• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Methodology
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: Florida : Alachua County, its resources and advantages : Gainesville, a healthful, progressive city.
Title: Florida
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055195/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida Alachua County, its resources and advantages : Gainesville, a healthful, progressive city
Uniform Title: Daily sun (Gainesville, Fla.)
Alternate Title: Alachua County, its resources and advantages
Gainesville, a healthful, progressive city
Physical Description: 35, <19> p., <7> p. of plates : ill., map ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Daily sun book print
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1898
 Subjects
Subject: Real estate investment -- Florida -- Alachua County   ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: On cover: Supplement to the Daily sun, Gainesville, Fla.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055195
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000130457
oclc - 01656991
notis - AAP6477

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Preface
        Page 4
    Methodology
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Advertising
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Back Cover
        Page 60
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THE
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FLORIDA,

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FLORIDA.








ALACHUA COUNTY

ITS RESOURCES AND ADVANTAGES.
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GAINESVILLE,

A HEALTHFUL,
PROGRESSIVE CITY.


IGalYVuILL, RLA.
DAILY sUs BOOK PrINT,
1608.



















PEACE.

No pretense is made in this publication to furnish rap-
turous descriptions of the advantages offered by Alachua
County to Home-Seekers or Investors, but.rather plain facts
in regard to its resources. Those who contemplate visiting
the State or becoming inhabitants thereof, will do well to
consider Alachua's advantages before investing elsewhere.






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FLORIDJ.

Florida was first discovered in 1497 by John Cabot, a
Venetian mariner in the service of Henry VII, King of Eng.
land, but more completely discovered in the year 1512 by
Jaun Ponce de Leon, who gave it the name of Florida
because it was first seen in Easter, called Pasqua de Flores
in the language of his country, or as Herreva alledges, be-
cause it was found to be covered with flowers, and the most
beautiful blossoms. Although it has been four hundred
Years since its discovery, until within a comparatively recent
period it has been almost an unknown country even to the
American people, but, during recent years, the state has
made rapid progress in population and wealth, and to-day
stands the peer of any in all the elements requisite for the
establishment of happy and prosperous homes.
Florida is the largest State east of the Mississippi river,
having an area of 59,268 square miles. Its shape is very
much like "the boot of Italy," and the average width of
the peninsula is 120 miles. It is bounded by the Gulf of
Mexico on the South and West, the Atlantic Ocean on the
East, and Georgia on the North. It lies nearer the equator
than any other portion o! the United States, or the most
southerly part of Europe.
The following article recently appeared in a leading
Northern paper: "The state of Florida is boasting of the
great progre it has made in every ranh of Ain ytry, in




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health population, etc., and it has good' grounds for itd
boasts. Its progress has been as rapid as any portion of
the Union, and challenges comparison with the mmet pros-
perous states of the North and West, while its eduational
advancement has been such as to show that it goe :forward
mentally and materially at the same time."
The population of the state today is 500,000; uw com-
pared with the population in 1885, it was 842,000; and in
1880, 269,000. This shows a high rate of increase.
In railroads are seen wonderful improvements. There
are today 3,174 miles in operation and the value of rolling
stock $2,370,000, as compared with 1688 miles in 18S8, and
528 in 1880.
In public schools the comparison is as follows: INamber
of schools in 1880, 1,181, attendance 39,000; number of
schools in 1898, 2,538, attendance 108,455.
The per cent. of increase in enrollment between 1888
and 1898 was 32. The per cent. of increase in the United
States for the same period was 13.


FLORID A FINANCES.

The state's entire debt for all purposes is $1,232,500. Of
this sum the state holds in her educational funds and under *
her control, $850,800, and in her internal iaprov'ement
fond, $25,000, leaving in the hands of individuals $W,700..
The bonds representing these amounts are held at a prem-
ium, although they have but a few years to rn. Thu debt
of the state is not over $20 per apita, being less tan any
state in the Union, and her state tax proper qualer than
any ottlP state.
The value of all ta ble properties ip jih State
for 18WB,^7 '0000
er9ag uvt oi fatMs prob4ets for 18W, the
tapOirgtobtianabl a-f tdhes:t

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Total value of Aeld crops ......$ ..:........ .'(8,085,31
Vegetable and garden products ............... $.1,288,356
Fruit crops, ................................... 6 1,590
Live stock .............. ................. 6,944,487
Poultry, ....................... ............ 608,483
Dairy Products, .............................. 892,638
Miscellaneous products,......... ............ 167,948

Total, .................................... 18,68,80

RESOUIeS.

Florida is one of the richest states in the Union. Capi-
tal and labor only are necessary to develop its vast re-
sources. In no other state will with so little labor produce
S as much. What is needed first is population; industrial
development will be accompanied by capital. Its resources
for manufacturing purpose are varied, and practically
without limit. There are hundreds of water powers lying
idle as on the day of their creation, awaiting the develop-
ment that a new era of progress must certainly bring.
In addition to the wonderful fertility of lands, there
are rich and extensive deposits of phosphate, kaolin, ochres,
fire and aluminum delays, gypsum and fullers earth, whose
value cannot be overestimated. Vast forests of pine, oak,
hickory, bay, magnolia, ash, gum, cypress and cedar, form
iW:the aggregate a great storehouse of well nigh inexhausti-
ble~muplly foriutilisation in arts, and the development of
industrial enterprises.

