• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Advertising
 Main
 Advertising






Group Title: White's Guide to Florida and her famous resorts : containing a brief history of Florida; her climate, health, soil, agricultural products, fruits, phosphates, transportation lines and other useful and interesting information : also a sketch of Jacksonville and other points of interest to the tourist, invalid, immigrant or sportsman, and how to reach them
Title: Lecithoceridae
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055192/00001
 Material Information
Title: Lecithoceridae
Series Title: Microlepidoptera palaearctica
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. (87 leaves of plates) ; 27 cm.
Language: German
Creator: Gozmány, L. A
Publisher: G. Fromme
Place of Publication: Wien
Publication Date: 1978
 Subjects
Subject: Lecithoceridae
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliography: v. 1, p. 269-276.
Statement of Responsibility: bearb. von László Gozmány.
General Note: Includes index.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055192
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000013509
oclc - 05159813
notis - AAB6578

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Front page 1
    Introduction
        Front page 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Advertising
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
Full Text









f'dr4% I. p


iS V" ,.-






i., 3 p

i .9
. ,V ''


I




% CONTAINING
|M A R r RTUR OR FLOwaA; HER CLu TE, Hz


'.I
AR CULTURAL PRODUCTS, FRUns, PuonATM,

* .sp. PORTATION LINES AND OTHER USEFUL AXI
if fllf linfl9KO -MOMAIN
SWrSuWLU INFO SMlO

~~ALSO A SKI-TCH O


V .
' "^'C'^BB ^
I



^^H
^ -'^i uf ^
4 #



**


'*!
p. I :





*' be
a C. I

.4 1;


,> r ,











L .3 mb
Cd 4 h 'j4-Me
q,,



**5* Iq


'.4
'a.


''tf



.*u
'%



'Sn:

"I
.1^
a' eAf
A.M
'*-




i. ~ ?' ~'i"n~ij-, .rl
r' i: 1.1


INTRODUCTORY.

8 THE third edition of this work goes among old friends to a
large extent, who look for its annual appearance, we feel that
an elaborate introduction is unnecessary. This edition, like
the first and second, will be placed in Hotels, Club Rooms, Waiting
Rooms, on Boats, Etc., in every part of the State. A number will
also be sent as in previous years to other parts of the Union as well as
foreign lands. That it will be kindly received and appreciated is our
desire, and that all who read may wonder at our wealth of sunshine
and happiness, and rejoice with us that Florida is the home of peace
and plenty, where each may watch our marvelous development and
thank the giver of all good that all our ways are ways of pleasantnees.


* a '-'


V.,,..







AND NN ]PAXoDS WMORnI


THE CARLETON.

We may say truthfully that the tourist and pleasure-eeeker who
has visited Florida in the nast, and who will seek the pleasure of our
winter climate, with its glorious sunshine, baln.y air and flowery
beauty, annually, is quite familiar with all our famous hotels, especially
the popular Carleton. If they have enjoyed its hospitality they know
that it provides all the comforts of a home, with all the modern con-
veniences of a first-claM hotel If they have failed to avail themselves
of these comforts by going elsewhere, they must certainly know that
the reputation of the house is all that could reasonably be asked. To
the visitor who comes to Florida for the first time we desire to say that
the Carleton occupies the finest location in the city, on Bay street,
opposite the postoffice, convenient to the business part of the city, and
where boats and trains may be reached with ease. The Carleton is
substantial in appearance, and furnished in a careful and perfect style
throughout. The table is supplied with the best the markets afford,
and every employee will be found prompt and courteous. Rates, $8.00
per day. Special rates to permanent guests and parties. Mr. A. J.
Miehener, the proprietor, formerly of Watkins Glen, N. Y., is a gentle-
man of long experience as a hotel man, and always takes delight in
providing for the pleasure and comfort of his guest.


Take the ATLANTIC COAST LINE.
mO. Thmh Owa aa Skrt UA m t* anr wurFl.. td. ra l U P, as.
Me sth. Lt aA Weit.





WHITr'8 GUtfX TO FLORIDA.


RAYMOND D. KNIGHT & CO.,
Importers and Dealers in
Crockery, China, Glass, Earthenware, Lamps
and Chandallers.
Oil and Gat Sims, Tinwar, Balaizd Goods, HousIold Outfitters.
StImd, Sllvr-Plated adu Rich Ct Belgi Glasmrie.
Hotel ud Sitelamt Sipplis.
SOLLE STATE AGENT FOR THE
Celebrated Monitor Oil Stoves, Indurated Fibre Ware,
Globe Incandescent Lamp, Iceberg Chief Refrigerators,
White Mountain Ice Cream Freezers,
Enameled Kitchen Ware.
H AND 13 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

.WsGCALDWELL & 00C.
SUCCESSORS TO
A E. G. BETT & CO.

Florida Coffee and Spice Mills.
Only Coffee Roasters in the State.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Teas, Coffees, Spices, Baking Powder,
Extracts, Bluing Pearline, Paper
und Paper Bags, Butter
Trays, Twine, Etc.
28 OCEAN STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLA,
Take the S4YANIAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
e ma,, Qtok mlo "t 'ra thaX Ekt. ThdLh PallaI.
aet ,emsIo n au Tsae. Toh rait I G. aA ms. W.
W. GDAi A Go" wtm -a S. J.kaeamtlko 13a.














FLORIDA.



There earth is an Eden, the climate a balm;
Bright hues deck the fields and aloft waves the palm;
O'er the hammocks its perfume the jasmine fling;
To the live-oak the solemn grey drapery clings;
Wide the cypress its vast leafy canop throws;
~' VAnd in loveless blosums the Florida Roe.

HE great State of Florida is a region of not only wonderful pos
sibilities, but great probabilities. In its mild, healthy and equa-
ble climate, exempt alike from the rigorous winters of the ice-
bound North and the heated summers of less favored sections; in its
boundless wealth of luscious fruits, agricultural products, lumber, phos-
phate, fish and other important productions, there is that which is real,
solid, hopeful. Others have gone through the dark days of anxiety,
and the thorns of pioneering are removed. The doubtful period is
past, and the future beams forth like the sun in heaven. Among the
thousands who have found homes of peace and plenty many have
become rich, while all have been made content. Many thousands
more will quickly follow the inspiration of such an alluring example.
During the next twenty years Florida will be the theatre of many vast
public enterprises. Fortunes will be made in every nook and corner,
and in every industry, and thousands now living will yet acquire and
enjoy the luxuries of wealth. Cities yet unborn will be built and pop-
ulated where now are virgin forests. This has been the history of all
the older sections of our Union. While recollecting that "history
repeats itself," the restless reader, looking from his quiet home "back
West or East"toward a new home, should carefully ponder over a still
more important fact; that is, that Florida is infinitely superior in cli-
mate and in all resources which go to make up great States and thrifty
people to any region of similar extent on earth. Every new-comer
cannot gain fame and riches here, but he can gain a good livelihood,
and will, all the time, have the consciousness ofbeing identified with a
gion whose glories he can proudly proclaim at all times and in all
lands.
There is but one Florida, and she offers to the tourist, invalid,
Takl the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTErN RAILWAY,
The ~'ersh OC Ua SIAe to Us as ar .k tlerd, amt aB Pralat
ew th, lst a4 Wed.






WHITB'S GUIDE TO FLORIDA


immigrant or sportsman a balm which will lengthen life and enrich
the fleeting hours.
It is the best inheritance bequeathed by the Father to His child-
ren; long reserved, but revealed at this day, possessing treasures such
as none of her sister States possesses or can secure.
Some would compare Florida with Italy. There can be no com-
parison, except by contrast. Italy is a region of hills and mountains,
now-capped during a part of the year. Florida is nearly a plain, and
in most of it snow was never seen. Florida is a peninsula, and extends
into the warmest portion of the ocean and on the border of the trade
winds; its breezes are tempered by the genial equability of the Gulf
Stream.
Spain and the Grecian Isles compare with Italy as to climate and
productions. Florida stands alone; no place can be compared to her.
Her highest praise is to call her by her mon beautiful Oastilis ame,
FLORIDA I No country can be like Florida, and she needs no gems
borrowed from another's crown.
Florida differs from all other countries and States; it difibrs from
itself in regions and parallels, as if to supply the desire of all choosing
to locate within its borders. In Florida may be found locations suited
to the tastes and desires of every would-be-resident, andpevery produc-
tion the agriculturist may desire to grow.
Between twenty-five degrees and thirty-one degrees north latitude,
and between eighty degrees and eighty-eight degrees west longitude
from Greenwich lies the State of Florida, containing 58,680 square
miles, 4,440 square miles being water surface, and the remaining 54,-
240 square miles land surface, or 34,713,600 acrrs.
The peninsula portion, measuring from the northern boundary,
extends south about 400 miles, with an ave rage width of about 100
miles. The northern part of the State extends from the Atlantic west-
ward along the southern boundary of the States of Georgia and Ala-
bama about 875 miles, with a width to the Gulf of from forty to ninety
miles.
The average altitude of Florida, as set forth in Toner's Dictionary
of Elevations, is sixty feet above the level of the sea. Louisiana, the
next lowest, averages seventy-five feet above the level of the sea. The
largest portion of the territory of all the States on the Atlantic coast
from Maine to Florida is less than 300 feet above the sea level by this
authority. Many are of the impression that high places are the most
healthy, but this is not always true, and is not the testimony of expe-
rience in Florida. Sometimes the lower places in the same neighbor-
hood have had quite the advantage in point.of health. In the Old
World some heathitl and fertile localities are below the level of the
ea, as the Valley of the Jordan, more than 1,000 feet below the mrface

Take the ATLANTIC COST LINE,
T MseRs -.4 11a0h Ron" wo* a" em.. Thfe m Paf
n- glm t OlC n all Tm as. TUS iMe U. s. MNa t wL
W. M9AUB; M Ae=A4r 9 We fats ay s em-e.i s, 21k







ANDMM. N33 AMMOU 1t1=0S.


of the Mediterranean Sea, the shores of the Caspian Sea; and portions
of Holland have been reclaimed from the ocean by its dykes.
With a oost line of almost 1,200 miles, accessible with small boats
all along the shore, the long, narrow peninsula of Florida puts its whole
surface in near approach to the commerce of the ocean. A number of
the best harbors of the United States are on the coast of Florida, and,
with an equitable expenditure upon them, will have a larger number of
ports accessible to ocean steamers than any other State. Nineteen of
the rivers of Florida are already navigable by steamers to the distance,
in the aggregate, of over 1,000 miles. These steamers, in some instances












0


Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY,
n ThI2agh Caw a hftm Lime to a4 m we lda, a" an Ps etn
NarU4, Dt mad WetLI






* mwarrT oUIDne TO rWonA.

4orip; entirely across the State, make transportation available to
extensive areas, and in almost every instance have at their mouths suae
harbor facilities as make coastwise navigation to vessels of moderate
draft safe and active.


HISTORY.

"Oh, Florida, romantic land,
Enraptured, I thy praises sing;
For Nature smiles on every hand,
And winter is as fair as spring."
HE history of Florida begins with its discovery by Juan Ponce
de Leon, which dates as early aa 1512. Its then unmolested
shores were discovered on the 27th day of March by this adven-
turous navigator, who landed his craft on the 2d day of April follow-
ing, near where the city of Fernandina now stands .There seems,
however, to have been no attempt made to establish a settlement at that
point at the time. Ponce de Leon was first made Governor of the ter-
ritory by the Spanish government in the year 1521; yet there is no
record of any noteworthy progress having been made until 1565, when
Pedro Menende sailed from Cadiz, Spain, on the 1st day of July;
arrived at St. Augustine Bay August 28th, and, on the 29th of the
same month, founded the city of St. Augustine, which place is reputed
to be by far the oldest town in the United States, being certainly the
most ancient in Florida, and figuring the most prominently in the early
history of the State. Other discoveries were made along the coast of
Florida, at various points, subsequent to that made by Ponce de Leon,
by other noted navigators, whose names are familiar.
The early history of Florida was not one of rapid and encourag-
ing development, as the progress of the colony during the successive
territorial administrations was of but little consequence to the foreign
powers under whose control the territory remained. The most import-
ant of the changes of ownership through which Florida has passed was
that effected by the treaty of February 22,1819. betweenJohn Quincy
Adatms, Secretary of State of the United States, sad Louis de Onis,
Envoy Extraordnary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the Kingdom of
Spain, by which 8pam ceded the Floridan, East and West, to the Uni-
ted States, the Territory being admitted into the Upion in 1845.
Spain controlled the territory from the discovery by Ponce de Leon up
tn the year 1763, at which time the Floridam, and West, were
ceded to Great Britain, Florida being subject to Briiit authority until
1783. Great Britain, however, had lost her thirteen American colon-
ies in the war of 1776, and -her government receded the Floridas to
Take the ATLANTIC CAST UIE,
2w smot. amgad k aete umte a1 a =aN.ah, d mas
l- a -- am on a wU rss. TW ahs 19. S. M rS s. W.
w. AAV & Am W. aR St., MaSvY re.






ASW -Ba FAxoUS aXmoas. I

Spain in 1783. Thus for more than 20 years Florida was in the
gasp of powers indifferent to its welfare and progree, u they regarded
at at too great a distance from their local interest to promise advtatag
from immigration and settlement.
From the time that Florida was admitted into the Union up to the
present, the increase in wealth and population has been truly wonder-
fl, and it is safe to predict that the future will be full of heaven's
richest blessings. The population of the State in 1830, and at the close
of each decade since, was as follows:
1830......................................... .... 87,730
1840...... ........................ .................. 54,477
1850....................................... ..... ..... 87,445
1860................................................ 140,424
1870............................................187,748
1880................................. ............. 269,490
And in 1890, with a careful count, would reach abive 400,000;
a fact which every citizen should feel justly proud of. The history of
Florida has been full of progress, and the time is not far distant when
Florida will hold the proud position she is destined to fill-the brightest
star in the Union.


OLD CIY GATMs, fr. AUOUrvI.


Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA a WESTERN RAILWAY.
m. h.... O.w .=& slbt Asto Ma ei. PI..fi, ina.On IaW
Ne fetht mmid Wos.






wITU'3 GUUIR '1O IWUWUD


CLIMATE.

Knowet thou the land where the lemon tree bloom,
Where the gold orange grows in the green thicket's gloom,
Where the wind ever from the blue heaven blows,
And groves are of myrtle and orange and rose?
1 LORIDA has many attractions, but the crown and pearl of them
all is her incomparable climate. So genial and balmy is it that
Sin winter, as well as summer, even invalids can live an outdoor
life, breathe the pure, bracing air, and bask in the warm sunshine.
It is difficult to give a definite idea of its beauty. Owing to the
peninsular position of Florida, its climate is unique. It is unlike that
of any other Southern State or Santa Barbara. You find nothing like
it in Southern Europe or Algiers. This climate is altogether peculiar.
There is ,nothing equal to it on the face of the earth. Of course, the
climate is warm in the direct rays of the sun-hot, even; but it is
scarcely ever sultry, muggy, prostrating. The sun, though hot, does
not smite. Sunstrokes are almost unknown; I have never heard of oue
in the State. The reason is that the heat is marvelously tempered by
the cool sea breezes which continually play across the peninsula.
Even in the hottest part of the day step into the shade and at once you
find the air deliciously cool and refreshing, and, at the same time,
indescribably soft and balmy.
But some one may ask, "What of your Florida summers; are they
not unbearable ?" We must emphatically answer, "Nol" for there are
but few places on the face of the globe more delightful during the sum-
mer than Florida.
The only drawback to this season is its length, generally extend-
ing from May until October. During the summer just past, when
every patr from the North gave long ists of fatal cases of sunstroke
and prostrtion from heat, in the whole of Florida there was not one
case reported, either fatal or otherwise. The average height of the
thermometer at noon is less than eighty-ix degrees, and even this is so
tempered by the constant sea breeze that it is more eddurable at that
rate than would be a much lower temperature in the North.
Many will be disposed to doubt this but when they consider our
location on this narrow strip of rolling land, surrounded on three sides
by miles and miles of water, from off which blow the cooling breezes,
and also the fact that nearly every day during the "rainy season," ex-
teading from June to September, we are favored with rins that lower
the temperature perceptibly, they must admit that our location is very
favorable for making our summers pleasant. The sun shines brightly
Take the ATLANTIC COAST LIE,
ne ld Oa ae k m... a. a.., s pun.. .
La h Mt 1--S Qftek Uskft Xf-1 f t.w. %%a ii Puflta
a nVf Q eaMan Trail- 2 H..* eU. a W..
aAeaa Aesut, n W. a b., t Pr 1 .







AND 333 FAMOUS RBORW. 6

and, of course, it is warm in its rays. Still we have known people to
come here from the extreme northern portion of. the Union and work
every day in the sun without experiencing any evil efsets. One great
advantage that the summers have over that of other sections i our cool
nights. Immediately after sunset a cool east breeze commences, and
generally continues through the night; and, almost without exception,
covering is in demand and comfortable before morning. Inhabitants
of northern countries, where the hot, sultry nights following the broil-
ing hot days, make sleep and rest almost impossible, will know how to
appreciate our Florida summer nights when once they have given them
a trial.
Much more might be said of our climate, but space forbids. We
can only add, come and see.


HEALTH.

"And the pale health-seeker findeth there
The wine of life in its pleasant air."
EALTH is the chief aim of humanity, or, at least, it should be,
for without it all of the favors lavished upon our devoted heads
by Dame Nature amount to naught; they are fleeting and transi-
tory, and are banished by the first appearance of the demon of ill
health. You may be surrounded by all mundane luxuries, and
imagine yourself in the seventh heaven of happiness, when the stinging
pangs of rheumatism, the choking hand of asthma, or the dread reflec-
tion that your chief heritage on earth is a pulmonary disease, comes to
you and banishes pleasure as rapidly as our Florida sunshine and resin-
ous breezes banish the pallor from the cheeks of the "puny" and paint
them with the roseate hue of health.
This, then, is the chief point to be considered when you contem-
plate a removal from your land of ice and snow to one of perpetual sun-
shine and summer--
"To a land by orange blooms shaded
Where summer ever lingers on the air.'
Do not think, however, that our climate is only healthy because it
is warm, or that all warm climates are healthy, for they, most emphati-
cally, are not. But when you find a place where sudden changes of
the temperature are rarely known, where there is no stagnant water and
decaying vegetation to breed malarial diseases, where the land is high
and dry and swept continually by ocean winds, you may be satisfied
that you have found a healthy location, and make your olana accord-
ingly.
People in the last stages of that most flattering of all diseases-
consumption--are prone to be hopeful, and annually many of them
Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY,
'T. WI ears car sad Ihet Liau to sAd aem leas, a" an lPeat s
, wlrt most sea WO .






j10 Warw's GUIDm TO WLORUIA

come tottering Floridaward. Ale! they come to stay, and the ed
soughing of the wind through the stately pines above their graven sIge
a warning to others, which they should heed. If you are in the lst
stages of consumption stay at home, wherever that home may be, where,
surrounded by friends and loved ones, the last days of your life may be
made comfortable, and you can die in peace, with a loving hand to lose
your eyis in the last long sleep. Florida will not cure you-nothing
will. So stay at home and die among friends. There are exceptions,
however, even to this rule. In some cases of consumption, where
hemorrhages are rapidly drawing the sufferer to an untimely grave,
we have known remarkable cures to be effected in a short time. The
healing air of our peninsula appears to give new life to the wasted
lungs and cause them to heal, and, to all appearances, become as sound
as ever.
So much, then, for those who have allowed this dread disease to
run so long, and get so firm a hold upon them. Now a word to those
who are troubled with weak lungs and are liable to go into consump
tion at any moment, and we will leave this sad, though important sub-
ject for one more cheerful To those who fear consumption, or lung
trouble in any form, we say come to Florida, and come at once. Do
not delay a day, or you may be in the lamentable condition of those
unfortunate creatures above mentioned. Come while you are young
and have the vitality to fight off the disease; come 'ere your frame is
emaciated by the dread scourge, and grim death stares you in the face.
Here you will find in our salubrious climate, in our healing air and
our lifnpiring sunshine the panacea for all your ills.
The climate of our State, however, is not only beneficial to weak
lungs, but is also highly recommended by eminent medical authorities
for bronchial throat troubles and asthma.
The healthfulness of no locality averts the divinely indicated
limitation placed upon human life as "three score and ten.' Sanitary
science attaches paramount importance to conditions or environments
as preservative from many avoidable diseases, thereby increasing the
sum total of human happiness, as well as aiding greatly in prolonging
life.
The interest taken in these favorable conditions is no longer con-
fined to the few who devote themselves to the critical investigation as
to the laws governing health, but the masses are deeply interested in
ascertainjng the sanitary requisites at home, and if they contemplate a
change of abode desire that it shall be a lad not only "flowing with
milk and honey," but also that it shall be eminently calculated to pre-
serve them from the ills of life.
Poverty's most efficient ally is disease. There is a word of com-
fort in Richardson's proverb: "National health is national wealth."
Surgeon-General Lawton, of the United States Army, in an official

Take the ATLAN1IC COAST LINE,
m. m Can em n sU am s. Hen -as4 sM aLLr e wvo. W.
V. DAh'lY O wW .-**A V* Bar ** **fteI, Jm *ll, a1..













































Tatk the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA WESTERN RAILWAY,
m.e Th...n am& s wt Jm. ta uan f h u S..-ul a.n PlM
.Wa I, Sm. Nao Wee.







