• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Janet's boots
 The flower garden
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: "Star of hope" series
Title: Janet's boots
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055319/00001
 Material Information
Title: Janet's boots
Series Title: "Star of hope" series
Physical Description: 64 p., 1 leaf of plates : col. ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Prentiss, E ( Elizabeth ), 1818-1878 ( Author, Primary )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Printer )
Camden Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co.
Place of Publication: London
New York
Manufacturer: Dalziel Brothers ; Camden Press
Publication Date: 1887
 Subjects
Subject: Girls -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Obedience -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Truthfulness and falsehood -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Pride and vanity -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Flowers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's parties -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Mothers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by the author of "Finette" ; with coloured frontispiece.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055319
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002232168
notis - ALH2560
oclc - 68663711

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title
    Janet's boots
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    The flower garden
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



























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9











JANET'S BOOTS.




BY THE AUTHOR OE "FINETTE."




WITH COLOURED FRONTISPIECE.











LONDON AND NEW YORK:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO
1887.
















JANET'S BOOTS.



T was about seven o'clock on a fine
evening in May, and Janet Holden
was just putting away her lesson

books; the school-room at Stanmore was very
cheerful-looking, and particularly did it appear
so on the evening of which I am writing. Janet
and her governess, Miss Simpson, had finished
tea, the lessons for the next day were learnt, and
the little girl was just preparing to go down to
her papa and mamma.
"Oh, Miss Simpson," she exclaimed, before
T-2






Janet's Boots.


leaving the room, "you must come down with
me to-night, please do, for mamma is going to
try on my dress for Aunt Caroline's party, and
you must see it."
AI., Simpson often stayed upstairs in the
school-room in the evening, instead of going
down with Janet, as she liked to be quiet, and
to write her letters or read; so she answered,
I certainly should like to stc your new frock,
dear; but don't you think you could come up
here wnen you have it on, and let me see it ? "
Oh, yes, that will do nicely," answered
Janet: I will come up here if mamma will
allow me; and if not," she added, "you will
come down if I call you-now do say you will,
dear Miss Simpson, pray do."
Miss Simpson promised to come if necessary,
and Janet went downstairs.






Janet's Boots.


The frock was tried on that evening, and gave
very great satisfaction both to Janet and to her
governess. It was settled that Janet and her
mother should leave for Bexworth-for that was
the name of th2 place where Janet's aunt lived
-the next day at twelve o'clock, and they were
to take Miss Simpson with them as far as the
station, as she was going home for a few days.
Bexworth was sixteen miles from Stanmore,
so Mrs. Holden and her little girl were to stay
all night at Lady Caroline's, and return to Stan-
more on the following day.
The next morning, when Janet looked out of
her window, she was very much disappointed to
find that it was raining; however, it soon cleared,
and by the time she was dressed the sun wa;
shining, so she was in high spirits, and ran into
the school-room exclaiming,






Janets Boots.


"Oh, I am so happy, Miss Simpson, it's going
to be such a fine day "
"I am very glad indeed, Janet," answered
Miss Simpson; "you will, I hope, enjoy yourself
very much, and you must tell me all about it."
"I wish you were going too," said Janet;
" only you would rather be going home, would
you not ?"
Miss Simpson said she would, and at that
moment Mrs. Holden came into the school-room
holding a letter in her hand.
"This will be, I fear, a great disappointment
to you, my dear," she said. I am very sorry
to say your aunt is obliged to put off her party
until to-morrow, and I cannot, you know, take
you then, as I am engaged; however," she added,
seeing Janet's great distress, "your aunt says very
kindly. that if I will send you to Bexworth this






Janet's Boots.


.i.in..-, and let you sleep there to-night, she
will take care of you, as she knows that her party

being on Wednesday instead of Tuesday, I shall
not be able to go, so she has been kind enough
to think of this plan."
"Oh, mamma! you will let me go, won't
you? "
"Well, Janet," answered her mother, "I
think I can trust you; but will you really be
very good, and behave exactly as if I or Miss
Simpson were there ? "
Indeed I will, mamma," said Janet.
Well, I think she may go. I think we can
trust her, Miss Simpson ? "
I am sure you can, Mrs. Holden," replied
Miss Simpson; Janet will, I am sure, try to
please you by remembering to do all you tell
her."






Janets Boots.


So Mrs. Holden consented, and Janet was to
go that day and return on Thursday.
"You must be sure and put on your thick
boots, Janet, dear, if it rains: you will be a great
deal on the grass, you know, playing at croquet."
I would much rather wear my new thin
ones, mamma."
If it is quite fine and dry you may; but re-
member, Janet, if it rains at all to-morrow, you
are to put on your thick ones."
But they are so ugly, mamma," said Janet.
"Not at all," replied her mother; "they are
very n;ce boots: I don't say they are so pretty
as your new thin ones, but it is much better to
wear rather uglier ones, than to run the risk of
watchingg cold; and remember how ill you were
once before when you got cold by getting wet.
You don't want to be ill again, do you ? "







Janet's Boots.


