• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 A negro melodist
 The doll's mishap
 Christmas at Homesdale
 The fire in the Australian...
 Why does coal burn?
 Changeful Hetty
 The Russian exiles
 What mother canary said
 Consequences: a parable
 Comfortable Mrs. Cook
 Miss Mabel's pony
 Clara and the animal book
 The unsociable ducks
 Looking out for number one
 The wise spider
 Earthen vessels
 Birdie's breakfast
 A battle
 Grace Darling, the heroine
 Boney
 Catching snowflakes
 A mischievous monkey
 The African boy slave
 Climbing
 On trial
 Two little girls
 She had never seen a tree
 Back Cover






Title: Stories from the treasure box
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055317/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stories from the treasure box
Physical Description: 164 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Ward & Drummond ( Publisher )
Jacob Leonard & Son
Publisher: Ward & Drummond
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Printed and bound by Jacob Leonard & Son
Publication Date: c1887
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1887   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1887   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1887
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- New York -- Albany
 Notes
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055317
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237947
notis - ALH8441
oclc - 68920252

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title 1
        Title 2
    A negro melodist
        Page 121
    The doll's mishap
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Christmas at Homesdale
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
    The fire in the Australian bush
        Page 128
        Page 129
    Why does coal burn?
        Page 130
    Changeful Hetty
        Page 131
    The Russian exiles
        Page 132
        Page 133
    What mother canary said
        Page 134
        Page 135
    Consequences: a parable
        Page 136
    Comfortable Mrs. Cook
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
    Miss Mabel's pony
        Page 140
        Page 141
    Clara and the animal book
        Page 142
        Page 143
    The unsociable ducks
        Page 144
        Page 145
    Looking out for number one
        Page 146
        Page 147
    The wise spider
        Page 148
    Earthen vessels
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
    Birdie's breakfast
        Page 152
    A battle
        Page 152
        Page 153
    Grace Darling, the heroine
        Page 154
        Page 155
    Boney
        Page 156
        Page 157
    Catching snowflakes
        Page 158
    A mischievous monkey
        Page 158
        Page 159
    The African boy slave
        Page 160
        Page 161
    Climbing
        Page 161
    On trial
        Page 162
    Two little girls
        Page 163
    She had never seen a tree
        Page 164
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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STORIES FROM THE



TREASURE BOX,










11









NEW YORK:
WARD & DRUMMOND,
i6 Nassau. St.

















































COPYRIGHT 1867.
D. R. NIVER PUBLISHING Co.
































PRINTED AND BOUND
BY
JACOB LEONARD & SON,
ALBANY, N. Y.








the beautiful
-_ colors and for
-5 the females
-- to be the
dowdyones-
---a rule which
would entail
a revolution
in fashions,
startling and
ludicrous, if
it were to be
introduced
for variety
among our
own kind.
Again, gaily-
dressed birds
have the least
pleasing song
'. -the scream-
ing jay bear-
ing an unfa-
vorable com-
parison with
the thrush-
and the mod-
esti -attired nightingale having fur-
nlslcd.U, in all ages. a brilliant example
.t irttze ulnadorned. The nightingale,
hI: ee r, a\i i! before the climate has
S bec,.me o:biecti:-nable, we must praise
its muic.il acc, 'mplihmlents rather as
Sbeir, those .:.f a di;tinuguished guest, or
fri.zn .r:wa ,',.',a, than of an indi-
gen:ous artist. Buit \.' have another
Sbird.l wh,, is al'wa\ s here. facing winter's
blasts in additich to summer's bloom,
S)v. ho m V- ie stan id un rivaled ; no com-
p Ietitr apl,r',achin any where near
111him fo,,r fuiinc,. richness, and liquid
m l,,\ :In s. -t" wit, the blackbird.
Tlhisi T C nir.:, ielhodist seldom spares
his lungs at all until winter is far ad-
vanced into its New Year months;
and even amid the bitter mornings of
A NEGRO MELODIST. January, his rich, unfaltering notes can
sometimes be heard. His coat is a
glossy black, always cleanly brushed,"
It has often been remarked that in and in the case of one family, some-
the bird world the rule is for the males times called the "Red-wing," with a
to have the brilliant plumage, with all gorgeous scarlet lapel on either side.
121












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THE DOLL'S MISHAP.


There was a little girl, Then further down the street,
But her head was in a whirl, She saw her loss complete,
Oh, how she could laugh and shout And she stopped the little carriage
and sing i
with a jerk;
What happened her one day, do one h h
I will tell you right away,
I am sorry I did so,
For she would not keep her mind on s soy d o
any thing. I wish I'd kept my mind upon my work."


She dressed her doll with pride, Then she hurried back to look,
And took her out to ride,
And she hunted every nook,
And the wheel came off the carriage on
S, And she staid and searched from half-
the way,
And naught she knew about past three till four,
Her dolly falling out; Then she gave up in despair;
She was looking at some nanny goats That doll with flaxen hair
at play. Was never seen or heard of any more.








123
























CHRISTMAS AT HOMESDALE.

Snow! snow! It just came drifting it fun ? the snow fell thick and fast,
down in great crystal heaps, whitening and the sharp wind whirled the flakes
trees and fences, as though itfnever in my eyes till I could hardly see, but
would stop. My brothers Bob and it set my blood tingling; with splendid
Will were whistling gaily and stepping health and good spirits, it was sport to
around in high glee, for, wasn't this brave the storm, and to-morrow was to
glorious Christmas weather? Papa and be Christmas! At six o'clock prompt
mamma lived with our grandparents, in we heard the tingling of sleigh-bells,
the old homestead, where we children and all bounded into the hall, throwing
were born and brought up; and this wide open the door. Such greeting and
evening, the brothers and sisters, with kissing, and hugging you never saw;
their families, were coming from the nor such a multitude of children. Uncle
city to spend Christmas at the old John, who had just returned from Japan,
place; and we were counting upon a said it was past belief, that all these
grand, good time. Once more I tripped were his nephews and nieces.
through the pretty rooms, and surveyed After tea, we all gathered around the
the wide hall, with its blazing logs in bright fire, in the old hall, and told
the fire-place, to see that every thing stories, and cracked jokes till after
was all right; there was not a bunch of eleven; then papa said, we had better
holly to be re-adjusted, or a wreath out retire, because Kriss Kringle would
of place. Papa had pronounced the soon be driving over the tops of the
decorations perfect, and as I danced houses, with his eight tiny rein-
down the polished floor and peered out deers, and if he saw any little folks up,
of the front door, a fresh gust of wind would not come down the chimney, and
blew in my face, and I cried,--" Mamma, what a sad sight would be fifteen or
may I go out for'a little run ? the boys twenty empty stockings, in the morn-
are busy with their snow-man, and the ing. "Come, manikins, scamper!"
company will not be here until six. said Uncle John, and as we were kissing
Receiving permission, I wrapped up good-night, cousin Bessie, who is the
warm, and with an umbrella over my sweetest little darling just four years
head, started for a brisk walk. Wasn t old, lisped from her mamma's arms
124

















































"K















OUT FOR A RUN IN THE SNOW.
125
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wnere she sat cuddled up, looking with and seen the funny things which
sleepy blue eyes in the fire : Oh, I do transpired. At one end of the hal was
wis' all littlee boys ap' dirls had lots of a dais, or raised platform, such as is
sings in their stockings, to-mollow! often seen in old houses; in front of
We older ones felt reproached; in our this, for a curtain, was strung a blue
fullness of joy, had we forgotten the and white counterpane, from behind
homeless poor, who to-morrow would which, occasionally a wild pirate's head
know no Christmas; ah, how many times emerged, with inconsistent knicker-
we had seen the wretched little waifs, bocker legs,-the make-up not being
shivering in ragged rows, in front of completed-a mysterious sweeping of
gay, tempting shop-windows, longingly trailing robes, and loud stage-whispers
peeping inside. We could but echo gave one an idea that charades of
Bessie's wish, and add,-" God help theatricals were to be the order of the
them." evening. After prolonged waiting, the
No sleep the next morning; before audience were summoned. I am sorry
day-light little white robed figures could I cannot enter into the details of the
be seen tip-toeing from room to room, plays, but they were really quite good
arms filled with presents, and drag- for impromptu efforts. here was a
going corpulent stockings. And later, little monotony about the scenery to be
the house resounded with merry greet- sure (Bob having borrowed the one
ings and the shouts of happy children. stage scene the village show-room af-
Dinner over-during which repast any forded) and a hitch now and then in the
amount of turkey and plum-pudding curtain, showing the company's heels
had been stored away in capacious little in flight, after an act; and then Romeo
stomachs, the young people repaired to may have used a trifle too much burnt
the great upper hall, where, they in- cork, but on the whole, the acting was
formed the folks, they must not come creditable. What brought down the
till bidden. Some wonderful doings house, however, were the tableau, from
-I i,,' I ,






























were evidently to take place. Readers, babes in the woods, acted by Master
I wish you had been mice, in a corner, Ted and wee Bessie. Their costumes
126
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THE JAPANESE SCREEN THAT UNCLE BIOUGH'T.
127