WHTVs GUIDCe Io FLORIDA


report written Iefore the war, presents the advantages of the Peninsu-
lar State at large.
Perhaps tt e freedom from suspicious bias, which is properly
attached to mu ch that is written of the booming nature, will secure it
a credence thlt its authority deserves.
"The oli.ate of Florida is remarkably agreeable, being subject to
fewer atmospheric variations, and its thermometer ranges much less
than that of any other part of the United States, except a portion of
the coast of Cnlifornia. For example, the winter at Fort Snelling,
Minnesota, is forty-eight degrees colder than at Fort Brook, Florida;
but the summer! at Fort Brook, Florida, i6 only eight degrees warmer.
The mean anmuul temperature of Augusta, Georgia, is nearly eight
degrees, and that of Fort Gibson, Arkansas, upwards of ten degrees
lower than at Tampa, yet in both these places the mean summer tempera-
ture is higherthan at Fort Brook, Tampa Bay. In the summer sea-
son the mercury rises higher in every part of the United States, and
even in Canads, than it does along the coast of Florida. This is shown
by meteorologieal statistics in this bureau.
"As respwdts health, the climate of Florida stands pre-eminent.
That the peniihsular climate of Florida is much more salubrious than
that of any other State in the Union is clearly established by the medi-
cal statistics of the army. Indeed, the statistics in this bureau demon-
strate the fact that diseases that result from malaria are of a much
milder type ii the peninsula of Florida than in any other State in the
Union. Them records show that the ratio of deaths to the number of
cases of remitt et fever has been much less than among the troops serv-
ing in any otler portion of the United States.
"In the IMiddle Division of the United States the proportion is
one death to thirty-six cases of remitting fever; in the Northern Divis-
ion, one to fift-two; in the Southern Division, one to fifty-four; in
Texas, one t seventy-eight; in California, one to one hundred and
twenty-two; io New Mexioe on to one hundred and forty-eight; while
in Florida it it but one to two hundred and eighty-seven."
According to the statistics prepared by United States Surgeon-,
General Hammond, Florida is the healthiest State in the Union. He
shows the deaoh rate in Florida to be one in 1,447; in Massachusetts,
one in 254; in New York, one in 473; and in Minnesota, one in 765.







rTa the ATLANTIC COAST LINE,
ThUe Nltml oQuk B-atS NX tU 4 &a Z Thusa Lw Pl a
W aft t.es- be Tf l. FaM UV. Fall 5ar. *W.
W. DA Mt, W. aWn St., 5 emuilW, a.t






AND HER FAMOUS BEBORTL


SOIL.


ct HERE is no soil susceptible of greater improvement, at equal
Expense, in the universe. It is exceedingly diversified, and its
Varied character is suited not only to the crops of the States, gen-
erally. but because of its near approach to a tropical climate, to some
products not grown elsewhere in the States. The soil is classed aa first,
second and third rate pine lands, and as high and low hammocks and
swamp lands.
The pine lands cover much the larger portion of the State; and
travelers i the train, or over the highways through them, are not apt
to be impressed in such casual inspection with their real worth. The
white sand on the immediate surface is taken as conclusive testimony
against them; but that is not all sand which, in the careless glance,
appears to be. In a large portion of the State this sand is mixed with
finely comminuted bits of shells or carbonate of lime.
The second class pine lands, which have been adjudged by compe-
tent authority to be in the largest proportion, are all productive.
They are not hilly, but, for the most part, undulating in their surface.
Some of the sand hills of Hernando County are regarded among the
highest points in the State. Underlying the surface is clay, marl,
lime-rock and sand. These lands, from their accessibility and produo-
tiveness, the facility of fertilizing with cattle, and the impression of
their healthfulness above hammock lands, have induced their enclosure
and tillage, when the richer hammock lands were near by, but more
difficult to prepare for cultivation.











Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY,
Tb. Thr..a on ..l" sa t Aes. s.a er i ftm noris, a& Ia .s
Nerth, Xa amd We".







wmEms eu!DU ro spLorIA


AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS.

J7ary: Plant Irish poctaosa,
agbbage, pu, gg pLa tomato.
February: Fruits and vanes,
Onions, melon, ad grapes for wine.
March: Corn, oas and ine spring wheat,
And all tht man or beast can eat.
Al: Millet and lady peas;
Iriash potatoes and hive your bee.
May: Plant pepper and finger-tips,
And lay for sweet potato lips.
June: Once more turn up the ground,
And sow and reap, an endless round.
July: Trees mar now be set,
The soil, from kindly rains, is wet.
August: Harvest, one and all I
Sow turnips and caulifowers for fall.
September: Spring is here again;
Now put your winter garden in.
October: 'Neath this genial sky
Sew oats and barley, wheat andrye.
November: Plant as heretofore,
Sow and reap. sill more and more.
December: Ditch, manure and drain,
For lo! sweet spring is here again.

PH OSE who have never carefully considered the statistics of the
State have but little idea of what the State produces annually.
A large amount of long and short staple cotton is grown, both of
which do well here, especially the former.
The sugar industry is being awakened, and considerable capital is
being invested in machinery for its manufacture. The reclaimed
lands of the State are well adapted to raising cane. At present it is
grown all over the State for domestic purposes, each farmer having his
own mill and evaporator, and making his own syrup and sugar, besides
ome for sale. Sugar cane grows better in Florida than anywhere else
in the United States, the canes often growing twelve feet high, while
in Louisiana they rarely grow over five feet.
Cdrn is the greatest cereal crop of Florida, and some of our farm-
ers produce as many as from 2,000 to 4,000 bushels annually, and at
the rate of from twelve to sixty bushels per acre.
The planting of upland rice is increasing from year to year, and,
with the introduction of improved machinery for cleaning it, it is fast
becoming one of our staple crops, as it not only furnishes a salable
article, but is a good grain for stock and poultry, containing more
nutriment than oats.

Trae tr ATLANTIC COAST ULE,
Ow sad a..es .W Q ..f. Nohr& al nm. Tb. 1fll
a-"m w -- os n e~UTanIm. The ,at U. mL a m$l et. W.
W. DAvILO Arm$t, We* Say 9., FJh-kb l av., 1s.






AD UB FAMOUS RBOEOBM.


Oats and rye are planted in the fall for winter pasture and bar-
vested in the spring.
The growing of tobacco has lately become one of Florida's indur
tries. Before the war Gadsden and adjoining counties produced some
of the finest tobacco grown, and it was largely exported. Its planting
has again been revived, and the quality of tobacco grown in the past
year equals the best Cubanaproduction.
Sweet potatoes can be grown anywhere in the State, and frequently
attain the weight of ten to eighteen pounds, .and produce from 100 to
500 bushels per acre, according to fertility of soil and cultivation.
Irish potatoes are grown for Northern markets, and bring from $5
to $8 per barrel The home market is a good one also, a they come
to maturity at the time when Northern potatoes are out.
Peanuts are raised to a considerable extent in West Florida, but
chiefly for home consumption and for fattening pork, which gives the
meat a very delicious flavor.
Watermelons are at home in Florida, and grow to a perfection sel-
dom attained in any other State. They produce well on new land, and
often grow to weigh sixty pounds. A melon under twenty pounds is
not considered worth handling for shipping.
Onion growing in Florida is increasing every year, and as the
result is quite satisfactory where they receive the proper cultivation,
those who raised a small patch last year have trebled the quantity of
seed planted. They require a rich and moist soil, and those who fur-
nish this and give the proper cultivation are the ones who realize a
handsome profit. The crop last year at no time brought less than $2
per bushel, and frequently more.
Cabbage is being cultivated to a great extent for shipping, as well
as a number of other kinds of vegetables.
Nearly all kinds of vegetables do well, and find a ready sale at
good prices, not only at home, but in the North, as they can be grown
here when more northern climes are covered with ice and snow.
It may not be generally known that the agricultural products, per
capital, of Florida double those of the average of all other Southern
States.
This' may seem strange to those who are ignorant of the truth, but
we have taken pains to investigate the value of the agricultural pro-
ducts of the other Southern States, and find it about $50, while our
own is $100.
With all California's wealth, her agricultural average is only $88;
that of Tennessee only $33 26; Arkansas, $76; Misissippi, $73; Geor-
gia, $60, and Alabama, $66.60. This is an exhibit which should make
the pulse of every Floridian throb fast
It will be seen by the above that Florida has a greater producing
rake the SAVANHAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RIHLWAT,
h. T=won& sar* ". S M.. tl se dih pusalls, s a Tst
Noiemw'2sal WOe.






WHITX'B GUIDE TO VORIDA


capaty than she is given credit for; but dear readers do not iw ine
for a moment that you can settle in any part of the State and rsa the
Alli r and LeConte pear side by side; that you can grow the uMgar
apple and peach together in any part of the State, for it cannot be
done. It has not been our aim to tell where and how each could be
raised, for it would require hundreds of pages to tell the interesting
story.


Take the ATLANTIC COAST LIN E,
a.cuaak wua a~t P-*r* X uw ag -i XTi~
Ons O alft'l u. ~'P Ther]tPoe L
--r=A&V- ma Was- &W. A w 4 -te^f It


~;rt~~-F;f~f-+--F










and~a u I to-te & l6 al an imponat
factor tobacco has been in the commerce of the world. Though an
article of luxury, it wps in the early history of Florida looked upon a
a convenient f 1it 6f etehaage In 1626, *ileb there was an
abundance of tobacco in the colonies, there was a great scarcity of
females. An enterprising trader brought ninety young women from


England to Aimeriea and exchanged to the planters at 120 weight of
female for iHW j4oids bf tobcco. King James iMbd i proclamation
restraining tI unlawful and obnoxious traffic. In 1670 Florida
tobaooo was first taken to HollUd, and not until 1616 did the colonists
of Virginia begin the planting of tobacco, the seed being obtained
woiiraa waM thmen kunw sAdthe 8panish Po ewonu-Flonda.
S' f w i iir FgihIda Was' cebrat!d for i tolice, which W
ext.ivuly an4d U cesl ly cultivated: Recently the industry has
rMW v Mdl mf WA wIESTW R4IW,
7,- 6" VV"




18 wimW' eUimn TO VXuaA

The Southwestern Railtad
(Fhmrt Wash Ralny Sf FkoU.)


Only Rail Line to the Finest Lake
Region of Florida around

MELROSE ON LAKE SANTA FE.
Tlu 6aO of ti TWistl d aM ir
WHERE LOCATED 2=X'
New Melrose Inn
Under the aeb Manaemw t of Mr. Jonb WoH,

Trains leave Union Station, Green Cove
Springs, at 4:30 p. m. daily,
except Sunday.
L. E BABKER, General Superintendent.
Take the ATLANTIC COAST LIE,.
Gmeml Ammu o n Wo Maw -Von&"









world are now wanted tot regi owb h again becomeAu
or the large yield sM tal--fe i toboo. The leao
grown here cloely nembl in appearance and flavor, the nest
Havana wrappers, and we cluage any expert to detect the arme,
and is coneiedly superior to tt igrowin any other part of the Uni-
ted States.
Fillers grown from genuine Vuelta Abajo seed, prime; prie, one
dolla per pound; fine quality superior to medium Vuel A o seed,
eoondi, seventy-five cents per pound, and will produce from 1,000 to
1,500 pounds per acre.
The following extracts are taken from a "Report upon the Culti-
ration of Tobacco in Florida," issued by Mr. H. R Duval, Receiver
of the Florida Railway and Navigation Company. It was made by
experts, who visited the plantations in person, and may be relied upon
as trustwortby and ooqaervative:
"We have found tobacco growing on quite a variety of soilr-but
mainly on sandy loam, with red lay subsoil eight to ten inches ds ;
oagan o ndy loam with no subsoil, and, in some intanes, on newly
learned bottom or 'hammock' land, which seemed to be very rich, and
required no fertilisr. The crop seems to fourish and do well on all
these sels, but it appears to us that the tobacco grown on the 'hp-
mock'"lad is of the best character, while it growth is more luxuriit.
Theoustry is well watered and timbered, and very fertile.
'The dalmate of Florida is so favorable to the culdvatiom of
tobacco that, aside from the first or original crop, two sucker crops can
be raised. This is accomplished by cutting the stook off near the
ground and leaving a sucker or shoot on the root, which will in a short
time grow into a healthy, well developed stalk, on which the leaves
will be lighter in weight, but larger and finer than the first rop.
Thi, we believe, is an advantage enjoyed in no other tobacco-produe-
ing State in this country, as late springs and early foets in the all
render a second or third crop in other sections an impossibility.
"With proper methods of growing, and careful, intelligent curing
and sorting, we see no good reason why Florida should not only regai
her former prestige as a tobcco-produing State but, indeed, beum
the .fediag tobacco State; for the natural advantage she enjoys, .th
in climate and soil, will go far toward giving her tobaco a reputation
in the markets of the world that could- scarcely be attained elsewhere
in this country.
"Florida tobacco should make a reputation for itself, for there is
a certain flavor and aroma pressed by it that is both desirable and
aeeable; ad we think it will ind much favor with the smoker when
properly introduced, s the experiments thus far made in the raising

Jflb th 84 DAN'H., FLWIDA i WESTERN AILWYI,
Nesth MOst mA West






SHoTEL PLAC1HE.
*ala tates, eari fqn$I,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
OPENED DEC. 1, UNDER MANAGEMENT OF
DODGE t OTTLLEX'NS
Everything entirely new and firt-class. Elegant Sample Booms
for Commercial Men. 900 FEET OF BROAD VVRNDA. Rate $2.
and upwards per day. Special by the week.

TREMONT HOTEL
Remains open under same management.
RATES: American Plan, $2.00 per day. European Plan,
50c. and $1.00 per day.

Jacksonville Club Stables
AND HORSE EXCHANGE.

Fine Livery Turnouts
AT REASONABLE RATES.

Horses and Mules for Sale
AT LOWEST.MARKET PRICES.
J. F. NICHOLS, Proprietor,
(or. Bay and Cedar. Sts. Telephone No. ;67.
Tabe the ATLANTIC COAST UNE,.
74lh4A~,,~kmt low A .t e x"" aM. t
Wak^^^nu W Oi 4e m2 W.6 s







of tobacco leave no doubt in our minds that the industry can be made
a sucess* 4a nebaIa '
J"The j itutof b~a i[ gtj it p but the
revival &f; -1i^kJbu1 )ieti Jtiter i- there a
more favorable time than the present for its renewal on a large sale."


FLOUIDA FR UT .
Too much cannot be said of Florida's delicious fruit. The orange
is considered the most profitable, as well as the most prolific, of our
fruits. The praise of the Florida orange has been sung in every land
and clime, and the new varieties which have been brought forward in
the last few years make it possible to enjoy this delightful product of
our sunny clime from the first of November until the first of Auut,
VARIETIES OP THE OR41AGE
In growing. the orange it i ts ell to lqtrgvaietL w io ,ye
been tested andknown to be prolific and desble as to plant Ieelings,
which possibly may not prove satisfactory when they come into bear-
ing. For the past eight or ten years much attention has been given
by amateurs and professional fruit growers to selecting the varieties
which promise the best, and the result has been that we are now ena-
bled to select varieties which give a wide range in the time of ripening,
and almost every quality desirable. We propose to give a short
description of a few well known varieties, which we believe will meet
thl erequirameno of all or4 growe, and be aLitj#6& to aJ Mqa
Weri We.TTllbeui witlth e e mt o.ave
iumaRithe desirable qualities, and continue the list, pointing oat the
different features as they vary in comparison:
MAGNUM BoNUM.-Large to very large; skin moderately thin,
tough, smooth and glossy; pulp fine, tender, melting, juicy, sweet and
vinous. The membranes enclosing the juicy cells are remarkably thin,
and leave but little residue on eating the orange. Ripens in January,
and is prime first of February. The bed.
HomoeAss~.-Medium size; skin very thin, smooth, tough and
glossy; pulp very fine, remarkable juicy, sweet nd delicious. Ripens
i December, and is prime in January; early and prolific bearer.
HxooGIN.-Similar to Homoassa, but ripens later.
NONPAREIL--Above medium; bright color ; skin moderately
thin; pulp tender and mltiqg; juice sub-acid and vinoup. Ripens last
of January and February; an early bearer.
OLD VxxI.-Above medium in size, oval in shape; skin rather
thick and rough; pulp omewhat cone; juia sweet and remarkable
for a sprightly, aromatic flavor. This is the standard for flavor, and
Take the SAIkNAl, FLORiBA n WaftRTE RAILWAY,
0bhv4C- "4Wo ^! ^^ Ail^ t1






STRUMPELLER

THE LEADING



Merchant Tailor
AND DEALER IN

Fist-Class Ready-Made Clothing,


61 W. BAY STREET,


JACKSONVILLE,


FLA.


J. H. SHUFELT. A#esw.


. ,., ~T E A TLAMUITC COAST ULK,
WU. GeseWAWUW'krtS it
*f *BSS0r^>""^rnaiMT>^^ Tr






A"n usa VAWOw ZMin.


bean the am te ia o to t4Q. that the Sbeki peawdoae toall
Pther ,pea n i Janolyr i n rip rbAry
NlAvL,.-UsM very large; akin rog and tough; co l
in shape; blossom end preset thae of the human navel,
bence its name; and this appearance is nothing more nor less than a
small orA uolosed and nearly .urro ndelb them ir
orange. Ol A 7y fe, meting, tender, j
ipean in brury, and i valuable on aesit 4
keeping and carrying qualities. A very earlybearer. any ve
it to be a shy bearer, but as the tree grows to maturity we believe it
will prove to be among the best. This variety ill always be popular
in consequence of its superior qualities when mature, and from the fat
that none other can be substituted for it. It carries its own unchange-
able "trade mark." Tree a fair grower, nearly thornless, and fruit
nearly seedless.
TAnDIcr.-Size large, or above medium; dski rather rough and
moderately thick and tough; pulp fine, tender, melting; juice sweet and
good flavor. Ripens in Marc and April, and prime in May and June.
A good ordinary orange, but valuable on account of late ripening and
carrying qualities.
Dumnrrr.-Large, bright, handsome shape; akin very thin and
tender; pulpfine, melting, juicy, very sweet and vinous. One of the
bet, but, in consequence of its thin, tender skin, it requires great care
in handling to prevent bruising. A poor shipper. Ripens in January,
and when in its prime, one of the most delicious oranges known.
MeorrDfkTRAEAN RWF T.-This variety is of medium or large
size; oval in shape; medium thin skin; pulp a little coarse, juicy and
very sweet. Ripen. in February. Tree a fir grower, but branches
are inclined to droop and become dwarfih. Branches entirely thorn-
less, and fruit nearly seedless; an early and prolific bearer; will bear
the second ear after budding on five-year old stock. Valuable for its
early proliIo bearing, thornless branches, late ripening and carrying
qualites.
Bnaca's No. 1 Eoo.-Medium size; thin skin; pulp rather coarse,
juicy, sweet and delicious. Ripens first of November, and prime in
December. Valuable for its early ripening, sweetaeMa, and keeping
and carrying qualities. Probably the best early ripening good orange.
PHarLu Brrran BSwe r.-Medium to lage sie; thin skin;
pulp tender, juicy, slightly sub-acid, bitter and aromatic. Ripens from
April to Jane. A good summer fruit. Tree is, doubtess, a hybrid b
the sweet and wild orange, and the branches ae free from thorns.
MADA4 --TANGonz-Kw>-GOwv0-Oraus closed uuder
this heading, undoubtedly belong to a distinct species of the citrus
family, as they have very few, if any characteristic of the common
oranges. Small to sdklmn les, iaiteed at bthe blossom end, or
shaped like a.tomato; skin rather smooth, ribbed, and, when the fruit

rai I S HH nM ^
TW~tir~l^^a-- A rf*A. TTL**T fw^M^ lli~




11t Wier tf I o %oada



ETE EWQTABLE INVESTMENT CO
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


FlI


Investments in Real Estate
A SPECIALTY.

RST MORTGAGE SECURITII
ON IMPROVED FARMS.


ES


Information CBne0tfhing Resources,
Scenery and Climate of the Great
State of Florida Furnished
Free. Send for
ahttitulart of our Great Tobacco and
YVegtable Laids for Sale on
Small Payments.






