• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Prologue
 Scene II
 Period, early in 1823
 Dawn
 Second episode
 Third episode: The battle of Natural...
 Epilogue






Title: Historical pageant of Tallahassee
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055162/00001
 Material Information
Title: Historical pageant of Tallahassee
Alternate Title: Legend of the Cherokee rose
Physical Description: 27 p. : ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Long, Reinette Gamble
Publisher: E. Dillon
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla.?
Publication Date: [192-?]
 Subjects
Subject: Tallahassee in literature   ( lcsh )
Indians of North America -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Indians of North America -- Folklore   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Reinette Gamble Long.
General Note: Running title: Legend of the Cherokee rose.
General Note: Autographed by the author.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055162
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001869041
oclc - 02948010
notis - AJU3571

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 1a
        Page 2
        Page 2a
    Prologue
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Scene II
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Period, early in 1823
        Page 12
    Dawn
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Second episode
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Third episode: The battle of Natural Bridge
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Epilogue
        Page 26
        Page 27
Full Text





6*
HISTORICAL

PAGEANT


TALLAHASSEE


BY REInrTE GAMBLE LONG


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HISTORICAL

PAGEANT

of

TALLAHASSEE

By Reinette Gamble Long
Author of "Oola", "Welau." mad otLer Florida d etches


ELWOOD DILLON. PUBLISHER.
























Printed by The Service Print Shop. Tallahasce. Fla.











HISTORICAL

PAGEANT

of

TALLAHASSEE

By Reinette Gamble Long
Author of "Osola". "Wclaunce" and theirr Flo,rda skctchs






ELWOOI) DI)LLON. PUllISHIER.
e- _.o I mI -J -------------------





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COPYRIGHTED BY REINETTE L. HUNT







LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE


Prologue
LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE

Scene: Lodge of the Priest, chief or Mi-co, as he was
called.
(The Mi-co with raised arm offers prayer to the rising
san)
The Mi-co:.
Behold the star of the morning smiles upon bur land
The land of our fathers
Come all the maidens of our village,
Come spirit creatures of the forests,
Spirit creatures of earth and sky,
Come pray to the star of the morning
The forerunner of the dawn
The dawn of our Buskita,
This day of our feast,
The feast of green corn growing.
(Enter youth leading maiden. Maid carries a r"T bush).
(Dryad and Mist Maiden Dance).
(Seminole dances).
Youth:
0 Mi-co! I bring with me a maid!
A maid from the up-country.
She is to me as the dew to the thirsty gram,
As the rain to the parched earth-mother.
Let this day, O Mi-co, this day of our Buskita,
Be a feast to our marriage.
\'







4 LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEEcROSE
The Mi-co:
Rash youth, the sons of our tribe
Wed not the daughters of other'gens.
Youth:
O Mi-co, I cannot return her to her home;
With her father there is no forgiveness.
The Mi-co:
Thou shouldst have considered first.
Youth:
Put some heavy duty upoh me, 0 Mi-co,
That I may win the right to make her my wife.
The Mi-co:
Only one w'o lias done some great deed of bravery,
Only he who has won a name, can expect forgiveness.
Thou art a nameless youth, and yet ask to break one
Of the sacred laws of the Seminoles.
Youth:
What shall I do, 0 Mi-co?
You alone can give her to me.
(To maid) I will not give you up, Rose Maiden!
The Mi-co:
The Sacred fire is out, I feel the gloomy clouds
gather.
Youth:
I will light the sacred fire,
I will call upon the earth spirit,
The Manitou.
I will light the fire with the strength of my love!
The Mi-co:







LEGEND OF THE CHEROKRE ROSE 5
Come forward maid, what have you there ?
Maid:
A rose bush from the home of my father.
The Mi-co:
What name has this rose?
Maid:
It is called the Cherokee.
The Mi-co:
Then you a Cherokee would wed a Seminole?
Maid:
A great love, Oh Chief, outweights a great hatred!
The Mi-co:
Thou hast done thy father a great wrong,
Dost not know that a Seminole cannot wed out of
his gens.
The Seminole is too proud to marry with a Cherokee.
Maid:
The Cherokee too is proud, 0 Mi-co!
Only a great love could make me leave my people.
The Mi-co:
If thou lovest this youth, thou wilt give him up, and
return to thy father.
Youth:
That she shall not do, 0 Mi-co.
Maid:
Perhaps he is right, my love, I have eaued you the
anger of your people.
Youth:
Once more, 0 Mi-co, I beg that you give this maid







LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE


to me.
I beg that you marry us.
The Mi-co:
Begone false youth, false to your people,
False to the graves of your fathers.
Begone, and take with you this maid,
This Cherokee rose maiden,
Build for yourselves a lodge in the forests,
But come not near our village.
Touch not our sacred fire,
I, the Mi-co, will light the Sacred flame,
Though the day and through the darkness I will
Keep it burning.
Go false youth and false maid,
Take with you your Cherokee rose,
Plant it by your lodge,
If it lives and blossoms, it will be to you a sign.
If the Great Spirit can forgive,
I, the Mi-co, will give thee in marrigae
On this day twelve moons.
(The youth turns to the maid and they leave stage on
right.
(Flame dance here). (Mi-co fans as he chants, fire lights,
and the Mi-co places a vessel upon the fire. Lights
go out).
Mi-co:
Flame and smoke, higher, higher
Leap and burn, Oh sacred fire,
Spirit Creatures of the earth,
Fan to life the sacred fire.








LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE 7
SCENE II
(Lodge of the youth and maid one yeau lat).
Youth:
See the rose has taken root and a blossom will soon
open.
Maid:
My love, I am filled with a great fear,
An icy hand .grips my heart.
Strange faces I have seen in these forests,
Leave me not dear one.
Last night I had a dream, a vision,
I dreamed you left me for the wild duck shooting
In our forest lakes,
Oh! I dare not give my vision words.
Youth:
Come, My Chereokee Rose, dream no more dreams,
today we shall go before the Mi-co and take this
blossom.
Today we shall return to my people, and my rose
shall become my wife.
Maid:
Can we not come back to our home on these hills?
We cannot move our rose, it would die.
Youth:
This rose will be as an emblem of our undying love,
It will grow and spread and cover the earth,
It will be the bridal rose to those who truly love.
(Cherokee Rose Dance)
Maid:








S LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE
See who comes! 'Tis the face that I beheld in my
dreams.
(Enter Adventure, Pioneer Spirit, Memory and Vision)
Adventure:
Behold again the enchanted land!
It was I who led the white man
Into these hills. It was I, the Spirit of Adventure,
Who drew Columbus across the Atlantic.
It was I who led Ponce d'Leon,
De Soto-
Pioneer Spirit:
Thou art such a boaster Adventure,
It was I, the old pioneer spirit,
Coming down from the Virginias and
The Carolinas. It was I, Oh people
Of Florida who blazed the way, and now
The fair city of Tallahassee stands
Upon the hills of the great Sun Chief
Of the Seminoles.
Awake sweet Memory, and recall those early dayi.
Memory:
Who calls?
Pioneer:
I, the spirit of the old pioneers;
It has been so long and I have wandered far.
I cannot recall those old days as I would
Tell us, Memory, some of the legends told by
The Indians we found here.
It is one hundred years since these hills were


1







LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE 9
Selected as the Site for Florida's Capital.
(Taken from "Osola" by the author)
Memory:
Long ago when Ponce d'Leon,
Landed on our floral shore,
Sought the spring of youth eternal,
Sought to find it in this region;
Waded through the swamp and cypress
In the lowlands far to southward,
Reached at last the hills to northward,
Which are called the hills of Leon;
Here they found a spring of water
Rippling through the roots and tangles
Of the live oak and magnolia,
Where the yellow jasmine flower,
Blossomed in a golden bower
Here the rose, our Cherokee
With the jasmine running races,
Clambered over every tree,
Bridal flower- of vanished faces.
Here they heard from friendly red-men
Legends of this wondrous region,
Heard the legend of Wakulla,
Saw the spring of deep clear water,
Thought they'd found youth eternal.
In these hills above yon flatwoods,
Mid this upland to the northward,
Lived a young chief Tallahassee,
Of the nation Seminole.