CLIMATE

: Theelimate of Florida is generally misunderstood by
residents of Northern state unacquainted with its charac-
tir. The majority believe that the weather is fearfully
warm in the suoaer and almost unbearable by white peo-
ple. A greater pistke could, not be made, for the summers
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art tnever oipessFey hot, and are cooler than those oi any
state in the union. If the thermometer goes up to 96 o the
weather is considered fearfully hot, yet it would not be
thought so by those from the North, for they would appre-
ciate the brisk sea breezes that blow almost continually from
the gulf or ocean, or the pleasant coolness which is always
found in the shade, even during the most torrid portion of
the day. Summer is also the rainy season in Florida, and
showers are'almost daily from June to September. These
cool the atmosphere immediately and often make it seem
chilly. The winters are mild and pleasant; the thermom-
eter seldom falling lower than 32. As compared with the
winter weather of more Northern states there is a vast dif-
ference in favor of Florida. The difference in the mean
monthly temperature the year around is seldom more
than 30 0.
It may be asserted without fear of contradiction that
Florida posesses a more agreeable climate than any other
state in the Union.
As respects health, the climate of Florida stands pre-
eminent. That the peninsular climate of the state is much
more salubrious than that of any other statein the Union,
is clearly established by the medical statistics of the army.
These records also show that the ratio of deaths to the num-
ber of cases of remittent fever has been much lessin Florida
than among the troops stationed in any other portion of the
United States. In the middle division of the states the pro-
portion is 1 death to 36 cases; in the Southern division 1 to
04, while in Florida, it is but 1 to 287.
The atmosphere of Florida is a medicine that has cured
thousands of patients. For consumption and all pulmon-
ary diseases whatever, for nervous disorder, and for the aged
whose vital forces begin to shrink before the austerities of
the Northern weather, the climate of Florida is a fountain
of healing and new life. Scattered all over the state are
-men and women healthy and vigorous, who, in years gone
by, came to Florid a aa lapt resource from death. There
am several ezxellent rsirei wlhih will aooomat for the ex-
a










fraordinary healthfulness of the people, and among them
may be mentioned the equibleness of the climate, the" per-
sistent sea breezes, the abundance of ozone-produced from
forests of pine, the well drained sandy soil, freedom from
caretaking, pleasant occupations, the absence of pinching
poverty, and the abundance of life giving sunshine through-
out the year.


\




..


ALACHUA COURkTY.


Alachua, one of the largest counties in the State. lies
just south of the 30 o of north latitude, and between the
820 and 830 of longitude west from Greenwich; it is
bounded on the north by Suwannee, Columbia and Brad-
ford counties; east by the counties of Clay and Putnam;
south by Marion and Levy; and west by Laayette, tfrm
which it is separated by the Suwannee river. Its asea is
1,260 square miles, or 806,400 acres. The population ii esti-
mated at 32,500 as compared with 28,207 in 1895.
It is 250j eet above the ocean's level, and far emPogh
south to be free from the ioe, snow and chilling wish of
the north, and is fanned by the gentle brses fzt. the
Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantio Ocean, hbe dt o to
either being about 45 miles. Fornatul beaies, eiity
of soil, perfect drainage, a light, dry aod iavig rat at-
mosphere, good water, good society and edtsaetmal adbha
tages, the county is po4 s=elled by any poeties &tb
JStte,; and the healthf4lace( the eonuty i not x
by sanyp oa of the Uit Eui .iM
that asydiusd iun ia 1il
death that-teb#saes ia *Warsa


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large the average annual death rate is exceedingly small, be-
ing only 11 per 1,000. The pine lands, which are unusually
healthy, are nearly everywhere studded at intervals of a
few miles with rich hammocks varying in extent from
twenty to forty thousand acres. Unlike the hammocks of
other sections of the State, no marshy or flat lands are
found, the absence of, which make them healthy and habita-
ble.

COSNOPOLITA POPULATION

There are in Alaehua County, like all places of mixed
people, representatives of nearly every sect in the Chris-
t1an religion, and in the larger places a goodly sprinkling of
Jes. The Churches are principally Baptist, Methodist,
Plebyterian and Episcopal, all of which ar well supported.
Tie White people represent every State in the Union, from
*ine to California, and are, in their moral and intellectual
status, of the advanced classes of the old States. Intelli-
gence predominates in all the essential avenues of business
and principal occupations of life. There is no ostracism
of settlers from other places and all worthy comers are
heartily welcomed, and will meet with well wishes on every
hand.


FIN)NCE&S

The assessed valuation of property in Alachua is
$8,856,9M8, which :represents about one-third of its value.
The tax rate for all purposes is 14 mills. The county is
out of debt, with funds on deposit. This is due entirely to
Seconomy and care that have haracterized the expendi-
tire of tnads by the County Commismioner. At Gaines-
vftle th-oounty seat, is the Court BRoe, one of the most
impe;a g tra~tures in the State. It was erected in 1885
sad [is tted -with all modern convenipoes. Cost W80,000
11
,.. ,









Those who coinemplate removing to this county will
not have to assist in the payment of a county debt, but
will be called upon only for their pro rata share neces-
sary to the maintenance of county and State.

EDUCATION.
No county in the State can boast of better educational
advantages than Alachua. At the head of this department
are men who have the sole interests and advancement of the
youths at heart.
There are today seventy-three white schools, with an
enrollment of 3,500, and forty-six colored schools with an
enrollment of 3,000. The total expenditures for educational
purposes annually aggregate the handsome sum of $50,000.

