• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 St. Johns River
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: Into tropical Florida : a trip upon the St. Johns River.
Title: Into tropical Florida
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055172/00001
 Material Information
Title: Into tropical Florida a trip upon the St. Johns River
Alternate Title: Tropical Florida
Physical Description: 31 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Clyde Steamship Company -- Passenger Dept
Publisher: Passenger Dept., Clyde Steamship Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1890
 Subjects
Subject: Guidebooks -- Saint Johns River (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Guidebooks -- Saint Johns River Region (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Guidebooks -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Cover title: Tropical Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055172
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002190389
oclc - 25422054
notis - ALD0171

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Advertising
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    St. Johns River
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Advertising
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Back Cover
        Page 32
Full Text

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THE CLYDE STEAMSHIP CO.

ST. JOHNS RIVER SERVICE.
JACKSONVILLE & SANFORD, FLA.,
---AMD--
atermediate Landings on the St Johns River.
Comprising the elegant steamboats,
CITY OF JACKSONVILLE, CPTr. W. A. SHAw.
FRED. DEBARY, CAPT. T. W. LUND, JR.
EVERGLADE, CArT. -
WELAKA, CAPT.-
Sailing from Jacksonville daily, except Saturday. at 3:30 P. M., from
foot of Laura street, making close connection with all railroads at
Palatka, Astor, Blue Springs and Sanford.
Retmurnlug leave Sanford daily, except Sunday, at 9 A. M.
Through tickets and bills of lading at lowest rates to and from all
Interior points in Florida.

JOHN L. HOWARD, Fla. Frt. Agt., J. A. LESLIE, Supt.,
Foot Laura st.. Jacksonville. Foot Laura st.. Jacksonville.
F. M. IRONMONGER, Ja., W. F. OGDEN FAY, Tray. Pass. Agt.,
Fla. Pass. Agt., 88 W. Bay st., Jacksonville. 5 Bowling Green, N. Y.
THOS. B. DICK, Agent, Sanford.
THEO. G. EGER, T. M., 5 Bowling Green, New York.


WI. P. CLYDE & CO., Gen. Agents,
5 Bowling Green, New York. 12 South Wharves, Philadelphia.
2








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TROPICAL


FLORIDA.


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SUED BY THE PASSENGER DEPARTMENT
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CLYDE


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NEW YORK.


THE 80UTI


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ARTISTIC ENR AVIRS AND PRINTEBS,
76 Park Place, New York.


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AMON(O THE PALMETT(YO.


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ST. JOHNS RIVeR.

N the first day of May, in 1562,
Jean Ribaut crossed the St. Johns
bar and named the stream within
in honor of that day "La Riviere
de Mai." This name the Span-
iards changed into San Mateo. It
is now known as the St. Johns. It
takes its rise among the springs
and swamps of southern Florida,
flows north for a distance of more
than 'four hundred miles and, turn-
ing eastward at Jacksonville, emp-
ties into the Atlantic Ocean twenty-
five miles from that city.
Jacksonville, the charming metropolis of Florida, the
Indian name of which was "Wacca Pilatka," is beautifully
situated on the banks of the St. Johns; its present name
was given in honor of General Andrew Jackson, the first
Governor of Florida. The present population is about
thirty thousand, including suburbs. Grand live oaks
adorn park-like thoroughfares on which are located many
fine residences, business houses and splendid hotels.
Jacksonville being the gateway to Florida, all tourists
to the State make this their first objective point. The
tourist takes his departure from Jacksonville on one of
the elegant steamers of Clyde's St. Johns River Line, viz :
CITY OF JACKSONVILLE," Capt. W. A. Shaw,
"FREDERICK DE BABY," Capt. T. W. Lund, Jr.,
"EVERGLADE,"
"WEIAKA,"
leaving from the foot of Laura street daily at 3:30 p. m.,
5













































































PICNIC PARTY.