Aim am VAMUS 0WORM


is mature, it k ,4Uy t the PIOp. Pulp Eatb 4arse, d sections
qepa.rate reedly without braking the membrane; juicy, sweet, aro-
matic and delicious. Ripens in December, and prime in January.
There are numerous varieties of this fine fruit, from the very sa4 to
large; skin usually bright or orange, with small dark speckles, and
the odr, on breaking the skin, is strong, pungent and disaeeable.
Dancy's Tangerine differs from the ordinary fruit only in color of the
rind, which is a deep crimson. Tree usually very th6rmy, leave lM,
willow-shaped, and branches slender and dark hue.
SATsuMA.-This is a late importation from Japan. Fruit much
larger than the foregoing, but of same species and many of the oba-
acteristics. Tree a slow grower, branches drooping, thornless, and fruit
seedless; early and prolific bearer; bears second year after budding on
four or five-year-old stock. Tree very hardy, leaves large and Weat
ery, and will stand a low degree of temperature without injury. On
account of its hardiness, disposition to dwarf, fine quality of fruit, early
ripening-December-this should become a popular variety, and be
largely planted.
There are many other varieties of the orange which are, doubt-
less, equal, in many respects, to some we have mentioned above, but
these we know to be all that is claimed for them, and a person owning
a grove planted with due proportion of the varieties here described
need look no further for quality of fruit. Here we have varieties
ripening from October to April, which ought to satisfy the taste and
mind of all lovers and growers of the golden fruit.
PEACHES.
The introduction of the Chinese strain of peaches and their.
oftpring in the last few years, together with their marked success
wherever planted in the State, has given great impetus to tree planting,
and hundreds of acres have been set out, which have generally come
into bearing the second year.
The small Peen-to peach of several years ago has been brought up
by cultivation to nearly twice its former size, and of a delicious favor,
having none of the bitter taste which formerly characterized this fruit.
This variety is the first to ripen, commencing the last of April or fint
of May, and closely followed by the Honey.
Only those who have tasted this favorite peach, picked ripe from
the tree, can have any idea of ite quality. As its name implies, it is
sweet,'and when fully ripe fairly melts in the mouth. Apricots and
netarines have been tried with sucoes, especially in the north of
SFlorida, and the trees are finding their way into nearly every orchard.
PLUMS.
No fruit has been introduced into our State that has been Wch a
happy surprise as the Kelsey plum. This fruit has been grown in
Tqhe te SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY,
aHw<^^~^ vo*4 *41 nn" aO





warn's oGmsM to ,umt.


AND 80 HAVB 1,000 OTHERS .
The Journal of Commerc will display your advertimments arteb-
ioally and so will
00) Otheer.-
TAe Journal of Comerme has a widely distributed circulation
among intelligent people, and so have
Q5O OCtlherZ.
The Journal of Cbmnwre appeals to a discriminating olass of
readers and so do
100 Ot herm.
The Journal of Commerce excludes advertising of a doubtful
character and so do
OC Oth.erm.
The Journal of Commere guarantees its advertisers satisfkation
and so do
10 O4t12erm.
BUT as a Trade Paper for the State of Florida The Journal
of Commere
mT&AlNDfi AL03aNCa3.
J. W. WIIITI, Proprtsr,
Jaoklcuw le, ltortdA.
A. W. BABB& i. W. CLARK.
BARRS & CLARK,

Real Estate Insurance I Loans.
High Grade Pkaphate Laid a Speialty.
OFFICE: 2 and 3 First National Bank Building, corner
Ocean and Bay Streets,
Jaocaoa-vlle, loricda.

NEW YORK STEAM LAUNDRY.

Tke LUpt a l Mod s Larry t Stat.
SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID to LACE CURTAINS.
Hotel, Sleeping Car and Steamship Work done on Short Notice.

TELEPHON 266. F. E. SMITH, Proprietor.
Take the ATLANTIC COAST LIE,
T e ShoIt sad QueLk e. rwt l W.h Xa, t ,et. t P--
m tL -- Can eO &U tar Te bA s. i t. .
w. -AVSI K A o u.- .T W. m 2, 6..6a.sl Fr..






AI0 FAUGM VinMUM-


California for pr sea ipad th9ee proomenqod the King of PhlNs,
and the rdI ii tbS tatJ soft, bealt out that reputation.
The tree commences to bear twyears from planting when proper-
ly caredsA, and the yield is spp ormous Trees at thi g
have bonse ,e emormou orops hbat the tba had to be supported to
keep thers fm breakin gand sweeping the gm.und.
Other new varieties of plums are being inustuced, with every
prospect of snooesm. The Chickasaw strain does wellb-b and furnishes
a variety not only in fruit, but in time of ripening.
The .Lnquat (Japan Medlar) differs from the other vari"ies of
plums in being an evergreen tree and producing its fruit in Jantay,
if the weather is mild, and later if severe. The tree is grown farther
north for its beautiful foliage, while here we ha-e both the foliage and
fruit. The fruit is about the size of the Wild Gowee plum; oblong, of
a light yellow color; acid, and excellent quality.
THE JAPAN PERSIMMON
is grown in a number of varieties. They are of a most excellent
quality, and command the highest prices in the market. The trees do
well, and generally come into bearing the second year.
THE PINEAPPLE.
The profitable cultivation of the pineapple must be practically
confined to the portion of the State generally exempt from even slight
frosts. With some protection they are raised as far north as Orange
county, and in some favored positions have been long grown even
where light frosts are common; but we may be sure the pine will
always continue to assert its tropical character.
The English gardeners of the last century thought it the height of
horticultural skill to produce pines in their cool, damp climate under
glass, and, as usual, the directions they have left us are so conflicting
as to be far from edifying. And we meet with a similar conflict of
ideas here in regard to the culture of the pine. It is not easy, without
more experience than we have, to sift out the wheat from the chaff.
There are a few things that seem very well settled, and these shall have
our notice.
It is evident here that the high, light, dry, sandy soil is preferable
to the shell, or even the richest hammock lands, for the culture of the
pine. Also, that the shelter belts, so much needed by the banana are
positively injurious to the pine. This is specially true when the shelter
belt. are on the east or north sides of a pine field. They are not
injured by the shade, but by the hot sun and still air.
While there are many varieties of the pine clamoring for notice,
there seems as yet to be no one that can be trusted to take the place of
the common Bed Spanish for a general crop. There are larger, sweeter
and more delicious pines in experimental, cultivation, and yet, as fir as
Te tihe SAVANNAH, FLORIDA A WESTER RAILWAY,
IN e 28 60 r m eA t eW* tu. ato M eMrn VIeWsaM ana U lfb
e3w, 210 ma" Wms41.







MAYNARD,

TICKET BROKER
u. nio Ticket Offie, 96 W% Bay 8t., cor. Bay and Hclqa,
J"AOCESOlNT T L, FILORIlD.A.
Lo^Mt It to .5.)0o PoOko lai the toltell 6ta.
f atroa TLo0 I Bo-slbt i 6i bsd.
THE BANK SALOON,
JOHN KAMA, Prop. JO "O AW't.
Imported Wines, Liquors and Cigars,
26 E. Bay St.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
| I 1 i I 1- -
Knowledge is Power."

HAWLEY'S

SHORTHAND SCHOOL
391 W. Bay St.,
Jacksonville, Florida.
Day Clasuse 2 P. M. Night Clammes 7:80 P. V.
Instruction Thorough and Practical. Highest Refer-
ences. Private Instruction if Desired.

Tak the AUM71/C COAST UNE,
Wt&lMH ag k As"&* NWh slo w. t-liu. PVu.ltM
W.DA~ FlBO--r n1 MY Y ~l; IT.. 5 J-k~L I3U.
V.`~IB Ousrlr I O V. k )Y






am am wVAU amm-a.


we tow tt e hea, l to e Za ith a l bat IttU m gi
as a hlt, rhap, to imply say that wile the od pine growers upon
the keys are always ready to sell us new varieties at speculative
prices, t lt thR weaoe -with Bed Spaiwi Vr this
is not anMaoldt or a ortsigM4d economy, Froat elr dpo
they only choose what to them seems the better.
Our experience encourages the planting of slips and suckers im-
mediately after picking, not leaving them to dry, as to ametim do^
for weeks. And in so doing we prefer not to trim them. This is
opposed to the general practice. Again, suckers are sold at higher
prices than the slips, but for our planting the latter are preferable.
New plantations are made usually from August to October. The
slips, growing out at the base of the fruit; the suckers, which spring
from the axils of the leaves near the ground, and the crowns from the
apex of the fruit, are all used in making new plantations. When the
fruit is gathered the slips are left for a month or more, upon the stem
to grow. Such slips as are unavoidably broken off with the fruit, if
slips are scarce, can be planted immediately, though they may be small.
Each plant will send up from one to three suckers from near the
ground. The one nearest the ground should be left for the next crop,
the others removed and planted. A part of the suckers will produce
small fruit the following season, and, as a result, such plants are weak.
The slips will require eighteen months to develop fruit, but the plants
will be strong, and the frit large. The first crop is usually the most
even and abundant. How long a plantation can be kept in profitable
bearing is not yet certain. On the common white sand, with only
ordinary care, three good successive crops have been grown, with present
prospects of a fair fourth crop.
The culture of the pine is extending very rapidly along the east-
ern coast of Florida from Eden, on the Indian River, south. Many
acres are already planted on Lae Worth. For several years the
grove ing of pines has been the leading industry upon the keys. Un-
fortunately, most of the earlier plantations of pines upon this coast were
made upon unsuitable soiL Our people are beginning to realize the
importance of a more extensive system of culture. This promises well
for our future.
PEARB,
Very large orchards of LeConte peas are being set out, mpecilly
in that section of the State known as Middle Florida. Other variees
are being tested, but are not as prolifi as the LeOona .
FIGS.
This is rightly considered as one of Florida's neglected frita, fr
It is known to the oldest inhabitant in some way or ot r.New viw-
ties hare been introduced, and it is claimed that we have thetrueftg cf
oommeroe. The White Adriatic is a most delicious frit, and is good
Tak the SAVAMNAM FLORIDA I WESTERN RAIWAY,
me a sU 6e md"a s" afno *m t.aoem nbem 1sui. .a W .E
ahesk, ahnsd West.





wh1_ 'Ib-Q f~ MYD


NEW INDEPENDENT LINE OF STEAMERS.

MANATEE. MARY DRAPER

Juiaulo, IkPmia, Orum Par, M dark, Nadk, Swat
InM, aid al Way Laudhp
Le.e JACKBONVILLE W:80 p, m. atiy.
GEE5n CQOVI, 6:8.O *.

Steamer Mary Draper for Charter for Hunting, Fishing and
Excursion Parties.
O s8 nad Pier, oot of Main Street. Jaok ville.
C. E. GARNER, General Manager.

R. FLEMING,

TAILOR.

Sl t CGlanIig ad ODyoen In lie Best Style.
93 Main St. Jackonville, Fla.
FRIEND OR STRANGER.
It is possible you may need a few dollars for immediate se, and do not wish to
obligate your friends. In such cae
J-ux1i S3 large & Co-,
as W. Bay 8t,Jacksonville, Fla.,
wil loan yon the money. A watch or a diamond, or any article of value wil be
received. We also do a lar wholesale and retail business In JEWELRY,
WATCHES, LOCKS, PLATED WARE, GLASS AND QUEEN'S WARE.
Also a lie of COOK, GASOLINE AND HEATING STOVES, SHOW CASES
AND HOUSEHOLD GOODS. 32 West Bay Stree.
We give wholesale price on all thee goods.
Te. e the ATLANTIC CAST LINE,
WiH sfot i-i e- s -lSi t" .& V... n.La"& u&a.-.
se Mn a 3 as. aO IWOe w oo Ta ea *a -I-h.
V. 0Aw a 'helmA W,. 2a1V So. asH&aVu .






A"D 333 2u26O UWL.


fr either drying or table u~. Th dtgt ad g of fig
should be one of Plorida's industries. h f bemes better
known, and the little care required to raise it realized, the evaporation
of figs must become a business that will retain many a dollar that is
now sent to foreign lands.
GRAPES.
After patient experimenting, a number of varieties of grapes have
been found to do exceedingly well, and all over the State growers are
increasing their vineyards, and, although a new industry, bids fair to
be a source of great revenue to the State, as they ripen early in our
climate, and always demand a good price.
GUAVAS.
The guava is grown to quite an extent, especially in the southern
part of the State, where the crop is truly wonderful. The guava is
one of the finest fruits grown for jelly.
BANNANS.
The banana is another of our beautiful fruit-bearing plants, and
the numerous varieties may be found in nearly every garden from Jack-
sonville to the southernmost part of the State. The two principal varie-
ties grown are the Horse and the Lady Finger. The plant often grows
to a great height, presenting a most beautiful appearance.
MANGO.
There are several varieties of this fruit, as with others, but the
tree, did it bear no fruit, would be very desirable for its beautiful shape
and rich foliage, the hlaves forming a star at the end of every twig.
The fruit has a large seed, and the pulp is filled with a coarse fiber.
The kinds having little fiber are considered the best. This variety is
known in the West Indies as No. 11. There are quite a number of
varieties grown in the southern part of Florida, but the one which
seems to be the favorite is the Apricot mango.
PAWPAW.
(Ourine papaya )
This is not the fruit known by that name in the Southern and East-
ernm tates. It is a native of South America, and is sometimes called
the Bread Fruit tree. This fruit is not grown so much for its eating
qualities as for its wonderful properties. However, it is sometimes
eaten raw, and has a flavor something like the muskmelon. The milky
juice i used in cooking all kinds of tough meats. A little of the juice
t put in with the meat and stewed for a few minutes, making it very
tender and palatable. Meat laid between its bruised leaves is sid to
absorb enough of its juice to make if tender, especially with steaks.
Tae tlh SVANHAH FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY
Te" sIo C ..a"sh e ous so .asbnm ush..ef a" n Pss
Ihuth enow A" W".





wnmT ownIM 1o naanm


LITTLE BROS..


FERTILIZER AND PHOSPHATE CO.


Office: Factory:
Jacksonville. South Jacksonville.

Paid up Capital, $175,000.



We are the only importers of Potash, Salts and Calcutta Bone in
the State. We carry the largest stock of materials in the State.
We have expended such a larpe sum of mon y in this State for
manufacturing fertilizers that we think it ought tobe sufficient guar-
antee to Florida that we shall always sell strictly honest goods.
Our goods are valued higher by the State Chemist than any others
sold in Florida, and our prices are no higher than other prominent
manufacturers.
We ask for the support of the State. All correspondence promptly'
attended to. Send for pamphlet.




LITTLE BROS.

Fertilizer and Phosphate Co.
Ofiee: JACKSONVILLE. Factory: SO. JACKSONVILLE.
Taio the ATLANTIC COAST IUNE
Wk. aS.e. aM Q itir f.t. Nwt .3a ,wte. mt hWua.m
v. DAVA amAIeM ue uki anlb, e.K.






AMR m VAUMn SAM


aS


Its med~iBtslj Illp RmusUllya wmdmtl, the j loe of agren fruit
being "ofefl ljfwh Iutunowh, pd the le;vc miUl in the
West Id wshhtg, Instead of map.

ANONA.
Thee a e some forty varieties of this amily, and flbordrlays
claim to swne of the beet, such as the sugar apple (A. samesa), sour
sap (A4. Muriest), cherimoys or Japan apple (A. eAerimolia), and
others. The sugar apple could be grown over a considerable portion
of the Stb, as it seldom grows over four feet high, and could be pro-
tected from cold the same as the guava.
Arrowroot and cassava are two of the beet starch-yielding plants
iW the United States, and they grow to perfection here.
The dae palm is one of the most magnificent fruit-bearing treq
with our herders. Its long, graceful, verdant, everchanging branches
make it a beauty to behold. It is grown as far north as t. Augustine,
and gives a rich and picturesque appearance to every garden in which
it is planted. There is no fruit tree on the continent that combines
such rare beauty and rich foliage with its fruit-producing qualities.

SAPODILLA.
(A4cra Sapota.)
This fruit is grown somewhat extensively along the coat of South
Florida and upon the keys. Its profitable culture will, doubtlem, he
eonmned to about the same limits with the eocoanut 'the tree grows
at fiat quite slowly, but when once established it grows more rddly,
and soon makes a conical tree about twenty feet in height. The leaves
are thick, smooth, and very glossy, with a marked tendency to form
dense terminal clusters. The flowers are small. The fruit is formed
on terminal shoots, frequently in clusters of four and five. The fruit
varies much in size, and often somewhat in quality. Externally it
rmemblt as English russet apple, while the flesh I not unlike themost
delicate of sweet pears, with a slight granulation surrounding a few
glosy seed--from one to five. This fruit, picked in a green tate, is
frequently sat from the Bahamas to Jacksonville, and, perhaps, to
same other points on the Atlantic coast; but in that.condition it is very
uli6k the sapodills as gathered in a mature state from our own trees.
tike the banana, the oonpanut and the guava, the sapodlls is a con.
tianoo bearer, though it is not equally productive throughout the year.
Hitherto this freit hm been propagated exclusively from the seed.
Vacation, then, is the rule, somewhat in quality and more in its sie and
form. The intrinsic value of this fruit certainly warrants the most
earebl atntion to its improvement.

rTd. the M4YAUN#, FLORIMDA WESTERN RA WMA,
ti%%I-i i '4 a"lIea b to ov him 12 I sow*e *a ree





H wua* e. sena i mnais

0. L. E lENE
MILLINERY,
Drem Goods, Trimmings, Notdose L e Kid Gloves, Palreol Silk
Umbrellas, Zephyrs and all Materiis for Fancy Work.
69 W. Bay St., corner of Laura, JACKSONVILIi, FLA.
E. I. GORDON & CO.,

Furnishing Undertakers,
Corner Foreyth and Laura Sts., Jacksonville, Florida.
Telephone Call 121. Orders by Telephone or Telegraph at all Hours
of Day or Night Promptly Executed.
'92--Sa:S.AS01r--'93.

Jacksonville, PalatkaRiver Landings
Come and e the beaUtim of the St. John River.
Dally EfzMiom. gttir back ame dy.


"ELIZA HANCOX"
a of Main St., at cW8 a. m. daily ptd AR to PALATKA
A IN." a t. wi

tl pk at Tea et' Ag.o aW WtI. B l Wf nr M.L
R. J. ADAMS, C. V. H. POST,
Agmet ?alatka. Mwsm..
Take the ATLANTIC COAST LIN
2- bletei. Qdhh RON"t 1ev, *4t? Wspti






- f aitns


Among the saot are found some very delicate sd valuable fruits
These trees varying grtly in charter, seem to be native of all tropi-
cal regions; and it ii not improbable that we may yet smeuAea
valuable additions to the anona fruit list.
The sugar apple I?,'o far, the best known and moat popular of ll
the anonas. It is quite extensively grown upon the keys and long the
east and west coasts of Florida; in many places so far north as to be
frequently killed back by frost. It is little more than a shrub, seldom
growing higher than fifteen feet, and frequently producing fruit it
abandasce when only four or five feet high. It can be so pruned as to
be easPil projected from slight cold, and hence can be grown for home
use mudh farther north than any other anona. The tree i d >rmant for
a short time in the winter months, but with us is not quite deciduous.
Though found everywhere in southernmost Florida, it has been proun,
so far, only for home use, excepting upon the keys. The fruit very
delicate, and will require as careful and prompt handling as strawber-
ries. It should be noted that a recent successful shipment of this fruit
has been made by express from Lake Worth to Philadelphia. With
the improvements that are sure soon to come, this fact gives us a beater
prospect for the future. The fruit resembles a shortened pine cone
three or four inches in diameter, with a yellowish green exterior, and
has averr sweet cream-white pulp, which is best eaten with a spoon.
Most pope soon learn to relish it very much, and are inclined to give
it a very high place as a desert fruit.
TAMARIND.
(Tbmarindus India.)
This tree is worthy of more attention than has hitherto been given
it. It is strictly tropical, and should be planted only where there is
littk da r 4f flot. As an ornamental tree it is extensively planted
im dI ttupieal countries. Its delicate acacis-like leaves, loinog at
night, other with the density of its shade, bring it out in agreeable
and strikig contrast with other tropical plants and trees. There can
scarcely be a more beautiful tree than the tamarind. From our past
experience we may plant it anywhere in South Florida where the
mango and sapodiia do not suffer from the frost. But this tree is of
still greater inrest, beosue it yields an abundanW of valuable and
agreeable fruit. This rows in large, thick pods oonsaining a large
quantity of delicate ald, used as the basis of an acid drink much
esteemed in fever. These pods row in large olustern, ad seemingly
erowd the laves from the branches. If careflly picked they can be
kept for two or three mOaths in their natural state, and there seem to
be a reason why they 'cannot be supplied thus to Nothern customer.

JMk 44 Ua Afts h e WMSTEN RA"aWAP
;I~faS~kt r i~C~r~~ F 10 1011 WOO6.




Wm= ~lB tem MN.