were very pretty and appropriate, and conditional; if his work were satisfactory
the chubby faces, so sweet and innocent, he might have a permanent situation.
(See frontispiece.)one did not wonder As he halted off in the lonely country,
the wicked ruffian's heart failed him. and turned round on his horse's back,
The performance wound up with a he said to himself:
grand chorus, -" The, Three Little "Now, if I could stay here always, I
Maids," and elegant scenery formed by could get rich. But there is Benson !"
the beautifully-embroidered and painted Benson Loring was a second boy on
Japanese screen Uncle had brought the sheep-run. He was also on trial.
mamma, and which we had guiltily It would be Benson or Carl that would
purloined for our play. But she for- have a long, steady job, and which of
gave us when she saw how successfully the two ?
produced was our finale. The young "I would like to stay," thought Carl,
actors and prima-donnas were heartily glancing across the country.
congratulated upon their talents, and What a lovely land it was! Aus-
all were invited down to a "bountiful tralians know the territory away from
collation," as the papers say, feeling the towns as the "bush", and it is bushy
that it had been the most delightful indeed in parts. Vast forests stretch
Christmas they had ever spent. far away, the tree-trunks succeeding;
A. DEG. H. one another like the ranks of count-
less armies. In many places there is,
in these forests, an absence of under-
growth. The ground is thatched with
THE FIRE IN THE AUS- grass on which the sheep can feed.
Other pastures are destitute of trees.
TRALIAN BUSH. The only covering of the grass is the
wide, limitless sky. Here the sheep
BY REV. EDWARD A. RAND. may browse for miles and not come to
the shelter of a tree. On the lonely,
rough bushland Carl was now looking.
"Whoa! "It looks like Australia," he added,
.It was Carl Mason who thus cried to "and I don't see any of master's sheep."
his horse. Away off in the Australian But what did he see, at his right? It
bush, he desired to halt and look about was a dark, low object, moving slowly
him, and find out at that point what over the ground.
kind of a country he was in, and if any "Benson!" he said; "I don't like
of his master's sheep were there. He him."
was an American boy, who had come The two boys were not congenial.
to Australia in one of the vessels in- They had differed that very morning
terested in the trade between that when discussing this subject-honesty.
country and America. On board this Carl had been trained to keep his word
ship was a gentleman who had largely scrupulously, to hate deception in every
invested in the wool business, and form. He was an orphan. He had
wished, among other places, to visit a been early thrown upon the world. His
Queensland sheep-run, of which he was parents had lived long enough, though,
part owner. Carl had been granted to teach him to hate dishonesty. Ben-
his discharge from the vessel, and had son had said that morning:
accompanied the wool-merchant up "When it comes to choosing between
into the Australian bush. He next my interests and those of the man I
obtained a chance to try his hand at work for, I shall choose my own, though
sheep-raising on this same far-reaching I have to lie for it."
run. His engagement, though, was "I don't think, in matters of right
128








and wrong, we are to look at our own "Smoke!" he said, excitedly, and
interests at all," replied Carl. then he drove his horse madly onward.
"Nonsense!" said Benson. "They Yes, a threatening cloud was hang-
say charity begins at home, and you ing above the spot where he had had
may say that about lots of things. such a contented meal. It was any-
When I ve got to choose between the thing but a scene now to inspire one
home of another and my home, I shan't with contentment! Under that long,
stop long to think of the other man's low, threatening cloud of smoke was a
home." scarlet line of fire! How it sharpened
"Right is right," said Carl. as Carl rode toward it! The wind, too,
"Nonsense! said Benson again, and had freshened. As the flames rose and
when a person has no good argument fluttered in the wind, they flared like
to offer, "nonsense" is a very conven- the banners of an evil host advancing
ient word. to sorhe work of destruction.
As Carl, seated on his horse, looked "Ho!" shouted a voice.
over toward this low, dark object, sup- It was Benson.
posed to be Benson, he recalled the "Pitch in, Carl!" he cried. "This
above conversation. This dark object fire is making headway. Grass is like
soon disappeared. Carl also went away, tinder."
purposing, in another part of the bush, What if the flames should get past
to hunt up the sheep of his master, Mr. the boys, ravage across the bush in
Robert Edmonds. every direction, reach the long wool-
"Ah!" said Carl, a half-hour later, sheds and level them, burning, too, the
"there are the sheep, and I will pull fences that enclose the sheep-run and
up by that stream and have my din- -Carl did not dare to think any longer.
ner. In every possible way, the boys fought
It was an easy matter to kindle a fire, the fire. They would run ahead, ignite
make a pot of tea, and toast the bread untouched patches of grass, and watch-
he had brought in his lunch-basket. ing and beating down the flames in the
While he contentedly ate his lunch, rear, let in front the fire conquer fire.
the sheep contentedly browsed amid They were so busy that they did not
the grass near the banks of the stream. observe the arrival of a third party, and
There, by the water, green patches Benson called out to Carl:
could be found, while away from the "How did this fire start?"
stream the herbage was fast drying and "It-" Carl hesitated. Undoubt-
withering, so long had the country been edly it originated in his noon-camp, he
without rain, thought. Should he confess?
Carl extinguished, as he thought, "You needn't own up if you don't
every trace of his fire, mounted his want to, do you say? I cannot let you
horse and rode off to hunt up another tell a lie," said Benson, sneeringly.
section of his master's great flock. He You must not tell it to Edmonds. Be
soon reached the great forest, and as a good boy."
it was free from all underbrush, he "No, I wont tell a lie. I suppose it
could easily ride beneath the spread- came from my camp-fire."
ing branches. For about ten minutes Your chance's gone for employ-
he penetrated the forest, and not see- ment," said Benson.
ing any sheep, he slowly retraced his "Can't help it. Shan't put the fire
way. He made a very leisurely retreat; out with a lie."
and by the time he was in the open But who was the new arrival work-
country again half an hour had elapsed. ing in the rear of the boys? They
But what was it he saw in the neigh- chanced to turn, and there was the
borhood of his late camp-fire! owner of the sheep-run.
129








"He heard every word," thought compare it with something else that
Carl. "I am a hopeless case." will burn, and see what resemblances
There was nothing said by Mr. Ed- we can find.
monds, but he gave his attention to the You will select charcoal, I am sure,
fire, determinedly fighting it until it as being the most like mineral, coal or
sullenly sank lower and lower, and all any thing that will burn. Charcoal,
along the red line of attack went out. you will probably know, is charred wood,
"A good deed done!" said Benson, wood that has been partly burned in a
complacently. pit or smothered place. If you examine
"Well, yes;" replied Mr. Edmonds. pieces of this, you will see the woody
"One good deed done, the fire is out." structure quite plainly. The grain of
Was any thing else done that was not the wood shows in every piece, and
good? Benson shrugged his shoul- traces of bark may sometimes be found.
ders and looked uneasy. Is there any thing like this in your
"How did the fire start, boys? It's coal? Choose a piece of soft coal,
a terrible thing, you know, if fire gets sometimes called bituminous coal, for
under way on a sheep-run," said Mr. comparison. It is black, and soils the
Edmonds. fingers like charcoal, but still it seems
Benson turned pale. much harder and heavier than that. If
"I was under the bank of the stream, the dust is carefully brushed off, you
and, looking over the brow of the bank, will see that certain sides of your
I saw you set the fire, Benson. You specimens are quite hard and shiny and
knew only one boy could remain in my clean; but you will also observe that
employ, and why you set it, too, where there are two opposite sides which look
Carl had his lunch, you know well much more like the charcoal. They
enough. Carl, I like your honesty. are soft, appearing very dirty when
You may stay with me." rubbed, have no lustre, and, when you
And-Benson ? That day he sneaked examine them closely, you will see
away from the sheep-run to try his patches which show the grain and form
hand at wrong-doing elsewhere in the of wood. If you are fortunate, you may
bush.-The Interior. even find delicate impressions of leaves
or ferns.
These woody patches will cut and
flake up with a knife exactly as charcoal
does. Now split your piece of coal into
thinner pieces, making the break paral-
WHY DOES COAL BURN? lel with the dull surfaces-it splits most
easily in this way-and you will find
that every new surface thus exposed
Now that winter has come, and col- has the same resemblance to charcoal
lecting out-of-doors will be confined as those you have been examining.
mostly to snow-balls, perhaps you will This will convince you that the char-
be glad to turn your attention to some coal structure goes all the way through
things in the house which you would the piece. In fact, your coal is a kind
hardly think of looking at in the pleas- of natural charcoal, and as you will
ant summer time. readily guess by this time, was once
Suppose you make the coal-hod your wood.
first field for investigation. You know Something more, however, has hap-
that coal is dug out of the ground, that opened to it than to ordinary charcoal.
it is taken from mines like many other Besides being wood that has been
minerals. But most minerals will not partly decayed, which means the same
burn, and why should this? Let us thing, the weight of the rocks that
130











CHANE LCHANGEFUL HETTY. JUSTSO WITH HER
TLE HETTY, DRESSES,
SEE WHAT SHE TURNS F R OM
IS AT; .1B U F F TO
NEVER STAYS AT GREEN;
ONE THING f THEN AGAIN TO
LONG, CRIMSON,
TURNS FROM WHAT DOES
THIS TO THAT. HETTY MEAN?




T" P THEN SHE WRIT E i
A WORD CWR
TWO
OF HER COPy
FAIR;
THEN SHE BLO IS






NOw SHE TRIES TO
SEW A BIT,
THREADS
HER NEEDLE,
THEN
STUDIES FOR A
LITTLE WHILE
THEN IS OFF
AGAIN.










TAmLE; HER SLATE TO CIPHER, HETv, ITAH YOUR FOLDED
DOES NOT MAKE IT OUT, HANDS,
SAYS THAT EVERY THING GOES MAMMA SAYS TO YOU,-
WRONG; (TAKE LESS WORK AND DO IT
THEN BEGINS TO POUT. WELL,
THAT'S THE WAY TO DO."

























































OLGA HURTZ.