(Saturdays excepted), for Sanford, one hundred and
ninety-five miles south, stopping at intermediate landings
on the St Johns river, and connecting for all points in
East, South and West Florida and on the Gulf coast.
At Green Cove Springs with Western Ry. of Florida.
At Tocoi with St. Johns Railway.
At Palatka with St Augustine and Palatka Railway.
At with Florida Southern Railway.
At with Georgia Southern and Florida Ry.
At with St Johns and Halifax River Ry.
At Astor with St. Johns & Lake Eustis Div. Fla. So. By.
At Blue Spring with Atlantic and Western Railway.
At Sanford with Orange Belt Railway.
At with South Florida Railroad.
At with Sanford and Lake Eustis Railway.
At with Indian River Div. J., T. & K. W. By.
In all this broad land of ours there is no nobler trip
than a sail up this grand sub-tropical river, the St. Johns.
Its banks are lined with a luxuriant tropical vegetation,
handsome shade trees, orange groves, and here and there
picturesque cities and villages. One passes for miles
along grand forests of cypresses robed in moss or mistle-
toe, or palms towering gracefully far above the surround-
ing palmetto trees whose rich trunks gleam in the sun; of
white and black .ash, magnolia, water oak, poplar and
'plane trees, and where the hummocks rise a few feet
above the water level the sweet bay, olive, cotton tree,
juniper, red cedar, sweet gum and the live oak shoot up
their splendid stems; while among the shrubbery and
inferior growths one may note the azalea, sumach, sensi-
tive plant, agave, poppy, mallow and the nettle.
After rounding Grassy Point off Jacksonville, the
steamer seeks the center of the grand stream whose aver-
age width for seventy-five miles is more than three




















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mills LINE.

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A FLO)RIDA AVENUE.





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miles, widening at Green Cove Springs to five miles.
The following gives a list of the landings, with dis-
tances from Jacksonville; the asterisk (*) indicating
points on the west bank of the river, viz:


MILB.
Arlington, . 2
St. Nicholas . 2
Riverside,* . 3
Black Point,* .. 10
Mulberry Grove,* . 12
Mandarin, . ... 15
Orange Park,* .. 15
Fruit Cove, . 19
Hibernia,* . .. .23
New Switzerland, . 23
Remington Park, ... 25
Magnolia,* . .. .28
Green Cove Springs. .. 30
Orange Dale, . 34
Hogarth's Landing, 38
Pioolata, . .. 44
Toool . 49
Federal Point, ... .58
Orange Mills, ... .63
Cook's Landing, 65
Dancy's Wharf. ... .66
Russell's Point, ... .(;7
Whetstone,* . .. .68
Russell's Landing, . 69
Palatka,* . .. 75
Hart's Orange Giove. 75
Rolleston, . .. 78
San Mateo, . 79
Edgewater . ... .80
Buffalo Bluff,* .. .. .87
Horse Landing,* . 94
Nashua,. . 95
Smith's Landing. .... 96
Welaka, . .. .100
Beeher . ..... 101
Norwalk, . o1


MILER.
Mt. Royal, . ... 105
Fruitlands, . .. .105
Fort Gates,* .. .106
Pelham Park, 112
Racemo, . 112
Georgetown .. ..... 113
Orange Point .... .113
Lake George, . 115
Drayton Island,* . 116
Salt Springs,* .. .119
Benella, . .. .120
Seville, . .. 120
Yellow Bluff,* ..... .121
Spring Garden ... .. .122
Spring Grove, ..... .. 126
Lake View, . 132
Volusia, . ..... 134
Astor, . ... .134
Manhattan,* ... .136
Fort Butler,* .. 138
Orange Bluff, .. 140
Bluffton . 140
St. Francis,* .... 155
Old Town,* ... 156
Crow's Landing, ... 159
Hawklnsvlle,* . 160
Cabbage Bluff . 162
DeLand Landing, . 162
Lake Beresford, . 163
Blue Spring, . 168
Wekiva, . .184
Manuel Landing, . 185
Shell Bank 193
Sanford,* . 193
Mellonville,* . 195
Enterprise, ... 198

















































































- I








The first landing is Mandarin, a small village on the
east bank of the river, and one of the oldest settlements
in the State. Near the landing, almost hidden among
fine old oaks and orange trees, is the home of the cele-
brated authoress of "Uncle Tom's Cabin," Mrs. Harriet
Beecher Stowe. The white wharf and fence of Orange
Park shines pleasantly across the river.
Passing Hibernia, New Switzerland, Remington Park
and Magnolia, we come to Green Cove Springs, a thriving
town, thirty miles from Jacksonville, noted for its mag-
nificent sulphur spring, located in a wooded and pictur-
esque hollow and which gushes forth three thousand
gallons of water per minute, clear and pure as crystal.
As the steamer glides swiftly over the placid water the
scenery, becomes more varied; villages have been built
along the banks of the river and attractive houses can be
seen nestling beneath the outstretched limbs of the mas-
sive oaks, and the sweet notes of the mocking birds fill
the air. After passing Orange Dale, Hogarth's Landing
and Picolata, we come to Tocoi, where connection is made
with St. Augustine by the St. Johns Railway.
The first orange grove to be seen is from the deck of
the steamer as she nears Federal Point, which is an incor-
porated town situated on the east bank, and from there
for one hundred miles the river is almost one connecting
link of groves. Eighteen miles on and the steamer stops
at Palatka, a town of considerable importance and a rail-
road center where connections are made with the Florida
Southern Railway for Gainesville, Ocala, Leesburg and
Tampa; The St. Johns and Halifax River Railroad for
Daytona; Palatka and St. Augustine Railway for St.
Augustine, and with steamboats for Crescent City and the
famous Ocklawaha river.
Leaving Palatka we pass Col. Hart's orange grove,

















































ON THE OCKLAWAHA.


