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 Material Information
Title: Newsletter
Uniform Title: Newsletter (Women and Food Information Network)
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Women and Food Information Network
Publisher: The Network
Place of Publication: Cambridge Mass
 Subjects
Subject: Women -- Periodicals -- Developing countries   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Developing countries   ( lcsh )
Women in rural development -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Women in agriculture -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Women and Food Information Network.
General Note: Description based on: No. 10 (Nov./Dec. 1983); title from caption.
Funding: Electronic resources created as part of a prototype UF Institutional Repository and Faculty Papers project by the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00055274
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 11243684

Table of Contents
    Grassroots projects addressing family food production systems
        Page 1
        The care women's development project in Bangladesh
            Page 1
            Page 2
            Page 3
        Other grassroots projects for family food production
            Page 4
            Page 5-8
            Page 9
        Preservation of genetic resources
            Page 10
        Publications-briefly noted
            Page 10
        Letter for the editor
            Page 11
            Page 12
Full Text





Eu THE WOMEN AND FOOD INFORMATION NETWORK







Newsletter: Volume 2, No.2 Winter 1986

GRASSROOTS PROJECTS ADDRESSING FAMILY FOOD PRODUCTION SYSTEMS
Martha Lewis, Guest Editor



World food production is at an all time high and continues to climb; up 45 percent
in the last 15 years. Yet in spite of increasing food supplies, hunger and
malnutrition are still the reality for million of the poor. This anomolous
situation is causing thoughtful development planners to look for alternate ways to
improve food supplies and nutritional levels for the poor. Traditional family food
strategies are being reappraised as a way to improve nutrition and provide an
element of self sufficiency. Home vegetable gardens are a central element in
traditional strategies and women are central to home gardens.

Because they earn no foreign exchange and are often not reflected in market
production figures, it has been hard to make the case for investing scarce national
resources in home gardens. However groups working at the grassroots level such as
private voluntary agencies (PVO's), the Peace Corps and local community development
groups are responding to the crisis on food production with a variety of small scale
food production strategies. Research an the economic and nutritional worth of home
gardens is also accumulating evidence of their valuable contributions to both
household nutrition and income. This issue will share some of the recent activities
by telling the story of one successful project in some detail, and briefly
summarizing a number of others. It will also note resources where further
information can be obtained. M.L.

THE CARE WOMEN'S DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN BANGLADESH
This report is drawn from Reaching Rural Women, an Evaluation published by CARE
in Bangladesh in 1983, and from internal project reports.

The Women's Development Program (WDP) is an integrated rural development project
which works with rural women in 90 villages in Tangail District, located in the
north central part of Bangladesh. CARE runs the program in cooperation with the
Ministry of Health and Population Control with substantial financial support from
NORAD, the Norwegian International Development Agency.

The goal of the program is to improve the health and socio-economic status of rural
Bangladeshi women and their families. In the WDP, CARE female extension workers
help village women to implement a variety of health, family planning and
agricultural activities. Intensive training and extension services for village
women are emphasized in the project. The program began work in July, 1980 in 60
villages and expanded to 90 villages in July 1981. A year round program of health
and agricultural activities are intended to be mutually reinforcing. The extension
workers' activities address a variety of inter-related problems of poverty, poor
health, and the restrictions on the role of rural women.









Eu THE WOMEN AND FOOD INFORMATION NETWORK







Newsletter: Volume 2, No.2 Winter 1986

GRASSROOTS PROJECTS ADDRESSING FAMILY FOOD PRODUCTION SYSTEMS
Martha Lewis, Guest Editor



World food production is at an all time high and continues to climb; up 45 percent
in the last 15 years. Yet in spite of increasing food supplies, hunger and
malnutrition are still the reality for million of the poor. This anomolous
situation is causing thoughtful development planners to look for alternate ways to
improve food supplies and nutritional levels for the poor. Traditional family food
strategies are being reappraised as a way to improve nutrition and provide an
element of self sufficiency. Home vegetable gardens are a central element in
traditional strategies and women are central to home gardens.