"Oh, no, mamma! "
Well, then," continued Mrs. Golden, you
must do what I wish. Now will you promise
me this ? "
Yes, dear mamma," Janet said, I'Il be
sure and put on my thick boots; but I don't
think it will rain to-morrow."
But I think it will," answered her mother;
"and remember, you have my positive orders, if
there is a drop of rain to-morrow, that you are
not to wear your thin boots."

Janet faithfully promised to do as her mother
wished; but she could not help hoping that after
all it might be fine, as she was very anxious to
x ere these new thin boots, which were of a dif-
ferent kind from any she had ever worn, and
were very neat and pretty, while her thick boots
were, she considered, extremely ugly.







Janet's Boots.


Janet was very busy all the morning getting
ready to go, and at about four o'clock in the
afternoon she started: her mamma's maid went
with her in the carriage.
They arrived at Bexworth just as her cousins
were going to sit down to tea. The maid un-
packed Janet's clothes, and then returned in the
carriage to Stanmore. Before leaving she again
reminded Janet that she was on no account to
wear her thin hoots if it rained.
There was quite a large party in the school-
room that evening, as, besides Janet's two cou-
sins, Beatrice and Mary, there were three young
friends of theirs who were also come to stay at
Bexworth for the party.
Why did Aunt Caroline put off the party for
a day ? asked Janet, as they sat down to tea.
Oh," Beatrice answered, because the fire-
works from London are not come."






Janet's Boots.


Fireworks! exclaimed all.
"How delightful said Janet.
"Very jolly!" cried little Hester Herbert,
who had six brothers, and who therefore some-
times, indeed very often, adopted their language.
"For shame, Hester!" said her eldest sister
Gertrude; "you know quite well that mamma
says you are not to use that word."
"No, I know she says it's a boy's word,"
said Hester, but it's a very jolly word for all
that, and, besides, what could I say that fire-
works are, except jolly ?"
"Nice," suggested Hester's other sister Lucy.
Pretty," said Beatrice.
"Beautiful," put in Janet.
Oh, no!" answered Hester, nice, and

pretty, and beautiful are not half so jolly as
jolly."






Janet's Boots.


"I think we had better ask mamma to let you
say jolly, just for fireworks, Hester," said Ger-
trude, laughing.
"Yes, that will be a capital plan, and you
shall ask her, Gerty," answered Hester.
I have never seen any fireworks," Janet told
Hester, upon which the latter gave her a long
description of some that one of her brothers had
let off the Christmas before.
Oh, I wish it was all going to be to-night,"
said Janet.
But then we could not have had the fire-
wvorks if they are not come from London," said
Beatrice.
Oh, no! I forgot that," answered Janet.
Gertrude, Lucy, and Hester Herbert were
g~eat friends of Janet's cousins, and often came
to stay at Bexworth. Gertrude was fourteen,






Janet's Boots.


Lucy twelve, and Hester nine years old, just one
year younger than Janet.
After tea the whole party went down to the
drawing-room, where Janet's aunt, Lady Caro-
line Sterling, and a large party of friends, were
busy preparing a number of tickets for a raffle,
which was to take place the following day.

Janet and Hester, the two youngest of the
party, were allowed to cut some of the tickets,
and the elder girls helped to write the numbers
on them. Altogether Janet had a very pleasant
evening, and when she and Hester went to bed,
they could scarcely go to sleep, they had so much
to talk about.
"Janet," said Hester, "do you know all that's
going to happen to-morrow ? because if you
don't, I do, and I will tell you."
"I know there is to be a bazaar, and a raffle,






Janet's Boots.


and the fireworks, and that we are to play at
croquet," answered Janet.
"Oh, that's not all," said Hester. "First of
all there is to be the bazaar, as you say, and
croquet; I don't like croquet nearly so well as
cricket, do you ?"
Janet had never played cricket, and she said
SO.
Never played cricket!" cried Hester; "oh,
you don't know what an awfully jolly game it
is."
"Is it really ?" said Janet.
Of course it is," said Hester; oh, we have
such games when the boys are at home! "
She gave Janet a long description of different
games which she had often played with her
brothers; but Janet wanted to hear more about
the party, so she said,






Janet's Boots.


"But you have not told me all you know
about to-morrow, have you, Hester ?"
"No, I have not," said she, but I will,
Well, you say you know about the bazaar, the
croquet, and the fireworks; but there is going to
be something else besides, something far more
amusing. Guess what? "
Perhaps a sack race, like we had at our
school-feast," said Janet.
"Nonsense said Hester; "guess again."
"Games of some sort ?" asked Janet.
"No, not games," answered Hester.
Indeed I don't know, and can't guess."
Well, then, I'11 tell you. At four o'clock,
that will be after the raffle, there is to be a play
acted in the garden."
"A play in the garden!" exclaimed Janet,
" impossible! "






Janet's Boots.