132








were on top of it when it was in the the slizghtst suspicion is immediately
ground have made it hard and solid, thrown into prison, and often without
and much heavier than common char- trial sent to Siberia-that word which
coal. In short, it has been changed makes the stoutest heart quiver.
into a mineral, has become mineralized. About a month after his marriage,
Soft coal has been only imperfectly one night, suddenly, without warning,
mineralized, so that in it we find much Leon was torn from his beautiful bride
that still looks like charcoal; while and lovely home, and put under arrest
hard coal, or anthracite, which has been as a Socialist. In vain he protested
more thoroughly changed, shows hardly his innocence, and all efforts of his de-
a trace of woody structure. It is hard voted wife to clear him were fruit-
and brilliant on all sides, less; he was doomed to banishment,
It will not seem strange that coal with no chance of defending himself.
should burn when you know that it was He started on his terrible journey, in
once wood, and you will see that the mid-winter, of 4,000 miles, to Irkoutsk,
reason why it burns so much more and when he reached there, fate de-
slowly than wood is because it is so creed that he should be sent still fur-
much more compact. their on, 2,000 miles, to a frozen soli-
tude, almost within hailing distance
of the Polar Sea.
The heart-broken, but loyal wife, re-
THE RUSSIAN EXILES. ceived permission to follow her exile
husband, and frail and delicate as she
was, undertook the long distance
I have a little boy who, whenever I through bitter winter weather, over the
am telling him a story, asks, "Mamma, pitiless white plains and dreary steppes.
is it true.'" So I will answer your un- After three months of horrible suffer-
Sasked question-this is a true story. ing, she reached Irkoutsk, fondly hoping
The wedding bells rang out merrily, there to meet Leon. Alas it was a
and the gay procession of guests moved cruel disappointment; as we know he
slowly to the sound of sweet music, had been removed. The shock was
from the little rustic church, toward the too great; and the fair young. Olga
home of Olga Hurtz, who that morn died of a broken heart. Many months
had wedded Leon Von Bayley, the suc- later the sad news came to the poor
cessful young surgeon of Odessa, a exile, which whitened his dark hair at
large town near Moscow. the age of twenty-seven. Finally Leon,
Feasting and dancing continued for with four other exiles, planned an es-
several days, as is the custom in Rus- cape by way of Behrings Straits to
sia, and then the fair Olga laid aside Alaska; but was missed, pursued by
her wedding veil and'silver crown, and Cossacks, and returned to endure still
assumed the more modest coif of white, greater hardships.
with a simple myrtle wreath-for she Boys and girls, I know your hearts
was still a bride, are beating with pain and sympathy at
In their charming home, their cup of this pathetic little tale. But do you
happiness seemed full. But you know ever stop to think what a privilege and
that northern country is disturbed by blessing it is to live in this grand free
great political troubles; the people are country of America, with its laws of
aroused and in arms against their ruler, justice and right ?
and the head that wears the golden Every one of you should take great
crown of Russia never knows peaceful pride in our noble, beautiful land.
rest. The life of the Czar is in con-
stant danger, and any one who is under A. DE G. H.
133







































-22"
vu -
-I i~ *1-

; ,-~
;Ii' "
.1" 7









WHAT MOTHER CANARY SAID.

"Just look! Papa Top-knot, when one "Sing on, Papa Top-knot, that song
gets a crumb, takes my heart
Up go all the heads, and they all must Right into the summer, all joking apart
have some. When our cage hangs aloft near the
They keep me quite busy from morning green window vine,
till night, And we see passing wings in the gar-
But their bright little ways are a con- den a-shine."
stant delight.
"In this home we have surely more
"They move their soft wings and they safety and
open their bright eyes, se an
open their bright eyes, Than if we were living abroad in the
They charm me with loving and tender trees,
surprise. In winter, the parlor, with fire-light
Then they all settle down with a satis- aglow,
led peep, In summer, the lattice with roses in
And the first thing you know, they are blow."
all fast asleep.

"They hear Papa singing, for only to- "I have envied the robins, that fly to
day the ground,
They looked up inquiringly, as much as But their peace is destroyed by the
to say,- cats prowling around,
'Oh, how we would like to join in, if And lately I've heard of a young mother
we could; sparrow,
Go on, Papa Top-knot, that sounds That went for a crumb, and was killed
pretty good.' by an arrow."

"Little Freddie and May, some tricks "Indeed, we have every thing here that
came to try, we need,
They whistled and called, and the birds Ripe berries and green leaves, and water
would reply. and seed,
They said,-' That's a bird's nest, and And plenty of sunshine and Freddie
no April fool, and May,
.We would just like to carry that cage To look in quite often and bid us, 'good
off to school!' day.' "
135








CONS E Q U ENCES: A fortable." This was not much to tell,
PARABLE. for Mrs. Crook was not given to confi-
dences, and a frequent remark of hers
was: "I know my own business, and
The baby held it in his hand, that is enough for me. I don't see that
An acorn green and small, I have any call to fill other people's
He toyed with it, he tossed it high, minds and mouths with what does not
And then he let it fall! concern them."
He sought for it, and sorely wept, Seeing, however, that Mrs. Crook's
Or did his mother know own mind and heart were entirely filled
(Though sweet she kissed and clasped by Mrs. Crook herself, it was, perhaps,
her boy) as well that she should not occupy too
What loss had grieved him so. much of the attention and affection of
her neighbors.
Then he was borne to other lands, It is a poor, narrow heart, and a small
And there he grew to man, mind, that find self enough to fill them;
And wrought his best, and did his but these sorts are not unknown, and
most, Mrs. Crook was a sample of such.
And lived as heroes can. When she spoke of having been left
But in old age it came to pass "comfortable' by her deceased part-
He trod his native shore, ner, there was a look of triumph and
Yet did not know the pleasant fields satisfaction on her face, and a "No-
Where he had played before thanks-to-any-of-you" kind of tone in
her voice, that must have jarred on the
Beneath a spreading oak he sat, ear of a listener.
A wearied man and old, No one ever saw a tear in Mrs. Crook's
And said,-" I feel a strange content eye, or heard an expression of regret
My inmost heart enfold. for the loss of "Crook" himself. He
"As if some sweet old secret wish had been dead and out of sight and mind
Was secretly fulfilled, almost these ten years past. He was
As if I traced the plan of life merely remembered as having done his
Which God Himself has willed! duty in leaving his widow "comfort-
"Oh, bonnie tree. which shelters me, able." People were left to speculate as
Where summer sunbeams glow, they chose about the amount repre-
I've surely seen thee in my dreams!- sented by the expression. It would
Why love thee so not have been good for the man or
woman who had ventured to ask a di-
ISABELLA FYVIE MAYO. rect question on the subject, but every-
body agreed that Mrs. Crook must have
something handsome. Surely "com-
COMFORTABLE MRS. fortable" means free from care, both
as regards to-day and to-morrow: not
CROOK. only enough, but a little more, or. else
anxiety might step in and spoil com-
BY RUTH LAMB. fort. If Mrs. Crook had more than
enough, she took care not to give of
If Mrs. Jemima Crook happened to her abundance. Neither man, woman
be in a very good temper, when taking nor child was ever the better for the
a cup of tea with some old acquaint- surplus, if such there were. One of
ance, she would sometimes allude to her favorite expressions was, "I don't
her private affairs in these words: "I care for much neighboring; I prefer
don't deny it; Crook has left me com- keeping myself to myself."
136








CONS E Q U ENCES: A fortable." This was not much to tell,
PARABLE. for Mrs. Crook was not given to confi-
dences, and a frequent remark of hers
was: "I know my own business, and
The baby held it in his hand, that is enough for me. I don't see that
An acorn green and small, I have any call to fill other people's
He toyed with it, he tossed it high, minds and mouths with what does not
And then he let it fall! concern them."
He sought for it, and sorely wept, Seeing, however, that Mrs. Crook's
Or did his mother know own mind and heart were entirely filled
(Though sweet she kissed and clasped by Mrs. Crook herself, it was, perhaps,
her boy) as well that she should not occupy too
What loss had grieved him so. much of the attention and affection of
her neighbors.
Then he was borne to other lands, It is a poor, narrow heart, and a small
And there he grew to man, mind, that find self enough to fill them;
And wrought his best, and did his but these sorts are not unknown, and
most, Mrs. Crook was a sample of such.
And lived as heroes can. When she spoke of having been left
But in old age it came to pass "comfortable' by her deceased part-
He trod his native shore, ner, there was a look of triumph and
Yet did not know the pleasant fields satisfaction on her face, and a "No-
Where he had played before thanks-to-any-of-you" kind of tone in
her voice, that must have jarred on the
Beneath a spreading oak he sat, ear of a listener.
A wearied man and old, No one ever saw a tear in Mrs. Crook's
And said,-" I feel a strange content eye, or heard an expression of regret
My inmost heart enfold. for the loss of "Crook" himself. He
"As if some sweet old secret wish had been dead and out of sight and mind
Was secretly fulfilled, almost these ten years past. He was
As if I traced the plan of life merely remembered as having done his
Which God Himself has willed! duty in leaving his widow "comfort-
"Oh, bonnie tree. which shelters me, able." People were left to speculate as
Where summer sunbeams glow, they chose about the amount repre-
I've surely seen thee in my dreams!- sented by the expression. It would
Why love thee so not have been good for the man or
woman who had ventured to ask a di-
ISABELLA FYVIE MAYO. rect question on the subject, but every-
body agreed that Mrs. Crook must have
something handsome. Surely "com-
COMFORTABLE MRS. fortable" means free from care, both
as regards to-day and to-morrow: not
CROOK. only enough, but a little more, or. else
anxiety might step in and spoil com-
BY RUTH LAMB. fort. If Mrs. Crook had more than
enough, she took care not to give of
If Mrs. Jemima Crook happened to her abundance. Neither man, woman
be in a very good temper, when taking nor child was ever the better for the
a cup of tea with some old acquaint- surplus, if such there were. One of
ance, she would sometimes allude to her favorite expressions was, "I don't
her private affairs in these words: "I care for much neighboring; I prefer
don't deny it; Crook has left me com- keeping myself to myself."
136