WANKLYN-& COO,

Wholesale and Retail


LIQUOR


DEALERS


91 W. BAY ST.
Jacksonville, Florida.
W. P. SUMNER,
Wholesale Dealer in

Fine Buffer and Cheese,
GROCERIES,
s4 W. Bay St., Jacksonvlle, Pla.
dgest for Ml (Cbaoasdend MUlk, rork State &ed R sr
Butter, Tork Stat and Sheboygfa Ckhese.
Tf t? ATL4N1/C CO4ST UAf,
W. i **tj i gl Am IhN a me Wt a.
A 9t ea, Aefr t Ag W* Ahwe p








And 0yIpod imm4144..=tb M
and S It i ba
other uits y be grown throughout the but the list here
produced lncmdi* mom -t#r trust to give
the reader Ison p rao TL-


PHOSPHATES.

f HE recent dieovery Of rich phosphate bed is Florida created
an excitement equal to the discovery of gold oa the Pacifi coast
in 1849. The dioovery mean fabulous weath, greater pros-
perity, an expanding commerce.
Considered is it relation to science, the discovery is not les im-
portant. It has upset all the accepted theories of the geological form.-
tion of Florida, mad opened a broad field of investigation for the geolo-
gist, the paleoatoloist and the antiquary. Here are many strange
forms of animal life which played their little parts in tie great drama
of progressive creation, and made their final exits befre man, "the
heavy villain" of the play, made his appearance on t world's stage.
The great wealth which has so suddenly made its appearance i
known in commerce as phosphate rock, bone phosphate, natural phos-
phate or simple phosphate, is bone phosphate of lime In conmbinitti
with varying percentages of silica, magnesia, iron, alumina, etc.
The marine god, Proteus, could not assume more forms than does
phosphate. Acquaintance with one, or a number of varieties, does not
enable one to recognize etLe form ; chemical s.lyq is the only sure
guide. When occurring in six-sided prisms, more or less transparent,
it is called apatite. This name, however, is applied to other forms, as
in Canada it is given to a soft, granular substance, greatly resembling
pure usad, and koo locally as gar polt Refern t
pbeqiW &kWs on the Ott n. Blver, is O a writer i
X 'AtIeetan safs: "The phosphate itsef vars much, ooia g tM
locality. It is found in crystals sometimes of large dimensions; in
masse varying from compact to coarse granular; in strata of a lamillar
texture, and m a fable trm. The colors amre ery vaud, consisting
of green of difrent shades; blue, red and brown of all shades; yellow,
white and cream-colored. Occasionally beautiful crystals are met
with, large and perfect at both ends. In one
of the mines on the Lievre crystals of gigantic sim have been met with,
some weighing indivaihally as much as one thoeand pounds."
When occurring as the fossilized excrements of animals and birds,
ph ophate is known to geologists as coprolites (literally trnslated,
per d g mao), Md is eiled by miner '1hbid-i .' t omists
usually of small white module, imbedded in a bu mre or less plasio

Ta hpl.Y1(A4W fLQR!OA 4 WESTIR RAIL WA P
nt. a* 14^d




Omwft 'w9am b mbfl9ut


Th~i A:4~e


T W .AIWe.'


- FLORIOA


EM b' '0 N n d *ihn fn
Ever kralptim d Alvrrtsi Pompfl km it migrate Pds


Latest Styles.


Finest Goods.


MRS. E. C. COFFIN,

Millinery, Dress Goods, Trimmings,

Fancy B Fas, Lace ams,

Hosiery, Underwear.


67 W. Bay St,


Jacksonvile, Fla.


- --W----I -
SJ. W. WHITE,

ADVERTSING


891 W. Bay St.,


JACKSOVIu E,


k. A A, A UUT.Ca COAST2- W
W 6 ATPL, DomII ft I subefta. 0"lls.^






i W


matOri hiChthb of lmell Wl&kil Wof thei=
find m esm in wih e nodule show 76 to 80 per cent and the
matrix 86 wt v t mof tonht of Hlie. Witwa a mile of the
depot at Bartow s a d which gave 68 per cet. as tie analysis of the
mas, while the nodules alone assayed 84 per .
at all, Me o ^ .thetY
Oo n -oami 4EjdtauieA~nadin nodchesiiCth~
a.fI i, .opgi4&a b *onlthe V ale
a oumpac bh oge tosing thr il t a s o
shade and color from budf or tan olor to pure white. It varies as
much in eomisteooe as i color, being soft, unctious and plastic, or hard
and tenacious, defending, apparently, upon the action of water or the
degree of amoeperic exposure to which ithas been subjected, or,
probably, due to both iluees.
The true nodular phophate is found in egg-shaped or kidney-
shaped nodules from an inch or les in diameter to a ton weight of a
greyish-white or. bluish-black color, according to locality; usually
rough, irregular and honey-combed externally, and sometimes present,
ing a somewhat vitrous appearance, not unlike slag from a snec fur-
nace.
Most of the phosphate rock of South Carolina is of that character,
and it is found here in many places on the surface. Though samples
quite rich in phosphoric acid have been found, I am not aware that
any of this sort of rock has yet been shipped. It is used, tp some extent,
however, in macadamizing roads and streets.
Still another distinct form of phosphate is the pebble, or bone-
pebble, as it is often termed; bluish-grey, dark blue and blue-black ;
amorphous nodules, of varying size, from a pea to a walnut. These
pebbles, intermixed with sand, from immense beds and bars in Peace
River, and scattered among them are the teeth, tusks, bones and scales
of animals that roamed the earth and sported in the ocean depths when
Florida accordingg to the generally accepted theory) was but a coral
reef, struggling to lift its jagged head above the surf.
This is true bone phosphate, the pebbles being simply frapgents
of animal and fish bone, rounded and polished by attrition with the
ever-shifting sands of the river for thousands of years. It is of a very
high grade, rarely containing more than one per cent of alumina, and
remarkably free from other contaminating substances.
In this particular variety of plant food we have an eternal and
everlasting monopoly, for the only extensive deposit of pebble ph-
phate in the known world is in Florida. and here the supply is simply
inexhaustible.
It will bring millions of dollars into the State, with prospectors
from all parts of the world. Valuable finds are reported daily; manu.
factories with the latest and most improved labor-saving dqview are
being erected in all phosphate sections. Lands, which a few months

7qA.f l^ui 4~V ,PnoRIoA A W TtAN RIAW
lA0lh a. 4





4fV G**tl ovxr'QO 9WAOMA
MERRYDAY & PAINE.
39 E. Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.

PIANOS, ORGANS
Wk% Y~dhr hIs, Sh ai l Uin tft DL.
J. M. COLEMAN,
CLOTEINTCG-,
Bhmi' Mu h s, Um~bas, Etc. Hlts ol Clps a ul
Agent for the Dunlap H'ata.
31 W. ay St, Jaclevlle, 1qVI
D. 0. ANDRBID Proprietor. C. A. ANDRESS Mamaer.

The Travelers' European Hotel
(The onlya Pltt-elm B Hotein a th eity)
AND
MOMI R ISTA U R A NT.

Oaetrally looted two blooks fom Railroad Depots and Steames,
WEST MY ST., J~ACmI E, F
Rooms o., 7Sc. $1. Regular Meal-Breakft t, 26.; Dinner, 80S.;
Supper, 2&
Spil Atttim 6lSe b t hort rin
In4ees Prepared on Short Notice. Orna ALL tX TUAr.
rate he ATLNTIC CQ- T ULI
o. V' d~, i v.e -' lat Si <,'he .
fiLfff~wwiCfw^^ mbgs^h, flat ^mm^^ tU p






AN" RnM VAMOUB fLnZOB


since, were rewarded as worthless, have since been old as high as $850
per acre. 'i ~ipment of Florida phosphates to Europe is no longer
an experiment, but a financial suces. Most of the phosphates are of
a high grade, nam gfrom 65 to 90 per cent.
The recent discoveries of this valuable mineral on the banks of
the Withlaoooehee, near Dunmelln, Albion, Archer, and in the coun-
ties of Gaded Jeffer on, Le,' wUanhee, Wakulla, Taylor, Madi-
son, Columbia, Bradford, y, Alchua Levy, Marion, Citrus, Sumter,
Lake, Orange, Hernando, Pao, Hilbboro, Polk, Manatee, DeSoto,
etc., has brought millionsof dollars into the State, with prospectors from
all parts of the world.

HOW PROSPHATE I TURNED INTO MONEY.
Phosphate is bought by the "unit," and a unit is one per cent.
Thus, a rock containing seventy-five per cent. of phosphate of lime is
said to have seventy4-ve units. For instance, the broker says to the
mine-owner "I will give you ten pence per unit for 75-4." This means
that the rok must contain seventy-five per cent. phosphate and not more
than four per cent. of alumina and iron, the latter being objectionable.
If the article filk the bill be will give seventy-five times ten pence for
a ton of it (the long ton, 2240 pounds, is used with phosphate.) If the
rock contains more than four pe eent. of alumina and iron the Europ-
ean dealers will not purchase it at all; and every fraction of a unit
above three per cent. ps a ts twice as much from the phosphate.
Thus a 76-8 rock is coiuted as only a 74 rock and a penny is knock-
ed off from each unit, making it worth 40 cents lees per ton.
Most phosphate quotations are expressed in English money; occa-
sionally one is expressed in German money. This is because the Flori-
da rock is sold almost exclusively in Europe. American fertilizer
manufacturers will not pay any more for a 75 per cent. rock than they
will for a 60 per cent. rock; hence the Florida rock, being generally
of the higher grade, goes mostly to Europe so far.
The rock is analysed four times, more or less carefully, between
the mine and factory in Europe. First, the company's chemist makes
a rough qualitative analysis of each new grade of rock as it turns up,
in order thLt the superintendent may know in which class to pile it as
it comes out of the pit. The second analysis is also made at the pit.
A small pee ofrock is taken from each cart load as it comes out and
thrown into a barrel, and the barrel is about filled with these samples.
The whole barrelfUl is then ground fine and analysed, and the result is
considered a fair average of the cargo. On this analysis the company7
fix their price. The European broker has his own chemist in this
country, and he makes his analysis in the same way just described,
from samples collected on the dock where the rock is being loaded on
the ship. The fourth and last analysis is made in Europe at the fac-

*4,,the SAVNH0 AH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAIL 4Y,
a iWeri o amest wn" Ws t l





M wmwwe's omnumo nwe la.


1

i








ast; 4 Ed ~I Strout,


Cf
t5






...1
, ,




(,,.
t,,
7>

o
CM
"f


- -.drrlk n~Y


Iaotoryt Botuth JaoksconUlre.
S r dt ArTLrcTI CoIrT
iammilKa Whmm -Irr W ih a 5
W. D, mm 5Agbo S W r. Ap-aL, fiaOavl






AIsM IS P"oes -AN&Vf


my. So aU donen claim that they praotiode halse b#i N e
expeinw ofalites a earaye.
AtM ka iuall y a y means. Theooean hfaiht its L76 a
ton from jm oas p Fen is
$2.49 a lota i cUphad d load
it on pean frI 3i t the ad the
unloading on the oer e ocean. A discount of 8 per cent.
on gnro les, that i on the prie of the phophate delivered i Eu-
rope, is allowed to the broker. Lastly, the company who purchase for
mannauctre get 6 dihont of 21 power ct on the A of the invoice.
Total discounts, 6 per oent. The mane owner is paid with a ten days'
sight drat, and thu again has to be discounted if he cannot wait for an
money until the veasel cras the water.
The mning of pha phate, like every other industry, ha it da
of anlmhine- d sadiow) but thoie who ar in a position to kaot
about the.i eWt firml believe that in the year to oome MV&Stt ll
realise emi m th wondarfal dlevery.














P


TeTk the SAVANNAH. FLORIDA a WESTERN RAILWAY,
a.* ." sba eet Sm.* to ".4 9hE ri..a "A an #@*s.
eSOMM4 not a" WeOOL




3t
Betablshed


waH]W'O wIDs TO n1amA
1876.


TepkAoae Ml.


A. CAMPBELL

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
ALL KIND OF


RTHERN MEU

ME, POULTRY AND VEGETABLE

PACKOPES SAUSAGE FACTORY,
JACKSONVILLE STEAM SAUSAGE FACTORY.


TS

ES.


Kettle Rendered Lard and Tallow a Specialty.

Offce: Ns 2 aMl 37 Ol Cty Market,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Country Orders a Specialty. Orders Received by Mail or Telegraph
will Receive Prompt Attention.
Take the ATLANTIC COAST LINE,
Tk Sheet anu QGuik Route North sad aest. Thx PUUsi
*m edu ca~no on and T a he n U p S. .. amtI. .
W. OAVL 0r.l Ag st, West M rS., Jatokavlll, Ia.


NO

A6







































-. I
r.aI


I.j


'--a-
'V.


I .


"-~

:i



































THE FLORIDA CENTRAL A19ND
The above cut represents the valuable property of the Florida'S trl
Peninsular Railroad Company, at JackJonille, the location being ln t hea
the city, a etending from Bay street back to the river front for hre boc
makes the property especially adapted to the business of tbis large aMl aterprisin
company. Over thi large treat the various depot, wbarves and elm d thrco
pay are located, and the soe' here presented is oe of great i s to td who
admire the push and energy displayed by our large cerporatiom o pltawi day.
In the foreground is what is known as "Tr-asprttia Row." HBeretM e pany
have their ticket office, the other offices beeg rstd to the Clyds Li, .L & N.
L R. Atlantic Coast Line J., S. A. & H.IL R. L and other. On 0 6bt i
M the general offices o the company. Tds large thrms.ey IsL t
usiess bss of D.E. Maxwell, the Gemel mmqwger A. 0, tt




4,'


































VINSULAR RAILROAD COMPANY.
General al eaer Agent; N. S. Pennington, Traffic Manager, as well as a long list ol
other, too mmero to men ion who keep the machinery of this big institution in
motion. On the left of the ticket oace and esxtnding to the river, are the depot,
freigt e aroumes and the dock at which the Clyde steamers land their pmauen .
The rad ad yanrd and other buildings of the Company are in the rear, and, d
course, M t be ane fre the point of view taken in the picture. We only wh
we wer *e to poperty speak of the ieaase bosine here represented, and of
the vat m t of good whebh ha eoo to our cidaa in every part of the State
a a raMlt of tbe em pri dof hi orpoatioa. Of the ae wo manage the
buds d the company we aed my but ble, as they ar known far and wide e4
ar U- to bn rida aod her people.--TrW of G mnv.








hJ .* **













A..

'-V f -`~'c


V


-, o-
- -- I'q ":
'h,

3b. *








'-*'< -


'4-


''4'




-".


*Ii 4.


tee-


*h 'i


...,






A=D A aO ormm. 4S

FLORIDA'S FAMOUS RESORTS.

A Baum DcITsmon OF WHAT THr Ama.














StfM-TROPAL NXPOBITION AT JACSONTVIAL
JACKSONVILLE.
(THE METROPOLIS OF FLORIDA.)
Jacksonville has become famous all over the civilized world a the
great winter resort of the sunny South. Built upon the splendid curve
of the magnificent St. Johns River, whose bosom is the broadest, and
whose sweep is the most majesticon the continent, Floridians may justly
refer to it with pride and admiration as one of the chief ornaments of
the State. The regularity and beauty of its streets; its beautiful gar-
dens and unequalled shade trees-water and live oaks, magnolia,
orange and pride of India; its mammoth hotels, popular Sub-Tropical
and charming residences, and the number and rare attractions which
surround it on every hand, justify its claim to pre-eminent beauty.
The city, in its human greed, has stolen much from the big-hearted
and unsuspecting river. Acres of piling and rubbish have changed
acres of water to land, on which imposing edifices stand, and over which
the iron monster carries the tourist who seeks the great Florida metrop-
olis for health, wealth or recreation. Long wharves run far out into the
stream along the city's length, and it is to this that is due the well-
known fact that the St. Johns, broad as it is at Jacksonville, is nar-
rower here than at any point between Palatka and the sea. But, for
all this, the tourist who stands in swelling contemplation on its banks
may wel and justly feel that he looks upon the noblest river of his
native land.
ToE the SAVANNA FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY,
U0o wk.*s ou ral na 6 ZAe s oa" h m pu "& sml alun wmf.
b g M Uwt. Man ba1es1





wau**s am inao I* MM-Am


DID YOU EVER
Know the reaon why we are underselling our ompetitn ? Stop a
moment R1ead this over careful a Yd yot O l rd dailyy ee
why you have got to pay 20 per cent. mor for your
show at other hoesI. for the ,ae g yodui
oomUPTiTOa' tPrnmsO. oUta lsPss.
Five clerks................. $260 No olerks..... .............
Bent ......................... 160 Rent ......................... 40
Firm expenses..... ......... 120 Firm expenses .............. 80
Taxes and insuraoe ........ 75 Taxes d insurane....... 16
Incidental expeomes ........ 60 Incidental expeam ......... 10
Total ................. .....665 Total .................. 146
You can readily se from the above that our --biM -ae lgot to
add 20 per ent. more to their goodo thrm we hv. Why
not rsve that and buy your shoes fos us.
Come and see us.
Spiers. & Palmer,
147 W. BAV *TREET. 147


Oakland Central Market ad Grey.

Ji v. I. BOEOF, Propdi.
SUoosMr to J. B. VaMNes.
Dealer i n fll kind of

Fresh Meat, Poultry, Etc.

Fine and Staple Groceries.
Order Promptly Delivered.

Corner Cedar and h Ave., Jasknomil* IaN.
FT tho ATLANTIC Co Tr Lmu ,
: it"Lkt ; oil III 12 m,.w. M 2 0' 4 al, W
'* -'s WI!a a tM .a
qlP.I VJ, ioo, a. 4-Q,.z! lmage 5a*






AND FA MOUS15 RMOWR


adjetZvs t thjge, a In sooth, we are oonem s IMy uthat art
ha not aided nature as she should have done in these fair highways,
and there is muia vq foAr A to do. Butp b been lavish in
her hangings, d d fresco work. of reet after street
lined with statsI, lquivSg ive oaks thatb q a.i d meet overhead,
making almost an arched and vaulted pathway of living green in well
njh prpetual shile. From thee trees hang in rare profusion te
sW ig a Ou glaying tut of moes that always delight Bthi irt ern
traiger's eye, and through the rifts in their clustering foliage peeps the
softet and bluest and balmiest of skies. Duval, Monroe, Adams,
Laura, Julia, ogan, Ocean, Newnan, Market and Forsyth street are
partcularly beampihi in this way.
Bay street can hardly be surpassed in the whole country as a
promenade. It is the principal street in the city, and has many build-
nmg which would do credit to communities of far greater pretensions.
In the amount of bumins tranuscted by its merchants ; and the gen-
eral air and stir that is presented, it is surpassed by few in the country.
The curiosity and souvenir shops attract no small part of the
stranger' attention. In the winter season these shops confront one
every twenty ste s during a walk through the city. They are full and
running over with all sorts and kinds and shapes of Florida curiosities;
alligator teeth polished to perfection, and worked into curious shapes
for all curious uses; the stuffed birds and beasts and fish of Florida air
and waters, and the live creatures as well; fans and plumes and screens
and rare devices worked into fbrm from the rich and radiant plumage
of tropical birds, and, in fact, all the beautiful constructions that can
be made from every Florida product, animate or inanimate, that lives
or moves, or has its existence in the heavens above or the earth beneath,
or in the waters under the earth, or in the deeps of the great sea. And
baok of thee, and framed, as it were, in most of them, the smiling shop-
aen stand ready to exhibit or explain, or tempt to a speedy and exteo-
sive purchase.
Jacksonville has been called the "City of Hotels," and its superb
hostelries are the wonder and delight of the pilgrim who come to Flori-
da, expecting to see an undeveloped country. It is safe to say that
these splendid hotels have no superiors, and few equals. Anywhere
among the elegant parlors and saloons, or upon the spacious balconies
and verandahs, hay be seen costumes as handsome as the country
albrds, and the flash of diamonds is as dazzling here as at Saratoga or
Cape May. In the course of the season at one of these hotels one will
see as much style in dress and as many suggotions of unlimited wealth
as at any Arerman eeater of fashion. Eah of the largest is provided
with a special oriestra, and music and dancing make the gaslit hours
of thesmaia g pa pleasantly away.
The more prominent hotels are the St. James, Windsor, Everett,

Ty k.s S4AIIM, FLORIDA 4 WEST RN RAlWYrA
.m r* .* .I m e. WOsO L s .a a P .
~lk~rrl~ c~ a-eUaJrstoneweek eagtgkl





48 WHITa's OGUDE TO 70WOlD
JOHN H. FOWLER.

PLUMBING, TINNING,
Steam and Gas Fitting.

Shop in rear of store, 40 and 42 E. Bay St. (New Mohawk
Block). Telephone 148.
Jacksonville, Florida.

A Full Une of Bath Tubs, Pumps, Pip, Etc.
8tefnboat Work a 8eealtty.

W. P. FLYNN,
Successor to FLYNN BROS.,

FINE GROCERIES
Tea and Coffee a Specialty.

Prices down to Rock Bottom for Goods where Quality is desired.
Free delivery to any part of the city. Polite and
prompt attention always guaranteed.
W P. FL3.f--T'rT,
Jacksonville. Campbell's Addition.
Take the ATLIATIC COST UNE,
'h, bh.rt saL t s.bk a4t. estwh 4im XSri. Tbrmg Pu~faa
.am T aOmw n a ak wahM Wi. Ians n. Iwo"* Nsa, 8t.
w. a Ags as ft. V, zw**ft ** eam", 1 Mo.