"Yes, really, I know there is," said Hester.
How do you know?" asked Janet.
"Because Gertrude is going to act, and so
are Lucy and Beatrice, and some more people.
Won't it be fun ? "
"Yes, I am sure it will," said Janet; but,
Hester, what will they do for a theatre ?"
"' Oh, it's all beautifully arranged; it is to be
in a sort of bower, and all dressed up with
flowers and things, and they have got a curtain
ready to put up, and I 've seen it."
Have you really ?" said Janet.
"Yes, I have; and after the play, do you
know, we are all to have tea in a large tent, and
then, when it gets dark enough, there will be
the fireworks."
Janet could hardly sleep, she was so excited,
thinking of all she was to see and do the next







Janets Boots.


day. Wednesday morning came, and to the
great distress of the two little girls, when they
looked out of their window at seven o'clock, it
was raining fast.
"What will they do ?" exclaimed Janet.
"How dreadful !" said Hester; and both
agreed that the best tiing that they could do
was to go to bed again, and as they had sat up
very late the night before, they both fell asleep,
and did not awake till the servant came in at
eight o'clock to tell them it was time to get up;
and then, to their great astonishment and de-
light, the rain was over, and the sun was shining
quite brightly; in fact, there was every prospect
ff a fine day.
After breakfast they were all very busy for
some time preparing everything for the bazaar,
a nd then Beatrice took her cousin, with Hester







Janet's Boots.


and Gertrude, to see all her pets; especially a
favourite old black cat, who had taken up her
abode in the farm-yard. Beatrice had a great
deal to tell them about pussy and her tiny black
kittens, one of which she promised to give to
Janet, if her mamma would permit her to have
it; and her young friends could hardly believe
it was one o'clock when they heard the bell
ring. However, they went in, and Lady Caro-
line told them that they were to dress directly
after dinner was over, and then go out to her
on the lawn, where the tents for the fancy fair
had been put up.
When Janet went with Hester into their
room to dress, she saw that the maid had put
her pretty new thin boots ready for ber to
wear.
"What a great pity," she thought, "that







Janet's Boots.


mamma said I was to wear my thick boots-
horrid things! I wish I could put on the
others. I 'm sure it can't be wet; and yet it
did rain this morning, and mamma said if there
was a drop of rain to-day I was not to put on
my thin ones."
Hester was very busy getting ready, for she
was to go and finish dressing in her sister's
room, so after a very short time Janet was left
alone. Again she began thinking about her
boots, and looking at the two pairs. Now
there was no harm in Janet's wishing that she
could wear her pretty boots, but she ought to
have thought to herself that of course
mamma knew best, and that as she had told
her what to do, she should certainly do it, and
have tried to think no more about it; but
instead of this, I am sorry to say, she began to
a-a







Janet's Boots.


think to herself that it was a great pity her
mamma had said anything about it, and that
she was sure the thin boots would be quite thick
enough.
Janet knew quite well that it had rained that
morning, and she remembered her promise to
her mamma, but she thought she knew better,
and said to herself, "Oh, I shall just put on
my thin boots, and if I get wet I can then
change them. I am sure Beatrice and Mary
won't have such clumsy boots on."
She took one of the thin boots up, and began
looking at it; then, one of her thick boots in
the other hand, and began comparing the two.
" How very bad these thick boots will look with
my muslin frock," she thought, and how nice
these thin ones would be." Then she put one
of her thick boots on one foot, and one of the






Janet's Boots.


thin ones on the other, and stood opposite a
long glass there was in the room, looking at
them. Of course, the more she compared the
two, the more she felt inclined to disobey her
mamma: she ought to have put her thin boots
away, and tried to forget them; instead of this,
I am sorry to say, she put them on.
Just at that moment Gertrude came into the
room, and Janet jumped up from the floor on
which she had been sitting whilst she fastened
her boots, and she felt exactly as if Gertrude
must know that she was doing something wrong.
Janet coloured, and looked so confused that
Gertrude said kindly, "Is anything the matter,
dear ? I came to say that we are going down,
and to see if you were ready."
"Oh," stammered Janet, "oh no, there's
nothing the matter ; I 'm quite ready."







Janet's Boots.


So saying, she went down with Gertrude,
and they found all the other children on the
lawn with Lady Caroline, who was very busy
putting a last touch to her stall.
"Now, Janet," she said, "come and help me
to put these dolls in their places; you can
airange them on this side."
Janet began doing as her aunt wished, and
thought she had never seen so many pretty
things before as there were on the stall.
Have you not got on very thin boots, my
dear ?" Lady Caroline said to Janet.
"No, Aunt Caroline," answered Janet;
"they are not very thin."
Are they not?" said her aunt. "Well, I
thought they looked thin, but. I suppose you
know what your mamma wishes you to wear.
Will you run and fetch me some more pins?"






TJanet's Boots.


she continued. Beatrice-or you, Hester, my
dear, you are not busy-just run in and ask
Estelle for some pins."
Hester ran in, and Janet went on arranging
the dolls : she did not feel happy, she knew that
she was disobeying her mother, and she cold
not for an instant forget it. Even when the
band arrived and began playing, and in the
midst of the bazaar, she felt so uncomfortable
that she could not enjoy herself at all. How-
ever, later on, when Hester and she went to
help the others in the theatre, she did forget all
about her boots, for she was so much amused
and so busy that there was not a moment in
which she could find time to think of anything
else.
Beatrice and Gertrude, the eldest of the
young party, had contrived a beautiful little






Janet's Boots.


theatre in the garden: it was in a sort of sum-
mer-house, which opened on one side on to a

lawn.