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIONS.
It is confidently believed that no county in the State,
nor elsewhere, can boast of a greater variety of products
than Alachua. 'Wheat is the only cereal that cannot be
abundantly produced. Cotton, tobacco, sugar cane, vegeta-
bles, grain and fruits can be raised in the greatest profusion.
So can stock of all kinds be reared in great numlrs.
While Alachua is far ahead of any other county in the
State in truck farming and fruit culture, general agricul-
tural statistics on record in the office of the Secretary of
Agriculture show that she also ranks first in general farm-
ing. This is due altogether to the thrift, enterprise and
persistency of her farmers, which is responsible for their
success; this county has within her borders'vast' tracts of
lands which can be cultivated with profit by any intelligent
farmer.
Not only is nearly every acre adapted to the cultivation
of general farm products, but the remarkable fertility of-
the soil has made possible many great sncesses in farming.
Corn for meal and hominy, oats, rye, rie, sugar, syrup,'to.
bacco and potatoes' can be prodnoed in larger- quantities on
any good land, than may be required for home use, and the
excess can be readily sold for good prime. rom this ree-
18








nue the farmer can supply himself.and family with flour,
coffee and many luxuries of life. Pinders, pumpkins, chu-
fas, potatoes, etc., all easily raised, will fatten hogs neces-
sary for meat or to sell.
Corn on ordinary pine land yields from twenty to thirty
bushels to the acre, and on good hammock land from thirty
to sixty.
Rye and oats average from thirty-five to one hundred
bushels per- acre.
Rice is raised principally for domestic use and yields
from twenty-five to seventy-five'bushels per acre.
The average yield of sweet potatoes is 200 to 400 bush.
els, and peanuts seventy-five bushels per acre.
Casava of the very best quality, arrow-root, castor
beans, grasses, millet, fiber plants, etc., are grown and as-
sist materially in the reduction of farm expenses.
The advantages this tQnty offers to those who prefer
the general farm life to Trlek Growing or raising an Orange
Grove, Orchard or Vineyard, are excelled by no part of the
United States. Any farmer in this county can make his oc-
cupation self sustaining and independent of the fatal sys-
tem of credit, and the county challenges the state as to the
prosperous condition of her farmers.

COTTON.
The soil throughout the entire county is especially
adapted to the cultivation of Sea Island Cotton, producing
a staple that will grade fully equal to that of South Caro-
lina, which is acknowledged to be the home of the cotton
plant, when proper care is taken in the selection of seed
and cultivation. This fact is being realized to a certain ex-
tent abroad, and as a result Messrs. H. F. Dutton & Co.,
of Gainesville, ship large quantities of Alachua seed into
other portions of the State and lower Georgia. At the Paris
Exposition, Messrs. Dutton & Co. exhibited cotton raised in
this county that was awarded a gold medal for the "High-
est Award Merit,' as to the length, strenght and fineness of
staple, over all other cottons. Cotton from this county







has also received gold medals and special notices at various
expositions, Philadelphia, Chicago, Atlanta and New Or.
leans, and is favorably known to the manufacturers all ovear
the world. The average annual production of cotton its
5,000 bales, valued at $275,000 or more.

TOBACCO.
The development of Tobacco culture in Florida is now
no longer a matter of theory or sentiment, but is a practicIl
enterprise. The amount of tobacco grown in Florida has
increased so, rapidly, and to such an extent, that its cul-
ture is now one of the most important industries in tie
State. The quality of Florida tobacco grown from impol-
ted Vuelta de Abajo seed is very fine and the largest lear
dealers are giving it a very prominent place in their combi-
nations for fine cigars. Florida Havana wrappers have been
sold for the imported article very extensively during tie
last two years. The soil for tobacco culture should be rich
in vegetable mould or humus a of a reddish, chocolate car
grayish color, with a yellowish clay or hardpan subsoil, nct
too near the surface. Such lands are found in abundance
in Alachua County.
The manager of the tobacco warehouses in Gainesvill,
where most of the Alachua County crop_ is sorted, bitune4
and bailed, has had years of experience in handling all va-
rieties of cigar tobacco, both imported and domestic, and is
also a practical cigarmaker. He pronounces the best to-
bacco grown in this county equal to any grown in Cuba. The
fillers are of fine flavor and aroma, and the wrappers thin anId
silky, of fine texture, very elastic and fine to burn. A vast
miue of wealth awaits those who will come to Alachua and
interest themselves in the cultivation of this article.

SUGJR CANE.
The growing of sugar cane in the State of Florida iis
assuming larger proportions each year. No State in the Un-
ion has soils and climate better adapted to its growing. .It.
is a crop easily and cheaply grown and convertible into 4.







marketable product, and one that commands a ready sale in
any market. : Much interest is now had in beet culture and
sugar making in the West. Were it generally known that
larger amounts of better sugar could be made in Florida, at
a much less cost per acre, with much less labor, and with
but little skill in growing, with far less capital required for
machinery and manufacturing than in beet sugar-making,
vast sums would be invested in the business. Alachua is
one of the largest sugar cane producing counties of the
State, and there are within her borders thousands of acres
admirably adapted to its culture, awaiting development.

TIUK FARMING.
No industry in the State offers greater inducements for
capital and labor than the growing of early vegetables for
the Northern and Western markets, and no section of the
State offers such great natural advantages for early vegeta-
ble growing as the county of Alachua. Nor is there a
county in the State so extensively engaged in the business.
Here are located the most extensive vegetable fields in the
South, and this may properly be denominated a "Garden
County." Truck farming is an industry that has grown to
wonderful proportions within a few years, paying large pro-
fits of several hundred dollars per acre. The vegetables
whi6h can be most profitably grown are: Artichokes,
Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Cu-
cumbers, Egg-Plants, Irish Potatoes, Lettuce, Mustard,
Okra, Onions, Parsnips, Peas, Pumpkins, Radishes, Squashes,
Sweet Potatoes, Tomatoes and Turnips.