Because they earn no foreign exchange and are often not reflected in market
production figures, it has been hard to make the case for investing scarce national
resources in home gardens. However groups working at the grassroots level such as
private voluntary agencies (PVO's), the Peace Corps and local community development
groups are responding to the crisis on food production with a variety of small scale
food production strategies. Research an the economic and nutritional worth of home
gardens is also accumulating evidence of their valuable contributions to both
household nutrition and income. This issue will share some of the recent activities
by telling the story of one successful project in some detail, and briefly
summarizing a number of others. It will also note resources where further
information can be obtained. M.L.

THE CARE WOMEN'S DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN BANGLADESH
This report is drawn from Reaching Rural Women, an Evaluation published by CARE
in Bangladesh in 1983, and from internal project reports.

The Women's Development Program (WDP) is an integrated rural development project
which works with rural women in 90 villages in Tangail District, located in the
north central part of Bangladesh. CARE runs the program in cooperation with the
Ministry of Health and Population Control with substantial financial support from
NORAD, the Norwegian International Development Agency.

The goal of the program is to improve the health and socio-economic status of rural
Bangladeshi women and their families. In the WDP, CARE female extension workers
help village women to implement a variety of health, family planning and
agricultural activities. Intensive training and extension services for village
women are emphasized in the project. The program began work in July, 1980 in 60
villages and expanded to 90 villages in July 1981. A year round program of health
and agricultural activities are intended to be mutually reinforcing. The extension
workers' activities address a variety of inter-related problems of poverty, poor
health, and the restrictions on the role of rural women.







- 2 -


From the beginning it was clear that any significant improvement in the health and
socio-economic status of women would require an integrated programming approach.
Poverty, ignorance and ill-health are mutually reinforcing, constituting a vicious
and continuing cycle of under- development. An integrated approach, which included
strong health, agriculture and training components, was therefore chosen. In this
integrated program, in addition to agriculture five other basic interventions are
included:
1. Introduction and use of homemade oral rehydration therapy for diarrhea
management;
2. Distribution of high-potency Vitamin A capsules to children under six for
prevention of night blindness;
3. Child weighing and nutrition education;
4. Immunizations;
5. Provision of follow up for family planning.

Three main agricultural activities are included in the WDP. Over the past years,
CARE has had program experience with more than 30 types of agricultural income
generating activities targeted at rural women. These activities were diverse,
ranging from silk worm rearing to pineapple cultivation to pisciculture. While
experimentation continues, three main activities now form the core of the program;
raising chickens, vegetable cultivation and fruit tree planting. In addition to
being popular in the villages and readily implementable with no marketing or supply
problems, these three activities also have close tie-ins with the health component.
For example, "lal shak" or red spinach is one of the richest sources of Vitamin A
The fruit trees planted are chosen for their good food value such as papayas, which
are rich in Vitamin A. Increased production of poultry and eggs is encouraged to
increase the protein available to the families of program participants. The three
main agricultural activities are implemented as follows:
1. Poultry Raising: Village women are taught the basics of small, household
flock management with stress laid on provision of adequate poultry feed,
housing and vaccination. Several women from each village are taught how to
vaccinate birds, receiving a small fee from the birds' owner for this service.
The program also raises improved variety cockerels for crossbreeding with
village birds to improve the egg laying ability of the village flocks.

2. Vegetable cultivation: Women are given training and seeds and seedlings
to grow nutritious vegetables in small "Kitchen" gardens around the household.

3. Fruit tree planting: Banana, papaya, coconut, lemon and other types of
fruit tree seedlings are supplied to village women for cultivation in their
households.

In the garden project high-quality seeds and seedlings for carrots, cabbages,
radishes, tomatoes, cauliflower and two types of local leafy vegetables, lal shak
and along shak, are distributed by CARE and then cultivated by village women with
CARE field staff supervision. The implementation of the winter vegetable project
began in October, 1980. The CARE extension staff, who are mostly women with
in-house training in health, agriculture and community development, spend two or
three days per week in each of the villages under their supervision. Each worker







-3 -


works in her assigned villages all year, but most of her time during October,
November and December is devoted to winter vegetables. The extension workers
encourage the village women to make a "kitchen garden", a small vegetable garden
near the homestead. The village women then decide which of the seven types of
vegetable seeds/seedlings available in the program they would like to cultivate.