"And you keep every thing else to daring little blue eyes outside, with
yourself,' muttered one who had vainly this injunction, however:
tried to enlist her sympathy for another "Mind you never come here asking
who was in sickness and trouble. for flowers any more.
Mrs. Crook had a pretty garden, well- This report was long current among
stocked with flowers, according to the the inhabitants of a city court, but it
season. She was fond of working in needs confirmation.
it, and might be seen there daily, with Mrs. Crook objected to borrowers
her sun-bonnet on, snipping, tying and also, and perhaps she was not so much
tending her plants. to be blamed for that. Most of us
Children do so love flowers, and, who possess bookshelves, and once de-
thank God, those who live in country lighted in seeing them well filled, look
places have grand gardens to roam in, sorrowfully at gaps made by borrow-
ree to all, and planted by His own ers who have failed to return our treas-
loving hand. But in town it is differ- ures. But domestic emergencies oc-
ent, and Mrs. Crook lived just out- cur even in the best regulated families,
side one; far enough away from its and neighborly help may be impera-
smoke to allow of successful garden- tively required. It may be a matter of
ing, not too far to prevent, little feet Christian duty and privilege too, to
from wandering thither from narrow lend both our goods and our personal
courts and alleys, to breathe a purer aid. Mrs. Crook did not think so.
air, and gaze, with longing eyes, at the Lending formed no part of her creed.
fair blossoms. It always irritated Mrs. If other people believed in it, and liked
Crook to see these dirty, unkempt little their household goods to travel up and
creatures clustering around her gate, down the neighborhood, that was their
or peeping through her hedge. look-out, not hers.
"What do you want here?" she "I never borrow, so why should I
would ask, sharply. "Get away with lend?" asked Mrs. Crook. "Besides,
you, or I will send for a policeman. I am particular about my things. My
You are peeping about to see if you pans are kept as bright and clean as
can pick up something; I know you new ones, and if my servant put them
are. Be off, without any more telling!" on the shelves, as some people's ser-
The light of pleasure called into the vants replace theirs after using, she
young eyes by the sight of the flowers would not be here long. No, thank
would fade away, and the hopeful look you. When I begin to borrow, I will
leave the dirty faces, as Mrs. Crook's begin to lend, but not until then."
harsh words fell on the children's ears. Mrs. Crook's sentiments were so well
But as they turned away with unwill- known that, even in a case of sickness,
ing, lingering steps, heads would be when a few spoonfuls of mustard were
stretched, and a wistful, longing gaze needed for immediate use in poultices,
cast upon the coveted flowers, until the messenger on the way to borrow it,
they were quite lost to sight. passed her door rather than risk a re-
There was a tradition amongst the fusal, whereby more time might be lost
youngsters that a very small child had than by going farther in the first in-
once called, through the bars of the stance.
gate: "P'ease, Missis, do give me a Many were the invitations Mrs. Crook
fower." Also that something in the received to take part in the work of dif-
baby voice had so far moved Mrs. Je- ferent societies. One lady asked her
mima Crook, that she had stooped to to join the Dorcas meeting.
select one or two of the least faded "You can sew so beautifully," she
roses among all those just snipped said, "You would be a great acquisi-
from the bushes, and given them to the tion to our little gathering.
137








The compliment touched a tender No chance of widows weeping for the
point. Mrs. Crook was proud of her loss of Mrs. Crook, or telling of her
needlework, but to dedicate such skill almsdeeds and good works, or showing
in sewing to making under-clothing for the coats and garments made for them
the poorest of the poor: The idea was by her active fingers!
monstrous! It was the same when some adven-
Mrs. Crook answered civilly, that she turous collector called upon Mrs. Crook
could not undertake to go backwards to solicit a subscription. She had al-
and forwards to a room half a mile off. ways something to say against the ob-
It would be a waste of time. Besides, ject for which money was asked. If it
though it was probably not the case in were for the sufferers by an accident in
that particular meeting, she had heard a coal mine or for the unemployed at a
that there was often a great deal of time of trade depression:
gossip going on at such places. The "Why don't they insure their lives
visitor was determined not to be of- like their betters. Why don't they
fended, and she replied, gently, that save something, when they are getting
there was no chance of gossip, for, af- good wages? I am not going to en-
ter a certain time had been given to courage the thriftless, or help those
the actual business of the meeting, who might help themselves, if they
such as planning, cutting out, and ap- would think beforehand."
portioning work, one of the ladies read, At length every one gave up trying
whilst the rest sewed. "But," she to enlist her services, or to obtain con-
added, "if you are willing to help us a tributions from her, for the support of
little, and object to joining the meet- any good cause. And Mrs. Crook be-
ing at the room, perhaps you would stowed all her thoughts, her affections,
let me bring you something to be made her time and her means, on the only
at home. There is always work for person she thought worthy of them all
every willing hand." -namely, Mrs. Crook herself.
Then Mrs. Crook drew herself up and
said she did not feel inclined to take in
sewing. She had her own to do, and AN EVENING SONG.
did it without requiring assistance, and
she thought it was better to teach the
lower classes to depend upon them- BY COUSIN ANNIE.
selves than to go about pampering poor
people and encouraging idleness, as Twilight dews are gathering,
many persons were so fond of doing now- The bright day's done;
a-days. No doubt they thought they Upon thy downy couch
were doing good, but, for herpart, she be- Rest, little one.
lived that in many cases they did harm. Each tiny bird's hieing
The visitor could have told tales of Home to its nest;
worn-out toilers, laboring almost night Each flower-head's nodding
and day to win bread for their children, Upon its breast.
but unable to find either material for a n,
garment or time to make it. She could Be still now, little heart,
have pleaded for the widow and the or- Until the morrow
phan, if there had seemed any feelings Brings again its share
to touch, any heart to stir. But Mrs. Of oy and sorrow.
Crook's hard words and looks repelled May angels round thy couch
her, and she went her way, after a mere Be ever nigh,
" Good-morning. I am sorry you can- And over thy slumbers chant
not see your way to help us. Their lullaby.
138
















THE BABIES ARE COMING TO TOWN;



SOME WITH BLUE EVES, AND SOME WITH BROWN;












I d I- .-












SOME WITH A LAUGH AND SOME WITI A CRY,


ROCK-A-BYE BABY BYE.





139

















'4c




-~~ -. .















'44









Miss MABEL'S PONY.


This hose was called Brownie, because When Miss Mabel got home, she'd go,
he was brown; right away,

He would trot and would gallop, from And take off her hat, with its feathers
country to town; so gay;
When Miss Mabel was ready, he tossed And bring out an apple, for Brownie
his dark mane, to eat,
And away, like the wind, over valley And look in his eyes with a smile very
and plain! sweet.




By hedges and ditches, and over the But Tristy and Gyp, two dogs of her
hill, own,
own,
And dowvn by the water, and past the
When the horse had an apple, they
old mill,
wanted a bone;
He would go, without urging., for many
a ; But Miss Mabel said, "No," with a sly
a mile;
But Miss Mabel would carry the whip, little shrug,
just for style.' It is harder to trot than to sleep on a rug.




He ne\er got angry at what people For dogs that are fed upon this thing
said, and that,
And put back his ears, and threw up Will get very lazy, and grow very fat;
his ead; She said, "Run away, since you both
And never shied off when he was afraid, have been fed,
But hurried right on, and when stopped, And take a good run on the roadway
there he stayed. instead."
141
f s.*




























S -=-i' C ". ;t ra. CL ..i" _tra .,- dot
m1- Nil'al bald m l rosy-
chI I b,, camiie rtlnninr t., ht -r, rub-
Sbin his sl.::e ,. dark -\ s
"" -\\hv Ch rlie, ha \-, .i finished
--- i o, it n p s. : soon c Yes Ih r. is your

CLAR.-\N[) RbANt?"



sketch of the deer, its haunts and habits,
Clara was a little western girl. She when he interrupted:
had lived in San Francisco until she "Has oo ever seen a deer-a real live
was nine years old, when her dear one?" and his black eyes opened wide.
mamma and papa brought her east to "Oh, yes; and when we were com-
live with Aunt Mary and Cousin Char- ing east, across the plains, whenever
lie, and they were growing very fond of the train drew near a wooded stream,
her indeed, for she was so sweet and often the screaming whistle would star-
kind and always obedient. tle a herd of deer from their covert,
One day she was sitting out under the and they would rush up through the
blossoming trees on the old Worden trees, antlers erect, and sleek brown
seat, her book lying, unread, in her lap, bodies quivering with alarm, and fol-
and her eyes having a dreamy, far- lowed by the soft-eyed, gentle fawn.
away look in them, when, from the It was quite a pretty picture.
balcony overhead, sounded a piping "Tell me more; what tind of a city
little voice: did oo live I-" "
142











mI F'"1


ild litil 'w~I~q

IL

















(I I ,









II.











: rI








"A very beautiful city, Charlie. You Good day Mrs. Duck," said the three
should see our noble bay, with the
great ships riding at anchor; our fine meadow birds,
parks and stately buildings. Then if "From all the news wue can gather,
you should go down in Market street,
where most of the business is done, You're a very good friend, of very few
you would see some funny sights. All wor
kinds of people are there-Ranchmen, words.
Indians, Spaniards, English, Ameri- Then one flew away with a feather.
cans and lots of queer little Chinamen,
and they have small, dark shops full of
curious things, and besides spread their
wares on the walk.
After telling about the orange groves "Quack! said the duck, "That
and vineyards, the lovely flowers, es- feather is mine,
pecially the fuchsia, which winds its
branches like a vine over the porches, I see through your ways altogether;
often reaching the upper story of a You want our feathers, your own nests
house, Charlie thought it must be a
wonderful country, and expressed his to line,
intention of living in California when
he became a man. All in the bright summer weather."


"What shall we use?" Said the three
-In a Chinese village during a time of
drought a missionary saw a row of idols meadow birds,
put in the hottest and dustiest part of "There's no good in moss or in
the road. He inquired the reason and
the natives answered: "We prayed heather."
our gods to send us rain, and they wont, "We don't care a straw" said the old
so we've put them out to see how they
like the heat and dryness." blue drake,
"If you line all your nests with sole
leather."
THE UNSOCIABLE DUCKS.

Three meadow birds went out in great "Quack! Quack Quack You must
glee, think we are slack !
All in the sunshiny weather; You talk too polite altogether;
Down by the pond, with the reeds We've had quite enough of your high-
waving free, flown stuff,
Where the ducks were all standing And we know, you are birds of a
together. feather.
144





















p .



-r...s



















99
















OLIVE A. WADSWORTH.

Joey was a country boy,
Father's help and mother's joy;
In the morning he rose early,--
That's what made his hair so curly;
Early went to bed at night,-
That's what made his eyes so bright;
SRuddy as a red-cheeked apple;
Playful as his pony, Dapple;
Even the nature of the rose
Wasn't quite as sweet as Joe's,

Charley was a city boy,
Father's pet and mother's joy;
Always lay in bed till late;
That's what made his hair so straight;
Late he sat up every night,-
That's what made his cheeks so white;
Always had whatever he wanted,
He but asked, and mother granted;
Cakes and comfits made him snarly,
Sweets but soured this poor Charley.