A") Ms P"AMOUs RB80BRT. 49

Carleton, Dural, Tremont, Glsd and Travele, wblch are avorably
ikno n, not only in this but foreign countries for their superior ano
WIktoidd It is s.ft to say tat hotels which xted to e
ket and invalid the many atrantges offid bi the hotels af
sonville do much to induce travel, and add to the pleasure of the visitors.
There are also a large number of hotels of minor importance suitable
to persons of more limited means, which are conducted to please the
most fastidious.
Large numbers make Jacksonville their headquarters for the sea-
son, making frequent excursions up the river and into the interior, but
always returning with a sense of satisfaction and contentment. Society
is cosmopolitan here to a marked degree, and is derived from all see-
tions of this and foreign countries. Churches of all denominations,
and the various shades of religious sentiment open their doors for the
benefit of the devoutly disposed. As a place of sojourn for the tourist,
the wealthy and fashionable classes, it is fast taking rank with Sara-
toga, Newport and Long Branch. With these elements it is becoming
a necessity to pass a portion of each winter in Jacksonville, Here
they meet the same associates that they found during the summer at
the most noted Northern resorts, and there has simply been a change
of climate and scenery. From the first of December to the middle of
April the city is crowded to overflowing with guests from every State
in the Union, and from the leading foreign countries. Here they Bud
all the conditions requisite for an existence of ease, luxury and pleasure,
and can set at defiance the bleak hills and icy breezes of their homes in
the higher latitudes.
There are daily excursions to St. Augustine, Palatka, Fernandina,
Mayport, Green Cove, and other favorite resorts, allowing abundance
of time to inspect those localities.
Herein consists another attraction of this city; its proximity to the
points above mentioned permits frequent visits that consume but little
time, and cost but a trifle. The broad and noble St. Johns affords
paseime for those food of sailing or rowing. Safe and staunch boats
are to be had in abundance, and furnish pleasure to those fond of such
amusement. Steam ferry boats ply regularly to the opposite side of the
river, where good roads, handsome residences, and thriving orange
groves await inspection.
This city is the base for supplies for a large portion of the State,
and the facilities of the merchants are such that they are able to com-
pete succesfjtly with any other point..
There has been an appropriation made by the General Govern-
ment for the erection of a public building, and a suitable location
Iemed in the center of the city. Jacksonville is the site of the United
ltf Court for the Northern district of Florida, and here are situated
tdMoes of the Judge, Marshal and Clerk of that tribunal. The Col-
letor of Internal Revenue for the State also has his headquarters in
T the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN 8RAILWAY4
NWe ut N*M W- -





WRIT OOTD^ TO G TD1Qp}


HAT AM WNTS' f MINIs N iS
Me*r4 alps i t$td "i N b tio Sol.
Adn1 kMr mI YmiE's Nats. ir Jrp'ls lary W"e sl,.
miCa. EIas8 ,
16 W. Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
H. JOHNSON,
TINSMITH,
Th 40of b ", 6uttern ad PIPLt Fibfig up Stom
and Repairing Tinware.
9l1asry 110e1, Cor. Main sa Churb 8th

THE GARRETT PRINTING Co.
(O.HGWmeH LL M.& ealmaTT AM *ASOU iOrNMi "mOr .)
BLANK BOOK FINE BOOK AND
MANUFACTURERS. CATALOGUE WORK.

FOLDERS, TIME ALL KIND OF
CARDS AND SCHEDULES. COMMERCIAL PRINTING.

-Ti| 'yet .E.i."i "leit ersi r MIerl t 'a.
P. oeO sox. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. TMION9 1e0.

Tae the ATLNUTIC MCAST ULI.
r*;~3;E~;i~eCIZoil 2- WIT M,$~ta~isi~
~dl~C r~rt-.9mm~a~t ~to". vow"~ icHS'i;







thiacityh Ver" I o d o w
mails reaching Florida.
TeauadwM<^ Atoqb e n "ad ""M tifr a
Od Fellows are also n I ourthing condition. Te rih
Labor, Knights of Hopor, Knights of. PythiJ ia4 ga lt
Golden Eagle, Red Men, and 8ons of Temperance are.largely
represented. St. Luke's Hospital, an institution VWs#qimW4"W plv*aM
charity, affords relief to destitute invalids. The Library Aasodlat
owns a handsome suite of rooms, where can be found the latest paper
and magazines, and a collection of books.
Four daily papers, enterprising and well inducted, enjoy r
crcNulation. There are several journals that isue a weekly editi
The public schools are lrge and convenient buildinES, awlojin
an^excellent corps of teachers, and attended by'large numb er o ii-
ren. The facilities for obtaining an education are equay oqpenm
bth races. The city is illuminated by g .a and electric I Two
clubs, the Yacht and the Jacksonville, have been former for sodu
enjoyment and intercourse, sad contribute larely tW thl aMe'
their members and visitors.
There are three uniformed military companies, the JhitvWM
Light Infantry, Metropolitan Light Infantry, and Light Artillery, and
two companies of colored infantry.
Lines of steamers leave daily for Palatk sm, Sford ad all j1tr-
media*i pOints on the St. Johns River, and to D ptort i Fort (I
Iand, at the'mouth of same river. There isi. s 'elt of fa
ers (The Clyde) running direct to New York, carrying freight ad
passengers, which give the citiWns of Jacksonvil advantages posed
by no other portion of the State. Heavy freight is brought vr cheap
from Northern points by the coasting vemdls, oumtaW yUl the
saw mills for cargoes of lumber.
Lines of street cars traverse the principal portion of tlh ~y an
reach out into the suburbs. Charters have been grased A sreral
new lines, and electric cars will be in operation sqoo t I ib
ville, Brooklyn, LaVilla, Springfield, Oakland, RiverWide Lp mp
bellton are largely peopled by penor who do boinaesrt Id h
proper, but who have their resideae~L the thriving enviros.
East Jacksonville contains large a w' mills, employiln namerow
laborers, and furnishing immense quad i of c~pmber.,o con-
sumptioud ad export. It is growing rapnl, sad th raald Ug out
to the grounds of the Jockey Club Aociati two Mseile distant fm
Jacksonville, are lined with handsome residoneep
Brooklyn and Riverside are beautifully situatedW .4 b
overlooking the St. Johns River. Here are to bef' .
sites for building purposes, many of which are already wup rbly
costly and imposing structu e.

i te w4nq4 a. FLORIDA &4r
*teiib~~ LIrawr;-i' m





















PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY.
E5 A. LINDSLE Y,









Jacksonville, Florida,

CIGAR MANUFACTURER.
L ose Paetory, No. 0. This is the only one in Dural County Manufttarinr Cigar from
Tomeco /rown here. Goods Give Perfect atisf ation.
to to- u-edtkc/ o t 4Lc w mo- ^ou tti
At(L o to- c tA-&' 0.-t 44 tecK^-'C / r.et QttO(4L P.4Lt&44






THEPATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY.





DeMed to HNO MW Truratfi Nem.
A 6ulde to the Winter Resort Section of the Southu
Issued every Saturday. Handled by the Union News Company, and
on file in all the leading hotels.
E. A. LINDSL&Y,





: Corner Bay and Newnan ., Jacksonville, Florida,





P. O. BOX K.
CIGAR MANUFACTURER.





Lte Pto ae, No. Th the onl one in COAnt MntriNE CI. e f
Too n here. Give Perfect Sa. L&UaiVon.
THE SOUTHERN TOURIST.
Dewttd to Hotel ue Trnportatl. Mm.
A Side to the Winter Resort Section of the South.
lasued every Saturday. Handled by the Union News Company, and
on file in all the leading hotels.
Oce: Corner By and Newnan 8to., Jaclsonville, Fa.
P. O. BOX K.
Take the ATLANTIC COAST ULIE.
B.i CfcM 1 i1 TM. Tc Flat U. S. V.i
V***V 6"W" IAm"&rt, ft Wea &y I j~bkUWVEMttl.





AMV TZ 1 WAMO= AT XOM!t'v-: 9 '

Springfield has been laid off in lota, and the pound of the lhanmer
and sw-are heard in every direction. The ealpetersr are o ~buy in
LaVills, Oakland and Campbellton, and thevalae of real estate co-
stantly on the increase in these thriving settlements. All contain
churches, schools, thriving industries and beautiful homes.
The bulkheading of the river front and opening up of a new street
is an important improvement of the near future.
That Jacksonville is a city with a glorious future none can dis-
pute. The glory and beauty of its development will depend largely
upon the enterprise and liberality of its people.
CITY CHURCHES.
Adventists-Corner of Adams and First streets.
Tabernacle Baptist-West Church street, east of Julia.
Christian-Corner Beaver and Main streets.
Christian Memorial Chapel--Riverside.
First Congregational Church-Corner Hogan and Church streets.
Church of Good Shepherd-Brooklyn.
St. John's Episcopal-Corner Market and Duval streets.
St Stephen's Episcopal-Corner Monroe and Third streets, La-
Villa.
St. Andrew's Episcopal-Corner Brough and Duval streets.
Ahavath Chesed (Jewish)-Corner Laura and Union streets.
Church of St. John (Lutheran)-Corner Ashley and Laurastreets.
St. Matthew's Methodist Episcopal-LaVilla.
McTyeire Memorial Methodist Episcopal-Corner Newnan and
Duval streets.
Trinity M. E.-Opposite City Park, West Monroe street.
Presbyterian-Corner Newnan and Monroe streets.
Roman Catholic-Corner Newnan and Church streets.

SOCIETY ORGANIZATIONS.
O. M. Mitchell Poet G. A. R.-National Bank State of Florida
Building.
Florida Camp No. 1, C. Vet.-Corner Adams and Laura streets.
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, No. 26.
Hebrew Benevolent Society.
Irish Land League-Corner Adams and Laura streets.
Jacksonville Board of Trade-201 West Bay street.
Jacksonville Typographical Union, No. 162.
Mechanic's Steam Fire Engine Company-Adams Street.
The Scottish Association of Florida-No. 201 West Bay.
Duval Lodge, No. 18 (Masonic)-Reed's Block, Bay street.
Solomon Lodge, No. 20 (Masonic)-Reed's Block, Bay street.
Florida Lodge, No. 1, I. O. O. F.-No. 44 Market street.
Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
The Tijms Oa ua SEhet Una t"e trem rled, m aM 3U Pldeat
N th, est sa WOLt.






S'min% idha rT 6i AdrAs


THE FIDELITY A.NID

CASUALTY Co.
TWi clly ha bea ed in the various branches of Cudalty Taouac for mayearnL
k lahshly act tke hed of Cmlty Companie.l Its uets amount to .nerly two mio ofto
d board of direction is of the very high character. It has paid loses in excess of
three milliam of dollars. Its underwriting sta and its adjusting sta areble to dal with att
coming befar them from the basis of long experience. The pecaltis of the company ar as follows:
ACCIDENT.
Under chis general title are embraced Peronal Accident and Employer's ability, Landlord'
Liability, Cemnmon Cariers' Lability, Teams Liability and Elevator Liablity, such liab being
that of the iven employers others when accidents occur in connection with theoperioa ol
their buisf, r and for whkh they may be held responsible.
STEAM BOILER.
Under his head is included the inspections and insurance of Steam Boilers, ad to a limited
extent, of tlae Machinery and Appliances used in connection with team boilers.
rIDIELITY.
Or the Inurance of Corporations and others against defalcation by empoye. .
ACCIINT POLICIES isued by the DAY, WrK or Yuti, payIn WEEKLY IN-
DEMN IpiwMe daaeda ,and provide for death free from vexatiqu rstri Send for
sample police and rates
EUGENE OBERDORFER,
General Agent for Florida, Jacksonville, Fla.

THE METROPOLIS.
THE PEOPLE'S PAPER.
DEUVEREI TO AMY PART OF THE CITY AT TEN CENTS A WEEK.
Special .lduertising One Cent a Word. Complete Local
.News, with State and General News.
CARTER & RUSSELL, Proprietors.

The Acme, Hotel.
Centrally Located.
Liberally Conducted. Open All the Year.
ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 100.
aMM A Ikmibl III W. Ba, StWt, Jklrals.
H. A. BURT, Proprietor.
rai ATLANTIC COAST LINE.
I m u
W.PA I*.lMJA V ittiJ>a Tl. U








Montelore, No. 2, K. of P.-Beed's Block, Bay street
S. Davis, No. 15, K. of P.-National Bank State of Florida
Building, Bay street.
Jacksonville Council, No. 888, A. L. H.-Reed's Block.
Knights of the ~olden Eagl-e S. D avss, K. f P. Hall
Fidelity Lodge, No. 2, A.O.U. W.-Wo. 62) Wt Bay street.
The Efks.a--obawk Block.
Harrison and Morton Republican Club.-Herkbioner Block.
Duval Division, 8. of T.-Reed's Block, Bay street
Guiding Star, No. 98, 8. of T.-Nellie street, East Jacksonville.
W. C. T. U.-No. 41 Ocean street.
Florida Yacht Club.-Foot of Market street.
Jacksonville Gun Club.
Home Minstrels.-Opera House Block, Laura ptret.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND PLACES OF AMUSEMENT.
Sub-Tropical.-Main street, corner First.
Court House.-Market street, corner Forsyth.
County Jail.-Liberty street, corner Beaver.
Poetoffice.-Mohawk Block, East Bay street
Mayor's Court.-Ocean street.
Jackonville Water Works.-Main Atreet
U. S. Signal Service Office.-Astor Block.
Park Theatre, opposite St. James Hotel, corner Laura and Duval
street.
Telegraph Office-Hubbard Block, Main street.
Express Office-Corner Bay and Hogan streets.
Home for the Friendlese-Evergreen street.
The Orphanage-Ocean street, corner Duval.
Luke's Hospital-Monroe street, corner Palmetto.
HOTELS.
Acme Hotel-Ill West Bay street
Bettelini's Hotel-No. 16 East Bay street.
Bristol-Hart's Block, East Bay street.
Carlptoa House-Corner Bay and Market streets,
Central Hodse-No. 40 West Forsyth street
Duval Hotel-Corner forsyth and Hogapa tret.
Evwett otel-Corner Forsyth and Julia street
Glenada Hotel-No. 118 West Churgh saqet.
Grand View Hotel--Foryth street, between Bridge and Clay.
Hotel Placi4e-Main street.
Hotel Roseland-Shell Road, opposite Eighth avenue, Fairfiek
Tremoot-Corner Bay and Newnan street
Johnson House-No. 94 West Adams street.
Take the SAPVANA, PLORIo A 4 VWTErE RAILMA ,
*Tyqgtht^^^^ Qeqa- f-i


AMPP X= FA WWI 34BOMgs





w'mrI s oGtm T' flO rDbA.


J. H. KOOKER,
Tkht's ht lam.
109 Maggie Street,
That's My Adiem.

Cntrator ad Builer,
ThIas My Blnmss.




W. R. PETERSON&SON.
DEALERS IN

Paint, Oils,Vanises, lanl U P ainter' SuPes
No. 20 E. Bay St.,Jacksonville, Fla.
P. O. Box 321.
I have a great deal to do, but I prob-
ably could find time to write you an ad.
like this if yon paid me for it.
J. "W". WhTTTTE,
White's Advertsing Apny, 39 1-2 W. By tret.
Tab the ATLAHTIC COAST ULE.
hf t i Q48ek Rute iNorth and East. ThrhP
w Wvii .( Pu 8Aa. W ter *, j ewtiie, rF.






AN" mmR FAMOUs RinO8IR.


Oxford Hotel-No. 90 Laura street.
St. Charles Hotel-No. 80 West Forsyth street.
St. Johns House-No. 41 West Forsyth street.
St. James Hotel-Laura street, on St. James Park.
Warner Houe--No. 148 Laura street.
Windsor Hotel-Corner Hogan and Monroe streets.
Travelers' Hotel-Corner Bay and Cedar streets.
BUSINESS BLOCKS AND HALLS.
Abell Block-Nos. 32, 34 and 36 West Bay street
Astor Block-Corner Bay and Hogan streets.
Atlantic Block-Nos. 26 and 28 West Bay street.
Bostwick Block-Corner Bay and Main streets.
City Hall-Foot of Market street.
Ely Block-Corner Forsyth and Laura street.
Everett Hotel Block-Corner Bay and Julia streets.
Hazeltine Block-Corner Bay and Laura streets.
Herkimer Block-Corner Bay and Newnan streets.
Holmes' Block-Nos. 99 and 105 West Bay street.
Holmes' (new) Block-Nos. 48, 50 and 52 West Bay street.
Hubbard Block-Corner Main and Forsyth streets.
Hudnall's Building-Nos. 43 and 45 West Forsyth street.
Law Building--No. 44 East Forsyth street.
Law Exchange-Corner Market and Forsyth streets.
Lincoln Hall-Second street, LaVilla.
McConihe Block-Nos. 58, 40 and 42 West Bay street.
McCormick's Hall-Washington street.
Masonic Temple-Corner Julia and Orange streets.
Metropolitan Hall-No. 17 East Bay street.
Mason's Block-Corner Bay and Julia streets.
Mohawk Block-Corner Bay and Market streets.
Meyer & Muller Block-Corner Bay and Liberty streets.
Palmetto Block-Between Main and Laura streets.
NEW BLOCKS.
Livingston Block-Corner Main and Forsyth streets.
Byrne's Block-Corner Main and Adams street.
McMurray & Baker--Corner Main and Church streets.
Metropolis Building-Forsyth street.
Seminole*Club Building-Corner Main and.Forsyth streets.
Smith's Auilding-Forsyth street.

INTERESTING ITEMS.
Population, 25,000; number of manufacturing industries, seventy-
six, classified as follows: Iron and brass work foundries, four; bridge
Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
T* Thbieh "ar sad hftw Iae to adl em r Inra, t anl Pe it
Xwoth, N1 esa" West.





WHITB'S GUIDE TO FLORIDA


WM.


FINE GAS


CLARKE,


FIXTURES,


PlUMBER AND GAS FITTER.



RIOFING, SHEET IRON WORK, BATH TUBS,

WATER CLOSETS, WASH STANDS, PUMPS
AND


DR AIN


PIPES.


47 Forsyth St, near Laura,


Jacksonville,


= Florida.


Take the ATLANTI' COAST LINE.
?!U sau4t &d eQs ..ot. 3Fwth aad &eat.. Th.m.hk Prun.
.l-~-lum b~i .* a *a lsims T r FM.t u. Ual wa. w.
.mar .A., wero s98 W a t., jMkSL .al., 2a.






'AND RUN FAMoI NM0n.


builders, one; artifii setoe, one; saw as.urpasing ills, eight; shingle
mill, one; gas works, one; Electric light works, one; palmetto fiber fa-
tory; one; marble yards, two; brick yards, two; boat builders, two;
blank book manufactories, three; grist mills, two; ice factories, two;
cabinet makers, two; manufacturing confectioners, four; carriage and
wagon factories, seven; chemical laboratories, two; cigar factories, four-
teen; cigar box factories, one; bottling works, three; coffee and spice
mills, one; fertilizer and phosphate works, one; soap and fertilizer fac-
tories, three; manufactories of curiosities, four; marine railways, two;
harness and saddle factory, one; trunk factory, one. Total amount of
capital invested in these various industries is $1,400,800. The annual
product is over $1,000,000.
The number of public buildings is six, costing (including the
amount to be expended on the Government building) $458,000.
Number of school buildings, ten, costing 856,000.
Number of churches (including all denominations), forty, white,
eighteen; colored, twenty-two; value of public library property, $20,-
000; number of volumes contained in library, 3,500.
Twenty railroads, operating 2,448 miles; two lines of ocean
steamers; six lines of river steamers.
Three artesian wells, having a flow of 4,737,172 gallons of water
every twenty-four hours. Nine miles of sewers through pipes from
eight to twenty-four inches in diameter. Two lines of street railroads,
covering eleven miles of streets; motive power, horses and mules. A
aid Fire Department, employing twenty-six men; annual expense of
Fire Department, $13,200; the Gamewell fire alarm system is used,
The Police Department consists of thirty-one men; annual expense of
the department, $21,000. The city tax rate per $100 is $1.621. As-
sessed valuation of city property, $12.335,000. City government:
Governed by a board of eighteen Councilmen, appointed by the Gov-
ernor of the State. The City Council elects the Mayor and all other
municipal officers.
THE CITY OF ST. AUGUSTINE.
Now put on thy musty garments, oh, St. Augustine ? Gather the
cobwebs around thy ancient ruins. Lay out the speaking emblems of
thy antiquity ; for the time of the year is come when the people gather
from near and from far to see the patriarch of cities with a Ponce de
Leon flowing in its heart Who that has traveled southward has not
seen St. Augustine? Who has not stood amid the venerable memories
of that old cathedral, whose masses have been chanted by Spanish
priest or hooded monk or modern prelate for more than three centuries
of time? Who has not gazed in speculative retrospection upon the
cabalistic Spanish inscribed upon the monument of the plaza de la
Constitucion? Who has not loved to pace the matchless sea-wall
promenade swept by the freshest of Atlantic breezes and kissed along
Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAr.
The Th"Me Caur saL "wre I es to rsa rm f Irrlds, msa n .l Pall
MWkth, B t sm Wrt.





WNITr's QGUID TO YLROIa
SEASON OF 1893.


THE


THE


ACME OPE ALLTHE YEAR ACME

Accommodations for 100 Guests.


Furnished Rooms 50c, to $ per Day, $2 to $6 per Wek.



n Connection on European and American Plan.
In Connection on European and American Plan.


Refitted and


Refurnished with entirely


New Furniture Throughout.

Central Located, Convenient to Depot and Boat Landins.


S1i West Bay Street,


Jacksonville, Fla.