They had put up a curtain, and were now

busily engaged in ornamenting the top of it
with a wreath of flowers. Janet and Hester
were to appear on the stage as attendants upon

Mary, who was to play the part of a queen.
They were charmed with the fun of dressing up

for it. They had bright coloured scarfs fastened
on one shoulder, and they wore these over their
white muslin dresses. Janet's scarf was pink

and Hester's blue.

The play was called Prince Sigismund's

Courtship,"* and, as it was all in verse, they


-* Prince Sigismund's Courtship ; or, the Fairy
Ordeal." Published by Lovegrove, Motcombe Street,
and Dean & Son.






Janet's Boots.


had not found it at all difficult to learn by
heart.
There were several songs in the piece, and so
they had got the school-room piano put on one
side of the little theatre, and Miss Hesse,
Beatrice and Mary's governess, had promised
to play for them.
The performance went off very well, and
when it was over Lady Caroline said to her
daughters,
"The photographer is here, and if you like,
my dears, you, who have been acting so nicely,
can all be photographed in a group:
Oh, yes," they exclaimed, "do let us all be
taken; it will be such fun."
"And may we be done as well, Aunt Caro-
line?" asked Janet- "Hester and I, for we
did act a little; did we not, Hester? "






Janet's Boots.


"Yes," answered Hester; "and, oh! Miss
Hesse should be photographed with us, because
she played the music."
Certainly," replied Lady Caroline, "all of
you. I will go and send Mr. Nutt at once,
whilst the sun is still bright."
Accordingly Mr. Nutt and his photographic
machine soon arrived, and a group was formed
of the actors, and very much delighted were all
at the idea of seeing how their dresses would
look in a photograph.
Hester and Janet, as the shortest of the party,
were placed in front, and Miss Hesse sitting in
the middle, with Mary and Lucy on each side
of her, and the others grouped round.
The picture was quit a success, and Lady
Caroline was so much pleased with it that she
ordered a number of copies to be done, and






Janet's Boots.


promised to give one to each of her young
friends.
The rest of the afternoon was spent in cro-
quet, and when the time came for them all to
go into the tent to have tea, Janet and Hester
were not at all sorry to sit down.
I'm awfully glad we were acting," said
Hester-" very glad, I mean: Gertrude does not
like me to say awfully. Are not you glad, Janet?
tor don't you see, if we had not been acting we
should not have bcen photographed !"
Yes, I am," answered Janet. I have
never been photographed before; have you ?"
"Oh, yes, lots of times," said Hester : "once
with Tom and once with Harry, and once with
Tom and Harry ; but mamma did not like the
one with Harry, because he put on my hat and
cloak, and I put on his hat and jacket, and they






Janets Boots.


say that I look exactly like one of the boys;
but I don't mind that."
Oh, you would not like to be taken for a
boy !" exclaimed Janet.
Yes I should," answered Hester. 1
should like to be a boy. Oh!" she continued,
" I wish it would get dark, because of the fire-
works. How soon will it be dark, Gertrude ?"
Gertrude said she thought in about an hour,
so Janet and Hester agreed that they would go
and have one more game at croquet before it
was quite dark.
Before long, however, there was not light
enough for them to play, and they were de.
lighted to see that all the people were assembling
on the terrace in front of the house, ready to
see the fireworks; so ,hey put away the mallets
and balls, and oiined the rest of the party.






Janet's Boots.


Janet thought she had never seen anything
half so beautiful in all her life. There were
-ockets, and wheels, and Roman candles, and
olue lights; but last of all, and much the most
beautiful, was a Prince of Wales's feathers all
in fire.
By the time the fireworks were over the
guests were all thinking of going home, and it
was not long before Janet and Hester went to
bed, certainly rather tired, but having had a
most pleasant day.
At least, to Hester it had been a very delight-
ful party, and would have been so also to Janet,
only that she had felt uncomfortable nearly the
whole time, knowing that she had done wrong
in wearing her thin boots; and when she took
them off she said to herself, Well, I wish I
had put on my thick ones, for I don't believe







Janet's Boots.


that any one looked at my beautiful new boots,
and certainly it was very damp and cold on the
grass when wewe were playing that last game of
croquet I"
She went to bed, but not to sleep: she kept
thinking whilt her mother would say if she
found out that she had disobeyed her, and she
wondered if she would ask her whether she
wore her thick boots or not.
When at last she fell asleep, she dreamt that
she was walking about in the garden, with only
her stockings on, and that she saw her namma
and Miss Simpson coming to meet her. She

jumped up, calling out, My boots my boots!"
so loud, that she awoke Hester, who asked her
what she wanted her boots for.
Janet felt quite frightened, for she did not
know that she had called out aloud for hei







Janet's Boots.


boots, and she thought H-ester must know what
she had done; however, she soon recollected
that she had been dreaming, and said,
Oh, nothing; I was only talking in my
sleep, I suppose."
"Oh! said Hester, in a very sleepy voice;
"then I am sure I wish you would not; I
thought that some one was calling us to get
up."
The next morning MIrs. Holden sent for
Janet. She was very sorry to go, and especially
to wish little Hester good-byve; but, as they
lived only two miles apart, they both hoped
they should meet again.
Janet had so much to tell her mamma's maid,
who came to fetch her, about the party, that
the drive home seemed quite short: they arrived
at about one o'clock, just in time for Janet's