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and a little further up Rolleston. From here up the river
narrows, and trees and foliage grow thicker and more
tropical, while the birds and cranes can be seen in the
tall grasses along the shore, the scenery growing wilder
and more luxuriant as the boat ascends this famous river.
Seated on the deck, an occasional alligator is seen to
swim leisurely across the path of the steamer.
Rounding a sharp bend in the river the steamer passes
San Mateo, Edgewater, Buffalo Bluff, Horse Landing,
Nashua and Smith's Landing, and we come to Welaka,
one hundred miles from Jacksonville. Passing the fol-
lowing small places, Beecher, Norwalk, Mount Royal,
Fruitlands, Fort Gates, Pelham Park, Racemo, George-
town and Orange Point, we reach Drayton Island, the
largest island in the St. Johns river, which contains some
eighteen hundred acres, good soil, and was once the seat
of a powerful tribe of Indians; it is now devoted to the
production of oranges and early vegetables; we are now
in Lake George, which is about twenty miles long and ten
wide, one of the most magnificent sheets of water imagin-
able, having the appearance of an inland sea and noted
for the large orange groves located on its banks. Passing
through the lake the mouth of the river is scarcely dis-
tinguishable on account of its diminished width and the
blending of forest and stream. Passing Volusia, the site
of an ancient Spanish settlement, we reach Astor, where
connection is made with the St. Johns and Lake Eustis
division of Florida Southern Railway.
From Astor to Lake Monroe the river is extremely
narrow, and with her double engines the steamer works
around curves and points so close to the bank that quite
often the passenger has an opportunity of plucking the
flowers from some vine covering the tree top which
brushes the side of the steamer.
15





























































PICKINdI OliANORFS









Passing Manhattan, Fort Butler, Orange Bluff, Bluff-
ton, Hawkinsville, the steamer reaches St. Francis, Old
Town and Crow's Landing, going through the narrowest
portion of the river; the banks are low on each side and
furnish to the eye a view of real tropical scenery. At
Alexander's landing, in Lake Beresford, connection is made
for the town of De Land, about three miles distant.
Leaving Lake Beresford, a five mile run brings us to the
landing of Blue Spring, where connection is made with
the Atlantic and Western Railway for Orange City, Lake
Helen and the Atlantic coast. About 190 miles from
Jacksonville is Lake Monroe, the head of navigation for
the larger boats, a beautiful sheet of water, about twelve
miles long and five wide. The town of Sanford, located
on its shore, is a thriving business place and justly famous
as a winter resort; here connection is made with the
South Florida Railway, Orange Belt Railway, Sanford and
Lake Eustis Railway, and the Indian River division of
the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railway, for the
Indian River, Florida Lake region, Tampa, St. Petersburg
and the Gulf coast.
Across the lake and nearly opposite Sanford is located
the beautiful town of Enterprise, which, has magnificent
orange groves surrounding it; Mr. DeBary's, Mrs. Bodine's,
Mrs. Soiers' and the Brock House groves being among the
finest; here, also, is the celebrated White Sulphur Spring.
This terminates the journey, as there is not sufficient
water for the larger steamers to proceed further up the
river; however, the St. Johns river does not end at Lake
Monroe; it continues on for one hundred and fifty or
more miles to its source at Lake Washington. The tourist
who is fond of hunting or fishing will find no spot more
suited for such sport than this part of Florida, as fish and
game of all descriptions are found here in abundance.
17






































































ALON(i S11U1E.