None of the poultry, seeds or seedlings for the agriculture projects are given free
of cost to women. These inputs are sold at prices approximating a reasonable market
price to encourage proper care and to habituate women to undertake these activities
even when inputs have a cost. In this way, women could continue the activities from
open-market sources. However, CARE does not actually take receipt of the money paid
in their village "Development Fund", a communal fund held in a bank account which is
jointly operated by the village Secretary and CARE. As the fund accumulates, the
money may be used by the village women for other self-help projects in their
villages, such as the purchase of poultry vaccination kits, the sinking of hand
tube-wells or school repairs. In this way, the village women are given an extra
incentive to undertake the projects, while also learning about receipts, banking and
group decision making on their own.

The Program is implemented with multi-purpose female extension workers. These staff
typically have a secondary school education but no previous work experience.
Applicants for the jobs are recruited through word-of-mouth, newspaper
advertisements and notices posted at girls' colleges and other public places. In
its initial phase, the program often had difficulty in finding qualified female
staff. However, the project now receives applications from more than 100 females
whenever a position is advertised.

These female staff may live with relatives, other female extension workers or a
respectable family with an extra room. Theimarital status of the female staff seems
to make little difference in their job performance and both married and unmarried
women are hired. The chief qualities which are sought during recruitment are a
willingness to travel and work in village areas, basic intelligence and the ability
to speak persuasively and directly. About one quarter of the female staff are
Hindu, somewhat more than the population as a whole staff are posted with little
regard for their religion or the religion of the villages served. While some
extension workers may live in villages where WDP is working, they prefer to work in
villages where they do not live.

Newly hired extension workers are given an introduction to all aspects of the
program and their work during one to two week sessions run by senior staff and
experienced extension workers. The methodology used in teaching extension workers
about maternal and child health, nutrition, small-scale agriculture and poultry is
modeled on the type of teaching that the workers will eventually be doing in the
field. It includes small group discussions, practical and field exercises and
reflective evaluation. The new extension workers then serve as "apprentices" along
side experienced staff until they are capable of working alone. Additional
in-service training is given on bi-weekly staff meetings and in special "refresher"
or staff-development training sessions.







-4-


During the 4 years of the program some adjustments have been made to the project's
agricultural activities, mostly to enable village women to continue these activities
with less reliance on outside support. Winter vegetable cultivation is still one of
WDP's main components; but more common and/or nutritious vegetables, such as sweet
potatoes, have been substituted for some of the vegetables first ordered. Selected
village women now grow and sell vegetable seedlings themselves in the village:
seedlings are no longer cultivated in the CARE office. Distributed of high yield
variety chickens was stopped in 1983, when it became clear that despite intensive
efforts to help them survive village conditions, these birds had extremely high
mortality. Poultry vaccinations of local variety birds and extension continue. All
project commodities are still sold at approximately market price, with sale proceeds
deposited in the village women's Development Fund. Project evaluation established
that the average gross value of vegetable produced was 313TK per woman, which was a
significant contribution to family economy. Most produce was consumed at home, some
was sold.

By 1982, CARE was confident that the WDP's particular "package" of activities was
effective and decided to test the replicability of WDP's activities in other parts
of Bangladesh, to enhance the impact of its other programs. In September, 1982,
women's health and agriculture activities similar to those of WDP were begun in
three other districts with the Deep Tubewell Irrigation and Credit Project, another
well-established CARE project which until then had only worked with landed, male
farmers. One year later, a WDP-type program is operating 18 villages with a
population of 22,000 in the Deep Tubewell Project.

CARE staff continue to refine activities and evaluate program content. Additional
income generation activities, such small-scale food processing and a credit program,
are also under consideration. Project staff are becoming sensitive to a need for
explicit activities to raise the consciousness and social awareness of village women
about their rights and capabilities. For more information, contact Care Asian
Regional Program Manager. Tom Drahman, 660 First Ave, New York, 10016 (212)
686-3110

OTHER GRASSROOTS PROJECTS FOR FAMILY FOOD PRODUCTION

Partners of the Americas has support a variety of projects that are building
family food systems. Partners is a private non-profit organization with operations
in 43 U.S. states 27 nations of Latin America and the Caribbean. The program links
human and institutional resources of a U.S. state, such as Kansas, with those of an
area in Latin America, such as Paraguay. Voluntary committees on both sides of the
"partnerships" determine which projects to carry out. Each year, more than 3,000
specialists in fields such as agriculture, nutrition, health services, community
education, vocational training, business and trade, rehabilitation of the
handicapped, sports, the arts of journalism, and women in development participate in
Partners' projects. These efforts not only bring benefits to the communities in
which the Partner work, they also product lasting bonds of friendship and
cooperation among the countries and peoples of the Western Hemisphere.