Tanet's Boots.


dinner. As Miss Simpson was not coming
home until the next day, she had no lessons to
do that afternoon, so she sat with her mamma
for some time, and then they went out walking.
Janet was not happy : she felt that she was
deceiving, and yet she could not make up her
mind to tell her mamma that she had disobeyed
her. Oh! if she had only done so at once, how
much happier she would have felt!
The next day Janet had a very had sore
throat, and in the evening she was so unwell
that Mrs. Holden sent for the doctor. Janet
was in bed when he came, so Mrs. Holden took
him upstairs to see her.
Your little girl has a very severe cold,
Mrs. Holden," he said. What has she been
doing ?"
"I suppose she must have caught it at the







Janet's Boots.


party at Bexworth," answered Mrs. Holden;
" though I don't see how she could, for it was a
very fine warm day, and she had thick boots on
as there had been a little rain; of course, my
dear, you did put on your thick boots ? "
Janet would have liked to avoid answering,
but, as her mamma asked her, she said,
Oh I was not at all wet, mamma."
"No, she could not get wet in these; now
could she, Doctor Markland ?" said Mrs. ITol-
den, going to the place where Janet's boots
were kept, and holding one of them up in her
hand.
"Certainly, those are very good, substantial
soles," he replied. "And so you wore those,
my dear Miss Janet, did you ?"
Yes," she said. Yes; I wore those."
Janet said "yes" in such a very peculiar way,

3






Janet's Boots.


that it made Mrs. Holden turn round and say,
"You are quite sure, Janet, you did wear them
all day, did you ?"
Yes, mamma, indeed I did," answered
Janet.
Poor Janet! she had felt miserable the day of
the party, but now that she had done far worse
and had added falsehood to disobedience, she
felt, oh! far more unhappy. How she wished
that she had never worn those boots! she hated
the sight of them; and now as she lay in bed,
feeling very ill, with a ..i.-lfl sore throat and
headache, there they were, those very boots, the
wearing of which had made her ill, just where
she could see them, putting her in mind of her
dreadful falsehood.
It was several days before Janet got well;
an-. when she did, she could not bear to thin.!






Janet's Boots.


of what she had done. She had not the courage
to confess all to her mamma, and yet she could
not be happy until she had done so.
Mrs. Holden and Miss Simpson both fancied
there was something the matter with the little
girl, but they thought that perhaps it was the
consequence of her bad cold.
One day, when Janet came down to lunch,
Mrs. Holden told her that there was a letter
come from her Aunt Caroline to say that the
photographs were finished, and that Janet's
would be sent the next day. Janet had told
her mamma all about the play and the photo-
graph of the actors, and was very anxious to
show it to all at home, and could hardly wait
for it until the next day.
In the morning, at about the time she knew
the letters generally came, she went at least






Janet's Boots.


half a dozen times to the garden gate, to find
out if the postman was in sight. Once she
thought that she saw him; but, no, it was only
one of the gardeners. At last the postman
appeared, and Janet ran to meet him.
Have you got a parcel or a letter for me,
Gregory? she cried out to the old man, as
soon as she saw him. "Do tell me quick. Is
there anything for me? "

"Yes, miss, there is," answered old Gregory,
who had brought the letters to Stanmore long
before Janet was born. Yes, my dear little
miss, here it is; and a queer-looking article it
be, to be sure."
So saying, he pulled out of his bag a square

parcel, or rather a large letter, only it had a stiff
piece of brown pasteboard on each side of it,
which made it look rather curious. Janet took






Janet's Boots.


it from the old man, and ran with it in her
hand into the dining-room: there was no one
there, so she took up a knife, and, cutting the
string which tied it, she opened the parcel.
When she uncovered the photograph, she
saw an exact likeness of the party who had
acted at Bexworth. She could almost fancy
that she was there,-they were all so clearly
before her eyes: Miss Hesse, sitting down;
Gertrude, standing, with a guitar in her hand;
and, in front, Hester and herself.
Janet was delighted with the picture. "Now,"
she thought, I can show mamma exactly
where the theatre was, and she will see how my
scarf was put on; and, oh! how nice my frock
looks I can see all the tucks in my skirt, and
even the pattern on my stockings, and "
At this moment, for the first time, she perceived






Janet's Boots.


that in the photograph could plainly be seen her
boots! Yes, there they were those very boots,
the wearing of which had not only made her
ill, but very miserable.
Poor Janet she stood looking at the picture,
which a moment before had given her such
great pleasure, with feelings of fear and horror.
Every moment she expected to see her mo-
ther come into the room; "and then," Janet
thought, "then she will know how wicked I
have been-that I disobeyed her, and that I have
told such a dreadful story !"
And here it should be explained that these
boots, which had been the cause of so much
misery to Janet, were of a peculiar sort and
shape, and therefore were very distinctly seen in
the photograph. They were made t' coir.e some
way up above the ankle, and were neatly finished






Janet's Boots


in front with tassels; altogether they were quite
different from common boots, and as Janet kept
gazing at the photograph, it seemed to her as if
they were by far the most striking objects in the
picture.