Charley, dressed quite like a beau,
Went, one day, to visit Joe.
Come," said Joey, "let's go walking;
As we wander, we'll be talking;
And, besides,there's something growing
In the garden, worth your knowing."
"Ha!" said Charley, "I'm your guest;
Therefore I mnTst have the best.
All the inner part I choose,
And the outer you can use."

Joey gave a little laugh;
Let's," said he, go half and half."

"No, you don't!" was Charley's answer, On the tree a peach of gold,
" I look out for number one, sir All without, fair, ripe and yellow,
But when they arrived, behold, Fragrant, juicy, tempting, mellow,
146














.-An.. within, a gnarly stone.
There." said Joey, "that's your own;
As \ii choose, by right of guest,
Keep vo'ur choice-I'll eat the rest."

Charlev looked as black as thunder,
Scarce cl.:uld keep his temper under.
'T..Ais t. o bad, I think," said Joe ; ..'
** Thrli.i'h the cornfield let us go,
Somcthirig there, perhaps we'll see
That will suit you to a T."
S\'- e." said Charles, with accent nip-

Ti\ Ice \:,u will not catch me tripping;
Since I lost the fruit before,
\'u no:w owe me ten times-more.
Now the outer part I choose, '
And the inner you can use. "

ie\ .ie another laugh: ,
Better call it half and half."
',.- No, indeed!" was Charley's answer,
I 1:,:lk out for number one, sir !
Well I know what I'm about,-
For \ou, what's in; for me what's out!"
' C On ihe\' went, and on a slope
S La'\ a luscious cantaloupe,
S Rich and rare, with all the rays
''Fr,:m the August suns that blaze;
luite ;tkin its sweets you find,
A.nd wBi.',out the rugged rind.

Charlev gazed in blank despair,
Deepl \-exed and shamed his air.
Well," said Joey, "since you would
Choose the bad and leave the
Since \,:u claimed the outer
part.
.And disdained the juicy
heart.-
.Yours the rind, and mine the rest; And we'll share it half and half;
'But as you're my friend and guest, Looking out for number one
C~arle4, man, cheer up and laugh, Doesn't always bring the fun."
.47
Vt..















THE WISE SPIDER.

"Why do you weave that cruel net,
Oh, spider, tell me why?
And make it all so fair and fine,
To catch a little fly."
"Dear child, I hate in this my work,
To be misunderstood;
You see it is the idle flies
That keep my business good."
"They dance around, from this to that,
And sip what sweets they can,
And tease you sometimes, till, you know,
You have to use a fan.






You do not see industrious ants
imorisoned where I lurk,
Nur do I catch the honey bees,
They are to.:, hard at ,,work.
'Tis tI, the io,,-lish. idlcrs all.
Temptation's snare is sIpread.
So dress your doll, or learn your
task,
And I will weave my thread.







. .
.:. .'-:-..." . ' .,, -:









EARTHEN VESSELS. likely to meet disaster as the earthen
pot.'
Charley did'nt care just then to dis-
,prin:. time- had come, with its blos- cuss disobedient boys, so he turned at
s..mns and birk.i,; and Mrs. Rossiter once to the subject of the pot.
tlre'v uIl the -a-h of the east window, "Made of clay," he exclaimed, "well,
and pushed open the blinds, and drew I'd like to see a man make a thing like
a lo:.ngi deep breath of morning air, and that of clay."
nmornimg sunshine. "And so would I," said sister Mary,
SI think, Bridget," she said, "that who, from an upper window, had lis-
we might ensuree to bring the house- tened to the conversation.
plants ut-,...i.:irs to-day. There can "And so you shall, if I have no fur-
hardly be an'_'thcr frost, this year." their reminders of this sort, that my
"- Oh! lma I help?" asked little children are made of the same unreli-
Charley. I'1 be very careful." able material."
On that condition, that you be very That afternoon, the three, started
careful. y\'ou ma bring the little ones, for the pottery works. Mr. Sands, the
answered his mother. proprietor, kindly received them, and
The \work progressed safely. and fully explained all his processes. First
rapidly for awhile. Geraniums, roses, he pointed out what seemed to Charley
fuchsias, heliot:ropes, and so follow- a heap of dry hard common dirt; tak-
ing, came forth in profusion, many in ing a little piece of this he dipped it
bloom, and were placed in rows along into a basin of water and then squeez-
"' the garden borders, ready to be trans- ing and pressing it in his hand it soon
S ferred to the beds, for the summer. At became soft, and plastic, so that it
S last the little o:,nes were all brought by could be wrought to any shape. He
",". Charley, and onlv larger ones remained, then led the party to another room
'I I'll carry just this one big one," where a young man was engaged in
,. he said to'himself: "I'm stronger thus softening large masses. He would
S than mother thinks I am." But the first crumble the hard earth into fine
S pot full of earth. was heavier than Char- pieces; then wet and pack it together
le had thought it, and before he into a "loaf," so Charley called it, and
reached the place to set it down it had then raising it over his head throw it
.grown 've\ry hea\v indeed; and, glad to again with all his might upon the table
Sget it out of his :iching arms as quickly before him until it became soft and
as possible, he placed it on the curb so smooth through all its bulk. This, Mr.
suddenly, that with a loud crash it Sands said, was called "wedging the
Spared in the middle and lay in pieces clay," and that it was now ready for
at his feet. Glancing quickly at his "throwing" into shape.
mother and seeing in her face impend- "Will it come into shape if you just
ing reproach, he forestalled it by ex- throw it ?" said Charley.
claiming : Mr. Sands laughed heartily at this,
i.. Well, that pot broke itself very and answered, "come and see;" and
easily. \\hat's it made of, any how ? taking up one of the softened "loaves,"
h. The mother couldn't help but smile to use Charley's word for them, he led
at this attempted shifting of the blame the way to the next room. The young
to the pot, but she answered, in a mo- man who had been "wedging now
.'met. gravelv: followed and placed himself at a large
S'he pot. Charley, was made of clay; wheel which was connected by a strap
he same weak material from which or belt with a table at which Mr. Sands
-i.ttle boys are made; who, when they seated himself.
.forget to obey their mothers, are as Upon the table was another little
149























































HOW POTS AND PANS ARE MADE.
150








tatL.. l.i.ui and low, and upon this claimed Charley, holding up a wee one.
Mr. Sands placed his "loaf. Then "We call them long Toms," said Mr.
the '.Ytin" man began to turn the Sands. They are mostly used by nur-
wheel and tile loaf began to spin round sery-gardeners, because they take so
very r td(iid Mr. Sands next pressed little room."
his'tin.:-r right through the middle of "How long do they take to dry ?"
the cili., t forming the hole which we asked Mary, looking longingly at her
ali-avs s"-.*' at the bottom of flower- little jug.
p,:tS The.n, as it spun round, he "About a day; so we will leave your
worked tlh: clay gradually upwards and jug with the others, and go to the kiln
sloped, it outwards, using both hands, to see how they will be burnt to-mor-
and hol.:irin the edges with his fingers row."
and thumbs. The kiln was round, with a big door-
B. :-ft.'rc' Charley could express his sur- way, called a wicket.
praise, the little roll of clay was changed The pots and pans are put inside,
Into i flo:w.r-pot. With a square iron great care being taken that they should
f,' ool called a rib it was smoothed out- not touch, each other, or they would
side ..iand then the pot was lifted on a stick like loaves of bread. Pans are
.board. Oe after another followed till first glazed with a mixture of blue or
a lin;- i..r v as ready and they were red lead. The fire is burning below,
carrie:l :fft to be dried, and there are holes to allow the flames
H:,i\ .Jo you know when to leave to pass upwards amongst the pottery.
off stretching it ?" asked Mary of the When the kiln is full the wicket is
Spitter. bricked up and daubed over with road-
H.- lmau.hed, and pointed to a small mud.
iron ..Ice on the table. As soon as "Fancy using such dirty stuff!" said
the pt reachedd this he knew he must Mary.
Sleave off stretching it out. This iron "The manure in it makes it stick,
S is o:,f course put higher or lower ac- just as hair does in mortar. Clay would
cording to the size required, crack with the heat. So you see, dear,
NoJw I '[I make you a pitcher, mis- there's nothing so dirty or so common
:;si:." said the good-natured man, and that it may not be of some use in the
x%' with the s.ine kind of clay, just round- world."
Sing it a bit and giving a cunning little "How do you know when they are
pinch to t'form the spout, he made quite cooked enough ?" asked Charley.
a pretty )ju. "I'11 show you," said Mr. Sands, and
." \\'here's the handle ?" asked Char- he immediately led us to a small door,
ile\. which opened some way up the kiln.
*' Oh, that can't go on yet, sir! We "This is called the crown," said Mr.
muSlt wXait till the jug is dry, for we Sands.
Should not piess it tight enough to make It was a flat surface, with four holes
i t stick." which showed the red heat below, and
Bre.ad-pans and washing-pans are looked like little volcanoes in a good
made in exactly the same way as flower- temper.
j,pots. being moulded by the hand into "Do you see those iron rods hanging
1i cdiffere-nt forms. When the pots and like walking-sticks in the furnace ?
.pans leave the potter's wheel they are asked our guide. "Well, those are
S''taken. as we saw, to dry, and great care called trials, and at the end of each is
'Is required to keep them at a certain a lump of clay and glaze. If the glaze
heat, for it the frost gets to them now is burnt enough we suppose that the
'they crack and are useless. whole batch is done, but we sometimes
" Here's a comical little pot!" ex- make a mistake and spoil a lot."
11S








