

flected as in a mirror. The reception of the young

knight was just as friendly here as at the two
former courts. Ufo was enchanted by months-
every seventh month the spell ceased: from one
full moon to the next, all things went on in their

natural train.- As Rinaldo's residence here was
longer, he became better acquainted with .his







THE THREE SISTERS. 73


brother Ufo, and contracted a warm friendship

with him.
Rinaldo's curiosity to know how the three
princes had been reduced to the unnatural state of
enchantment had -been long painful to him;. he,

therefore, inquired eagerly of his sister Bertha, but
she could give him no satisfaction on the point,
and Ufo preserved a mysterious silence. Rinaldo,
therefore, could not gratify his curiosity. Mean-
while the days of disenchantment hurried swiftly
away; the moon lost her silvery horns, and ac-
quired a rounder shape, which foretold her wane.
During an evening walk, Ufo gave his brother-in-
law Rinaldo to understand that the time of separa-

tion would arrive in a few hours: he recommended
him earnestly to return to his parents, who were. in
great affliction upon his account: his mother had
been inconsolable ever since it was known that he







74 7HE CHRONICLES OF


had not gone to Flanders, but to the enchanted
forest, in quest of adventures.

Rinaldo made no reply to Ufo's entreaties, but
asked if the wood contained other adventures, and

learned that there was only one more, of which

he had heard already-to seek the key of the
enchantments, and destroy the powerful talisman;

for as long as the spell was in force there was no

deliverance to be hoped for by the princes.
But," added Ufo, solemnly, "follow good coun-
sel, my dear brother; be satisfied with what you

have already achieved; depart, and acquaint your

parents with all you have seen and heard. Rescue,

by your return, your good mother from the sorrow

which oppresses her on your account."

Rinaldo appeared to listen to his brother's advice,

but he had resolved to continue his adventures.

Ufo easily discerned on what Rinaldo's mind








THE THREE SISTERS. 75


was bent. He, therefore, took out of a pouch

three fish-scales, saying :-

When hereafter you may want help, rub these

quickly in your hand until they become warm, and

await the consequence."

Rinaldo then took his leave, and, embarking in

a gilded barge, was rowed to land by four liveried








Embarking in a gilded barge, was rowed to land."


boatmen. He was scarcely ashore, when the

castle, gardens, and buildings disappeared: and of

all this glory there remained but a fish-pond, sur-

rounded by tall reeds, which were shaken by the

chilly morning breeze. The knight found himself







76 THE CHRONICLES OF


upon the spot where, some months before, he had
plunged in the water; his shield and armour lay
still where he had left them. Pressing the cross

handle of his sword to his lips, he vowed never to

rest till he had possessed himself of the key of the

spell which bound his kindred.







THE THREE SISTERS. 77





BOOK THE


THIRD.

RINALDO, THE SON OF WONDER, CONTINUES
HIS ADVENTURES IN SEARCH OF THE SPELL
WHICH ENCHANTS HIS KINDRED.

M f, ^ HO shall guide my
footsteps to the path
-'-5~)B, that leads to the most
wonderful of adven-
Stures in the enchanted
.forest ? Ye benefi-
cent powers, look down propitious! and if a son of
earth may break the mighty spell, 0! let me be
the fortunate mortal!"







78 THE CHRONICLES OF


Thus exclaimed Rinaldo, as he pursued, in deep

thought, the path far into the wood. For seven

long days he roamed, without fear or apprehension,

through the endless windings; seven nights he slept

under the canopy of heaven, so that his bright

armour was rusted by the dews. On the eighth

day he advanced to the edge of a projecting rock,

whence he could look down into the inhospitable

defiles. Sideways there opened a vale, covered

with evergreen creepers, and enclosed by rocks of

granite, over which waved the melancholy cypress.

In the distance he thought he could perceive a

monument of human design and construction.

Two gigantic pillars of marble, with capitals and

pedestals of brass, supported a huge ebony beam,

which rested against a precipice, overshadowing a

steel door, secured with strong bolts and bars.