FRUITS.
Fruits of, the following varieties are grown: Apricots,
Berries of all varieties, Figs, Grapes, Oranges, Pears,
Peaches, Persimmons, Plums, Pomegranates, Quinces and
Melons of the different varieties.
Strawberries are raised in large quantities, and are a
sure and good crop, netting most growers from 10 to 20
cents per quart during the shipping season. They ripen
15










early in February until July, and are shipped to North-
ern markets in refrigerator boxes or cars.
There are several varieties of grapes that thrive, of
which the Scuppernong is the most hardy and yeilds the
best returns.
Oranges can be more extensively grown in Florida
than in any other State of the Union, and from the ad-
vantages which the State enjoys in certain peculiarities
of climate, soil and season, it is more than likely that it
will ever retain a superiority over competitors. In
Alachua County are many of the finest groves and for
tunes have been made and are being made by the indus-
trious horticulturist.
Watermelons and Cantaloupes are extensively planted
and are a source of great profit to those who study their
culture. Hundreds of cars are shipped out of this county
during a season, bringing in return many thousands of
dollars. Mr. C. A. Colclough of Gainesville is one of
the most successful growers in the State. From forty-
five acres of Cantaloupes in cultivation last season he
netted over $10,000.
Peaches do well with proper attention, and consider-
able revenue is derived from the shipment of the early
crops to Northern markets. Many varieties are grown
and ripen early enough to be placed on the New York
market in May.
The LeConte and Keifer Pear do exceeding well and
furnish the table with fruit for nearly six months. The
shipping season begins in June. Pears are used at home
for canning, preserving and vinegar making.
There is an inviting field in Alachua County for a
first-class Canning Factory. Vegetables and fruits oould
be secured with little effort and at very low prices after
the best of the shipping seasons are over.
PHOSPHATE.

One of the greatest and most profitable industries in
the State today, is the mining and shipping of phosphate.
This is au industry that in recent years has assumed







masIaoth proportions. In Alachua Couity are the most
extensive deposits and plants in Ame~ea. S#tgtj ical
reports of phosphate shipped out of thejState show-that
this county has, during the past three years, shipped
nearly one-half of the entire output.

TIME.

Nature has covered thousands of acres in Alachua
County with a growth of timber rarely seen. Hickory
trees from one to seven feet in diameter; oak two to
four; "ash one to three; magnolia one to five, and a mul-
titude of other varieties of hardwood trees, suggest the
character of forestry. The accessibility, and character
of the timber makes this section peculiarly desirable for
the location of factories requiring hard wood, aiid no
section of the State offers better inducements than this
to the manufacturers of Wagons, Carriages, Baskets
and Woodenware, Furuiture, Agricultural Impleiente,
etc., because the woods with whibh to make them are
convenien cheap and easy of transportation.
'The supply of Florida Pine is abundant, and many
mills are being successfully operated along the lines of
railroads passing through the county. The product of
these mills is principally for export, but building pmate-
rial is of a necessity very cheap.
The manufacture of Naval Stores from the Florida
pine has recently come into prominence in this State.
Sinco the pine forests of the Corolinas began to deterio-
ate and business in those States wane, many large opera-
tors have sought Alachua County's magnificent limbered
tracts and begun manufacturing on large scales.

STOCK RAISING.

This is one ot the most profitable incidents to a farm
life, and occupies the time of many. The beef cattle of
this county have always commanded the very highest
prices Jn thb State markets.
17









Many farmers are breeding standard slock. The
cheapness of corn, oats, and hay, together % ith the right
prairie pasturage, and the climate produces excellent
animals.
Sheep do well on grasses. Climatic conditions are so
favorable to this animal that shelter is non-essential,
The soil does not produce any of the dreaded "loco"
weed of the Southwest and West.
In addition to the prairie grasses there are a number
of perennial grasses forming a close, heavy sod, which
bears troadinqg en4 constitutes a permanent pasturagp
for stock,
There are four annual grasses.-the "Crab," "Crow?
foot," "Barn" and "Water," which furnish the prin,
oipal hay supplies, The grasses abundantly seed them-
selves, coming up when the land surfaces are stirred,
from February to October.


TRANSPORTATIOk FACILITIES,

The transportation facilities in Alachua County are
unsurpassed by any portion of the State. Two lines of
the Plant System pass through tho county, one through
the phosphate section, the other through Gainesville and
on to Tampa. The Florida Southern Division of this sys-
tem also enters the county, and terminates in Gaines-
ville. The Florida Central & Peninsular Railroad has
two lines passing through the county. T.o Gainesville
& Gulf Railroad extends South from GainesviUe toward
Tampa, through some of the best vegetable lands in the
State. The Atlantic, Suwannee River and Gulf Railroad
furnishes transportation for thi Northern portion of the
county.
There is now in course of construction a railroad ex-
tending from Tallahassee, Fla., through Alachua County;
which will probably terminate in Gainesville, and the
Georgia Southern & 'Florida Railroad 'wijl evetituolly
extend its line into this county.







The assessed valuation of railroad property in this
county, not including terminal facilities, is $1,072.813.


SPOOM FOR fLL.

Anyjna can succeed in Alachua County by indus-
try, economy and application to business.
Come, if you havo capital To lend or invest in legiti-
mate manufacturing or industrial enterprises.
Come, if you are willing to assist in developing the
wonderful resources of this county.
Come, if you are plucky, energetic, and know how to
embrace an opportunity when you see it.
Come, if you. are a practical horticulturist, vine
grower, truck gardener or business man.
Come, if you like a mild climate better than a cold
one-a good "all the year round" climate.
Come, if you desire to live a retired life among na-
ture s fairest flowers.
Don't come empty handed. Capital is just as neces-
sary to get a start here as any where else.




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ALACOUA COUNTY COURT EOUX0.
















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GAIk SVILLE,

THE QUEEN CITY OF THE PENINSULA, COUNTY SEAT OF1
ALACHUA COUNTY.