"What is done next?" asked Char- A BATTLE.
ley.
"If they are properly burnt, they are
allowed to cool gradually, and are then Do you like accounts of battles?
ready for sale." Here is one for you. I shall have to
By this time all were pretty well tell of a well-disciplined army, and some
tired, and so they said good morning to hard fighting, as well as of a victory.
Mr. Sands and went home. The scene is a quiet country district,
"Mother," said Charley, as they sat with fields and hedge-rows, not looking
down to dinner, I shall ask how it's a bit like war and bloodshed, and the
done oftener than ever, now, for I like time is a summer afternoon, hot, for it
going over factories. What's to be the is July, and a haze is over the moun-
next one, I wonder." tains, which rise a little way behind,
Bread," exclaimed Mary, as she cut as silent witnesses of the fray. The
a big slice for herself. "Shall it be sun begins to decline, and as the air
bread, mother?" grows cooler the army has orders to
' Yes, if you like, but I propose we start. There is a short delay of prep-
go to see the flour made first. So the arations, and then the warriors pour
next place we explore will be a flour- forth; not in confusion, but in a com-
mill." E. M. W pact, unbroken column, each keeping to
the ranks in perfect order, and never di-
verging from them. At first the army
RD 'S BREAK AST follows the high road, but ere long.
BIRDIE'S BREAKFAST. it passes through an opening in the
hedge, and crosses the field on the
MRS. S. J. BRIGHAM. other side. Still the soldiers march on,
never hindered, never straggling out of
Take your breakfast, little birdie,- place. It must have been a clever com-
Cracker-crumbs, and seeds so yellow, mander-in-chief to have trained them
Bits of sponge-cake, sweet and mellow; into such admirable obedience.
Come quite near me; Presently a fortress rises before them
Do not fear me. -that is the object of their expedition;
I can hear your happy twitter, rather, it is something within' the cita-
Although winter winds are bitter; del that they are sent to get, and have
Take your breakfast, little birdie, it they will. Not without a struggle,
Come! Oh, come and tell me birdie! though, for the enemy is on guard, and
All night long the snow was falling; when he sees the hostile army ap-
Long ago, I heard you calling; preaching, he sallies out to battle. He
Tell me, dearie, has no idea of surrendering without a
Are you weary? fight for it.
Can you sleep, when winds are blowing? The invaders gather up their forces
Frosts are biting, clouds are snowing and charge bravely up the hill, and in
Come! Oh, come and tell me, birdie! an instant, hand to hand, or something
very like it, the foes are locked together
Take your food, and trust me, birdie; in desperate conflict. Neither have
Daily good the Father giveth; they any guns, but they carry sharp
Bread to every thing that liveth. weapons with them, and soon the field
Come quite near me; is strewn with the dead and dying.
Do not fear me. The fight thickens-the issue is
Come each day, and bring your fellow, doubtful, but not long-the defenders
For your bread, so sweet and mellow; are routed, and the assailants press for-
Take your food, and trust me, birdie, ward to the citadel. Most skillful are
152








"What is done next?" asked Char- A BATTLE.
ley.
"If they are properly burnt, they are
allowed to cool gradually, and are then Do you like accounts of battles?
ready for sale." Here is one for you. I shall have to
By this time all were pretty well tell of a well-disciplined army, and some
tired, and so they said good morning to hard fighting, as well as of a victory.
Mr. Sands and went home. The scene is a quiet country district,
"Mother," said Charley, as they sat with fields and hedge-rows, not looking
down to dinner, I shall ask how it's a bit like war and bloodshed, and the
done oftener than ever, now, for I like time is a summer afternoon, hot, for it
going over factories. What's to be the is July, and a haze is over the moun-
next one, I wonder." tains, which rise a little way behind,
Bread," exclaimed Mary, as she cut as silent witnesses of the fray. The
a big slice for herself. "Shall it be sun begins to decline, and as the air
bread, mother?" grows cooler the army has orders to
' Yes, if you like, but I propose we start. There is a short delay of prep-
go to see the flour made first. So the arations, and then the warriors pour
next place we explore will be a flour- forth; not in confusion, but in a com-
mill." E. M. W pact, unbroken column, each keeping to
the ranks in perfect order, and never di-
verging from them. At first the army
RD 'S BREAK AST follows the high road, but ere long.
BIRDIE'S BREAKFAST. it passes through an opening in the
hedge, and crosses the field on the
MRS. S. J. BRIGHAM. other side. Still the soldiers march on,
never hindered, never straggling out of
Take your breakfast, little birdie,- place. It must have been a clever com-
Cracker-crumbs, and seeds so yellow, mander-in-chief to have trained them
Bits of sponge-cake, sweet and mellow; into such admirable obedience.
Come quite near me; Presently a fortress rises before them
Do not fear me. -that is the object of their expedition;
I can hear your happy twitter, rather, it is something within' the cita-
Although winter winds are bitter; del that they are sent to get, and have
Take your breakfast, little birdie, it they will. Not without a struggle,
Come! Oh, come and tell me birdie! though, for the enemy is on guard, and
All night long the snow was falling; when he sees the hostile army ap-
Long ago, I heard you calling; preaching, he sallies out to battle. He
Tell me, dearie, has no idea of surrendering without a
Are you weary? fight for it.
Can you sleep, when winds are blowing? The invaders gather up their forces
Frosts are biting, clouds are snowing and charge bravely up the hill, and in
Come! Oh, come and tell me, birdie! an instant, hand to hand, or something
very like it, the foes are locked together
Take your food, and trust me, birdie; in desperate conflict. Neither have
Daily good the Father giveth; they any guns, but they carry sharp
Bread to every thing that liveth. weapons with them, and soon the field
Come quite near me; is strewn with the dead and dying.
Do not fear me. The fight thickens-the issue is
Come each day, and bring your fellow, doubtful, but not long-the defenders
For your bread, so sweet and mellow; are routed, and the assailants press for-
Take your food, and trust me, birdie, ward to the citadel. Most skillful are
152







I-

























they, for with neither cannon nor bat- on, fed, and altogether taken care of by
Ster'inrams they speedily make a breach its slaves. With food before them they
in the walls, and in they rush, pouring would starve unless the slaves put it
Through the street and lanes of the de- into their mouths.
voted city. Yet they do not destroy it If they want to change their abode,
-they do not kill the inhabitants- the slaves must make the new habita-
'. they d':I: not even stay within the walls tion ready, and then carry their mas-
Sso hardly won. In a very short space ters on their backs to reach it. If the
of time they return as they came, save children have to be taken care of, the
that each bears a portion of'the spoil slaves must be the nurses. In fact,
for which they came. They form in fighting is the one single thing they
; order once again, they march in line, can do, and that, as we have seen, they
They regain their own quarters, but do well. As the supply of slaves is
each one carrying-would you believe necessary to their existence, every now
it ?-a young slave, and then they have to go and help
Yes, the army did not care to con- themselves in the way we have just
quer the strange city; the expedition seen them do; and though the idea of
Swas organized solely and entirely that slavery is abhorrent .to every mind, we
they might steal the young and bring must allow that they are brave soldiers,
Stem up in their own colony as slaves, and under excellent discipline.
SFor, through the long influence of evil Now, can you tell me who the sol-
Shabits, the race to which these war- diers are ? Go back to your history sto-
riors belong have lost their natural ries and think. Some old Roman race,
Powers, and so have now to be waited perhaps, or the early inhabitants of
153









Britain, when people knew no better? and W. Darling, knowing well that
Or some tribe of savages in America, there would be many wrecks, and much
or the South Sea islands at the present sorrow on the sea that dark, tempest-
time? Nay, you must guess again, or uous night, waited for daybreak; and
shall I tell you? Yes, you give it up. when at last it came, he went to look
Well, then, it is a people "not strong;" out. About a mile away he saw a ship
small and insignificant, yet wise, for in great distress, but the storm was so
this is what the Bible says, Go to the awful he had hardly courage to venture
ANT, consider her ways and be wise." through it for their relief. His daugh-
-Prov. vi: o1. ter Grace, who was watching the wreck
This race of warriors is none other through a glass, could no longer bear
than the slave-keeping ant, (Polyergus to see the poor fellows clinging to the
iufescens). I do not think you would piece of wreck which remained on the
meet with it in our woods, but in Switz- rocks where it had been broken, and
erland and other countries it is common, make no effort to help them. She
Huber, who wrote so much about bees knew they must be lost. So she im-
and ants, first witnessed an attack near plored her father to launch the life-
Geneva. I should tell you that the boat and let her go with him to the res-
young which they carry off are the cue. He consented, and father and
larva or young grubs, which, trans- daughter, she taking the oars while he
ferred to the nests of the conquerors, steered, went pulling away for the
soon become ants, and live the rest of wreck; and I can fancy how the poor
their lives in serving them, and wait- fellows watched the life-boat like a
ing on them, as slaves or servants would speck on the waters, counting each
their masters. minute as it neared them, then fearing,
How extraordinary! Do they pine as it seemed to be almost lost amid the
for their own kind? Are they happy mountains of hissing and boilingwaves,
in their bondage? We do not know, lest it should never come to them at
but as far as we can judge they ren- all. But at last they are alongside; the
der a willing and cheerful service, for- sufferers hesitate not a moment, but
getting themselves in what they do for jump for the life-boat, and so nine pre-
others. Then, of course, they are happy; cious lives were saved from a watery
we need not repeat the question; we grave.
are only lost in wonder at this strange Every one sang the praises of brave
and interesting page in Nature's book. Grace Darling. A sum of $3,500 was
presented to her as a testimonial, and
M. K. M. she was invited to dine with the Duke
of Northumberland. She died at the
early age of twenty-seven, of consump-
tion.
Now, my readers cannot all be Grace
Darling, but they can come to the help
GRACE DARLING, THE of the perishing; those that are weary
and ready to die. They can all do
HEROINE. something, by working, by little efforts
of self-denial, and by praying for those
who are in danger of being lost; and
I presume must of you have heard of then one day they will hear those won-
Grace Darling, the brave girl who lived derful words, "Inasmuch as ye have
with her father and mother at Long- done it unto the least of these, ye have
stone light-house. On the 6th of Sep- done it unto me." A testimonial
tember, 1838, there was a terrible storm, worth having indeed !
154