Returning, the boats leave Sanford at 9 A. M. and
Enterprise at 9:30 A. M., stopping at intermediate land-
ings, giving tourists an opportunity to see such points on
the St. Johns river in daylight going north as were passed
in the night going south; Jacksonville is reached the same
evening, where close connection is made with the elegant
ocean steamers of Clyde's Charleston and New York Line,
leaving Jacksonville every Sunday, Tuesday and Thurs-
day at hours advertised, calling at Charleston on their
way to New York.
Connection is also made at Jacksonville with the Flor-
ida Central and Peninsular Itailroad, and the Savannah,
Florida and Western Railroad for all Western and North-
ern points.
MOONLIGHT ON THE ST. JOHNS.
Luna never looks brighter than when shining on the
rippled waters of this glorious stream. General Grant
spent a day and a moonlight night on tlhe St. Johns river, and
when he had finished his trip turned to a gentlemaln who,
had accompanied him and said, "In all my journey round
the world I have seen nothing to equal this trip on the
St. Johns." There is nothing which can be conceived of
more beautiful than a moonlight trip on the St. Johns; it
leaves an indelible impression upon the mind of the
tourist-the bright moon overhead, the boat gliding upon
a river lined with towering oaks and swaying moss, along
the banks from which the gentle zephyrs of a tropical
clime waft across the waters the sweet perfume of the
orange and magnolia buds, all combine to produce an
effect which for grandeur and impressiveness is simply
unsurpassed. Along the St. Johns is found all the trop-
ical scenery met with in any part of the State, and no
visit to Florida is complete without a trip on the famous
and beautiful St. Johns.









G. H. MUMM & CO.

E-lTA DRY.
Custom House statistics show that of 2,15-1,504 cises of champagne
iruporttel during the past ten years, comprising 21; brands, over
one-fourth was "G. H. Munni's Extra Dry," which during the sanm
period was over 200.000 cases In excess of any other brand.


1j. A. MU IJM,
FRANKFORT-ON-MAIN,
Rhine and Moselle Wines.
I'art i.,r.-r ,f th, .I,,h lnsi.,herg.



JCALVETDC
BORDEAUX,
CLARETS AND BURGUNDIES.
Ifuldrs of large and carefully sel-
ectecel stock of lRe andl White Bor-
deaux and Burgundy Wines in bulk
and cases.





FRED'K de BARY & CO., New York,
Sole Agents in the United States and Canada.





















































--Cow




1"I'~Ill~l ST. JOHNS.S














































































AUNT DINAH.











The Southern National Bank,

OF NEW YORK,


CAPITAL, =


W. W. FLANNAGAN,

JAS. KINCANNON,

J. D. ABRAHAMS,


$1,000,(0 () .


President,


Vice-President,

Cashier.


Late Deputy Comptroller of the Currency.
:0:

Solicits accounts of Banks, Bankers, (orporations and
Individuals.
Special attention given to Soutlhern business.
correspondencece invited.


1IRE ACTORS:
ISAAC ROSENWALD, of E. Rosenwald & Bro., Tobacco Merchants.
IR. J. H. PARKER, Late President New York Cotton Exchange.
W. L. MOODY, of W. L. Moody & Co., ilankers, New York & Galveston.
E. B. BARTLETT, President of the Empire Warehouse Co., Limited.
R. A. C. SMITH, Treas. of the Spanish-American Light & Power Co.
JAMES KINCANNON, Late Nat. Bank Examiner, Tex. Arizona, N. Mex.
ALDEN S. SWAN, of Swan A Finch, Manufacturers of Oils.
W. W. FLANNAGAN, President.






































































A I'ALEM.ETO AVENIlE.


































a..'


OlIAN'E (iltOVE.



























v- rC~'


SUNSET.

























j~;i


A O(;IMINP OF THE RIVER.


tA19











THE MAPES MANURES.