Gainesville is a growing manufacturing centeir'hore
Excellent opportunities are awaiting men of energy, skill
and capital. It is situated almost geographically in the
center of the State, on the main lines of the Plant Sys-
tem -of Railways, the Florida Central and Peninsula
Railroad, and the Gainesville & Gulf Railroad.
1,080 miles from New York, or thirty hours.
8.O0 miles from Washington, or twenty-four hours.
1,148 miles from Chicago, or forty-one hours.
1,025 miles from St. Louis, or forty hours.
242 miles from Savannah, or seven hours.
70 miles from Jacksonville, or two hours.
It is the termiuu- of the Florida Southern division pf
the Plaut System, and headquarters of the Gainesville
and Gulf Railroad, which is being extended toward
Tampa Bay. The Gainesville, Tallahassee ahd Western
Railroad is now in course of construction, extending
from Tallahassee. This road will develop a rich section
of country, and assist materially in the advancement of
Gainesville and Alachua County.
The Georgia Southern and Florida Railroad Company
will eventually extend their line to this city.

PROSPERITY OF THE CITY.

Backed as it is by fertile lands, progressive farmers
and truck growers, the phosphate -industry, naval stores
and milling interests, it has always been considered one








S.f the most progressive cities in the State. The index of
its prosperity is the character of its homes and business
houses. 1 he latter are of the most substantial kind, all
built on modern styles, mostly of brick. The merchants
carry unusually large nnd up to date stocks, and can
&ipase the most fastidious tastes. One cannot fai. to be
irtfressed with the beautiful hnme- of her people. They
are well kept. and in the majority of cases surrounded
by green lawns and gardens. rich in flowers and shrubs.
The principal streets are broad, most of them 100 feet
wide, regularly laid out. and shaded by hugh water oaks.
These streets are paved with Alachua County rock, and
lighted by electricity.
TIlh Watpr Works plant is one of the finest and most
complete in the State. It is the property of the city, and
was constructed at a cost of $C0,000, for the payment of
which there was issued 6 per cent bonds. This coisti-
tutes the only indebtedness of the city.- The supply of
waters pumped from the renowned "Boulware" Springs,
and is as pure chemically as any in the United States,
and its purity has gained for Gainesville an envia-
ble reputation.
Chemical analysis of "Boulwrare" Springs Water,
made by II. Horzi. Jr.. Analytical Chemist and Mining
Engineer. Gainesvil:c, Fla.. July 25th, 1898:
T ;tal solids, part per million .....................76.80
4 grains per gallon.
Oiganic matter, parts per million................. 2.97
Oxygen required to Oxidize, parts per million....... 1.46
Albuminoid Ammonia, parts per million ........... .0
Pree Ammonia, parts per million.................. .048
Nitrates, parts per million .... ...................trace
Nitrites. arts per million ...... ................. none
Alk-Ohlorides. parts per niilli .................... 8.88
(Chlorine. 408.)
Silica, parts per inllion........................... .1
Aluinna, parts per milli ......................... 8.71
Oalinam Carbonate, parts p wr million ................81
Magnestum Carbonate, arts per million......... .1.4
alp- rio Acid .... ........ ........................ A. o"e
E HERZOG, Ja., Chemist
24



















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BUSINESS ENTERPRISES.

The enterprises and business houses of Gain-esville
may be divided as follows:
2 Banks.
2 Building and Loan Associations.
1 Cotton Ginnery.
2 Moss Ginneries.
2 Wagon and Carriage Factories.
2 Ice Manufactories, capacity twenty tons each.
2 Cigar Factories.
1 Fertilizer Factory.
1 Electric Light Plant.
1 Gas Plant.
1 Tannery.
1 Sash and Door Factory.
2 Planing Mills.
1 Basket and Package Factory.
1 Bottling Establishment.
1 Wholesale Grocery House.
2 Wholesale and Retail Hardware Stores.
15 Grocery Stores.
7 Dry Goods and Millinery Stores.
9 Gents' Furnishing Stores.
2 Seed Stores.
3 Racket Stores.
4 Furniture Stores.
1 Bicycle Store.









2 News Depots.
4 Drug Storrs.
3 Barber Shops.
4 Saloons.
4 Fish and hMvat Markets.
2 Tailor Shops.
3 Jewelers.
1 Dying and Cleaning Establishment.
3 Photograph Galleries.
2 Rostuarants.
3 Cakeries.
3 Livery Stables.
1 Music Store.
2 Telegraph Offices.
1 Daily and Weekly Newspaper.
1 Expr Rss Office.
1 Opera lHou-'e.
:1 First-class Hotelq.
10 Private Boarding Hou1es.
TO THE INVESTOR
The population of Gainesville comprise about 1,(-00
peopll,. the majority of whom are fully alive to the nat-
ural advantages and resources of their surrounding,
that await the coming of more capital, and earnest, in-
duist,.ous men to assist in developing them. Capitalists
and Manufacturers who are seeking investment-sites on
which to locate plants will find many opportunities in
Gainesville that will assure them of profitable returns.
Its central location and healthfulness are aperi'or ad-
vantages. A numbe-r of factories of various kinds
could be profitably operated from this point. Aiporg
them, cotton, cotton seed oil, glucose, cigar, camping,
cider and vinegar, wood working, boot and sho, and
also a foundry and Machine shop. The largest factpry
of its kind in the State is that of the Florida lrtiser .
Manufacturing Company. located here.
There is also a grand opening for inetettta in
city and suburban property.




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TO THE HOME-SEEKEl.