PP









811.
st i









B O N E Y. But Fannie would say, "Don't think
of it, Boney; I would like to have
Boney was not a thin cat by any them, but it would be wicked to catch
means, as his name would suggest, them you know." Pussey did not want
He was very stout for his age; this to give up the sport of hunting them,
could be explained by the fact that however, and Fannie would have to
he had always looked out for number take him right up, and carry him until
one, and had managed to secure a great they had passed them.
many nice things to eat in the course He had such lovely coaxing ways;
of his short life. he knew to a minute when it was lunch
His coat, which was striped, gray and time, and he had his in the kitchen,
black, had an infinite number of shades but he would steal up into the dining-
in it and was so beautiful, that more room, and pass round softly to Fannie s
than one lady wanted to buy him. place, and pop up into her lap-or, if
Boney was not his whole name. A she were standing up, he'd get upon the
lovely romance could be written, I've table and rub his furry cheek against
no doubt, out of the adventures of this her shoulder, and shut one eye.
cat, before Fannie found him, one cold Then Fannie would turn round, and
morning, in the summer-house. He his comical appearance, sitting there
was covered with dust and leaves, and with his little pink tongue sticking out
moaning piteously. Fannie said,- between his lips, would make Fannie
"Pussy, pussy," to him; and he tried just jump up and down with laughing.
to get up and come to her, but he Of course, he wanted some of Fan-
couldn't make any progress, and John nie's lunch, and he always got it, and
Henry came up at that moment, and this was the way he managed to get so
taking up the cat by the back of the fat and sleek.
neck, looked at it critically, and said,- One unfortunate time, Fannie was
"That cat ain't a-going to die-he'll very sick; the room was darkened, and
come out 'all right in a few days; he's the doctor came. All the pets were
been pelted with stones by those chil- not allowed to come near the room.
dren that live at the cross-roads, I It was, oh, so lonesome for Boney.
think." No one petted him like his little mis-
Fannie followed her brother into the tress, and they didn't put up with his
house with the cat, and he gave it some tricks, or laugh at his funny pranks.
warm milk, and Fannie covered it up, The time went by heavily enough, he
snug, by the kitchen stove, had not had on any of his ribbons, and
It was surprising how soon that he would go and stay away from home
pussy got well; and John Henry chose for days together, and when he came
to call him Boneset. The name took home just before dark, he had a wild
in the household, and though Fannie look, as if he had been in rough com-
called him Boney," Boneset was his pany.
real name. John Henry bought him a On a lovely morning in June, Fannie
collar, and Fannie would tie a beauti- was carried down stairs, to sit in the
ful scarlet ribbon on this, and away bay window, in the sunshine, and the
they'd go together, down the road to ivy hung down its fresh, green leaves.
the village post-office. He'd look very Boney saw her the first thing. His
sharply at the meadow-birds flitting delight knew no bounds; he rubbed his
over the stone fences, and the yellow back against her chair, turned his head
butterflies on the tall mullen stalks, as around in her robe as it lay on the car-
as if he would say,-" I'll get you any pet, and jumped into her lap And
of those you'd like to have, my dear Fannie smoothed his back with her
mistress.' little thin hand.
156























kA-;-







-Ir.
*i'. .~- .


*I -,. .j



h-.!

y :'i;J K

.fl~
5~v. i









After a time he went away, and no- A MISCHIEVOUS MONKEY.
body thought any thing about him, till
dinner-time, when, what should they
see coming up the piazza steps, but Jocko was hardly more than a baby
Boney, with a bobolink in his mouth monkey, but he was so full of mischief
He walked right up to Fannie, and laid that he often made his mother very
it down at her feet, and looked up at sad. Jocko's father used to get angry
his little mistress, with such satisfied, with him; sometimes he used to give
happy expression on his face, as if he Jocko a good spanking; only he hadn't
would say,-" There, that's the best I aslipperasthefather of little boys have!
could do, and you are welcome to it." Jocko's father and mother used to try
Fannie understood his good inten- to teach him that it was very bad man-
tions, and laughed heartily, and that ners to snatch any thing from the vis.
was the beginning of her recovery, itors who came up to the cage. That
Pretty soon, she was able to go out was a very hard lesson for Jocko to
again, and she and Boney had the learn. One day he snatched a pair of
best of times that summer, spectacles from an old lady, who was
looking into the cage and laughing;
the old lady screamed with fright.
Jocko tried to put the spectacles on
CATCHING SNOW FLAKES. himself; but the keeper made him give
them up. When the old lady got her
BY MRS. S. J. BRIGHAM. glasses again, she didn't care to look at
the monkeys any more.
Down from the sky, one winter day, Another day Jocko was taken very
The snow-flakes tumbled and whirled sick; he laid down in one corner of the
in play. cage, and could not be made to move.
White as a lily, His mother thought he was going to
Light as a feather, die, and she was quite sure that some
Some so chilly of his monkey cousins had hurt him.
Were clinging together. Not so," chattered Jocko's father, I
Falling so softly on things below, found some pieces of gloves among the
Covering all with beautiful snow. hay; I think the bad fellow has
Sthe wis at p, snatched them from somebody, and
Drifting about with the winds at play, partly eaten them."
Hiding m hollows along the way, Dear, dear," chattered mother mon-
White as a lily, key, "I think you are right." When
Light as a feather, she turned Jocko over, he was so afraid
Coming so still of being punished, that he pretended
T oucing so li tl weather, s to be fast asleep; but he heard all that
Touching so lightly the snow-birds his father and mother had said, and
wing, knew that they guessed right.
Silently covering every thing. They're just like boys," said George
Every flake is a falling star, Bliss one day, as he stood looking at
Gently falling, who knows how far ? the monkeys in Central park. George
White as a lily, is a boy, and he ought to know. But
Light as a feather, there is a great difference after all.
Hosts so still Boys can learn, better than monkeys,
Are falling together. not to get into mischief, and bother
Every star that comes fluttering down, their parents, and other people who
Falls, I know, from the Frost King's come where they are. Some boys do
crown. not behave better than monkeys.
158









After a time he went away, and no- A MISCHIEVOUS MONKEY.
body thought any thing about him, till
dinner-time, when, what should they
see coming up the piazza steps, but Jocko was hardly more than a baby
Boney, with a bobolink in his mouth monkey, but he was so full of mischief
He walked right up to Fannie, and laid that he often made his mother very
it down at her feet, and looked up at sad. Jocko's father used to get angry
his little mistress, with such satisfied, with him; sometimes he used to give
happy expression on his face, as if he Jocko a good spanking; only he hadn't
would say,-" There, that's the best I aslipperasthefather of little boys have!
could do, and you are welcome to it." Jocko's father and mother used to try
Fannie understood his good inten- to teach him that it was very bad man-
tions, and laughed heartily, and that ners to snatch any thing from the vis.
was the beginning of her recovery, itors who came up to the cage. That
Pretty soon, she was able to go out was a very hard lesson for Jocko to
again, and she and Boney had the learn. One day he snatched a pair of
best of times that summer, spectacles from an old lady, who was
looking into the cage and laughing;
the old lady screamed with fright.
Jocko tried to put the spectacles on
CATCHING SNOW FLAKES. himself; but the keeper made him give
them up. When the old lady got her
BY MRS. S. J. BRIGHAM. glasses again, she didn't care to look at
the monkeys any more.
Down from the sky, one winter day, Another day Jocko was taken very
The snow-flakes tumbled and whirled sick; he laid down in one corner of the
in play. cage, and could not be made to move.
White as a lily, His mother thought he was going to
Light as a feather, die, and she was quite sure that some
Some so chilly of his monkey cousins had hurt him.
Were clinging together. Not so," chattered Jocko's father, I
Falling so softly on things below, found some pieces of gloves among the
Covering all with beautiful snow. hay; I think the bad fellow has
Sthe wis at p, snatched them from somebody, and
Drifting about with the winds at play, partly eaten them."
Hiding m hollows along the way, Dear, dear," chattered mother mon-
White as a lily, key, "I think you are right." When
Light as a feather, she turned Jocko over, he was so afraid
Coming so still of being punished, that he pretended
T oucing so li tl weather, s to be fast asleep; but he heard all that
Touching so lightly the snow-birds his father and mother had said, and
wing, knew that they guessed right.
Silently covering every thing. They're just like boys," said George
Every flake is a falling star, Bliss one day, as he stood looking at
Gently falling, who knows how far ? the monkeys in Central park. George
White as a lily, is a boy, and he ought to know. But
Light as a feather, there is a great difference after all.
Hosts so still Boys can learn, better than monkeys,
Are falling together. not to get into mischief, and bother
Every star that comes fluttering down, their parents, and other people who
Falls, I know, from the Frost King's come where they are. Some boys do
crown. not behave better than monkeys.
158












i'l i I i IFl Il Ii
-lllpli I' l l l



'' p" I WR ',
1. I lll,'!1)' II II' 'I Illll i l l i i -tII lrl ,l P.. I.. i 1..1 'i
iII i1 ,1 I' I I II, II I '




Jil- je

ji 1 li ,I




























A MISCHIEVOUS MONKEY.












YE IN








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1 ..4





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4.