Near the portal was feeding a black bull, whose

.. __ -








THE THREE SISTERS. 79


watchful sparkling eyes seemed to indicate that he
had charge of the entrance. Rinaldo doubted not







---w
AI






Near the portal was feeding a black bull."


that he had found the adventure mentioned by his
brother, Ulf the Dolphin, and immediately re-
solved to attempt it. Down he clambered from

the ridge of the rocks into the vale. He had ap-

Proached within an arrow-shot before the bull







80 THE CHRONICLES OF


observed him; but, now that he did so, he sprang

up fiercely, galloped in great fury around, like an

Andalusian bull preparing to encounter the Torre-
ador, and snuffed against the ground, so that great

clouds of dust arose; he stamped till the earth
shook; and then, striking the rocks with his head
and horns, shivered the hard stone into fragments.
The knight threw himself into an attitude of de-
fence, and, as the bull ran at him, he avoided his

deadly horns by a quick turn, giving the neck of

the beast so violent a blow with his sword, that he
thought he must have severed the head from the
trunk; but, alas, the neck of the bull was invul-

nerable to steel or iron; the sword was shivered

into a thousand pieces, and the knight retained

only the hilt in his hand. He had now nothing to
defend himself with but a spear of ash, armed with
a two-edged point of steel; but this also broke








THE THREE SISTERS. 8


upon the second assault, like a blade of straw.

The bull caught the defenceless youth upon his

horns, and tossed him aloft in the air, waiting to

gore him as he fell, or to trample him under his

feet. Happily Rinaldo caught between the spread-

ing branches of a tree, which, holding him,

rescued him from death. Although every bone in

his body seemed to have suffered, he retained suffi-

cient presence of mind to hold fast by the tree;

for the raging bull butted so violently against the

stem with his brazen front, that the roots were
loosened, and the tree nodded to his fall.

As the infuriated beast turned back to charge

again, Rinaldo bethought himself of the presents

of his brothers. Accident brought to his hand the

packet of the three bear's bristles: he rubbed them

violently together, when instantly there came

trotting along a powerful bear, and began a fierce
G






8 2 THE CHRONICLES OF


contest with the bull. The bear soon prevailed,

laid the bull on his back, and tore him to pieces.

Whilst this dismemberment proceeded, a duck

flew out from the interior of the dead bull, and

flew away, screaming

loudly. Rinaldo guess-
S"--- ed that the duck mock-

ed the victory attained

S -by the bear, and carried

Saway the magic spell;
he therefore took out

instantly the three

A mighty Eagle appeared." plumes, and rubbed
them between his

hands. On this a mighty Eagle appeared high

in the air; and the wily duck instantly alighted,

squatting close among the bushes, the Eagle hover-
ing at an immense height above. The knight,








THE THREE SISTERS. 83


observing this, endeavoured to rouse the duck, and

pursued it until the undergrowth was thinner, and,

as it could no longer conceal itself, it arose, and

directed its flight towards the pool, but the eagle,

darting down, seized and tore it to pieces with its

mighty talons. In dying, the duck dropped a

golden egg into the pool.

NV








"A large fish appeared above the waves."

Rinaldo knew at once how to meet this new

difficulty. He instantly rubbed the scales between

his hands, and a large fish appeared above the

waves. The fish, which had caught the egg in his

G 2







84 THE CHRONICLES OF


capacious jaws, now threw it on shore. At this

Rinaldo jumped for joy; he struck the golden egg

with a stone, it parted in two, and a little key fell

out, which he recognized in triumph as the key of

the enchantment. He now

hurried back to the steel por-
w /_ IJ tal. The dwarf key seemed

little suited to the giant pad-
The enchanted key.
lock ; however, he did not

hesitate to try it, and scarce had it touched the

lock when it was loosened, the ponderous iron

bars drew back of their own accord, and the steel

portal unclosed.

He quickly descended into the duskycavern which

presented itself. Seven doors led to seven subter-

raneous apartments, all sumptuously furnished and

gloriously illuminated with many-coloured lights.

Rinaldo, having traversed them all, came at








THE THREE SISTERS. 85


last to a closet, where he beheld a young lady
lying on a sofa in a magic sleep. He strove to
awake her, but, alas, he could not. This affecting
spectacle at once created in his heart the sensation

of love, and he stood gazing at her without being
capable of word or motion.

When Rinaldo had a little recovered himself,
he looked round, and saw, right opposite the sleep-
ing beauty, an alabaster table, on which was en-
graven a number of unknown characters. He
guessed that the talisman which directed the spells
of the enchanted wood was engraved upon this
table, and in the indignation of the moment, he
clenched his fist, armed as it was with an iron

glove, and struck with all his force upon the table.

Immediately the beautiful sleeper awoke, and
having cast an affrighted look towards the table,

fell back again into a profound sleep.




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