Through their women's program, Partners conduct urban and rural food production
projects to train low-income Latin America and Caribbean women in four components of
Partners family food strategy--production, preservation, nutrition and marketing.
The emphasis is on family food self-sufficiency and low-cost appropriate technology
food preservation such as solar drying. Examples of these projects are briefly
described below. For more information on any of these projects contact Martha
Lewis, Partners of the American, 1424 K Street, N.W., Washington, DC (202)628-3300.





Pages
5-8
Missing
From
Original







-9 -


"Women and The International Food System: The Next Step" was the title of a
symposium held on Capital Hill in Washington, D.C., October 3, 1984. It was
sponsored by CARE, The Cooperative League of the USA, Equity Policy Center,
L.I.F.E., OEF International, Partners of the Americas, and the Select Committee on
Hunger of the U.S. House of Representatives. The symposium opened with a ceremony
awarding $10,000 to the U.S. Committee for the UN Fund for Women. The money will be
used to increase production and marketing of cassava through a rural women's
cooperative in Sierra Leone. Roundtable working groups addressed issues in
effectively integrating women in the international food systems. Each group
developed specific recommendations for consideration by legislators, administrators,
and organizations concerned with developing food systems and understanding the role
of women in them. The working groups addressed these issues.

o Is Household Food Production the invisible Resource?
o How Can P.L. 480 Be Restructured to Integrate Women?
o How can Agricultural Programs be Restructured to Involve Women?
o The Percy Amendment: How Can Policy By Translated Into Programming In
Agriculture?
o How Can Agricultural Policy More Effectively Reflect Nutritional
Considerations?

A follow-up task force has mapped a strategy for action on the principles and
recommendations raised at the symposium. It proposes to:

1. Developed a new policy initiative, linked to the Percy Amendment, that is
based on the reality of women's central role in food systems.
2. Implement the agenda by pushing for legislative, regulatory and
policy action.
For a summary of the addresses and a report on the recommendations of each working
group, write: Christine Burbach, Director, Washington Office, InterAction, 2101 L
Street, N.W., Suite 916, Washington, D.C. 20037

A follow up symposium is being planned to proceed hearings called by the select
committee on hunger for April, 1986. These hearings will focus on hunger in
Africa, and the symposium will address the implications for women in all the
subjects covered by the hearings. For more information call Lynn Herbon, Select
Committee on Hunger, House Annex #2, Room 507, Washington DC 20515 (202)226-5470.

WIDTech (Technical Assistance for Women in Development Organizations) provides
short-term technical assistance to international, national and community based
development organizations striving to improve the status of Third World Women.
WIDTech offers two kinds of assistance: field training and consultation in areas of
organizational management, project management and income- generating activities; and
a Women-in-Development information service which responds to written requests for
information. For more information contact: WIDTech Project, Overseas Education
Fund, 2101 L Street, N.W., Suite 916, Washington, D.C., 30037 USA Tung Sensing (202)
466-3430







- 10 -


PRESERVATION OF GENETIC RESOURCES
The overwhelming majority of the world's plant species originate in the Third World.
As nutritional needs, soil, and climates change, scientists and farmers must
continuously search for new material to breed into crops. However, this treasure of
genetic diversity is disappearing; it is estimated that over half the traditionally
grown varieties of every crop have already disappeared. Though there is a system of
gene preservation banks, they are inadequately funded to the task and most are found
in the developed world. Internationally, it is becoming evident that political
factors, especially commercial interests, are increasingly interfering in the free-
flow of genetic materials from developed to developing nations, including material
originally gathered in the developing world.