These Three MAPES MANURES, as made for Florida,
have been found by the recent official analysis
issued by the Florida State Bureau of Fer-
tilizers (Prof. N. Robinson, Chemist).
-- TO CONTAIN -
MORE PLANT FOOD THAN OUR PUBLISHED GUARIATEES CALLED FOR.
The official Bulletin, March, 1X90, gave the following:
Phosphoric Acid. Potash. Ammonia
Available. Insoluble, oluble. Total.
Iapes Fruit and Vine lanure, 6.84 3.40 1203 2.91
Percentage Guaranteed, 5 to 7 2 to 4 10 to 12 2 to :1
lapes Orange Tree lannre, 7.85 3.40 392 4.95
Percentage Guaranteed, 6 to 8 2 to 4 3 to 4 4 to 5
lapes Vegetable Manure, 7.60 3.28 5.80 5.94
Precentage Guaranteed, to N 2 to -4 4 to 6 4 to 5
The above analyses shour thI strength of the Mapes Manures, (the number of
ponllils iof Phosphorli Acid, lPotash andl Ammonia c ,ntainer In each hundreds
weight), but fail to bring out what Is of fully equal importane' to the grower, the
Ahilh *p,,IHlty if the plant fqoHl Inlgrodients. Prof. Voelcker, (.nsulting Chemist to
the Ioyal Agricultural Society of England, truly stated "that it male all the
dliffTrenre whether Nltrogen (Alllnlnia) was In such a form as Leather Powder or
as Peruvian (lGino, in which latter bsape it was readily taken up by the soil.
He would rather have, ne perr cent. of Nitrogen in the shape of SBllphate of Ammn-
nia than si.r pe rrnt in the shape of Powdered Leather." Another point was the
niechanlcal condition of the manure, which had a material Iniluence on ius
value: dryness and flmneness of division could not he obtained without expense."
Dlr. J. It. Lawes. of England. In a lecture, stated: "The present method of
analyzing mlanures does not properly recognize these distinctions (forms in
which time Ingredients are present) and the valuations' founded upon these
analyses are altogether false anld erroneous."
We use no, ic.k, Horn, Leather, Marl, or any inferior Ingredients. All the
materials used are of the choricest rpialiti and of high concentration.
One of the most inalsmrtant features, particularly in Orange culture, in con-
nection with Potash, is the swr'.ssity f the absener of IMriiate or Chlonrdes. In the
analyses published -of the Florila Bureau of Fertillizors, all I'tash, in whatever
forn, Is included, uio dilstiwinn being shown between Murlatos and the superior
iand more valuable Sulphates. In these Mapes Manures ial the 1Iitash is present
as high grade Sulphate, and In form free from Muriates (or Chlorides). Again.
the Phspihorie Arid and Amnmnill are supplied In tile choicest and most varied
forms.
SRnd for pamphlet free ,f charge.
J. R. TYSEN & CO., Forwarding Agents.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA

The Mapes Fomula and Peruvian uano Co.,
158 FRONT ST., NEW YORK.







































5', Irw -






















-N.9









MAXFIELD & TODD,
101 Park Place, New York.
PACKING HOUSE-NASHUA. FLA.

AGENTS FOR CLYDE LINE STEAMSHIPS,
At Nashua, Fla.



- BUYERS OF ORANGES AND LEMONS -

We make a specialty in their season of
FANCY FLORIDA LEMONS,
ORANGES,
TANGERINES
AND GRAPE FRUIT.
Growers having a stock of STRICTLY FANCY Lemons or
Oranges will do well to communicate with us. We deal
in all kinds of
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC DRIED AND GREEN FRUITS,
and will fill orders for any responsible parties at lowest
Tnarket prices for good stock.
Great care taken with orders. Correspondence solicited.

REFERENCE-Chatham National Bank, New York.
30











THE CLYDE STEAMSHIP CO.,
NEW YORK, CHARLESTON, S. C., AND
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., SERVICE.
The Only Line Between New York and Jacksonville,
Florida, without change.
UNSURPASSED PASSENGER ACCOMMODATIONS AND CUISINE.
Compriing the following elegant steamers:
ALGONQUIN (new), CAPT. -
IBOQUOIS, Capt. L. W. Pennington,
CHEROKEE, Capt. H. A. Bearse,
SEMINOLE, Capt. S. C. Platt,
YEMASSEE, Capt. Joseph McKee,
DELAWARE, Capt. I. K. hichester.
APPOINTED SAILING DAYS:
From Pier 29 East River, New York, for Charleston
and Jacksonville,
every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 P. M.
From Charleston for Jacksonville,
every Monday, Thursday and Saturday at noon.
From Jacksonville for Charleston and New York,
every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday, in accordance with tide;
for hour of sailing see Jacksonville papers.
From Charleston for New York,
every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, in accordance with tide;
for hour of sailing see Charleston papers.
Through tickets, freight rates and bills of lading at lowest rates,
between all points North and East, and the South and Southwest via
Charleston, and all Florida points via Jacksonville.
JOHN L. HOWARD, Fla. Frt. Agt, J. A. LESLIE, Supt.,
Foot Laura st., Jacksonville. Foot Laura st., Jacksonville.
F. M. IBONMONGEB, JB. W. F. OGDEN FAY, Trav. Pass. Agt.,
Fla. Pass. Agt., 88 West Bay St., Jacksonville. 5 Bowling Green, N.Y.
J. A. FLANDERS, East. Agt., JAB. E. EDGERTON. G. F. & P. A.,
322 Washington st., Boston, Mass. Charleston, S. C.
THEO. G. EGER, T. M., 5 Bowling Green, New York.

WI. P. CLYDE & CO., Gen. Agents,
5 Bowling Green, New York. 12 South Wharves, hiladelphia.













MOONLIGhT ON THE
ST. dOH NS.




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