No city in Florida offers better inducements to the
Home-seeker than Gainesvillo. Her people are well bred;
polite and kindly in manner and feeling. The social sen-
timent is most liberal, and th.-ce exists that prot.oincedly
warm hospitality to every wellbred stranger, so charac-
teristic of Southern manner and custom.
In addition to henlthfulnoss, there is nothing more
necessary to the advancement of a community 1' an
good schools and churches. Of these Gainesville is w. 11
supplied. Her churches are elegant brick structure, s,
with large congregations ably presided over.
The educational advantages offered by Gainesville
are not surpassed by any city in the State, and by few in
the South. In addition to the City Graded and High
School, there are a number of private schools and kin-
dergardens in charge of thoroughly competent instruc-
tors.

EAST FLORIDA SEMINARY.

The East Florida Seminary is a State Military and
Collegiate Institute, of which the citizens of Florida are
-proud. The Seminary buildings, consisting of an acade-
mic building and a dormitory for the residence of stu-
-dents and teachers, are handsome, commodious, and ad-
mirably adapted to the purposes and regime of a military
school. The grounds are ample, and the drill ground's
are the finest in the State.
The 1,ranches of study taught at this Institution are
-grouped under the following department: Mathematics.
Science, English Language and History, Latin, Greek.
Bookkeeping, Military Science and Tactics, Calistheiics,
and Modern.Languages.
The Instructors are thoroughly competent gentle-
man and graduates of the leading Colleges of America.








Opinions of Some of the Officers of the Army and Navy Who Have
Been Connected with the Seminary in the Capacity of Instruc-
tors in Military Science.

From Major A. L. Wagner, United States Army,
first commandant of cadets at East Florida Seminary,
late superintendent of United States Infantry and Cav-
alry School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, now in Adju-
tant General's Department, Washington, D. C.:
"As to the management of the East Florida Semin-
ary, I have no comment but unqualified praise.
The military department of the seminary is not.
merely an adjunct, but is 'bone of its bone, flesh of its
flesh.' Military system, and regularity pervade every
branch and feature of the school, and promptness and
decision are virtues inculcated in every phase of the ca-
det's existence. The drills furnish healthful exercise of
the best kind; and though constituting an extended
course of military training, they are not allowed to
trench upon the time required for studies. The discip-
line is firm and exacting, but gentle, and is based upon
the principle that a boy's self-respect must be thoroughly
cultivated in drder that it may be the solid foundation of
a true manhood."
From Captain Charles A. Curtis, United States Army
(retired):
"I have for twenty-five years been under detail as
military instructor, and during that time have been at-
tached to four different military schools, in as many
quarters of the Union, three years of which I spent at
the East Florida Seminary. The seminary, in my opin-
ion, compares favorably with the best institutions in all
that constitutes a good school, and especially in its mili-
tary feature, which is much above the average.
'The school is well managed under its present head."
From Captain F. J. Kernan, Acting Judge Advo,
cate. United States Army:
"The East Florida Seminary, with its central and un,
surpassed location, its long years of useful work behind
84







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ACADEMIC HALL.


From Photograph..


DORMITORY.


F!, P& Fl AL 131






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it, and its military feature, deserves well the patronage
of those parents who have boys to educate."
From Lieutenant Charles G. Morton, United States
Army:
"In my opinion the East Florida Seminary is now,
and is destined to continue, one of the finest schools in
the South."
Col. Edwin P. Cater, Superintendent, will cheerfully
furnish additional information.
Among the benevolent societies having florishing
lodges in Gainesville may be mentioned the Masons,
Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows, Knights of Honor,
and the Ancient Order of United Workmen.


TO THE TOURIST,


The hotel and boarding house accommodations of
Gainesville are excellent, and good board may be had at
prices ranging from $4.00 to $8.00 per week. The hotels
are conveniently located near the business portion of the
City. The boarding houses are well kept, most of them
with much elegance and by refined ladies. Board may
also be had with private families by those desirous of
avoiding publicity. These houses are all fitted with
modern conveniences, such as bath rooms, city water,
electric or gas lights, etc.
The charms of Gainesville as an inland winter re-
sort, attractive in many ways to tourists and visitors,
have become so generally known that but little com-
ment is necessary. Especially has Gainesville gained
popularity among those who visit lorida to enjoy the
hunting which the surrounding country affords. Quail,
snipe, duck, turkey, squirrels and deer are plentiful.
Fishing in the two large lakes near Gainesville also
affords much amusement. To all lovers of out door
sports there is no better opportunity afforded than by
35








spending a winter here., The distance is short, quickly
traveled, and may be made by land or water, and the
fare is easily within reach of a moderate purse.


TO THE INVALID.

S- The impression has been created that a winter spent
in Florida is a luxury that only the rich can afford. This'
is by no means true. The necessaries of life are not at-all
expensive, but luxuries and novelties impoverish the
purse-and Florida is no exception to the rule.
There is but little rain during the winter and the air
is beneficial to delicate lungs. The days are generally
warm and pleasant and the nights cool enough to insure
comfortable sleep.
The physicians of Gainesville are among the best in
the country, and the drug stores first-class and well
equipped. Livery stables are conveniently located, and
their charges are very moderate.
Located in Gainesville is the National Sanitarium for
Odd Fellows, an imposing brick structure erected in 1893.
This in itself speaks volumes of praise for the health-
fulness of the city. This institution opens November
1st and closes June 1st.

CONTEMPLATED IMPROVEMENTS.

The natural drainage of Gainesville is good, but will
soon be improved by the construction of a first class sys-
tem of sewerage.
A forty-acre magnolia grove adjoining the city has
been selected as a suitable location for a Public Park.
This will add greatly to the attractiveness of the city.

W For any information not furnished herein write
Griffin & Co., Gainesville, enclosing a stamp for reply,





























RESIDENCE OF P. MILLER, GAINESVILLE.