10 LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE
(Pioneer Spirit keeps the fire up, Adventure and Vision
appear interested. Lights grow dim as party of Indians
enter at left of stage, and group around the fire. Right;
Indian maidens and four men)
Chief Tallahassee:
Behold the dawning of a new day!
Draw near my people while I tell
Of the coming to our cornfields,
Settlers from the Carolinas,
Settlers from the old Virginias,
Peace at last twixt red and white men.
Gold they offer for these cornfields,
Half the price unseen they paid us.
Peace and plenty to our people.
Not the Spaniard, not the English,
Those who come seem,more friendly.
Wear your belt of wampum white,
Watch the crescent moon tonight,
Dance our maidens, dance well knowing,
T'is the dance of green corn growing.
(The Passa Brewer enters and places the Black drink
over fire, all this while Memory is speaking) Enters
Chief Tallahassee. Indians seated at fire come forward
and dance the corn dance. As dance finishes, the Passa
Brewer speaks.
Passa Brewer:
Stronger grows the vision, stronger,
Hark! I hear again the white man,
Neither English, neither Spaniard,
And we Seminoles are fearful
Of the coming of this nation;








LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE II
Of their treaties, of their bargains;
Promise* that mean but nothing.
This young nation strong in battle,
Quick to act, quick with vengeance,
All our people dread their coming,
E'en the Spaniard fled before them.
They will till our broad old cornfields.
They will drive us to the marshes,
To the depths of the "Big Cypress,"
Rise my people from your dreaming,
Cast their gold into the camp-fire,
It will melt as will their promise.
Gather close and sit in council,
While I stir and mix the black-drink,
Fire-water they will offer,
Touch it not, nor to them listen
Break the contract you have made them,
To give up these fields and lodges.
(Tallahasee, standing right of stage looking expectantly
ia the distance)
Chief Tallahasse:
Stir thy black drink, old mother,
But cease to sing a song of battle.
Let us try once more the white man;
Six moons gone by we made this bargain,
Let us not make broken promise
Tallahassee will not break his.
Listen to this brave young nation
Who for chief, a General Jackson


Il__l_____bl____U___i







12 LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE
To command the troop of soldiers.
Gen. Jackson will protect us,
I, the great Sun Chief have spoken.
Passa Brewer:
Poor deluded one I tell you,
Might is right with all the white men,
Once they come they always conquer.
Come my children, let us hasten,
To our lodges by the lakeside,
We will leave you to consider,
For the Vision draws still nearer,
But I warn thee, Tallahassee.
(Passa Brewer slowly walks off stage carrying the black
drink, followed by group of Indians Tallahassee is the
last to follow, reluctantly looking back into distance
at right of stage)
PERIOD, EARLY IN 1823.

(Enter settlers from Virginia and Carolina)
First Virginia Gentleman:
Here let us pitch our tents, there has been a camp
and the fire still burns. According to our map
we should be close to the lake named for the
Marquis de Lafayette.
The night draws on, my dear, we will rest here, and
on the morn see the chiefs of the Indian Nation,
and locate in our several divisions as agreed in
the purchase. We are late in reaching our des-
tination. Come boys, unload and tether the


1







LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE 13
horses and cattle in yonder thicket.
Gentleman from Carolina:
See who comes I
(Bter Indian runner)
,What news bring you, my good red brother
s this a welcome from your chieftain?
Indian:
Behold the vision of the pass I
Crimson grew this belt of wampum
As our elders sat in council.
Fear we must the white man's coming,
Says the vision of the pass,
Go back to where you came from
Ne-ha-math-la bids me say it.
All Settlers:
What! Go back! would your chieftain his contract
break?
We have made half payment for these lands.
Indian:
I have spoken.
I (Leaves, lights grow dim, settlers camp for night, light
goes out. Light comes on slowly, settlers still sleeping)
(Enter Tallahassee and some of his tribe)
(Dawn Dance)

Dawn
Chief Tallahassee:
Dawn and still the white man slumbers,
Like a brother he would trust us.