The need to preserve genetic resources operates at two levels. Locally there is the
need to insure that the introduction of agricultural changes (new varieties, new
crops, cultivation of marginal lands, irrigation) does not lead to the eradication
of old species. Internationally, it is important to follow the lead of the recent
FAO Conference on Plant Genetic Resources which called for an international system
of gene banks. The International Genetic Resources Program (IGRP) and the Rural
Advancement Fund (RAFI), which has a long history of working for the economic and
political rights of minorities in the southeastern United States, are working
together in this effort and have produced a first hand report on the FAO conference,
a newsletter, and a set of information and guidelines, "NGOs and Crop Diversity," on
how to identify potential losses of genetic material, help preserve them and
contribute to a storehouse of information about them. For more information write
IGRP/RAFI, P.O. Box 1029, Pittsboro, NC 27312.

PUBLICATIONS-BRIEFLY NOTED

Three publications associated with the U.N. World Conference on Women are available
from the Women, Public Policy and Development Project, Humphry Institute, 909 Social
Sciences Building, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 55455.
-Forward Looking Strategies to the year 2000. (unofficial text)--The document
adopted by the Conference in Nairobe. $5.00 per copy.
-State of the World's Women, 1985--compiled on behalf of the UN by New
Internationalist Publications, 18 pages of snappily written narrative and
statistics useful in classroom, by writers and researchers. $2.00 per copy.
-Women..A World Survey, by Ruth Leger Sivard--44 colorful pages of
statistics, graphs, and narrative illustrating changes in women's situation
worldwide since 1945. $6.00 per copy.

Women, Work and Society; Proceeding of the Indian Statistical Institute Golden
Jubilee Symposium. Edited by K. Saradamoni Includes contribution of scientists
from India and abroad on work and the status of women in socialist and capitalist
countries, as well as a review of Indian Studies of women and work. $70.50 plus
$3.00 mailing from Statistical Publishing Society, 204/1 Barrackpore Road, Calcutta
700 035, India.

Participation of Women in Water Supply and Sanitation: Roles and Realities. by
Christine Van Wijk Sijbesma. The review of projects and the literature has been
written specifically for planners and managers of water supply and sanitation
projects and programs. It also contains information of interest to research workers
and national and international women's organization and donor organizations. $15
from International Resource Center Publications, PO Box 931930, 2509 AD the Hague,
The Netherlands.







- 10 -


PRESERVATION OF GENETIC RESOURCES
The overwhelming majority of the world's plant species originate in the Third World.
As nutritional needs, soil, and climates change, scientists and farmers must
continuously search for new material to breed into crops. However, this treasure of
genetic diversity is disappearing; it is estimated that over half the traditionally
grown varieties of every crop have already disappeared. Though there is a system of
gene preservation banks, they are inadequately funded to the task and most are found
in the developed world. Internationally, it is becoming evident that political
factors, especially commercial interests, are increasingly interfering in the free-
flow of genetic materials from developed to developing nations, including material
originally gathered in the developing world.

The need to preserve genetic resources operates at two levels. Locally there is the
need to insure that the introduction of agricultural changes (new varieties, new
crops, cultivation of marginal lands, irrigation) does not lead to the eradication
of old species. Internationally, it is important to follow the lead of the recent
FAO Conference on Plant Genetic Resources which called for an international system
of gene banks. The International Genetic Resources Program (IGRP) and the Rural
Advancement Fund (RAFI), which has a long history of working for the economic and
political rights of minorities in the southeastern United States, are working
together in this effort and have produced a first hand report on the FAO conference,
a newsletter, and a set of information and guidelines, "NGOs and Crop Diversity," on
how to identify potential losses of genetic material, help preserve them and
contribute to a storehouse of information about them. For more information write
IGRP/RAFI, P.O. Box 1029, Pittsboro, NC 27312.

PUBLICATIONS-BRIEFLY NOTED

Three publications associated with the U.N. World Conference on Women are available
from the Women, Public Policy and Development Project, Humphry Institute, 909 Social
Sciences Building, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 55455.
-Forward Looking Strategies to the year 2000. (unofficial text)--The document
adopted by the Conference in Nairobe. $5.00 per copy.
-State of the World's Women, 1985--compiled on behalf of the UN by New
Internationalist Publications, 18 pages of snappily written narrative and
statistics useful in classroom, by writers and researchers. $2.00 per copy.
-Women..A World Survey, by Ruth Leger Sivard--44 colorful pages of
statistics, graphs, and narrative illustrating changes in women's situation
worldwide since 1945. $6.00 per copy.