A DAY ON LAKE NEWNAN.































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W. R, THOMAS, Prop'r,

City Livery, Feed aud Sale Stables,
GAINESVILLE, FLA.



Carriages, Bfuggies, Phaetons, Wagons,
Iirniess, Robes nnd Whips, at


- SLAUGRI


SPRICIS, -


Stylish Turnouts and Trusty Attendants.


Call and see my stock when visiting Gainesville.


Charges Reasonable.


Prompt Service.







G E


W. HYD .
Dealer In


DRY GOODS,


FANCY GOODS
AND MILLION ERY.

NOTIONS, GETS' FUR-
NISHINGS, SHOES.


SOur Motto.


,* BEST GOODS AT LOWEST PRICES,"
-t
The Largest and Most Complete Dry-Goods
House in Alachua County.


,, .







FLORIDA

Fertilizer Mlllnuaclturi
j 'COMPANY, :-'

(i "iireviM Alachua County; Florida.

Manufacturers of High Grade
.,Fertilizers for all kinds of
Vegetables and Oraikge '
Trees, and a.
Special Formula for Cigar Leaf Tobacco.

We are growers of tobacco, having a 45-acre farm,
well equipped with large barns for pole curing. Also
operate a large curing house in Gainesville for the
purpose of curing, sweating, betuning and putting the
tobacco in shape for the cigar'manufacturers. All
,goods put up in Cuban style.

BUYERS OF FLORIDA TOBACCO.







H. F. DUTTON & CO.,
BANKERS.

DEALERS IN SEA ISLAND COONT
MINERS AND SHIPPERS OF

Florida Phosphat
SGAINESVILLE, FLORIDA, U. S. A.
W. & W. H. STEAD, Agents, : : London and I verpool, Elrct'.
JA It. GRATIAMl, President GEO. W. H'DE, Vioeae-I e-

The First National Bank,
nOANEBVILLE, TL\.

Oily Chartered Bank in Alashea Count,.

Capital 50000. o0
Surplus and Undivided Profits 18,00C.

Do-s cxclu-lvely a honking business, with ftmilitie* equal *.
any bank In the sta:o. Solicits the accounteofFarmen, Mlerchan ,
Cortorallor.s, ec. Interest allcwrd by rpcolal arrangement. 11
badae3 irnPFacted promptly. H. E TAYLOR, Camhier.







T. J. SWEARINGEN.


BAIRD &


E0.,


Gainesville, Fla.


Wholesale
and Retail
Dealers In


Simeral Hardware.


Our stock comprises everything required by ev-
eybody from the housewife to the phosphate miner.
We are agents for and carry in stock
ROBLIN6S MIRE ROPE,
C. ATIIS & COS. SAWS,
M CITTUOOGA IILLS AID PLOWS,
DUPOrrI EXPLOSIVES,
QVU IBAL GASOLIE STOVES,
B- C'S STOVES AND RAISES
GLADIATOR BRUBBE BELTS,
PLEIT, Jr., GOODS,
GOULD MAINFACTURIIG Cox's. PUIPS.
Steens Bros.' Jugs, Churns and Pots.


Our Tin and


Plumbing shop is thoroughly


Inquiries and orders solicited.


Xx


~. BAIR]
E.


equipped.






EDWARD O'DONALD. M. B. 4VKNDFR8.



O'DONALD & SAUNDERS,
(Successors to PbiUip Miller & Co.)

Wholesale .nd
oi
Rotall Dealers In



Facy and apple roeries,
FLOUR, MEAL AND GRITS, HAY
AND GRAIN, QUEENSWARE,
GLASSWARE, JUGS, TILING, Etc.
Agents for ...

Columbia and Hartford
BICYCLES.

Gainesville, Florida.
SOUTH-EAST CORNER
EAST MAlf AND LIBERTY STREETS.





*
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$5


I.


:,- LLER
;; 'S


, & B AVERA,


SDEA. LE. R .I.
DrALERS IN


Sthly Candlie Ciprs, Tobacco Mantels, Gral,


T 3ZLIJ:T-,


3aITO.


. fFIEST o300 WATER OUTFIT IN TIHE STATE


S .


V ..


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DUKE,


GAINESVILLE. FLA.
DCSM.R "-


Pure Wines, Liquars, Beer and


Cigars.


Jiuldr for lpliorrs and Oetle Rm, Snu, Bradiles
al WhlIsm.

. f p TABITig I oVll THIE Jo0 TRAsE .


_ __ __








PIA1BS Dl-i -lS


AT BETAIL PACTOTRY PIE E.
RIS TO SOfT THE PIUCHA


Fischer,
Kimball,
Crown,
Kimball.


UP-TO-DATE
PFANOS
AND
ORGANS.


Whitney, "
'Hinzeand
Franklin.
"Crown."


Sent to any point in Florida on approval.
Freight paid both ways if not satisfactory. Corres-
pondence solicited. .


Manufacturers, Agent.


JAS. A. ABRAnS,
Uenlaeibvl% kl.


PEDRICK & SMITH,
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA.





Mtaufeoturenr of
High Grade Bu ies, Wagons
and Carts.
Call and. Seo Us Before Purchasing.
Prices the Lowest.


TEl


ER.





ISfAI8SHERO 1864.
J;. R. EDDiN,
UMnufacturur of san Dealer lu

DOORS, SASH AlM BLINDS,
ORNAMENTAL EMBOSSED WORK A SPECIALTY.

Stair Nrle, 'Balusters, Brackets, Moulding,
IRcaM.il&Ori Otja L"anrit A specialty,
Laths, Shingles, Brtik and Lime.