Janet wished she could hide the photograph,
but she knew that it would be no use, as her
mother would be sure to ask her directly she saw
her, whether it had come; still; anything to put
off the dreadful moment. She thought if she
could only get out of the room with it, any-
where, it would at all events delay the time of
her fault being found out.
She was just going out of the door when in
came Miss Simpson.
"So you have got your photograph, Janet,
dear, have you ? she said ; "well, let me look
at it."







Janet's Boots.


So saying, she took it out of poor Janet's
unwilling hand : Janet trembled and felt so cold
that her teeth quite chattered; she expected
every moment that Miss Simpson would notice
the boots.
"So that's Miss Hesse, is it? And which is

your friend, little Hester Herbert "
Janet pointed her out.
It is a very good photograph," Miss Simpson
continued, "and I will frame it for you to hang
up in the school-room: you will like that, shall

you not, Janet ?"
"Oh, yes, thank you, Miss Simpson," stam-
mered Janet, very much."
At this moment Mr. Holden came in to break-
fast. He admired the photograph very much
too, and when he heard of Miss Simpson's in-
tention of framing it, he told his little daughter







Janet's Boots.


that if it was fine he would drive them both to
Leckham, a small town about three miles off,
that afternoon, to buy the glass for the frame;
but no remark was made about the boots, either
by her papa or Miss Simpson, and Janet began
to breathe more freely.
In a short time Mrs. Holden came in, and the
moment she saw Janet's face she noticed that
something was the matter.
Mr. Holden showed her the photograph, and

Janet felt convinced, the instant her mamma
looked at it, that her secret was discovered;
however, Mrs. IIolden said nothing about it,
but sat down and began making the tea.

Janet was miserable and uncomfortable; but
still as her mother had not made a remark about
her boots, she began to hope that it was possible
that she had not noticed them. After breakfast






Janet's Boots.


Mrs. Holden desired Janet to come with her into
her room, and then she felt quite certain that
her mamma had indeed found out her fault, and
she followed her with a beating heart.
When they were in Mrs. Holden's own room,
she shut the door and sat down.
"Janet," she said, "you have something to tell
me. Now do not try to deceive me any longer;
you must know that I have found out what you
have done-do not attempt to deny it."

Janet burst into tears.
Oh, mamma! she sobbed, what must I
do? What will papa say? What do you think
of me? Oh, you will never, never trust me
again !"
I do not say that, my dear child," answered
her mother, kindly: "you have certainly done
very wrong, and I am distressed and surprised to






Janets Boots.


find that you have been deceiving us all this
time."
"Oh! I did not mean to do it," cried Janet.
"Very likely not," answered Mrs. Holden;
"but, you see, instead of telling me at once that
you had disobeyed me and worn your thin boots,
you tried to hide your fault by telling me a false-
hood, and by that means you made your conduct
ten times worse. Your papa and Miss Simpson
have not, I suppose, noticed in the photograph
that you had on those boots, which you told
us all you did not wear, but you must go and
tell them."
"Oh, no, no 1" exclaimed Janet, "anything
but that! I cannot tell them, oh! I cannot,
indeed, mamma, I cannot!"
My dear Janet," said Mrs. Holden very ear-
nestly, "ryou have already rhnc a very wicked







Janet's Boots.


thing; first, you broke your promise to me, and
secondly, which was far worse, you told a false-
hood about it. Do you not wish to do every-
thing that is in your power to atone f >r your
fault ?"
Yes-yes," said poor Janet.
C'Well, then, my dear, believe me, you will

not feel happy until you have been and told your
father and Miss Simpson the whole truth; you
have deceived them as well as me. You do not,
I am sure, wish to continue in your deceit; and
don't you think that your papa would much
rather that you should tell him the truth your-
self, even now, than find it out, as he would be
sure to do some day or other, even if I did not
tell him ? And Miss Simpson, do you not think
that she would discover your boots in the pic-
,Yu:e? why, here you are," she added, pointing






Janet's Boots.


to the photograph which she held in her hand,
"as distinct as possible."
But, oh, mamma!" cried Janet, not to-
day let me wait till to-morrow."
"And what good would that do ?" answered
her mother; "only add one more miserable day
of deceit to those which are already past. No,
believe me, my dear Janet, the only right thing
for you to do is to go at once and confess all."
It was a long time before Janet could be per-

suaded to do so: her mother, however, talked
to her for a long time, and so kindly, and at the
same time so earnestly, that at last Janet was

quite convinced, and said she would.
She already felt happier after having talked
with her mother. Janet told her all about her
putting on the boots, and how she had tried to
think she knew best which she ought to wear.







Janet's Boots.


"You see, Janet, how very much you were
mistaken," remarked Mrs. Holden, for no
doubt you caught that bad cold entirely by get-
ting your feet wet on that day."
"Oh, I hope I shall never wear those boots
again! exclaimed Janet.
"On the contrary," said Mrs. Holden, "I hope
every time you put them on you will try to re-
member all the good resolutions which I feel
sure you will make to-day, and that you will say
to yourself, 'If ever I am tempted to do any-
thing wrong, I will not make it worse by telling
a falsehood about it. "
Mr. Holden was greatly shocked when Janet
told him what she had done, but he saw how
truly sorry she now was for her fault, and said
he hoped it would be a lesson to her for the
future.