Women, Work and Society; Proceeding of the Indian Statistical Institute Golden
Jubilee Symposium. Edited by K. Saradamoni Includes contribution of scientists
from India and abroad on work and the status of women in socialist and capitalist
countries, as well as a review of Indian Studies of women and work. $70.50 plus
$3.00 mailing from Statistical Publishing Society, 204/1 Barrackpore Road, Calcutta
700 035, India.

Participation of Women in Water Supply and Sanitation: Roles and Realities. by
Christine Van Wijk Sijbesma. The review of projects and the literature has been
written specifically for planners and managers of water supply and sanitation
projects and programs. It also contains information of interest to research workers
and national and international women's organization and donor organizations. $15
from International Resource Center Publications, PO Box 931930, 2509 AD the Hague,
The Netherlands.







- 11


Women Creating Wealth: Transforming Economic Development. ed by Rita Gallen and
Anita Spring. Includes selected papers and plenary presentations from the April,
1985 conference of the Association for Women in Development in Washington, D.C.
Available for $22.50 from JTA, Inc. 1815 H St N.W., Suite 1000, Washington DC 20006

Women, Foreign Assistance and Advocacy Administration. Kathleen Staudt. The
study analyses the bureaucratic politics associated with the implementation of
policy calling for integration of women into the development activities of USAID.
Available for $24.95 from Praeger Publishers, 521 Fifth Avenue, New York, 10175.

Sellers and Servants; Working Women in Lima, Peru. by Zimina Bunster, Elsa Chaney
and Ellen Young is a study of women in the informal sector; street vendors, maids,
cooks, telling in their own words how they experience their lives. Available from
Preager Publishers, address above.

Michigan State University is publishing a series of Women-in-Agriculture Resource
Guides to provide agriculturists with information of women's roles in agricultural
production, processing and food preparation in the 13 African and Latin American
countries where the Beans-Cowpeas Collaborative Research Support Program is working.
The guides for Botswanna and Cameroon are already available, Brazil and Guatamala
will soon be available free of charge from The Beans/Cowpeas CRSP Management Office,
200 Center for International Programs, Michigan State, East Lansing, Mich. 48824.

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Well, Here we are again. A year late to be sure, but here. We apologize to all of
you for our tardiness, but maintaining the files and putting out the newsletter an a
volunteer basis has been a much bigger job than we realized when we under took it.
7As we explained in the last newsletter, the Network is now operating on a
transitional basis. We are trying to find a more workable mechanism for its long
term existence, and while we are currently exploring alternatives, no final solution
is in hand. We are firmly committed to publishing one more issue on the integration
of women into large scale development projects. This issue will come out in the
fall of 1986, and by then we will be able to share with you whether, and how, the
Network will continue.

In the meantime, some decisions have been made. The Cambridge office has been
closed and the document collection has been given to the University of Wisconsin and
Tenure Center Library, where it will be available for reference. This library has
extensive holdings on women and has published an annotated biblography, #20 Women
and Development. The library is also used extensively by Third World scholars,
particularly during the annual Ford Foundation sponsored summer workshops on Women
and Development for women from developing countries. For more information on the
library collection and its use, contact: Beverly Phillips, Land Tenure Center
Library, 432 Steenback Library, Observation Drive, University of Wisconsin, Madison,
Wise 53706.

Until the next issue, announcements, inquires and documents should be mailed to the
temporary office noted on the back of the newsletter, 1505 S. Broadway, #6 Urbana,
Illinois. We are sorry that we are no longer able to respond to individual
inquires, but the volume of work has nearly swamped us. We do want to express our
appreciation to all of you who have continued to support us with contributions,
letters and documents, you expressions of support are what continues to make the
effort worthwhile. K.C.







- 12 -


THE WOMEN AND FOOD INFORMATION NETWORK
1505 S. Broadway #6
Urbana, IL 61801



The network is supported by
the contributions of its members.
It welcomes announcement of
conference, training programs,
project activities, research
help wanted, and publications
of interest as well as short
articles. To contribute or to
join the Network, Contact
Kathleen Cloud, Director


i {L3
AG, E
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RECEIVED MAR 1 7 IsE




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