BUILDINGS ERECTED ON SHORT NOTICE.
GAlNRSVILLE, FLA.

The Alacbua Conuty Abstract Co.,
GATNESVILLE, FLA.

Complete Abstracts of Title Furnished. Taxes
plid, Land returned for Assessment. We investi-
gate and report on the Title to any and all Lands.

Correspondence Solicited.
R ferenoes...
FIRST NATIONAL BANK.
H. F. DUTTON & CO., (Bankers.)






DORSEY & WAUIH,
GAINESVILLE, FLA.,
DEALERS IN
Staple and Fancy, Groceries, Grain,
Hay, Crockery and Glassware.


. FINE CANDIES A SPECIALTY ..

THOMAS & COMPANY,

H ll ware F urilre.

Seed and Farming Implements. All
Kinds of Farmers Supplies.

. We Lead in Low Prics .
WEST SIDE SQUARK GAINESYILLE, FLA,


/








BROWN HOUSE,
E. B. WHIDDON, Manager.

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA.

Tourists Headquarters Central location Weekly or
monthly rates on application.

*ARILINGTON HOTEL,P
MRS. C. J. SEAGLE, Proprietress.

CAINESVILLE, FLORIDA.
,NEWLY FURNISHED THROUGHOUT.
NEAR PUBLIC SQUARE .....
Large sample room for commercial men free. Monthly
and weekly rates on application.

HOTEL PLAZA,

GAINESVILLE, FLA.

STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS.



Florida visitors.make this headquarters. Open all the
year.







GRAHAM BROS.,

FUTNITURE AND MATTING.
BICYCLES AND SUNDRIES.
I1OD.MI. i -TP A~i*P
West Side Square, Calnesvlle, Fla.

CITY MARKET,
J. 8. HARROLD 00, Props.
The Fioest Beef, Mutton, ani- Pork,
and Fish, Oysters and Game
in Season.
1Puet ide TPutllo "quarc. OGainOAvi*llle. F3i
A. M. CUSHMAN,
GAINESVILLE. FL,.
Fire, Life tird ~ic eid, nt 'InPurande, irtrtv
Im cipal officials. -
Correispondonoc. (olicited.
A ttoey a Caviso

Attorney and Counselor at LaI,


GAINESVILLE.


FLORiOA.








WM. WADE HAMPTON,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law and Solicitor in
Chancery.

G/INESVILLE, -- FLORIDA.
P actice in State and Federal Courts.
ESTABLISi ED 1868.
Let Us Make Your Clothes.
We sre TAILORS, CLOTHIF'RS and GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Itest Equipped Tailoring Establishment In Florida.
NEW YORK CNLO~ t 6 CO., A. M. ENOEL, Mgr. md Prm'r..
CGAINESYILLK, FLORIDA.

'Mf1fH THE JEWE LE R,
GAINESVILLt, FLORIDA.
ji 'lMiaduarten for Fverything carried in Stoek by FIRST CLA88
JEW I.IRi His- Stock is up to date and i.uaranteed. Prices
laiie thte any firm ii, Florida.
.%_Expert Repairing A Specialty.-"
~\........... r'," "f~~. '..I111. .. .. ........ ......... .
'WM. SCO T,

MERCHANT TAILOR,
GAINESVILLE, PLA.

Most cdlthptte Etirblishtnent in Middle Florida.
SA'TISACTION GUARAIHTED.






A A IASURNCE A A&
FIRE, LIFE AND ACCIDENT.
ONLY FIRST CLASS COMPANIES REPRESENTED.
B. F. JORDAN, AGENT,
GAINESVILLE, FLA.
H. W. Harriman, Prop'r.,

Central City Tonsorial Parlors,
HOT AND COLD BATHS.
First-Class Service.
When Visiting Gainesville,
Be sure and call at .
THE RED FRONT CLOTHING STORE,
Where will be found the Largest and best selected Stock of Cloth-
ing, Furnighings, Shoes and Hate.
OUR GRADES ARE THE BEST, PRICES CHEAPEST,
NEW YORK RACKET,
CHEAPEST STORE ON EARTH.
Dry Goods, Notions, Hats, Shoes, Furniture and
Everything ..
West Side Square. PHIFER BROS.
GAINESVILLE. FEA.






4.4
A%i~2


WM. C. JACKSON,





ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,



GAINESVILLE, FLA.


Attorney for R. C. DUNN & CO.
miw I~aa.. .' )~C r~C';XI7 L C K.' LIP .I~~I~


Edwards' Opera House and Wine Room
One of the prettiefs ()pers Hmouse In the Stalte; seat ng cnps:ty 00O-4 ri-tly firlt-cl ia At
tractions always pay Opera Ho,UMe Wine Room on ground floor In one of the banisomeet
nl the 8tse, sod always supplied with the very bei t of everything. I am sole agent sad
wholesule dealer for the Anheuser-Busoh Brewing Associaton t. Louis famous:keg
and bottle eer, J. F. EDWARDS, proprietor.


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DAILY. GaMI-wamKLY.



THE SUN,
GAINS8VILLE, FJA,

HN H. Mooreary. Editor and Proprietor.


PUBLISHED IN THE HEART OF THE VEGETABLE
AND PHOSPAATE BELT.
OLDEST ESTABLISHED PAPER IN THE COUNTY.
DAILY $5. SEMI-WEEKLY $1.
ADVERTISING RATES REASONABLE.


G : ~LEVIIL.E FLA.



4Repe~snts the OLDhST INTERNATIONAL
4 IE lNS-URANCE COMPANY IN THE
WQpRLD-THE NEW YORK LIFE.



.*Iv tgte.tbe ;pc Contr.cts of this Company before placing
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