14 LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE
Virginia Gentleman:
(Rising and holding out his hand to chief)
A glorious day, Oh chief! Not a day in which to break
a promise.
Chief Tallahassee:
Tallahassee, the great sun chief, breaks no promise.
What means the white brother by such speaking?
Virginia Gentleman: ,
But last night this belt of redl was sent by Ne-ha-
math-la.
He breaks his contract; he bids us return whence
we came.
Carolina Gentlemen:
Half payment we have made.
(All settlers now awake and exclaim)
We cannot go back.
Carolina Gentlemen:
We are to meet the commissioners from Pensacola,
the Governor too is expected.
Chief Tallahassee:
Listen not to Ne-ha-math-la
Fat chief of the Seminoles;
Too much black drink he has taken,
Fear has made him like a woman.
All these lands upon these hills
As far as arrows ten can fly
Are the lands of my old chief,
He we call Chefixico.
Tallahassee loves his brother,








LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE 15
Buries deep the bloody hatchet
I, the great Sun Chief will lead you
To the lands that you may purchase.
SECOND EPISODE
Mr. Williams:
We, the Capital Commissioners,
Thank you Ne-ha-math-la, for the
Hospitality you have shown us in
Your village, and for pointing
Out these fields.
We come to find a place for the head town of the
white man,
or the Governor's lodge we choose these hills.
Nst-Aa-mas/-la:
I show you the lands, but I give no consent until
Governor Duval comes.
He will come to my village, I wait for him.
Mr. Williams:
Does this mean he refuses?
Dr. Simmons:
The Seminoles have moved farther out, and Nerha-
math-la has no right to these lands here. I fear
he will try to influence his followers, but Gov-
ernor Duval will settle with him.
(To surveyors)
This wide tract of land on these hills, we choose
for the Capital.
The soil is rich, and the climate will permit the







16 LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE
growth of almost anything. There is nothing
better and water is good and plentiful.
First Virginia Gentleman:
(To entlemn entering)
I take you gentlemen to be the Capital Commission-
ers.
Our names; let us introduce ourselves,
/ Messrs. Randal, Chaires, Brown, and my name is
Gamble.
We have only arrived a few days, and have pur-
chased lands
To the east of this from a chief named Tallahassee,
who calls himself, the sun chief.
Dr. Simmons:
Yes, these Seminoles clearly show traces of Aztec
origin, in being sun worshippers. Tallahassee
means "sunny fields.'
Gamble:
Then what more fitting and appropriate a name for
a city built on these sunlit hills, which were the
old fields of these Indians.
Dr. Simmons:
So it shall be, "Tallahassee," the sun city of Florida.
Mr. Williams to Dr. Simmons:
I have heard something of a grant of land to the
east of here?
Dr. Simmons:
A township in the name of Lafayette.
Settlers:







LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE 17
Ah, we passed a party of French settlers on our way,
I think I see them coming.
Virgisia Settler:
Mes Amies, these gentlemen are the Commissioners,
They have surveyors with them, and can direct you
to your lands.
French:
Messieurs, les Commissionaires, we bring map which
shows grant of land in the name of Lafayette.
We beg that you direct us to this tract.
Dr. Simmons:
We extend a warm welcome to any who come in the
name of Lafayette. Your lands lie to the east
from this point. These gentlemen will be your
neighbors.
French Leader:
We are grateful for your help and a safe ending to
a long and tedious journey, we hope to help
build a city and trust we will ever prove good
citizens.
Dr. Simmons:
Come camp with us today and we will make feast
between your people and my people, between the
white settlers and their red brothers.
Pioneer Spirit:
You have made me live over again those old days,
sweet spirit, made me recall
Many scenes half forgotten.
Vision:







18 LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE
I see the proud chief Ne-ha-math-la in his lodge,
inciting the Indians against the white man.
Ne-ha-math-la: Tuscnoogies
Chieftains, braves and Tuscanoogies
Listen to these words of warning!
Message comes from Governor Duval,
With your braves and other chieftains,
Meet me at the St. Marks River-
Promises of better cornfields!
Promises of fish in plenty!
Hark to me my Tuscanoogies- -
They would steal our very hill tops
They would drive us to the river,
Then across the bigger waters,
To the lands beyond the river
I have heard the Passa Brewer.
I have seen the steaming pass.
Heed not what the Governor says.
On the war-path once again
Let their blood flow as the rain.
(As Ne-ha-math-la finishes speaking, Dvual, with one
interpreter enters, walks up to the chief, seizes him and
slings him aside and takes his place on the rostrum,
and speaks to the Seminoles)
Gov. Duval:
Traitor to your given promise,
Coward chieftain of your nation,
Let me talk to these brave people!
Chieftains, braves and Tuscanoogies,
Hear the message that I bring you.







LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE 19
(Reads)
The Great Father at Washington offers
The Seminole Indians a new home in the West.
Indian Chief:
We have sent some of our people to look at the lands
The Great Father at Washington would give to the
Seminoles.
The Great Father does not give warm air of Florida
In this land beyond the river, there is no lightwood.
Our people would die of hunger and cold. Governor
Duval is a Great man, he will understand. We
go with you as far as the St. Marks river, we
will stay in Florida We have spoken.

Adventure to Pioneer Spirit:
You old limb. Gve me that ax and I will make a
fire of you that will illuminate these forests.
Memory:
Adventure you are so restless
Adventure:
Well Memory, tell us another legend or some of the
early history of the town.
8CENE-Ball room at the old Call Mansion
During administration of Gov. Call
Memory to Vision:
Draw near dear Vision and help me to recall that
wonderful ball 6f the roses.
Vision:
Yes, Memory, I can see it all as though it were but
yesterday.







20 LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE
Mrs.Call on the arm of General Butler, and that
handsome young Frenich-manif sthe Count De
Coursey, and there is MissBown, and- ewit
oTtFheday, Missucket, Miss Austin with young
Dem illy
I thinm te count is much taken with Elizabeth
Brown, and they say her father stands a chance
of the governorship.
Here comes Reinette Morris with one of the Gamble
men, from We ikuniee Plantation, and with them
are Prince aniaPiRicess Murat.
Oh, look at Mr. Fisher and those -tw girls. They are
forming for the Minuet.
Pioneer Spirit:
The Prince and I are old pals, I will go over and
talk to him.
Adventure:
These social functions are very tame; take us unto
the Seminole Wars, tell of the close of the war.
Memory: t
Balls and roses anmd a cruel warfare.
(The Passing of the Seminole)
Vision:
Hush, Memory, I can see the spirit of Osceola, and
the brave chieftain Tiger Tail. See they looked \
crushed and broken, but listen to the Passa
Brewer who still leads them in Spirit.
Passa Brewer:
Tiger Tail and Osceola,







LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE 21
Now their warwhoop rises clearly,
Filling all the land with terror.
Seven years of cruel warfare,
Seven years before the ending
Deeper in the shadows hiding
Farther in the swamps abiding
Then with vengeance quickly striking,
Back again deep in the marshes,
Dreaded chieftain, Osceola,
Seven years before 1eperished,
Seven years before they slew him.
Then my people but a remnant,
Sad and crushed and broken hearted,
By the long and cruel hunting.
All my people met together
Gave the white men all their home lands,
Gave the white man all their grave lands,
Gave their pride and then departed.
And so go I the Passa Brewer,
Pouring out the steaming pass,
Leave you to deface our gravelands
Leave as did our once proud people,
To the West across the river
Where is naught but cold and silence
Taking only sad remembrance.
(INTERLUDE)
Vision:
The breeze is from the south, behold who comes!
(Enter Southwind, followed by North, East and West







22 LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE
winds)
Adventure:
Tell us Southwind where you gathered,
All the gold and yellow flowers,
Did you paint the shrubs and grasses,
Do you bring the gentle showers?
Did you steal the brilliant reds
From the dawn far in the East,
Rouse the violets from their beds,
Making for.our eyes a feast ?
Southwind:
I will answer with a legend,
Of the long grey Spanish Moss.
(Legend of the grey moss followed by the moss dance)
Southwind:
Years ago from out the Northland
A wind came blowing to our land,
Saw the beauty of our Southland,
Saw our lovely shrubs and flowers
Felt the warmth of our bright sunshine
Saw his snowflakes melt to showers
Jealous grew this fierce old Northwind
I will come again some day,
I will drive away the Southwind,
With my snow and ice I'll play
Snow and icicles Ill carry
Hang some on to every tree,
This will kill the trees and flowers,
This will chill the gentle showers,