Janet's Boots.


For," he added, I am sure you have suffered
enough in consequence of your fault to make
you remember it."
Oh, papa! you will never believe a word I
say again! said Janet.
It is the first time that you ever deceived
me," answered Mr. Holden, "and if I see you
trying to regain my confidence by your conduct
in future, I shall trust you, and I am sure you
intend to try."
"Indeed, I do," said Janet; and I am glad
to say that from that day she never was known
again to speak anything but the exact truth.
The photograph was framed and hung in the
school-room; at first Janet could hardly bear to
look at it, but in time she got quite fond of it.
She remembered that it had helped her to bear
in mind the resolution she had made of being







Janet's Boots.


very particular in always speaking the truth, for
she never could look at it without saying to her-

self, I never will tell another falsehood, for I

remember how miserable I was when I wore my

thin boots, and then told mamma a story about

it!"







.. A -


^J '"11 ~















THE FLOWER GARDEN.

















THE FLOWER GARDEN.

BY MRS. E. PRENTISS.



HE Lady walked through her garden
Sin the early morning, and she smiled
upon her flowers as she passed by; so they
looked up and smiled too.
Who was the Lady?
I do not know. She had come from far
away, and called her garden her home, and
her flowers were her mother and sisters, she
said. The garden was very beautiful at all
times, but on this morning the flowers were
more so than usual, for they had not laid aside






The Flowcr Garden.


the holiday robes with which they had adorned
themselves for the Sabbath; for this was
Monday.
"The Lady has not looked at me once,"
said a Scarlet Pea near which she stood. She
loves my cousin so much better! See how
she stands and pets her, and puts down her
red lips to be kissed. Ah\ but I wish she
cared for me."
The Lady was grieved when she heard this,
and she said to herself, Oh! I must not again
neglect my Scarlet Pea, for I would not will-
ingly wound her; besides I want to gain her
affections, that I may persuade her to mount up-
ward rather than thus trail upon the ground."
Thus thinking, the Lady passed on, and quite
forgot that she had not said good morning to
her little friend, her beloved Mignonette.







The Flower Garden.


"There, Miss said the Scarlet Pea, "the
Lady is always pretending to find great delight
in your society, and now she has passed you
by without even saying good morning."
Well, I don't much wonder," answered the
little neighbour," for I am sure there is nothing
in me which is worthy of her notice. I am so
ugly! and so low!"
Just then the Lady turned and looked back,
saying, "How very fragrant it is just here!
My sweet Mignonette must be near, and I had
nearly forgotten her. Ah my little pet, you
know how to call me back when I pass you by."
I am not sure that little Mignonette smiled
when she heard this, but I think she could not
help doing so. As for Scarlet Pea, she turned
redder than ever, and said, "Well, I never
did-!"







The Flower Garden.


"Here comes the Lady," said Love-in-a-
Mist, to herself, but I won't let her know that
I love her, I shall just turn my head the other
way."
Poor Love-in-a-Mist was very diffident, and
she lost no time in carrying her plan into exe-
cution. The lady stopped and spoke to her, but
she pretended not to hear her, while yet she
trembled all over. The Lady knew not what
to do, but she spoke a few kind words, and
walked on to the Moss Rose, her favourite
flower. The Rose was very happy and very
beautiful that morning, and she showed the
Lady how many of her buds had opened since
last she was there, and begged that one might
rest upon her bosom that day. No wonder,
then, Moss Rose was very dear to the Lady!
Was she not nearly perfect in her lovely robe







The Flower Garden.


of soft green moss-was not her smile the
sweetest and her lip the softest in the whole
garden? The flowers about her knew this, and
some of them loved to sit at her feet and own
it-while others were ready to bite their lips
with envy.
"When the lady comes this way, I'm going
to show her how I am crowded up here in third.
little corner," said the Tulip. I never could
bear to live next door to anything so vulgar
as that mean old Buttercup."
"As to that," returned the Buttercup, "I
am not so very old as you imagine, madam;
and I would have you to know that as I am
placed in the garden by the special direction
of the Lady, I shall stay here as long as I
please."
"Then don't expect any attentions from






The Flower Garden.


me," said the Tulip, tossing her beautiful
head in high disdain, "for I shall not associate
with every low person who is forced into our
neighbourhood."
"As you please," answered the Buttercup:
"you had better stay at home and make pre-
parations for your Dutch cousins, who I hear
are coming to visit you."
Dutck cousins, indeed I think I see my-
self entertaining those vulgar persons! I desire
to be thankful that there is no Dutch blood in
my veins, madam."
The Buttercup smiled a very provoking
smile ; and this so exasperated the Tulip that
she could scarcely speak when the Lady made
her appearance.
But the Lady saw that all was not right.
She strove to make the two regard each other







The Flower Garcdez.