H. A. BURT, Proprietor.
Take the ATLANTIC COAST LINE.
Tho *mwt na Quiek Resne Nerth Mad west. *Tn Pouzlaa
FIdse l1ins O.. en alL Trlns. The rat IU.. Mal VW.
W. DA M, Bnera Aget, West ay St, s W i J., le.






A"D 333 FAMOUS MKORMI'S


its lovely length by the plashing wavelets that have dashed themselves
in sterner form against it for a hundred years iA vain ? And who, amid
theorowding memories and vivid antiquities of old Fort Marion, has
not caught the glow of chivalry from the old Castilian days of Spain ?
It is no wonder that St Augustine has been growing in popularity year
by year, until the last season crowded all the hotels, filled the boarding
houses and private homes with tourists, and left many barred of en-
trance by the impossibility of accommodation.
The city is located on a peninsula formed by the San Sebastian
and Matanzas rivers, and is built in the form of a parallogram a mile
in length and three-quarters of a mile wide. It contains about 10,000
inhabitants, but during the winter season the population is much larger,
owing to its wonderful popularity as a resort, which is yearly increas-
ing. As the stranger wanders through the shady streets, hundreds of
rare and interesting sights may be found on every side. Among the
principal points of mterest to the tourist we might mention
FORT MARION,
formerly called San Marco, and anciently San Juan de Pinos, covers
four acres, and commands the harbor and its entrance from the sea. It
is built of coquina; its walls are twenty-one feet high and twelve feet
thick. It has four bastions, and in all respects is a military castle. It
has twenty-seven casements thirty five feet long and eighteen feet wide,
and its complement is one hundred guns and one thousand men. (See
Chapin's Hand Book of St. Augustine for a full history of this famous
old fortress and a full account of the finding of the mysterious cage,
which was broken up by the St. Augustine blacksmith for the use of
the iron of which it was composed. The skeleton found in the cage
was buried outside the fort, and, it is said, was afterwards exhumed and
deposited in the St. Augustine Museum, where many other Spanish
relics may now be seen.)
THE SEA WALL
was built by the United States government, 1837-43, at an expense of
$100,000, to protect the city from the encroachment of the sea. It
rises ten feet above high-water mark, and the capping of granite is just
wide enough for two persons to walk abreast. The United States bar-
racks, at the southern extremity of the sea wall, are now occupied by
United States troops. Prior to 1556, the Franciscan Monks estab-
lished a convent here, hence the walls of this structure may now be
three centuries old.
THE CITY GATES.
Two picturesque square pillars of coqaina, surmounted with
Moorish capitals, bearing marks of great antiquity, stand at the head
of St. George street, within a gun shot of the Museum. When, or by
Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
tU Throw Ogur awl Sheet L te to I a.d rem Mrida, si4 Ul Peime
nres, m aut sa W 6.






WuJTu's OMJDU To VWUJDA'


Two of the Best!



THE FAMOUS ST. JAMES HOTEL
JACKSONVILLK.
AND
SAN CARLOS HOTEL,
ST. JAMS ON THE GULF.
To thoeM who are familiar with the beauties and attractions of Florida, the splendid loea-
tioun, omali equipment, and many advantage of the St. James, Jacksonville are well
known. Th0te who visit Jacksonille for the first time during the present season will ind
in the St. JmmI a great hotel, centrally but beautifully located on the highest ground in the
city. Saying the St. Jame Park, and saoommodating 500 guests. They wilT find in Mr. J. R.
Campbell, prpnetor of the house. an able and experienced hotel man whose heart is in his
business ad who does not intend that any reasonable want of his guests shall be over looked.
Mr. C. O. Chbmberlain. the manager of the hotel, has also proved his abili and earned an
enviable tre tion in past seasons at the St. James and as manager of the Point Hotel,
of Rock, a e Me and other New England summer hotela.-Bostoa Home Journal.
That U e St. James is one of the best and most popular hotels on this continent none will
dtte. The hotel is supplied with all the appointments of the modern first-clas houe with
telgraphicaend railway ticket omfoe where tickets may be boubt and baggage checked to all
points. A elect orchetra is also a harm to the St. James, and the table s unsurpased.

San Carlos Hotel

ST. JAMES-ON-THE-GULF.
St James is situated on Pine Island, in Charlotte Harbor, between
the 26th and 27th parallel north latitude, with a temperature averag-
ing 60 to 80 degrees. The entire absence of swamps and malaria make
it a most healthful and life-giving retreat.
Patro-ms of former years need no repetition of the many advantages
of this fannous winter resort. To those who have never visited South-
ern Flori-da, it can be said here is the loveliest spot in the Sunny
South." A few of the many attractions are.: Fine drives, splendid
yachting sad luxuriant tropical foliage. The sportsman is offered the
finest gunning and fishing. Here is the home of the Tarpon, or Silver
King, the greatest of all game fish. In the forests, Deer and Wild
Turkey ure plentiful, and the shores abound with snipe and other game.
birds. nothing will be left undone by the management for the com-
fort of ilts guests, and to make this resort popular to its patrons.
Special attention will be given to the table. Delicious Vegetables,
together with Oranges, Bananas and other Tropical Fruits, through-
out the lasion.
Take the ALANTIC COAST LINE.
The MeMt am a Qk RAtB e Neath Ent. lThnr- Pwllas
sIta mSUo al a all Tsm T.h* Tre a"t U. aMn Res, w.
V. AL Ba sd Aw1e s Vat Ba so., JOa6rmBllo, 1ak.






AND HBB FAMOUS BEBORTS


whom these strange pillars werererected, no one knows, but they fur-
nish ample scope for the speculation of the antiquarian.
THE OLD SPANISB BeLIOB,
of which so much is said, are deposited in the Museum, and should be
seen by every visitor.
THE CATHEDRAL.
This antiquated Catholic church was built in 1793, at a cost of
$16,650, and stands on the north side of the Plaza. The Moorish belfry
contains a chime of four bells placed on four several niches, three of
which form a horizontal line across the tower, and the other is above ;
these, together with the clock below, are so arranged as to form a per-
fect cross. One of these bells, supposed to be the oldest in the country,
bears the inscription: "Sancte Joseph, ora pro nobis, D. 1689."
Which, translated, means, "Holy Joseph, pray for us. Dedicated
1689." This bell is supposed to have belonged to the earlier Church.
CEMETERIES.
The Huguenot Cemetery, near the city gates; the Catholic Ceme-
tery, west of Spanish street; and the Military Cemetery, which con-
tains the graves of General Dade and his soldiers.
THE LIGHTHOUSE,
on Anastasia Island, which is 164 feet high, was built in 1873, at a
cost of upwards of $100,000. The lantern cost $16,000. The visitor
will be well repaid for ascending the steps by the enjoyment of the
magnificent view. Near by, on the east side of the island, are the
ruins of the old Spanish lighthouse, erected during the seventeenth
century, which was destroyed by a furious storm, June 20, 1880.
THE PLAZA,
containing the Spanish monument, erected in 1812, to commemorate
the Spanish Liberal Constitution.
There are also a number of large and costly churches, the old
market, the United States Barracks, the north beach, noted for the
quantity of beautiful sea shells exposed at low tide. Scores of walks
and drives will not tell half the delightful story of St. Augustine's
wealth of the quaint, curious and beautiful. Her hotels are equal to
those of any winter resort in the world, the mammoth Ponce de Leon
taking front rank as being the most costly, the largest and most unique
and magnificently appointed hotel in America. To see the Ponce de
Leon is alone worth a long and dusty tramp amid difficulties which can
never be encountered by a Florida tourist. Reader, if you have never
visited St. Augustine, you are putting off until some more convenient
time one of the pleasures of a life-time.
Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERu RAILWAY.
Te Thriwe O rAl "sa t same o sad o arn rewis, ae i n Wef.
Sesth s* eds4 Wee





WITE'S GUIDE TO PLBUIDA.


Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffett,
Sewing the old fashioned way;
Up came a spider and sat down beside her,
And turned her work into play.
THE NATION'S PRIDE.



d THy E Sh

Standard Rotary Shuttle


Sewing


Machine.


Proud of its beauty. [stitch. Proud of the variety of its work
Proud of the uniformity of its Proud of its speed.
Proud of its quietness. Proud of its ingenious mechanism.
Proud to own it.
Fifty per cent. more inches of sewing in the same time
than on the old timers.


2000 Stitches per Minute.
Tho Rotary Shuttle Don It-Woman's Bt t Frid.


The Standard Sewing Machine
JOHN T. HAGUE, Agent,


Co.,


No. 7 W. Forsyth St.,


a Jacksonville, Fla.


Take the ATLANTIC COAST LINE.
n1oirt and Quiek P.et. W.ormh aad Eat. Through PFlma
;fgt OL-te t m mr aml Trains. Tbe Iemst U.S. Mall ests. W.
W. DVA u AgMr S, West May t., JackSunvale., 7I .






A"D X=5 FIAOUS nUo uU


THE CITY OF FEBNANDINA.
Fernandin is a little over an hour's ride from Jacksonville, by
the Florida Central and Peninsular train, and is the county eat of
Nassau county. The city was founded by the Spaniards in the year
1632, and has a population of about 3,000, largely increased during
the winter season. It has an important trade in lumber, possessee a
large cotton ginning establishment, a manufactory of cotton-seed oil,
one of the best hotels in the South, a large number of fine residences,
business houses and churches. Near the city may be found a large
number of sugar, cotton and orange plantations. The climate is very
mild and healthy. It has the largest and deepest harbor on the eastern
coast of the State. It is beautifully located in a sheltered situation on
the west side of Amelia Island, the northern extremity of which guards
the entrance to Cumberland Sound and the extensive land-locked
harbor, into which open the St. Mary's River, and Amelia River from
Nassau Inlet.
One of the chief attractions of Fernandina is the Amelia Beach,
a noble stretch of smooth, shining sand, sloping gently from the foot
of the great "sand-dune" which lee along the outer edge of the island
far out under the shallow waters of the Atlantic. and extending from
one end of the island to the other, a distance of over twenty miles.
The surface of the sand at the edge of the water is as hard as a floor,
forming a magnificent drive, and a firm, hard shell road extends from
the city to the beach, a distance of nearly two miles.
Connections is made at Fernandina, semi-weekly, with the elegant
steamships of the Clyde Line and Mallory Line to and from Charles-
ton and New York; with the Sea Island Route steamers to and from
Savannah, Tuesday and Friday, and daily with the Cumberland Route
to and from Brunswick, Macon, Atlanta, Chattanooga and all points
West and Northwest.
A branch track from the city to the beach has recently been com-
pleted, rendering the facilities for reaching this notable resort perfect.
Eight miles from Fernandina, by water, on Cumberland Island, is
the famous estate of Dungeness, several thousand acres in extent,
bestowed by the State of Georgia upon General Nathaniel Green, and
belonging for many years to his descendants. Broad avenues, bounded
by plantations of ancient orange and olive trees, and bordered by giant
oaks, stretch grandly away on either side of the homestead. The
old family burying-ground, with its ancient tombs (one of which covers
the mortal prt of the renowned soldier known to fame and the history
of this country as "Light-Horse Harry" Lee), is located in a grove not
far from the mansion.
KEY WEST,
THE MOST SOUTHERN LAND UNDER THE BTAR-SPANGLED BANNED.
Key West, the county seat of Monroe county, is situated on the
Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
The ThrauAi Os w~ Sh~ Ia to tad m le rsd, aMs. l Penaes
Neuth, aes" 4 Wet.





waIT's GUmDE TO i ORIDA


P, E. McMURRAY & BAKER,
MANUFACTURERS AND JOBBERS


Carriage and Wagon Material.

Vehicles of Every Description.

Harness, Saddles, Robes, Whips, Etc.

Cor. Main and Church Sts.,
Jacksonville, Florida.
TALIAFERRO'S
TONSORIAL PARLORS.
Main St., near Bay, Jacksonville, Fla.
One of the nicest, cleanest and most elegantly fitted up establish-
ments in the South. The best attention given to customers. Latest
improved chairs and fittings. Hot and cold baths. None but first-
clas workmen. DANIEL W. TALIAFERRO, Proprietor.
W W .L Z : ER 'S
EXCLUSIVE
TRUNK AND VALISE FACTORY
IN THE STATE.
Genuine Alliigtor Satchels, Sole Leather Trunks. The Largest Stock,
Fimest Assortment, Lowest Prices. Old Trunks
Repaired and Exchanged.
68 W. Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
Take the ATLUATIC COAST LINE.
no fsbrt sm Qsuk .deo ]Nw a" R. 't. euhnma.
B.JlM II w sU Ta. nfte 2.m* U.& .M.- V.
W. DAVU, ~A s, A M Wt Ba Us, Jna.uavllU, glo.






AND REB FAMOUrS uROS. 67

Island of Key We, fr out in the Gulf of Mexio. It is sixty miles
fom Cape Sable; the most souther extremity of main land in the
United States, and ninety miles from Cuba. The Island embraces
two thousand acres of a coral formation. Population, 20,000. Key
West is one of the most important naval stations in the United States,
as she is, indeed, the Key of the Gulf. The Gulf Stream flows in sight
of the city, and is nowhere distant over five miles from the Islands of
Monroe. The Custom House here is the second in importance in the
South, and transacts a revenue of $1,000,000. There are fifty officials
employed by the Collector and the business is increasing fast. Key
West presents the appearance of a West India city, and is one of the
most beautiful places in America. Her capacious wharves are lined
with vessels from every nation, and the commodities of every quarter
of the globe find an exchange here. The stranger is forcibly impressed
with the tropical appearance of the city, and wonders to himself if he
is really in the United States. Bearing cocoanut trees, as tall as eighty
feet, give grateful shade to her citizens; tamarind trees from the tropics
and the banyan from India, attain large size here; and flowers as rare
as exotics grace the gardens on every hand. The sea surrounding the
Island City is as clear as crystal and reflects a summer sky of purest
blue. Street car lines encircle the city, and gas and electric lights
flash from every corner, and a system of artesian wells is now in opera-
tion. Schools, churches, convents and colleges give Key West ample
facilities for educating the many children dwelling on. the island and
main land. The cigar industry of this city is immense. Two hundred
factories, employing 5,000 operatives, and doing a business of $7,000,-
000 annually. Key West is the great port of entry between the Uni-
ted States and the West India Islands.
As the traveler from other climes approaches Key West, on the
elegant steamer "Olivette," (the fastest in American waters-twenty-
two miles per hour), that runs from Tampa to Havana, via Key West,
he is certain to be both surprised and delighted. The result is always
the same; the attractions prove to be far greater than their most san-
guine expectations lead them to believe. Nor is this feeling of exhu-
berant satisfaction diminished as they land and proceed to investigate
the attractions and resources of the city itself. The pleasant streets,
running at right angles, as smooth and hard as adamant; the hand-
some and substantial residences, the home lots filled with great numbers
of cocoanut, tamarind and rubber trees; and such flowers as poncian-
nas, night-blooming cereus and magnolia-frascatti; and perfect forests
of bananas and guavas. The large and well-stocked stores give ocular
and tangible evidences that Key West is a prosperous city.
PENSACOLA,
the county seat of Escambia county, is pleasantly situated on Penacola
Bay, twelve miles from the Gulf of Mexico. Pensacola Bay has a
Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA A WESTERN RAILWAY.
ST T~rh osd o4it "0r to d em eeia, usad ar& Iosds
W304h, 9 1 saa Wes0.





68 WHITET8 GUIDE TO PLORIDA

LOUIS I. STEPHENS
THE JEWELER,
INVITES THE PEOPLE OF THE
STATE O F FLO1RIIDA,
Who are here as residents or tourists to inspect his
MAGNIFICENT STOCK OF

Watches, Diamonds, Silver Novelties

Souvenir Spoons. Fine Line

of Optical Goods, Florida Curiosities
AND IN FACT
EVERYTHING
Usually found in a first-class jewelry
establishment.
Fine Watch Repairing a Specialty. Years of Experience
Prices Always Reasonable.
29 West Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.
SIGN OF THE GOLDEN ALLIGATOR.
Take the ATLANTIC COAST LINE.
nb. Shat an Quie k Ree NWrt "ad ZA u. Tkre uh Punmaa
.j IeLaam e an U TwsSi n TbEIa U.. Ma&nll Uets V
W. DIAVIA Asax, 0 Weet Bar *., JmkaaWlle la.






AND HER FVAOUS RiOM9 .


depth of twenty-esx feet of water, making it the best seaport on the
coast. The site upon which the city of Pensacola stands was occupied
byihe Spaniards in 1686. The British subsequently came into posses-
son and evidently established its first commerce and business. The
Spaniards afterwards obtained a permanent foothold until the United
States Government came into possession of the territory. The principal
shipments are lumber, timber, ice, fish and cotton. The ocean shipping
interest is the main factor, timber being shipped to foreign ports daily.
The soil is sandy loam, underlaid with clay, and fruits of all kinds do
well, especially the pear and peach. Very little attention is paid to
orange culture. Land varies in price from $2 to $20 per acre, five
miles from the city. Vegetable growing is profitable, although very
little attention is directed in that course at present. Pensacola can
justly boast of the finest public school in the State.
There are several good hotels which are well patronized by tourists
during the winter season from every section of the Union. That Pen-
sacola is in a prosperous condition and rapidly increasing in population
is evident, and the day is not far distant when she will be looked upon
as one of the finest cities in the South.


BOBNN ON THE F. C. & P.


Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
T2b Thregh Gew and Short IEd. to sad fr-m Flerida,' a *du Poat
Weort, Wm t ad Wee.





70 WHmTE's GUIDr TO FLORIDA

THE GROWLER.
ISSUED EVERY WEDNESDAY FROM
159 W. Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
LIONCL JACOBS, Editor. VICTOR E. JACOBS, Ar't Editor.
Two thousand copies of this paper is distributed frie every week.
As an advertising medium its advantages are that it reaches different
people every week and aggregates from ten to twelve thousand readers
per month.


The Davis Gallery!
13 1.2 West Bay St.
YOU WILL FIND IT THE

Best Equipped Studio A South,
While the work turned out by far excells any
done in this State, both for

Style, Pose and Finish.
Never in the history of this Gallery has the work reached such an
artistic standpoint as it has under its present management.

West End Jewelry and Musical

Instrument Store.
0JOSEPII 3. J.ACOOBS,
159 W. Bay St., El Modelo Bloek, Jaeksonville, Fla.
A ue sad varied asortment of Watches. Chains, Rins Earrings. Brest Pinu and Jewelry,
Landipe-Panted Shells. Portraita Painted on Shells. Guitrm. Violins, Aeoordeons
adevery article in the muMiesl line at lowest prices. Jewelers and ped-
dlers supplied at wholesale fiures-low for cash.
Call and examine my stock.
Take the A7LANTIC COAST LINE.
The tlewt a&d Qieik RBet North d E t. Tkreuh Pfltan
*B.* mA e an *UTWmi. The Fre sW. t Kail X e* W.
W. 3AMt 8 Aws**, West 31 Se., Jas..k-su., rU .,






AND EM3 FAKOUB RWIOBlU.


STATI CAPITOL.


TALLAHASSEE,
the beautiful capital city of Florida, is in sight, commanding a mag-
nificent view of the surrounding country. The city is full of interest
to visitors.
Two miles west of Tallahassee is the "Murat Place," a fine planta-
tion, owned and occupied, until her death, by the widow of Prince
Murat, the *son of Napoleon's favorite Marshal, afterwards King of
Naples. The Prince, who spent the last years of his life upon his fine
estate in Jefierson County, and his widow, who survived him many
years, lie side by side in the Episcopal Cemetery at Tallahassee, their
lastresting place marked by twin monuments of v white marble with
quaint and interesting inscriptions.
Tallahassee has been called the "Floral City of the Land of Flow-
ers," and well deserves the name. Almost every dwelling is in the
midst of a wilderness of flowers, which seem to bloom with equal splen-
dor from January to December.
The hard clay roads, winding gently over the hills and through

Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
Tho T..gf Oca Sb aShet Idu e ta o a Trer". *Sad .a ate
Neret, Zw* mud Wet.





WHITr's OUID TO FLOrL A.


THE

DAILY,
DAILY, -
DAILY,
DAILY,

Advertiiin


THE


ESTABLISHED 1890.

SPRING.


OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF CLAY COUNTY.
Puiell at the Celerated
WATERINC PLACE AND RESORT, GREEN COVE. SPRINGS, FLA.
Circulated largely locally and abroad.
W. D. RANDALL, Editor and Manager.

MAIN STREET CAFE.
LIVINGSTON BLOCK.

New and Neatly Furnished, Centrally

Located, Liberally Conducted.


Bst Walr ib the City.


Por JIlcknM lk rim.


WeekIy Beard, $5; Dinner, 35c.; Breakfast and Supper, 30o.
Meckh s NH Lch ud Oyptrs a SpeMy.
Exmoell8t coookin and prompt attention makes our table
unsurpassed.


LANIE CLOWES,


- Proprietor.


FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
DAILY AND WEEKLY.
One Month, N$.oo SUNDAY, Si Months, $1.oo
Three Months, e.g SUNDAY. One Year, .0o
Six Month, oo WEEKLY, Si Month, .so
One Year, oo.o WEEKLY, Oe Year. z.oo
ADVERTISING RATES.
g Rates depend on Place in the Paper and will be furnished
on application.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Take the ATLANTIC COAST LINE.
Ito PUkt a"I Qis.k aIts wIer .aiI sut. w..u&b Panma.
R.asdt m-Asm 1 o n ea.. TiW... Tb. FM.t U. l. Mail Mrts. V.
v. f DAm-3 w As=mt, *a West m7r t., Jaohnatln., Pas.