L- -..---







LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE 23
All this shall the Southwind see.
Now the Southwind heard the Northwind
And she feared this jealous king,
So she called unto the heavens
Asked for help from everything.
When the soft grey clouds up high,
Heard the cry from all the land,
Down they came from in the sky,
Clustered over all the trees,
PFilling all the swaying branches
j Hung in long festoons of grey.
,,When the Northwind reached our forests
Saw them draped in soft grey clouds,
Met the Southwind calm and smiling,
Laughing at his snowy shrouds,
Saw there was no place left vacant
In the great old live oak trees,
Where his ice and snow could kill them
So the lakes he tried to freeze.
But the little clouds were happy
In their new home in the trees,
And the Southwind would not blow them
Back to even, if you please.
(Dance of Mosses)
THIRD EPISODE

THE BATTLE OF NATURAL BRIDGE







24 LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE
Memory: ,
How well I can recall the excitement in Tallahassee
when news came that the Federal troops were
marching towards Natural Bridge.
Vision:
I can see the little boys, mere children with their
M guns marching off to meet the enemy.
I recall the message: "General Miller's command
has burned the bridge, the Federal troops are
directing their march towards Natural Bridge,
you are to send what troops you can secure to
stop them at the bridge."
Vision:
And those boys stopped them; boys and red men.
I can see Dick Long dashing up the street, on
horse back, shouting, "We have won the fight,
the Yanks are coming, they did not get across."
They were all young lads then, but I can see
many of them now, old war horses in their uni-
forms of the Confederacy.
(Enter Confederate Veterans)
Adventure;
Come old comrade, these time are getting too
civilized for me.
SI see the glitter of gold in the west, bring along
your ax and I will shoulder pick and shovel.
Farewell sweet spirits, and thank you for an inter-
esting and entertaining evening-education







LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE 25
presses too closely on my heels.
Pioneer Spirit: .
Already you have given me new life.
To the westward, like the red man we go.
Like the pine trees of our forest, we retire with the
approach of civilization.
Farewell sister Spirits.
Memory to Vision:
Two old cronies! We shall miss them, but I can well
understand that they would be bored here.
A Seminary for boys and girls, The West Florida
Seminary.
(Enter students singing:
Students all are we
West of Suwannee
Co-ed are we,
and military.
Vision:
"West Florida Seminary" now, but I see far into the
future, "The Florida State College for Women."
Dimly now but growing stronger,
Vision of an institution-
Seat of learning, source of knowledge,
Crowns a hill top of our city,
Crowns it like a mighty fortress,
Spreading out its stately rampart-',
Towers that rise above the 'tree ,tai --'
Here they come from all directions,
From the farthest southern key,







26 LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE
From the westward, Pensacola,
From the east St. Augustine,
Cap and gown, down to freshmen
From each hamlet town and city,
s,-6nce sought a fountain,
C/4ooking for eternal youth,
These will seek a greater fountain,
Fount of wisdom, knowledge, truth.
EPILOGUE


Memory
Am I awake, or does the vision last?
Awake did I say? Ah np! rTis better thus.
To awake is to remember-yet who but Memory
Can recall those early days, that those who
Have forgotten may again look into the past,
May again see and realize the struggle for white
supremacy?
Here amidst the massive walls of our State College,
Which has grown so wonderfully under its efficient
management,
We "apt ,to forget the hardships, struggles and
d'scouragtints of those early days.
It is left to me, the Spirit of Memory, to cherish the








LEGEND OF THE CHEROKEE ROSE 27
legends of our land.
The sweet spirit of Vision will fade,
But I, Memory will come back again to recall to
those who take too lightly amid the luxuries
and comforts of today,
The struggle of those, who, sustained by the strength
and power of Omnipotent Love and Intelligence,
Have hewn the way before us, making possible our
fair city of Tallahassee
Let our Centennial be our feast day, and celebrated
with song and dance, as did the brave Seminoles
their Buskita.




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