as friends, and told them that in her affections
they were of equal rank; but they refused to
become reconciled, and though they dared not
speak, they threw angry and contemptuous
glances at each other, and so made the Lady
sad. She said to herself, I expected to find
peace and harmony here, but it is far other-
wise. Is the fault mine? It grieves me to see
my Scarlet Pea trailing along upon the ground,
making acquaintance with the stones and sticks
she finds there; and the aristocracy of the
Tulip disturbs me also. I must seek a remedy
for all this."
The Lady went straight to the Scarlet Pea
the next time she visited the garden, and said
to her, Now, my little friend, I don't like your
lying down here in the dust. I mean to help
you to climb up this delicate frame which I







The Flower Garden.


have had prepared for you. Then you can
look all over the garden and breathe the sweet
fresh air. See your cousin, the Pink Sweet
Pea! how beautiful and how good she is!
Would not you like to resemble her ?"
The Scarlet Pea promised to try, and she
began to wind her arms about the framework
which was to be her support. How very glad
was the Lady then !
My Pea has a good disposition, I am sure,"
she said, and will soon take her place among
the beautiful of my garden. But what is this?"
she cried, as a great tall Poppy thrust herself
right into her very face and eyes,
Good morning," said the Poppy pertly,
and putting herself directly before the Lady,
so that it was impossible to pass. "I have
been waiting an hour for an opportunity to







The Flower Garden.


speak to you, but, really! the others take up
all the time, and I never get a chance to come
near you." The Lady thought this no great
misfortune, but she spoke kindly to the Poppy,
and tried to proceed on her way. But the

Poppy had a dozen foolish questions to ask,
and as many sage opinions to express; and
the Lady was kept standing in the hot sun
while the talkative flower unburdened her
mind of all that had interested it during the
last week.
When the Lady at last made her escape, she
turned to cast a glance at her Scarlet Pea ere
she passed onward. Alas! for her sanguine
hopes concerning it. Alas! for the flattering
unction which she had laid to her soul, in re-
gard to the "gooddisposition of the object of
her interest. The Scarlet Pea, notwithstand-







The Flower Garden.


ing her fair promises and ready smiles and
good intentions, had relapsed to her former
grovelling position, and was at this moment
so ardently engaged in making love to a cer-
tain crooked stick of her neighbourhood, as
to be quite unconscious of the sad and half-
despairing look which rested upon her. The
Lady sighed and passed on, and as she passed,
the Moss Rose looked her ready sympathy,
and seemed to sigh too.
A fine Scotch Thistle next attracted the
notice of the Lady, and she went smilingly
toward her, making pleasant inquiries about
her health and comfort. The Thistle, armed
with sharp points, had a who-dare-meddle-
with-me ?" sort of look, and her voice and
manner, when she spoke to the Lady, were
rough and harsh. It was to those only who






The Flozcer Garden.


had known and understood the Thistle that
she was an object of interest, for her warlike
air and repelling armour drove far from her
those who sought to approach. On this occa-
sion she spoke roughly to the Lady, and put
on a more fierce expression than usual; but
the moment she had passed, our Scotch Thistle
lost no time in bowing down her stately head
to kiss the very dust which bore the impress
of the little foot which was as dear to her as
her own life.
The heart of the Lady was gladdened that
day by an unexpected sight-that of the Tulip
and the Buttercup in friendly intercourse!
The Tulip being indisposed by the effect of
the intense cold, the really warm and kind
heart of her lowly neighbour softened toward
her, and her quiet attentions had no small






The Flower Garden.


effect upon the aristocratic beauty. How
pleased and how happy the Buttercup looked,
and how lovingly the Lady bade good morning
to both!
But even while she was rejoicing over them,
the Tulip was removed to another garden, and
the Moss Rose began to droop and to hang
its head as if in pain, upon its stalk, and the
fragrance of the beloved Mignonette was borne
by new breezes to a far-off region. The Lady
shed no tears, but when she came to her gar-
den again, and looked at the vacant places,
her heart was full of the pain which tears
would have relieved, and her face was sad
even when she smiled.
When the Scotch Thistle saw that the Lady
was sad, she said to herself, "Now will I con-
sole and comfort her by my gentlest tones."






The Flower Garden.


So she spake in the low, soft voice which those
who have heard it love, and no longer met the
offered hand of the Lady with pretended in-
difference and stinging thorns. And she spake
to the Scarlet Pea, kind, beseeching words in
the early morning, and in the still evening,
till that strange, wild thing grew serious and
thoughtful, and at last began with right good
will to clasp her unlifted arms around the
framework on which she was to ascend up-
ward-how far more beautiful and lovely now,
than in the days of her earthward creepings
and stick-embracings And now that she had
left room for her to do so, a little flower, a
loving, winning Pink Sweet Pea, who had
been almost lost to sight by the overwhelm-
ing leaves and tendrils of her unruly cousin,
began to be seen and appreciated; and the






The Floeer Gar~dez.


heart of the Lady opened to bid her welcome,
as if she had but just begun to know her
aright.
My little reader, do not open your bright,,
wondering eyes, and ask "how can flowers

talk ?" but when you are at school to-morrow,
ask your teacher if she has not a flower garden
wherein she daily walks and smiles and sighs,
and ask your own heart if you are one of its

sweet ornaments, or but a lofty weed, or a

disagreeable Poppy.




1%





DALZIEL BROTHEBB, CAMDEN PrESS, LONDON, N.W.
D23529387236




h 107 I17










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