Al" k IM fAMO Ift iW


the valleys, under ovrarching boughs and among the rtile fids,
toward the various beautiful lakes which abound throughout the
country, afford the finest opportunities for pleasant drives, rides and
Pk ; all of which are invited by the clear, bracing atmosphere sad
die abng mges of the landscape.
aZla ee can boast of mot excellent hotels-Leon ad St.
James; also a number of good boarding houses.
GREEN COVE SPRINGS,
(THE PABLOB CITY.)
Everybody has heard of Green Cove Springs, the most enterpris-
ing and beautiful little city on the noble St. Johns. Proud of its present
and with a fixed faith in its future, Green Cove Springs enjoys an
enviable and not unpleasant self satisfaction which vents itself in
municipal and specultive enterprise. The location of the town is very
attraCtive, circling about a woodd and picturesque hollow, from which
gushes a bold, magnificent sulphur spring, with a basin as large as the
foundation of a cottage, and s deep in places as the cottage's peaked
roof. Three thousand gallons of water per minute, clear and pure as
crystal, gush from thegreag cavernous boil. The water is strong sulphur
and is esteemed a very Ae remedial agent in cases of neuralgia, ner-
vous prostration, rheumattm, liver andkidney complaints. The water
empties fom the spring iAo several bathing pools of unusual size and
beauty, which are open and in use all the year round.
Think of open air bathing in December. It is the county seat,
and one of the most famous and delightful winter resorts in Florida.
Its resident population is rapidly increasing, and will soon reach
the 6,000 mark.
As the visitor wanders through the shady streets of the town, he
can be but favorably impressed with the neat and tidy appearance of
all he sees; miles of good sidewalks, beautiful parks, mammoth hotels,
commodious churches, schools, pretty residences, and lovely flower
gardens, stately oaks and magnolias. draped in Spanish mors, with a
background of magnificent pine woods, make a scene where one could
rest for hours
"And come ad come again,
That he might call it up when r away."
The transportation facilities are unsurpassed in any town in Flori-
da; three large piers, juting out in the St. Johns, afford convenient
aoem to se-gomg vesel and river craft of every kind, while the
Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Railroad, running through the
center of the town,.gives communication with the railroad systems of
the country.
The Southwestern Railroad, which runs to Melrose, connects here
with the J., T. & K. W. The Southwestern is well equipped and care-
fully managed, and to those who take a trip over this beautiful route
Te te M h4VANNM, FLORIDA A WESTERN RAILWAY.
T2e TbIe0h ar saM> U$ a* bel f dt m rtli a, sam l re PeI
N




wawro's 6Um TO WORbAs


PIANOS


ERIMS


aaler, Lame & Co.
(sueorsso. A. m e OAMpSLL),
A __


5mueavgtnoe, Ia.


PIANOS:
Conover,
Haines Bros.,
Schubert,
Kingsbury.


ORGANS:
Chicago Cottage,
Farrand & Votey.


MERCHANDISE


Take th ATLANTIC COAST LINE.

W.AAVXM, 0ui3 l A-K NR Wrt- I* J -fl]a


MUSICAL


----


-----






A"b -a" FAMO mornM


to Wua irogIp s on Lake Banta Fe, we promise a semo of d tigt
Thoh some of the priiapal streets of the town a ode of tret
railiad has been complete, andis now in operation, connecting with
all the railroad stations, wharves and hotels. There are also two lines
of ,Ma ;;ili; Beaoh and Miller Line, running daily bots, and the
Nw ndepeadmnt Line, making daily trips between Green Cove Springs
and Jaksonville.
In all this broad land of ours there is no nobler trip than a sail up
the great tropical river from Jacksonville to Green Gove Springs.
The aeath dikana of thirty miles In as beautiful as a dream. When
yone mad Grassy P' t, off Jacksonville, your throbbing steamer seeks
the center of a great stream, whose average width is three miles, widen-
ing at Green Cove Spring to five.
Such a world of waters; sometimes stretching for miles in a
straight, majestic sweep, and then turning slowly, as become its size and
greatne, in a long stately curve that makes a bay or cove large enough
for a nation's navy to lie at bay. The never-ceasing sea breeze ruffles
the broad surface into waves that break into white caps as merrily, if
not as noisily, as the billows of the great ocean. There is a feeling of
awe, the majesty of size, the grandeur of scope, and the sublimity of
power in this mighty stream on which your steamer rides like a tiny
thing at the mercy of the river god.
The great river seems indeed a chain of lakes, throbbing with
ocean tides and inheriting the swell of ocean waves. Along the cir-
cumscribing shores that bind its mighty current, the succession of fair
cities, of thrifty towns, of orange groves and grand hotels, is strikingly
beautiful. The shores so far away grow shapely and regular in per-
spective, and die away in walls of green against the horizon. Manda-
rin's bright groves first greet the traveler's eye, followed quickly by
the tasteful pier and snowy fences over which peeps the green of Orange
Park. Magnolia looms in stately beauty from its crest of emerald
sward; and Green Coves's fair canon with its healing spring makes a
sweet picture in the semi-circle of the river's sweep long to be rmem-
bered. Reader, if you doubt God's goodness, and power and want to
become a better man or woman, the delightful two hours spent on the
St. Johns River in reaching Green Cove Springs, will prove a sweet
blowing indeed.
The bathing and fishing at Green Cove Springs is unsurpassed,
black bass and speckled bream are caught in large numbers. Quail
are abundant, and the numerous deer and turkey in the neighboring
forests contribute much to the lover of rod and gun.
Among its numerous attractions is St. David's Path, or the Lover's
Walk, where one may wonder over little hills, through miniature dell,
sparkling rivulets, in and out among magnificent moss-laden oaks, the
sweet-scented magnolia, and amid flowers which fill the air with fra-
grance.
Tafe the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
Th Th eugh Car ad Shmt Ma" e a& frts IU igd, a & all Vet"e
WaIe, mlt t Al We.s,





76 WHIrT'S OUIDZ TO FLOIhar

Thomas Nooney & Sons,

WHOLESALE GROCERS AID COMMISSIONH E IMS
IN, AND SHIPPERB OF,

Foreign and Domestic Fruit and Produce,
14 East Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
All orders for shipping promptly attended to. Consignments of pro-
duce and Fruits solicited.
Returns Made on Day of Sale.
THao. NOONEY. CHASE. A. NOONEY. FRANK NOONzY.
W. P. WEBBTER, Vice-President. E. I. RoBINSON, Treasurer.
THE
DIME SAVINGS BANK
OF FLORIDA.
CHARTERED BY THE STATE.
Pays Four Per Cent on Deposits. authorized to Transact
a Geneml Banking Business.
Special allities for makin and negotiating Loans on Real
SEstte and Collateral Security.
Receives Deposits from 10 Cents Upward, subject to Check.
BANK HOURS. 10 A. M. to 4 P. M. OPEN SATURDAY AND MONDAY EVENINGS
FROM 6 TO &30 P. M.
OFFICE, 76 WEST FORSYTH STREET,
Opposite Public Building Site.
rTae the ATLANTIC COAST LINE.
Th* kOa t uA Qu mek sto. ea w sAl lt. Imnrab P .aa
M # hMN1-Ii- 0w ,- b.lu. =. at U. &, M ,IWT vW
W. :AjMa~4 Aa- w-i* 8"b f5 5nai.






k"D Am3 PAOUG lRlSM.


Floyida has numerous attractions, but none a more worthy of
pedal aeti than Marion Bordea Park, the moit beautiful spot in
the South. Not only is it celebrated far and wide for its great beauty,
but stands as an everlasting monument to one of Florida's most public
spirited citizens, who was enterprising and generous in every movement
which advanced the interests of his town, county or State, as well as to
increase the dimples ofjoy in the homes of the needy and affected.
The immense tract of land purchased by the late Hon. John G.
Borden, of which Marion Borden Park is a part, has been laid out in
parks, courts, drives, circles and avenues in a most striking manner,
and when completed will present a scene as near Eden as we may ever
hope to behold below.
The hotels of Green Cove Springs are models of comfort, over-
looking the river and furnished with all modern conveniences for the
accommodation of their numerous guests. There are also a large num-
ber of excellent boarding houses, where board may be obtained at rea-
sonable prices.
There are a large number of secret societies, a splendid newspaper,
"The Green Cove Spring," express, telephone, telegraph offices, and
daily mails, the new county court house, amusement halls, the Ladies'
Village Improvement Association, an admirable society of ladies, whose
chief aim is to maintain for the city the reputation of being the neatest
and sweetest community in the State. Their work is well done and an
example set which towns of far greater pretensions would do well to
follow.
There are ulso a number of large manufacturing plants, among
which we notice Borden's Clay County Wood-Working Co., the car
works of Blain Bros. and the Clay County Brick Works.
The rapid increase in population and the vast and wonderful
improvements now going on, tell the story of the city's future in words
more forcible than we can employ.
GAINESVILLE,
Alachua County, is the county seat. Its growth during the past few
years has been phenomenal, and it has become a distributing point for
the trade of a large and rich section of country. The city is situated
on the edge of a vast tract of the richest hammock lands, at an eleva-
tion of one hundred and twenty-eight feet above the level of the sea.
It has long been noted as a place of unusual sanitary attractions, and
is already a popular and pleasant place of resort for winter visitors.
The streets are wide and shady, and the business portion of the place
contains a number of substantial and well-arranged buildings, good
hotels and boarding houses. Arredondo is in Alachua county, near
Gaineeville, and is chiefly noted for the large quantities of vegetables
produced in its vicinity for shipment to Northern markets. This
industry has been steadily increasing in volume and profit for several
Tke the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
The Tb' ugh we a" Ihawe XIme teo rm A 0 l. r "a al P.at
New.& tsoo 0" Wed.





SWae GmI oUoDU TO rLbtDA

RAYMON D. KNIGHT & CO.,
IMPORTERS. AND DEALERS IN

Crockery, China, Glass, Earthenare,

Lamps and Chandallers.

OIL AND GAS STOVES, TINWARE,
GALVANIZED GOODS AND

HOUSEHOLD OUTFITTERS.
Sterling, Silver-Plated and Rich Cut Belgian Glassware.

MIotel aind. Steamzaboat S-.ppalies-

SOLE STATE AGENTS FOR THE
Clebrated Monitor Oil Stoves, Indurated Fibre
Ware, Globe Incandescent Lamps, Ice-
berg Chief Refrigerators, White
Mountain Ice Cream Freezers,
Enameled Kitchen Ware.

ii and 13 WEST BAY, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Take the ATLANTIC COAST LUE.
The Sort a Quitk Seat N oth aad t. TAh Pum
Me". -uav Cow- an TusWaf. T&hb re* V.L& ma l0 W.
W. VA uw Ape*, 91 Wet 3N7 eS, U.**uylil, 7We.






A" MRt PMOVt1 anoufli


years and k. -1.4 fertility of the soil is usually 4 onstra-
ted. KaisY id al are great shipping points for oranges,
watertnelon and vegetables.
OCALA.
Thip vigorous and prosperous city is the county seat of Marion
county, is siuated in the center of the great phosphate belt, and one of
the richest regions of the State, and is manifestly destined to rival other
points as the distributing point of the Great Orange Belt.
The Ooala House is one of the largest hotels in the State. Visitors
will find it first-clae in all respects; also the Montezuma, Alfred and
Magnolia.
Connection is made here with the Silver Springs, Ocala & Gulf
Railroad for Wekiwa Blue Springs, the most attractive spring and
country in Florida, beautiful rolling land, good soil, and bids fair in a
few years to be the most delightful point in the State. Near here, at
Dunnellon, is located the mammoth phosphate beds of the world; it
was here they were first discovered.
QUINCY.
(the county seat of Gadeden county), a charming town, high situation,
rich and productive country. Near here is located the mammoth
tobacco plantations of the South, over 16,000 acres under cultivation,
producing only the finest Havana wrappers, the aroma of which is not
excelled by wrappers grown on the Island of Cuba. Tobacco was
grown in this section in ante-bellum days, but only in the last two years
as this industry been revived. At the instigation of Mr. H. R. Duval,
President of the Florida Central & Peninsular Railroad Company, a
number of New York capitalists, headed by Mr. Geo. Storm, of the
Owl Cigar Manufacturing Company, bought up thousands of acres, at
a cost of several hundred thousands of dollars, and revived this most
profitable industry, the success of which has been phenomenal. The
crop of this season will return to the company over fifty per cent on
their investment. The success of this company has induced many
others to make large investments with a view to tobacco culture in this
and other places on the Western Division of the Florida Central &
Peninsular Railroad.
ORLANDO,
the chief city and county seat of Orange county, is almost as well
known to those who know anything at all of Florida as Jacksonville
or Tallahassee. It is one of those remarkable places, which, like many
Western towns, have grown in a night, as it were, contrary to all
expectations, and in spite of a world of detraction from less fortunate
rivals, into a veritable city, while its older and perhaps more favorably
situated neighbors have been asleep.
The region round about Orlando is charmingly diversified by beau-
Take the SAVAINAH. FLORIDA a WE TERH RAILWAY.
T hr he ama4 s sh t aw ti n ahe m r .& i -am& a n F
Xw]r, Zese &" West.






WMTFEs GUIDE TO PLORMUA.


W. CALDWt I,
(Sucoessor to A. E. G. BITT &. Co.,)

Florida Coffee and Spice Mills,
ONLY COFFEE ROASTERS IN THE STATE.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in


Teas, Coffee, Spices,


Baking Powder, Extracts,


Bluing, Pearline,


Paper and Paper Bags,


Butter Trays, Twine, etc.


S 28 OCEAN STREET,
JTALECSO1T'VILLT-jE, :FL'A.

W. M. STONER,
TOURIST TICKET AGENT.
St. OJaReS s Aotel, J'ao3csoA.N-v1e, arI .
TOURS TO ALL POINTS IN FLORIDA CUBA AND MEXICO.


FLORIDA VIEWS,


.A3 1


MAGNIFICENT LINE OF
BOOKS ON FLORIDA, AAZIES. WALLACE & CO'S FIE
CONFECTIONERY, ic.
tblLe Leadi-Lg Pa&pers.


READ THIS TWICE.
PITTTp = K U --TZ,
29 WEST BAY STREET,
H-1 the ureat and Bt AMortment of Ciars, Tobwao and Smokers' Artiel to be
Found in the State, Wholeale and Retal.
MEERSCHAUM, AMBER AND BRIER GOODS A SPECIALTY.
SOLE OWMER OF CELEBRATED WHISKY PLUG TOBACCO.
PRICES ALWAYS THE LOWEST.
Take the ATLANTIC COAST INE.
mooa .s3 eas msTses .1 s4E zUa. %m..gHo Pn=u"
9,1 e- I a m- aN &TUe 5. V s. NAiL mau mte W.
V* ZeTmf Is wo= W*er SAW., Jmhmsvglen, 12.






A" # M IAXOft' I1n t111


~ti~tf~el Hn< wrb 4ri" -o a A-A A^&
sudmg legat vilasi ad posy winter cotta iomes b nn to
Northern residents, who ftad here the perfection of a winter climate
ath i t doltloiu mo ievomble to orsage oultaLe Orhldlt 4
boat of several good ho te and a number of good boarding ho6d
Oombietin Is alo made hre with South Florida Rairoad for Maiimtl,
Klimmee, etc.
LAKE CITY
is the county seat of Columbia county, and one of the prettiest and
most prosperous places in the State. It is almost surrounded by a
series of charming lakelets, which give a most pleaiang effect to the
landscape, and are enough to afford, besides unlimited fishing, very
pleasant sport in the way of sailing and rowing. The city contains about
2,000 people, and its prosperity, as well as that of the county, is increase
ing rapidly. Near ere are located valuable phosphate mines Thit
Sth junction of the new Georgia, Southern & Florida Railroad ust
finished from Maci, Georgia, and in connection with the Florida Cen-
tral & Peninsular, forns the shortest and quickest route from all points
West and Northwest to South Florida. Suwannee Wfite Sulphur
Springs is but a few miles from this station, via rail.
LEESBURG.
is one of the oldest places in this part of the country, and ha quite
the appearance of a oity, and is the most important coamerdal place
in the country, doing a large mercantile business with the region lying
about lakes Harris and Griffin. It is situated on a narrow peninsula
separating.the two lakes named, whose shores are lined for long di-
ances with what were once wild groves of orange trees, but are now
fine, profitable budded groves. Leaving Leesburg the Florida Oeatie
& Peninsular Railway runs for miles on the banks of lake Harris to
Eldorado, whence connection is made with boats for Yalaha, Bloom-
field, Lane Park and other landings. This part of the line is said to
be the most attractive railroad in Florida, the train passing throu
twelve miles of continuous orange groves on the banks of lakes Harr
Griffin and Eunts.
PALATKA.
The thriving and picturesque city of Palatka is located on the St.
Johns River, souvrtyI-ve miles from Jacksonville by boat and ffty-s
miles by rail. The town is situated on an inlet, or cove, and fbtas a'
splendid fishing, boating and bathing ground. Previous to the year
1887, the town was occupied by the Indians. It is the largest town
above Jacksonville ou the river, and boasts of a population of 5,000.
Palatka is the canty seat of Putnam county, and an important rail-
road center and distributing point for lumber and vegetable. Her
telegraph and postal eommunicatiois are excellent. Beautiful resi-
T7 the *f WAMNW, FLORWI WESTERN RAILWAY.
no ftiw^OA q00 -am EL u 6& 4to "ia rul"04 o^o
I W"-Aw xiot "a VxCW





WHITil' GUIOD )5 rLOIWDA


DUVAL PRINTING CO.,
R. S. MARVIN, Mawaqr.

MI3T-iL3 303 P=B11I3T IBnhAPIhDU
OFFICE AND PRESS ROOMS, 64 1-2 W. BAY,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Low Prices and Prompt attention given to all orders. Give us a trial
and be convinced of our desire to please you.
J. S. BEACH,
Florida Cane Manufactory and Curiosity Store.
THE TRADE SUPPLIED WITH *
ORANGE, PALMETTO, COCOANUT, ROYAL PALM AND OTHER CANES.
Live Alliators, from 10 Ioomb to 12 feet long. shipped to all parts of the United States.
Live Allgator Orange Stick, and all Curiosities Bought and the Highest prices paid.
27 Laura Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
O. PIERRE HAVENS,

LEADING PHOTOGRAPHER
OF THE STATE,
67 and 69 West Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.
"W. A.. GFL O V :.R,
TAILOR.
GENTLEMEN'S CLOTHING CLEANED, DYED AND NEATLY REPAIRED
At Reasonable Prioes.
PANTS TO ORDER $4.00. SUITS $18.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED FIRST-CLASS.
tI AIT rFOlrMTH ST aT, Car. New- lan S
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
Take the ATLANTIC COAST LINE.
ha. sO-- f ms an &asTm. Ite Tkh L &. r Bste. W.
". AV (AeO ml A--a 9Na Wr r, reka-vly Was"






A"a UM VAN&W ainOin'.'


donees, commodius churches, good schools, magniacent hotels aad
buaies blocks speak volumes for the enterprise and public sr of
the dtiasns. The estimate i especially benefiial to those Aufibarin from
pula nay complaints. Among the amusenwts of Palatka, bat
ahtig, fishing and huting have a prominent place. Some of
n ornge grove in tBe 8 f located L r ti city, and should
receive a visit from the traveler, who seeks the beauties of our sunny
clime.
CEDAR KEY.
This place is the terminus of the Central Division of the great
F. C & P. system, and is situated uponon of a series of small islands
or "keys" lying close to the main land and surrounded by the deep
waters of the gulf of Meiioo, forming a aspalious and excellent harbor.
Large quantities of fis, oysters and turtle are shipped hence all over
the State, and latterly, by preservation in ice, to the cities of Georgia
sad other interior States. A large oyter ending factory has been
established here.
Steamers ply- from Cedar Keys to all landings on the Suwannee
and Crystal river.
Cedar Keys has several good hotels and is a favorite winter rmaset
TAMPA.
This is the gateway to the Gulf, and the county eat of Hillsboro
county. It is quite a busy little city with a number of fne building.
The principal streets are paved, and a good drive extends several miles
into the suburbs. It is the terminus of the main line of the South
Florida Railroad, and is situated at the head of Hillsboro Bay. Tam-
pa has a fine system of water works, an electric light plant, fle build-
igs, steam street cars, good sidewalks, etc. Steamers leave there every
afternoon for St. Petersburg, the terminus of the Orange Belt Rail
road, and every other morning for points on the Manatee river. The
Tampa Bay Hotel is located on the opposite side of the Hillsboro
river, and, with its silvered domes, gilded crescents, Moorish arches and
tropically decorated grounds, makes a picture as beautiful as a dream,
and will be a living monument to the enterprise of Mr. H. B. Plant,
the owner. A fifteen minutes ride in one of the street ars lands you
in Ybor City, where the big cigar factories are located. Ybor is an
Americanized edition of Cuba, and the seniors, in their white Panama
hats, and the senoritas, with their Spanish mantillas and high-heeled
shoes, together with the unintelligible dishes served in the restaurants,
will make your visit an interesting one. Tampa has numerous hotels,
and you can get accommodations to suit your pocket book.
SANFORD.
This city is beautifully located on the south side of Lake Monroe,
on the St. Johns river, twenty-one miles north of Orlando, the county
Tr the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
Lno abseou fs a" La U2 .to &.n r ".idea, au oln W*
uWee ame a West