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THE AFRICAN SLAVE taught him a great deal, and then sent
BOY. him, with some other lads, to Egypt, to
help in the Mission work.
Unfortunately, his companions had
There are few who have not heard soon forgotten the good things they
or read of the great traveler, Sir Samuel had been taught, and behaved so badly
Baker, who found his way into the heart that the Missionaries in Egypt refused
of Africa, and whose brave wife accom- to keep them, and turned them out, to
panied him in all his perilous journeys, find their way back as best they might
The natives, when they found how kind to their own people; but Saat had no
he was, and how interested in trying to people of his own, and he never rested
help them, called him the Great White until he succeeded in finding the Great
Man. White Man of whom he had heard so
One day, after traveling a long dis- much.
tance, Sir Samuel and Lady Baker were Lady Baker's kind heart was touched.
sitting, in the cool of the evening, in She determined to keep the little black
front of their tent, enjoying a cup of boy and train him to be her own at-
tea in their English fashion, when a tendant. He accompanied the travel-
little black boy suddenly ran into the ers upon their wonderful journey to the
courtyard, and throwing himself at Source of the Nile, and his attachment
Lady Baker's feet raised his hands to- to his mistress was very touching.
ward her, and gazed imploringly into
her face.
The English lady thought that the
little lad was hungry, and hastened to CLIMBING.
offer him food; but he refused to eat,
and began, with sobs and tears, to tell The ivy, while climbing, preserves
his tale. He was not hungry, but he its pointed leaf, but when it has reached
wanted to stay with the white lady and the top of its support it spreads out
be her slave, into,a bushy head and produces only
In broken accents he related how rounded and unshapely leaves.
cruelly he had been treated by the mas-
ter, who stole him from his parents The ivy, climbing upward on the tower,
when he was quite a little boy; how he In vigorous life its shapely tendrils.
made him earn money for him, and
beat him because he was too small to weaves,
undertake the tasks which were set But, resting on the summit, forms a
him. He told how he and some other bower,
boys had crept out of the slave-hut at And sleeps, a tangled mass of shape-
night and found their way to English less leaves.
Mission House, because they had heard
of the white people, who were kind to So we, while striving, climb the up-
the blacks.
Then little Saat, for that was his ward way,
name, made Lady Baker understand And shape by enterprise our inner
how much he loved the white people, lives;
and how he wished to be her little But when, on some low rest we idly
slave. She told him kindly that she stay,
needed no slave-boy, and that he must Our purpose, losing pint no longer
go back to his rightful master. But lit- ur purpose, losing point no longer
tie Saat said, "No, he had no master;" strives.
and explained that the Missionaries had ELLIOT STOCK.
161









THE AFRICAN SLAVE taught him a great deal, and then sent
BOY. him, with some other lads, to Egypt, to
help in the Mission work.
Unfortunately, his companions had
There are few who have not heard soon forgotten the good things they
or read of the great traveler, Sir Samuel had been taught, and behaved so badly
Baker, who found his way into the heart that the Missionaries in Egypt refused
of Africa, and whose brave wife accom- to keep them, and turned them out, to
panied him in all his perilous journeys, find their way back as best they might
The natives, when they found how kind to their own people; but Saat had no
he was, and how interested in trying to people of his own, and he never rested
help them, called him the Great White until he succeeded in finding the Great
Man. White Man of whom he had heard so
One day, after traveling a long dis- much.
tance, Sir Samuel and Lady Baker were Lady Baker's kind heart was touched.
sitting, in the cool of the evening, in She determined to keep the little black
front of their tent, enjoying a cup of boy and train him to be her own at-
tea in their English fashion, when a tendant. He accompanied the travel-
little black boy suddenly ran into the ers upon their wonderful journey to the
courtyard, and throwing himself at Source of the Nile, and his attachment
Lady Baker's feet raised his hands to- to his mistress was very touching.
ward her, and gazed imploringly into
her face.
The English lady thought that the
little lad was hungry, and hastened to CLIMBING.
offer him food; but he refused to eat,
and began, with sobs and tears, to tell The ivy, while climbing, preserves
his tale. He was not hungry, but he its pointed leaf, but when it has reached
wanted to stay with the white lady and the top of its support it spreads out
be her slave, into,a bushy head and produces only
In broken accents he related how rounded and unshapely leaves.
cruelly he had been treated by the mas-
ter, who stole him from his parents The ivy, climbing upward on the tower,
when he was quite a little boy; how he In vigorous life its shapely tendrils.
made him earn money for him, and
beat him because he was too small to weaves,
undertake the tasks which were set But, resting on the summit, forms a
him. He told how he and some other bower,
boys had crept out of the slave-hut at And sleeps, a tangled mass of shape-
night and found their way to English less leaves.
Mission House, because they had heard
of the white people, who were kind to So we, while striving, climb the up-
the blacks.
Then little Saat, for that was his ward way,
name, made Lady Baker understand And shape by enterprise our inner
how much he loved the white people, lives;
and how he wished to be her little But when, on some low rest we idly
slave. She told him kindly that she stay,
needed no slave-boy, and that he must Our purpose, losing pint no longer
go back to his rightful master. But lit- ur purpose, losing point no longer
tie Saat said, "No, he had no master;" strives.
and explained that the Missionaries had ELLIOT STOCK.
161









ON TRIAL. kind to me from the time I was a little
kitten, I will be his lawyer, and try to
Little Hal Keys was pretty sure to get his punishment made as light as I
throw a stone at every pussy cat he can.
saw, and so all the cats around used to Twelve cats had to be found who
have a great deal to say about him as could say that they were not quite sure
they sat together on the back fences, that Hal was such a bad, boy as he
or when they had a party in the big seemed to be. They were stay-at-home
barn. At last the cats determined to cats,who did not know what was going
do something about it, and so they on outside of the comfortable houses
said: "We will have him up for trial where they lived. These twelve cats


























DOLLY VARDEN ACCUSING JACK WITH CRUELTY.
before Judge Thomas White." Hewas were to be the jury, and it was their
the wisest and oldest of all the cats in duty to hear all that the lawyers and
town, and wore spectacles that made the witnesses had to say about Hal's
him look even wiser than he was. doings, and then to tell whether or not
Eleven of the most learned cats said they thought he ought to be punished.
they would be lawyers, and get other At last the day of the trial came;
cats t be witnesses, to tell what Hal Judge Thomas White sat down in his
had done, and try to get him punished. big chair and took his pen; the law-
One of the eleven said: For the sake years took their places; the twelve jury
of Hal's mother, who has always been cats were brought in, and put in a high
162









box, so they could not jump out and Cat town for two days and one night."
run away. Hal was brought in and There were tears in Hal's eyes, but
put in the prisoner's box, as they call the Judge had no pity on him, and he
it; and Christopher Gray, his mother's called in some of the strongest cats to
old cat, took his place beside Hal. take him. Oh! what a long, hard way
Three cats, called "reporters," came it was; over fences, under houses, and
in with pockets full of paper and pen- through the barns. It was hard work
cils, to write down all that is said; to for Hal to keep up with them, but they
print in the newspapers, for all cats in made him. What a time he had after
the world to read. he got to Cat town. All of the cats
The first witness to tell all the bad gathered around him, and howled at
she knew about Hal was his sister him, and scratched his face and hands,
Alice's little Dolly Varden. How and made him wish he was any place
saucy she looked, with the blue ribbon but there. At last when he was set
tied around her neck, as she sat on the free, he never could have found his
witness stand telling how Hal chased way home, if pretty little Dolly Var-
her from cellar to garret; and stepped den had not forgiven him, and shown
on her tail; and gave her saucer of him the way back.
milk to the dog Jack whenever he got Hal was never known after that to
a chance. "Cruel, cruel boy," said throw a stone at a cat, or to treat one
Dolly Varden, "he teases his sister al- badly in any way.
most as much as he teases me."
Hal trembled from head to foot when
he heard what Dolly Varden said, for
he knew it all was true, and he was
much afraid that a very hard punish- TWO LITTLE GIRLS.
ment would be given to him. Then
the old black cat, on whom Hal had
thrown a dipper of hot water, was They don't know much, these little girls,
called to the witness stand. Poor old I'll tell you why 'tis so,
thing! the hot water had taken the They played away their time at school,
fur off his back. Then came another And let their lessons go.
cat, limping up to the witness stand,
whose leg had been broken by a stone One took a slate to cipher,
which Hal had thrown. There were so And all went very well,
many witnesses that it would make my Until she came to four times eight,
story too long to tell about them all And that she could not tell.
All that Christopher Gray could say in
Hal's favor was: "He has a good The other would make pictures,
mother." In her copy book at school,
"The more shame for him," said Of boys and girls and donkeys,
one of the lawyers. Which was against the rule.
When the jury had heard all that was
to be said, they went out of the room But nothing good could come of it,
together; in five minutes they came And this is what befel;
back; all agreed that Hal should be She tried to write to papa,
punished. Then Judge Thomas White, And found she could not spell.
in his most solemn tone, said : "Albert
Keys, you are found guilty of great The teacher said, "Of all sad things,
cruelty .to good cats everywhere. I I would not be a dunce,
must, therefore, pronounce sentence But would learn to write and cipher,
upon you. You must go with us to And begin the work at once.
163









SHE HAD NEVER SEEN A TREE.


They took the little London girl, from Oh, like some horrid monster, of which
out the city street, the child had dreamed,
To where the grass was growing green, With nodding head, and waving arms,
the birds were singing sweet; the angry creature seemed;
And every thing along the road, so filled It threatened her, it mocked at her, with
her with surprise, gestures and grimace
The look of wonder fixed itself, within That made her shrink with terror, from
her violet eyes. its serpent-like embrace.


The breezes ran to welcome her; they They kissed the trembling little one;
kissed her on each cheek, they held her in their arms,
And tried in every way they could, their And tried in every way they could to
ecstacy to speak, quiet her alarms,
Inviting her to romp with them, and And said, Oh, what a foolish little girl
tumbling up her curls, you are, to be
Expecting she would laugh or scold, So nervous and so terrified, at nothing
like other little girls, but a tree !"


But she didn't-no she didn't; for this They made her go up close to it, and
crippled little child put her arms around
Had lived within a dingy court, where The trunk, and see how firmly it was
sunshine never smiled; fastened in the ground;
And for weary, weary days and months, They told her all about the roots, that
the little one had lain clung down deeper yet,
Confined within a narrow room, and on And spoke of other curious things, she
a couch of pain. never would forget.


The out-door world was strange to her Oh, I have heard of many, very many
-the broad expanse of sky, girls and boys
The soft, green grass, the pretty flow- Who have to do without the sight, of
ers, the stream that trickled by; pretty books and toys-
But all at once she saw a sight, that Who have never seen the ocean; but
made her hold her breath, the saddest thought to me
And shake and tremble as if she were Is that any where there lives a child,
frightened near to death, who never saw a tree.
164







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