MWEeO oUD W4 ftm


cc














ia






to
CDC











"of

co
Mi
















Takh Me ATLANTI COAST LIME.
1iwmwg d &I 2 3.A. 2wftoa L"
VU"WlmmlAX* Wo M okii






-js N~~URO &*Wr~rS


et; ^Whh Jsf twVA o ws e m1,onvilas
TUmpa ydrYet IUro ad 1| fCuter the tSoth
Florwda alr ompaUny. meSin e thefire..w bch destroyed the bu-
neswrt opof the place -i; rapidly being rebuiltt ,ith Jand0 o
bricJ e fbuIa. T ahis plheed@e ead aviintigp r lem.r nm-
rsIa on t t' Johar ri". Thlip am seveprrai sag.Mls
performing daily service between this place and Jlac nville. Soil is
sandy loam. Vegetables and friits of almost all kinds e sippal
from this place.
MONTIOCELO,
seated on A high ridge, surrounded by a splendid farming ooustry-one
of the richet sections of Middle Florida. It is a queer combination,
a many of the older towns are, of old-fshioned, comfortable simplicity
(in habits as well as architecture), and modern improvements and style.
Many of the lately erected dwellings and stores would do credit to a
large city. Like most Middle Florida towns, it is heavily shaded,
chiefly by handsome live-oaks and water-oaks. Flowers abound every-
where through the grounds of the private residences. Excellent hotel,
and boarding houses at reasonable prices. Connection is made here for
Thomasville, Ga. Aucilla, and then Greenville, occupies a beautiful
situation, near the foot of a range of low hills, which rise behind and
beyond it to the southward, while a charming landscape of broad, fertile
valleys surrounds it in every other direction. Giant live oaks are
plentifully grouped about, and in the vicinity are several small lakes.
MAGNOLIA SPRINGS
is one of the loveliest spots in Florida. You will find mammoth oaks
qad sttely magnolias with thier graceful limbe draped in a delicate
mantle of Spanish moss; pretty walks and tinkling fountains, and
bright green lawns sloping gently to the water's edge. The hotel is a
large three-story structure with wide verandahs around it; handsomely
finished and furnished throughout; has an opera house of its own;
lawn tenia courts; stable of horses for riding and driving; a fleet of
pleasure boats; two elegant lawn tenis courts and a fine orchestra.
ALTEMONTE SPRINGS.
This is a beautiful place, in the midst of the health-giving aroma
from the pines, and is extensively patronized by large numbers of East-
ern people. The wide verandahs surrounding the hotel overlook two
clear-water lakes, while flower beds, green lawns, tasty shrubbery and
graceful shade trees assist in the general attractiveness. A long, broad
avenue, lined with shade trees, connects the hotel with the depot, and
hoses ea meet every train. The property is owned by a syndicate of
Boston capitalists, and quite a number of the stockholders have erected
winter residences around the hotel.
Take the SAVA ANH, FLORIDA a WESTERN RAILWY.
Me .hRI& o.w a" see" i t. A" e..* .m nolwa, a" .an af
Usmbw. V4.





vWels amm; 3o wtO jOm


BoNToN & TuPsOi,
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS

MACHINERY AND MILL SUPPLIES,
Engines, Boilers, Saw Mills, Shingle
Mills, Wood Working Machinery,
Sugar, Rice, Cotton and Plan-
ing Machinery.

Irrigating Machinery a Specialty.
Oflee ad Warehouse, laetiery Wharv es, Aieolalag 8 P.
A W. BR Depot
J4.ACLE:80-r7VEI3LBJ, FTLA.
cOR0 EPONDENWZ ISOJrrmD.
A. D. STEVENS. M. E. A. R. MERRILL, J. E. MERRILL,
Pr and Mr. Engineering Dept. Secy. and Mgr. Boiler Dept. Tn. and Mr. Blackmrit Det.


IGM-STD71R ZWWWmx CORW129f,
MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS.
Iron sad Steel Forging a d Boiler Making. Boiler and Blaeckmith Work Done l tIh
Sat Manner and at Short notie.
Boilers, Engines and Machinery of all Kinds Fur-
nished and Set Up.
We ae making a specialty of small 8TBAMBOAT HULLS and MACHINERY.
HULLS of 8TEEL OR WOOD, with or without Machiner Workmen ent to any art of
the State. We keep o had a fill line of Boilermaker' and Blacksmiths' Sppli.
Second-Hand Machinery Bought and Sold.
WRITE FOR ESTIMATES AND PRICES.
Offiee and Shop, 188 and 140 East Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Take the ATLAhTIC COAST LIE.
WI e s" O a" eQns nlei. owei an& X ftdW. 9W..b
8u1 "U mw O n an TnUd T1. hfa I.a. ..
vW. EDAL Anes *na 'm n B Woo Nmr ta, eWtlea Ia.






A"b MUB WAOXWO 30ETS.


WINTER PARK
is a cha ig place and appropriately named. The forest trees have
been left standing, only where it was actually necemary to out them
down for building purposes. Quite a large number of Northern people
have erected elegant winter homes around the chain of lakes to be
found there, and the season is one continual round of pleasure. The
Seminole is one of the handsomest hotels in the State, and is surround-
ed by green lawns, flowers and shrubbery, while a fleet of steamers, sail
and row boats furnish every opportunity for the enjoyment of aquatic
sport. Music is furnished throughout the season by an imported
orchestra. There is a street car line between the hotel and depot.

KISSIMMEE.
This is a quaint little town situated at the head of Lake Tohope-
kaliga, and at one time was a favorite hunting ground with the Sem-
inole Indians, and even now small bands of them occasionally come to
town and do their trading. Lake Tohopekaliga is a beautiful body of
island-dotted water, along the shores of which are thousands of acres
of sugar cane and numerous rice fields, in the midst of which is Ham-
ilton Disston's big sugar mill. Kissimmee is the county seat of Oceola
county, and is the starting point for a number of excursions through
lakes and rivers whose waters are only disturbed by an, occasional
Indian canoe. The Tropical, Kissimmee's resort hotel, is a little gem,
and from its piazzas and towers a delightful view of the lake can be
obtained.
ORANGE PARK
is a charming little village overlooking the St. Johns river, where a
large number of regular winter visitors have erected cottages surround-
ed by small orange groves.& Flowers are grown in profusion, and,
together with the green lawns, make a charming picture. A broad
avenue, lined with stately live-oaks and fragrant magnolias extend
nearly a mile from the depot to the Hotel Marion, which is located on
a high bank overlooking the river, and supplied with every conven-
ience.

LAKELAND.
This is the highest point on the South Florida Railroad, and the
trains on the Pemberton Ferry branch make connection here for Lees-
burg, Ocala, and all points north. The town is surrounded by clear
water lakes, in which will be found an abundance of fish, while the
hunting is almost equally as good. The Tremont Hotel, under the
proprietorship of CoL J. H. A. Bruce, is one of the best hotels in South
Florida and enjoys a large patronage from winter visitors.
Takthe SAhVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
2he fthewk Oui I&h" t ri tme to mt behn flerit a& l r Ptate
Werk, Nest am West







wnrrus' dtft to ft0t6tb'A


HOME MARKET.
SIXTH SEASON.
GLUTB ae the principal source of lo in orange marketing. For the part six ies a
arge portion of eah crop ha been lost in this way. Imperfect distribution Oames sita by
over-spplying a action or a market. This cannot be avoided when shippers or shippeW
seoales distribute the fruit-it cannot ocur when each market derives its own supply fkr
the prodnuing territory, as it is the asse when dealers buy and distribute the fuit. 8als at
home man market value, cash in hand to the grower w thout risk. and leave transportation,
distribution, et., etc., to "the trade" which is equipped or dealing with such questions. The
superiority of Home Market over other plans well as its present practicability has been de-
mo.trated by
FIVE YEARS OF SUCCESS.

THE BEST HOME MARKET
I unqetonably mming aad selling at auction at the natural distributing point (Jackono-
ville). BUYERS CAN AFFORD TO PAY MORE HERE THAN AT THE GROVE.
become all elements of uncertainty are eliminated. The buyer does not have to deal with a
m n of whoe business methods he is ignorant. The fruit is before him, its quality, its ability
to stand up and the style in whchb it is packed are definite quantities. He knows how long it
will take to reach his market, what pries rule there and what buyers from other markets are
paring. There in no uncertainty as to whether labor, packing materials. etc., as there i when
he buys on the tree. He can afford to pay more than when he takes these risks; in fact, the
competition from his own and other markets force him to pay the highest market price if he
gets the fruit.
The grower selling at the Home Market receives eash in hand and deals with an bstit-
tution of whose reliability he is well ivised. and whose operation are at all times easily mb-
Jeeted to scrutiny. Selling at the gtove is to a greter or les extent a credit operation, de-
pendin upon the good faith and correct understanding of a stranger. In Home Market auc-
tion he is always sure of the highest market price, for all the buyers compete for the fruit. In
selling at the grove he can only avail himself of mch byers as come his way, mst take their
ofer r loose a ale. He is at dsadvantae bein not so well informed as they as to market
iaditions and prospects The buyer's only object tin 'ming to him and taking the risk that
buying at the grove implies, being to get a better brain than the open market affords-A
SALE AT THE GROVE 18 USUALLY EQUIVALENT TO A BARGAIN FOR THE
BUYER
OBIRAxO 8OLD BI "HOME MARKET at AUCTION In Jackemorile are
remitted for within twenty-four bonrs after sale.
*HOME MARKET" mesas FULL BRTURNS FOR EVERY BOX HIIPPED,
whether reeled or not, provided the shipper sends bill of lading and elanl-
featton to siae.
QgOTATIONS AND MARKET REPORTS, bised trt-weekly, will be mt to
thoeee apply for ame.
WE CHARGE BUT SIX PER CENT.
Orange and Vegetable Auction Co.,
A. 8. MANN, Preeident and Manager,
J.A.OsSONVLVTI.L FLTA.
Tko the ATLANTIC COAST LmU
Quiek A-r%- X orth U1 3m. Ihugp4&P02Iu"
v. IAVMS, AuPS t, gwlntw AI 7 I, DO prY-iut r144






AND HUEL FAMOUS EMOWM


DzLAND.
At DeLand Junction you change cars for DeLand, the oounty
eat of Voluia. The change is made without any trouble, for youa a
almost step off one train into the 6ther. The ride into DeLand is a
attractive one, and gives the passengers a view of almost the entire
town with its pretty residences and fragrant orange groves. John B.
Stetson, whose well known hats are nomadic monuments to a successful
enterprise, has a winter home in DeLand as beautiful as a dream.
Stetson University, one of the most popular educational institutions in
the South, was endowed by Mr. Stetson. There are three good hotels
and a number of boarding houses in DeLand, andthey are generally
well patronized by winter visitors.

ENTERPRISE
is a small town, located on the east side of Lake Monroe, on the banks
of which are situated the Brock House and cottages. The hunting and
fishing in this vicinity enjoy an excellent reputation, and quite a num-
ber of sportsmen congregate every season. Count Frederick DeBary's
beautiful winter home, with its magnificent grove, lovely grounds and
deer park, are located within a short distance of the town. At Enter-
prise Junction you change cars for

TITUSVILLE,
where close connection is made with the Indian River Steamboat Com-
pany's steamers for Rockledge, Lake Worth and intermediate points.
Although Titusville cannot be called beautiful, her two hotels are gen-
erally filled with guests during the season. The river in front of the
town is generally lined with ducks, and they prove quite an attraction.
A Titusville ordinance prohibits the shooting of them within a certain
limit, and whenever the ducks fse a boat and a gun coming in their
direction they scamper away and-get within the boundaries.

ROCKLEDGE.
This is a beautiful spot on the banks of Indian River, and the place
is just what the name implies-a rock ledge. Palmettoes, flowers, love-
ly green lawns, fountains, numerous orange groves, together with beau-
tiful vines and shrubbery, make a poem out of it. The Indian River
Hotel is a handsome structure, supplied with every convenience and
all the luxuries, and is under the proprietorship of Mr. Andrew Lee.
There are two other hotels for the accommodation of those who want
cheaper rates. Fishing and duck hunting and a number of short ex-
cursions will furnish an. abundance of employment.
Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
2Tho h om. ma Mseet ut to. ua sft o W1 4 ,an an nPe am
WUrth Jiem d ad Wes.






9o IlT'B GUIDE TO FLORIDA

MASON &. CO.,

Wholesale Liquor Dealers,
107, 118sand 116 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Dealers in Fin WVhiskies, Imported and Cali-
lmrnia Wines, etc.

BOTTLED KOODS A SPECIALTY.

Orders by mall Prnmptly attended to. We are an old and
rellablI house. Goods guaranteed.

ZEPIM HARRISON,
CIVIL ENGINEER t SURVEYOR,
Ror m 9, Palmntto Blook,
89 West lsy Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
Notary Pubbc State of Florida at Large.
SPFANIA 8 GRANTS.
There are said to have been certain lands
granted to Floiiida's early settlers or pioneers
generally knowwnas Spanish Grants. We make a
practice otperfec-ting the title to these lands and
obtaining Patents from the United States Gov-
ernment, freeirf the lands from adverse Tax
Titles and possession, watching the timber, etc.
We would like to bamrfrom you in regard to these matters.
Promptness of actiqi may yet save many Thousands if not Millions, of
Acres to the Heirs of the t nt Settlers of Our Fair Florida.
Vtn respectfully,
SrEP H HARRISON,
P. O. Box 65, Jacksonville, Fla.
Take i A ATLANTIC COAST LINE.
The &*i4 aAi ei ideu. K ort&h a Erat. Thrva Pllman
RaWNt-4- Ommea Tsm m. Th we. UI.. I.afl Dt W.
W. DAIk*B, oeoLAgt*, o We m.aByr 5. mkmll ll., lna.






AnD nB FAMOUve nRson.

LAKE WORTH.
By taking the evening boat at Titusville passengers are landed at
Jupiter the next morning, From Jupiter you are given a half hour's
ride by rail to the head of the lake, and thence by steamer to the lower
end. There are a number of hotels around the lake, but it will be a
good idea to engage accommodations in advance. Around Lake Worth
the seenery is luxuriantly tropical---ocoanut and banana groves, pine-
apple farms, etc., are found in profusion, while the hunting and fishing
is excellent.
SEVILLE.
This is a picturesque place in the midst of the pine woods. There
is a good hotel surrounded by green lawns and flower beds.
LONGWOOD.
This is a quaint little village in the flat pine woods, where rest and
quiet are retailed in wholesale quantities. Comfortable hotel accom-
modations can be found there.


DISTANCES ON THE ST. JOHNS RIVER FROM
JACKSONVILLE.


MILE.E
Beaucler's Bluff .............. 12
Orange Park................... 13
Mandarin .......................... 15
Fruit Cove...................... 18
Hibernia.................... .... 23
Remington Park................ 27
Magnolia.......................... 28
Green Cove Springs............ 30
Orange Dale..................... 33
Florence ........................... 40
Picolata ....... ................ 40
Tocoi...... ....................... 49
Federal Point... ................. 8
Orange Mills.................... 63
Oakvilla......................... 65
Palatka............................ 75
San Mateo....................... 79
Edgewater........................ 80
Buffalo Bluff: .............. ... 87
Nashua ................... ........ 95
Welaka.............................100
Beecher...........................101


MILES.
Norwalk ...... ....... .........103
Mount Royal................... 105
Fruitland ...........................106
Fort Gates...................... 107
Pelham Park......... .......111
Georgetown .... ................. 112
Lake George.................. 114
Drayton Island.. ................ 115
Seville ................... .........126
Volusia.................. ........134
Astor..............................134
Manhattan ......... ...............136
Bluffton............................188
St. Francis.................. .....153
Hawkinsville.................... 155
DeLand........................ .160
Beresford..........................165
Blue Spring... ...................170
Sanford .............................195
Mellonville.....................196
Enterprise. ....... ...............200


Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
Th Tlrwe Our..a.. s* Idau to Ad fMr nRMser, sa4d 1u ore i
INerth, Mst "ad Wet.





WHITE'S GUIDIR TI) PLORIDA.


THE FLORIDA REPUBLICAN,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY.
ead $1.50 for One Year' Sbmaription. AdvertiUig at Reoonable
Rates.
P- O. BO: 85-

W. M. LEDWITH, Jr.,
DEALER IN

Fine aily Goceies, Tolacco, Cigr, Et.,
No. 4 Bast Bay Street, (Old Market Square.)
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Cholee Brands of Fleur. wHdquamrters for C*mued Goods.

WM. H. HARWICK,

ATTORNEY AT LAW,
RQOM 2, 24 1-2 EAST BAY ST.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Notary in Offloo.

THE SOUTHERN COURIER,
PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE
SOUTHERN COURIER PUBLISHING COMPANY.
Every Thursday.
1. W. ILBERT, K4itor. I. J. PRESTON, Butlmes lmager.
Teri of Su aription: One year. t.0: six months, 1.00. ,
Adrl la Rates: 1 inoh. one insertion, $1; 1 inoh one month, 3. 2 ina one insertion
SI.Jl one montLh, 3. arl'r advertiMments in proportion to above Local notioC e ot per
I ia eriontlon. F peoils rat~ for standing drvertisements for the year. lalf yea or
ouHMT riven on pplclation.
Take the ATLANTIC COAST LINE.
Th.a. sh mA Quisk aRm* wINMre &ai a.. Trmd Pulaua
iIgu V I as &waU ssi.S The Nt o .s. MVaL- W.
SrAr,O- Agms, n Wms* K as 8t., Jekwalle, ra.






AiD iaB FAMOUS Rm0Of18 .


TABLE OF DISTANCES TO PRINCIPAL FI ORIDA
POINTS BY RAIL.


MILES.
Green Cove 8prin ............ 29
Palatka .......................... 55
Fernandina ... ................. 36
St. Augustine.................. 36
O cala .................. ...........101
Orlando ............... ........222
Tallahassee......................165
Gainesville ...................... 70
Key West ................ .....466
Tampa ......... ....... .....212
DeLand ...... ...................112
Silvfr Springs .................. 100
Cedar Keys ............ ..........127
M adison ........... ..............110
Quincy ..... ............. ......189
Lake City....................... 59
Macclennv ..................... 28
Live Oak .......................... 82

THE F.


MILES.
River Junction ....... .........208
Sanford........ ......... .........125
Enterprise .................. ....122
Ormond ...... ...............106
Bartow .............. ...... .....210
DeFuniak Springs ............290
Pensacola .......................371
Brnonon....... .................. 94
Brooksville.... ...... .............201,
Rockledge ..... .............. 177
Interlachen ............ ... 78
Jasper......................... 89
Kissimmee .......................166
Titusville ........................159
W aldo ........................... 56
Winter Park .................148
Eustis .............................159
Orange Park .................... 14


C. G& P.


THE ONLY TRUE FLORIDA LINE

FOR BUSINESS OR PLEASURE.

THIS IS THE POPULAR LINE.


3 journal of Eommerce,

1 YEAR, $1.00.
100 YEARS, *100.00.

TAKE IT FOREVER.
Take the SAVANNAH, FLORIDA & WESTERN RAILWAY.
nT Th..shk C. sa IS.A n ia. to ra he k forest. aMU ME
Wmsth. est ma" Weomk






WHrrIT'l oUID TO rFLOSID


ST. JOHNS HOTEL,
E. HUDNA.LL. PFroprtetor.
We"t. Worth Street, between Main and Lars. JaeksonviUle, fh.
One of the =eot comfortable and homelike hotels in the souih. Rates $9.w and $L.o per day.
Special rates to cua mentr l men, weekly and permanent guests.
N. H. BANEB. D. WARRINGTON. W. J. PEARSON.
BANES, VWARRINGTON &. PEARSON,
Proprietors of

Enterprise Plaining Mill.

Orders from the City or Country will Receive Prompt
Attention.
TTxRMIM a A.ND 80COLL B.AWIIN G.
Stair Work and Fine Mantles of Hardwood or Pine.
TILIMG AND GRATES FURNISHED ON APPLICATION.
Estimates on Hard Wood Inside Finish Purnished.

West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
FRED B. WHITE,

THE ELK'S CIGAR STORE,
No. 4 BVBRTT BLOOK, JACKSONVILL, FLA.
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND PIPES.
Large Variety Carefully Selected.
TRY OUR FAMOUS BRANDS:
'DEL ICO," "ELP," "HUMBOLT," "HBRNAN OORTBZ," othew eboie
rd. Ilporpeuldr d Domestio Goods. Smoking room a .
Take the A7LANTIC COAST UL
TM. tiu aAd emwwk semte wt sWa4 No. Tafwe Pu nmam
6 Am*, N We" g5mw IS., -a~s 1k




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs