• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
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 Frontispiece
 Table of Contents
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Title: Florida, the farmer's sportsmen's and tourist's paradise
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055134/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida, the farmer's sportsmen's and tourist's paradise
Physical Description: 67p. : illus., map. ; 23cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Farms and Homes Company
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: n.p
Publication Date: c1916]
 Subjects
Subject: Description and travel -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055134
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000136494
oclc - 01748479
notis - AAQ2556

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Copyright
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Main
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
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        Page 12
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Full Text

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FLORIDA


THE FARMER'S
SPORTSMEN'S
AND TOURISTS
PARADISE ET T


COMPLIMENTS OF THE
LORIDA FARMS & HOMES ."
ORANGE SPRINGS
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FLORIDA


THE FARMER'S

SPORTSMEN'S

AND TOURIST'S

PARADE


Coplimem d ohe
Florida Fam r Homes Co., hIc.
ORANGE SPRINGS, FLORDA


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Table of Subjects
A CANDID STATEMENT.
Signed by James R. Murphy, President Florida Farms and Homes, Inc.
To THE MEN AND WOMEN WHO LOOK AHEAD.
Prospectus of booklet.
ONE OF THE BEST FARMING SECTIONS IN FLORIDA.
Palatit-Ocala territory incudint colony lands.
THE MAC OF FLORIDA'S CLIMATE.
Temperaturesc.
FLORIDA GROWING FASTER THAN THE NATION.
Comparatve figures from United States cenus..
FLORIDA DESTED To BE GREATEST AGRICULTURAL
STATE IN UNION.
Authoriteve ement and ftres.
THREE HUNDRED MILUON DOLLARS MORE FOR
FLORIDA FARMERS.
Opportunities pointed out by Goverrment authorities.
FLORIDA SHOULD LEAD THE NATION IN PRODUCTION
OF BEEF CATTLE.
Ouotations from authorities and sttstics.
BEST LANDS IN WORLD FOR RAISING FORAGE CROPS.
Quotations and swestfons as to what crops ae bht,
MANY SIDE CIROP PAY FANCY PRICES.
Qotatin from State Report.
FLORIDA FARM A WINTER PASTIME FOR NORTHERN
FARMERS.
EVERY MONTH PLANTING TIME IN FLORIDA.
Agricultural Department' list of crops to plant each month.
Mn.uoNS SPENT EVERY YEAR TO HELP THE FARMER.
What the National and State Government and railroads are doing to aid
farmers.
Ocw WA- VALLEY THE LAND OF THE TOURIST.
oeiption of Oclawha River and Silver Springs.
THE SPoR AN'S PARADISE.
Orange Springs the centre of Florda's reatst hunting and fishing tr-
ritoy.


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A Candid Statement
HE purpose of this book is to tell the truth about
Florida and the lands of the Florida Farms and
Homes. Inc.. to aet down the facts a they are with-
out any attempt at exaggeration. To those who do not know
the advantages and opportunities of Florida the truth will
read like fiction. But we want to impress upon the reader of
this book that it is not to our interest to deceive any one. Our
holdings are so large and so extensive. 150.000 acres, cover-
ing an rea fifty miles long and from two to twenty miles
broad, that we must do constructive work of the very best
kind for our own salvation.
We want real farmers, or men and women who can be
real farmers, home builders who will fid a climate and a
oil where, with constant application of labor and intelligence,
they can become in les time than in any other part of the
world, the happiest and most independent people on earth.
Nowhere in all the world has nature done so much for
man as here in Florida. Nowhere el are the sunshine and
the rain so benignly distributed throughout the year. Truly
is it the playground of the nation, but more certainly is it the
treasure trove for the industrious man, the home builder who
has the strength of mind and body. and enough of the pioneer
spirit of his ancestors to be the architect of his own fortune.
Too many men overlook the fact that success on the farm.
like success anywhere else is the result of hard wor. patient
waiting, and the conquest of many diiculties especially for
those who have had no experience on the farm.
The present owner of the Florida Farm and Homes.
Inc. acquired the property through foreclosure proceeding.
We had faith in the future of this State when we became
interested as bondholders. Our investigation before acquir-
ing the property outright confirmed us in our conviction that

-. -, *











ood land in Florida i aong the afest of investment with
tde bet pmrpcts of a ia idcreaae in value.
So cofi ed are we in the futu of Florida that we ar
n mh O uy to dispose of th lad. We me e that the con-
structi policy of encoragies b e buders and real farm-
e to sttle anso will bring to w and to our buyers
R atr retur an our invade ets and the good will of
IuMmamd of ou fellow mn.
T bs is sund buMi sem e, the gospel of a square deal.
We won for Me neihbrs nd asmsoieso people thai w
a n co-opera wit.. to lwom afhr feas of dcoe contact in
aie heir problem ard or problems in this lnd so rich
in oppor nifies we can o send td hand of goo fe low&dp
and know thai she prrea re rereei in ren is thai of
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SPresidn Florida Frms and Homes. In.














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To the Men and Women who Look
Ahead
HIS booklet is a prospectus for the man who has
J. enough real indepedmce to have already deter-
mined to own his home where he can be master of
S his own fortune, enough of the spirit of the pioner to dey
himself for a while the luxuries that are the reward of hard
labor and intelligent application, and enough determination
to put aside all the allurements of the most generous climate
in the world that bids you bask in the sunshine of its winters
and seek the cool shade of its welcoming woodlands and
waters in summer.
Florida's climate offers health and happiness to rich and
poor alike, but she offers the golden reward of fortune to
those only who will work for it as industriously here as els
where, the difference being that the conditions of life and the
cost of living are greatly in your favor in Florida.
Come with the expectations of laying the foundations of
your home the first year. Clear a few acres of land. build a
modest cottage, get a cow and pigs and chickens, and a horse,
Sif possible, plant a few trees as a nucleus of a profit-making
orchard and raise enough food products ontthe land to supply
your own needs and those of your stock.
Then you will have become sufficiently acquainted with
the land and your opportunities for the most profitable lines
to follow.


It is a fact that Florida's growth is much greater than that
of the nation as a whole, and it is equally true that this
growth will be much greater in the near future than it has
been in the past.
We are offering you an opportunity to share in the re-
wards of those who, as pioneers, have come before you, and
demonstrated what you can do. Don't come if you expect

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to get rich without effort. The price of scess is not mere
chance. Good common sme, coupled with tires energy
and thrift born of elf-denial, ar needed in Florida just as
much as they are need anywhere ele.
We are setting forth condition md facts as we fid them.
Our own investment of re than half a million dollar in
Florida is a guarantee of or faith in the land. It i not our
intention to allure or deceive any unsuspecting prospective
purchaser to invest his money with the idea of getting rich
quick, or in any way to misrepresent the living conditions or
the character, or the fertility of the lands we are offering
for sale.
Florida land is cheap to-day not beca it is poor, but
because the masses of the United States do not know of its
wonderful fertility and the charm of life here in the summer
as well as in the winter.
As a winter resort Florida is the best advertised state in
the Union but its record for the lowest death rate of all the
southern state' is not based alone on its winter climate, but
the all-year conditions which are'more conducive to. good
health than those in any other state.
Every year sees a greater growth in population, increased
productivity of the land, and greater diversifcation in agi-
culture and industry. The price of land in Florida is till
within the buying power of the greater masses, and this will
be another tremendous factor in the increased wealth of her
citizens. Hundreds of people every week are pouring into
Florida to settle on farms which they have purchased on
easy payments.
The statistics contained in this book are a careful com-
pilation of facts gathered from State and Federal authorities
in the state and national capitals and at the State Experi-
mental Farm at Gainesville. which is only a couple of hours
ride by automobile from much of the Company's lands.
On this land and all around it the facts are being demon


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strated in a manner to atisfy any man or woman who real-
ize that succe is the product of hard labor.
S We are espedally grateful to the Department of Agrial-
ture at Washington the State Aricultural Department, the
State Agricultural College and Experimental Farm. the
Industrial Departments of all the railroad in Florida. to
the press, to the Boaids of Trade of Marion and Putam
counties, to the real estate fraternity, and also to the good
people of the entire state who are doing their part to help all
Newcomer like ourselve to do their hare in building up what
we have grown to appreciate and recognize as the greatest
place in the universe.
FLORIDA FARMS AND HOMES. INC.

















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One of the Best Farming Sections in
Florida
T HE land of the Florida Farm and HomI Inc.. an
in the heart of one of the bet all-around agical-
taral and fruit-growin sectios of Florida. haow
i the Mbdiios of the state a Central Fleoida an
Northeast Florida. Marion County being in t former and
Putmam and Clay counties in the latter.
The Oclawaha Valley railroad starting at Palatha the
county eat of Putnam County and running to Ocala the
county seat.of Masion Coty. a ditace of ifty-four
miles, traveres the Copanys property.
Shirti the earter boundary of the property is th Ocka.
waha River, famous wherever Fldida is bs asu met
weirdly picturesque ad aoit frequsited by ta-ist of al
the Sou nd's dreams. The river is nasigble fbm Palaka
to Silver Sprin, another of the great eaeic aracti of
the date, ad the boats making daily trips btw these
points are crowded during the tourist season.
On the ppoite bk of the Ocklawaha River is a 210.-
000 acre National Forest Rserve where all inds of me
from quail to deer and bear can be had. Nowhere ese i
all the country is in so good as in he Oclawaha and
St. Johu rive and hundreds of lake o and near the Com-
pany's land.
Orange Springs, about equal distance from Palat and
Ocala in the midst of rves of great spreading oak treess.
enjoys the reptatio n Florida of having the bet and mot
healt-giving mineral pings in the tate. Bathing in th
waters of the ulphur spring, which has a large pool sr-
rounded by overhanging trees, gives uch early relief to f-
ferer fro nervo and rheumatic trouble that ay belief
it also possess radio-active properties


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Before railroads diverted traffic in other direction Orange
Springs was the most popular health and pleasure resort in
Florida. With the building of the Ocklawaha Valley rail-
road it is regaining its popularity, which is rapidly becoming
nation-wide. A hunting lodge, a modern hotel and a sani-
tarium are among improvements planned for early com-
pletion.
A study of the map of Florida will show that Orange
Springs, around which the colonies of the Florida Farms and


CUCUMBERS A PROFITABLE CROP, A FIELD IN PUTNAM COUNTY


Homes, Inc., radiate is about equal distance from Jacksonville
and Tampa, the two greatest centres of population in Florida.
and the two greatest local markets for the farmer, paricu-
lady for dairy products, meats and es. The value of this
market may be appreciated when it is estimated by Professor
Rolfs, director of the State Experimental Farm, that ninety-
five per cent of the eggs and eighty-five per cent. of the beef
consumed in Florida are shipped in here from other states.
Jacksonville and the famous winter hotels along the east

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Twelve









coast of Florida get most of their rew antd htt fro the
North.
Palatka. n th St. Johns Riv. 23 mil fo Omrange
Spings and 55 miles front Jackraim,- i aw rwat rail
-and water traMsortati centre a the state ad4 t the msnt
diect line of though travel to and ien ail anMcMs smoh.of
the city. It h been likened to the ck of a, ie tdthogh
which al oumit to ard from the most ppoploa ests alag
the eat and wet cotes and th lake l e ieos am pass. The
eat ad wet divisions of the Atlantic Cat lie. th Sth.
er Railway, two branches of the Floride Eat Cast Ad the
Ocklawaha Valley railroad center at Palata. and the
Clyde lin of immde j d dis~t tad ta t d fo- m
New Yak and Bostm.
Palaaka is aiso hbwCm thp g st d O"O pa "0
in Floeida. Bad are be- r aWdUth the leat V*
in the bisk oda toSt. Afwiw, ZM a and to Jack-
somillp. 55 mie. T i Paqi Beour dA Tndk i a *ry
ir a, faer in dim wm e
A send aahpealt d ta Otmraw nSi wio e bilt.
and owe to Cmcsm GCity in PpACo Cou moe of the
greatest eiau ntreain the stoe a dtind.
Leaving Palaka via the QOkfiwa, Vallre Railroad.
which run about forty-five mild poth aw d soth through
the center of the colo land of the Florida Farms and
Hoes. Inc, the train pass. thls ug Peld. rapidly becom-
ing a qpledid Irish potato rectiom and Kennilworth, the
nearest townite to Palathd laid out by the colonization co-
pay and surrounded by fruit and tbc land. Thi town. a
near Rodman, an old settlement.
Lumber is the principal intat of Rodman. b as dte
forests are being u out land 4i being leaud and pt under
cultivation. Practically all of th acreage surrounding Rod-
man belongs to the Florida Farm Hopens Inc. The-
soil is black, heavy and rich, the kind that delights the heart
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of the real celery and Irish potato grower. Last year for
the firt time Irish potatoes were tried out on an exlsive
plan, and as a conequenc to-day hundreds of acres of land
ae bein cleared and made ready for that most probable
crop. Cabbage, corn, ugar cae and general field crops
are also successfully grown. Th i in the wing well
section. Rodman is twelve miles from Palatha, the county
eat of Putnam County. A plendid new highway is being
graded from Rodman to connect with the hard road leading
to Palatka, and the intention is to continue this road from
Rodman south to the Marion County line at Orange Springs
and then n to Ocala, the county eat of Mario County.
Five mile farther south on the Ocklawaha Valley Rail-
road is Kenwood, one of the last townsites opened for
settlement by the Florida Farm and Homes. Inc. Much
S of the soil is ke that at Rdman. The colonit have tried
Smot all of the vegetable and field and forage crops with
access. Irish potatoes and strawberries, two real money
crop., gow in mot satisfactory way and produce abund-
andy when properly handled. Kenwood i south of te
splendid itrs fruit grove at Interlache and Keuka, and
many of the colonists have set t trees. Flowing wells have
been obtained at from twenty-fre feet on down, and the
water is very good. Settlers are alo. engaging in raisin
ho. and specializing in chickens and egg.
Famous old Orange Springs. jut over the line in Marion
County, comes next, being about midway in the Company's
holdings. Nature performed at her very bet when she gave
that section the beautiful rolling land, the great oaks. mag-
nolias pines and other trees and draped them with that
strange yet beautiful Spanish moss; and in locating me of
the greatest health-giving and health-retoring spring in all
the Southland. The water of the spring i said to have
wonderful medicinal properties and thousand have laved
in it and sone away rejoicing in the benefit obtained. The

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faCous Ocklawaha. that widst of all amei rivers in the
United Stat. r swiftly by within a mile or so of the
town line. TMer a qie a a er of old and new senetd
in Orange Spring and the runm country. for the
Florida Farm and Homm, Ic., have sold a large area,
and stdaers alrea an their farm an being avuemad from
time to time by newaomar. The moil i mixed, both heavy
and liah. and adaptae f fo i t and eral farm prod-
ucts. Orange Springs es of the a st naturally beautiful
pots in all the South.
Bay Lake i about iS ye i somth of Orang Spris,
and topgrapicaly s a cotinuatio of the later section.
This wooderfMy ood elory. the soil being adapted to
the growing of all farm crops, vetables and fruits. One
of the colonists of the Florida Farm and Homes, Inc., has
made a real sucesr of grape culture both te' Niagara ad
Comcord varieties producing i abmdance, ,ae of the vim
having thereon from thirty e to forty-e bmch and
some of the bunches weigie a full poud. There a a
farmer who have lived there for amost half a country, and
t14 alone is a spkldmd tea.im.ial to ethvalue of the Ca-
pamy's holding. This is o of the best watrmdon sections
in the colonies.
Below Bay Lake eight or mine miles is Fort McCoy, an-
other old town being rehabilitate by the Florida Farm and
Homes. Inc. A bi lumber mill has been operating there
for a number of years, taking out the valuable timber a in
all other sectioo of the Company's holding and opening the
rich lands for cuhivation. A nmber of the colonists ecial-
ize in beans-two crops a year--while others cultivate ge-
eral farm crops. Quite a few have mt out citrus fruit trees
and theme are doing eceptioally wel. Bing close to Bay
Lake ome of the ttlers jin with the latter and o in
heavily for watermelons. A large poti of the acreage


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I-SCHOOLHOUSE AT INTERLACHEN 3-SCOOLHOOLHOUSE AT KENWOOD
2-SCHOOLHOUSE AT BURBANK 4-SCHOOLHOUSE AT RODMAN


Sixteen
































































5-SCHOOLHOUSE AT FT. MC COY. 6--CHURCH AT BURBANK.
7--CHURCH AT INTERLACHEN. 8-CHURCH AT RODMAN













Seventeen









here has been disposed of. but the Company still has some
very deairabl tract for either fruit or general farm crops.
Burbank, twelve mile from Ocala, the County seat of
Marion County. i below Fort McCoy about eight miles and
was the firt new town opened for settlement by the land com-
pany. It is in Marion County, conceded to be one of the
bet fruit, truck and general farming counties in Florida.
The colonists have grown some of the finest vegetables ever
exhibited at the Marion County fair, and one season won
more than twenty first prizes, one being the prize in gold


THREE-YEAR CITRUS GROV 0F M. I. L. GRAHAM ON COLONY LAND
AT BURBANK
for Irish potatoes. The soil of Burbank i especially adapted
for potatoes and strawberries. Many of the colonists have
set out orange and grapefruit tiees and the fruit from these
is aid to have a flavor equal to the finest of any grown in
Florida. There are a number of pretty homes, and the con-
tentment of settler is the admiration of the natives who have
resided there for many years. Six miles to the west of Bur-
bank are Anthony and Sparr, the former one of the largest
shipping points of canteloupes and vegetables in that section
of the county.


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S At Hollister, on te Atlantic Cot Lin Railroad twelve.
m. Bile from Palatka. Putuam County the colony lands of
the Florida Farm and Home Inc., are ideal for general
farming fruits and vegetable. Coloim have made spleadid
profits from the cltivation of strawberries, which do neq
tionally well not only there, but on most parts of the Com-
panys holdings. In addition to general farming and truck-
Sing some settlers are ettle are taking an active interest in racing hop
for marketing purposes.
Mannille is three and a quarter miles from Holliser.
The country ner the depot is somewhat higher and the soil
lighter than at the latter place, but grows darker and veraj
rich a it dlope to the outh. Settler produce the very be
vegetables and farm crop, and it is there that the famous
Florida orange and grapefruit grove begin to show with
the district comprising the colony lands of the Florida Farms
and Homes Inc. The Murray cdtr fruit grove right in
the sett ent. i conceded to be one of the prettiest and beat
in the state.
Interlache, about a mile and a half from Mamville is
one of.the prettiest little town in Florida, mde so by the
quaintness of some of the structures, the beauty of the nat-
ral folia and the wonderfully fine dear water lake, the
latter testing with fih. It is an old town, and artwhle
oe of the largest orange shipping points in the tate. There
are a number of gross, the mot important being the Fraucis.
There is a large citrus fruit cleaning and packing house, and
the products of the Intelachen grove are known in the
markets of the North as being of the very beet found any-
where. Indeed the citrus fruts of Putnam. Marin and
adjoining counties, according to citrs fruit me. have the
best flavor of any of the Florida fruits.
A mile and a half from Interlachenis Keuka, a contiu-
ation of the citrus fruit section. This place is not so larg
as Interlachen but its citizens are every bit as progressmie.









Nineteen


















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The Florida Farms and Homes, Inc., have sold quite a few
tracts of land near there and still have some very desirable
allotments left for those who with to specialize in fruit-
growing.
Edgar, where are located the big kaolin mines (kaolin is
used in the manufacture of pottery), is distant from Keuka
about iwo and a half miles. The country roundabout is
very like that at Keuka, but more attention is given to the
mining and shipping of kaolin than to the growing of citrus
fruits or vegetables, although in the outlying sections there is
some general farming. Johnston is about two miles from
Edgar and quite a little citrus fruit is grown there also.
Carleton, four miles west of Edgar, was laid out as a
winter colony of Union Veterans. It is in the citrus section
and borders a vast expanse of muck land known as Levy's
prairie. Many railroad men from the West are now locat-
ing there.
Carraway, Putnam County, on the Georgia Southern and
Florida Railroad, is the latest colonization project of the
Florida Farms and Homes, Inc. The soil is mostly a dark
gray, sandy loam, especially adapted to the cultivation of
strawberries and Irish potatoes, but all kinds of vegetable
and farm crops grow to perfection. The tract comprises
8,020 acres.


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Florida Destined To Be the Greatest
Agricultural State in the Union
HE great value of Florida land is that it never tires
of working for you if you work with it Professor
P. H. Rolfs, director of the State Experiment Farm
at Gainesville, says: "The more you crop the land the les
the sun bakes it and the less the rain washes away its fer-
tility. The longer you work it with intelligent rotation of
crops the more fertile and productive it becomes. Keep it
busy all the year. Just as soon as oe crop is harvested
sow another. Leave it idle and you lose 80% of its fertility
through exposure to the rain and the sun.
"Florida must ake up general farming to fulfill her des-
tiny as the greatest agricultural state in the Union. Marion
and Putnam counties are among those where conditions are
best suited for this branch of agriculture.
"Ninety-five per cent of the egg and eighty-fie per
cent of the beef consumed in Florida are shaped in here
from other states. Railroad freight rates which munt be
paid by the shipper to reach this market constitute a tariff
in favor of the local farmer that cannot be removed.
"One advantage for the new settler in adopting a plan
of general farming is that he can start operations with a
smaller amount of capital and does not have his ideals shot
topieces.
"Put your colonist first to make a living. See that he
gets a cow. horse, pigs and chickens. These will add an
attraction and a value to his home which will give him stabil-
ity of purpose and greater incentive to produce the necessi-
ties of life for his family and its dependents. Then he has
the nucleus for a farm. He has no time to get lonely. The
secret of success in farming is in the foundations you lay for
your home life and sustenance."






'^\ *** r' J ~ ^ __ f\ o ^A










So much has been said and written about the quick for-
tunes that are to be made in truck farming in Florida that it
is well to warn the beginner that truck farming has so many
elements of speculation in it that it has been frequently re-
ferred to by Professor Rolfs as the "Poker Game of Agri-
culture."
Let the beginner keep in mind the advice of another fa-
mous pioneer, Davy Crockett, who said: "Be sure you're
right and then go ahead."
There is no denying the fact that almost unheard of
profits can be made on an acre of Florida land. It is
pregnant with wealth for the man who knows his business
from the A, B, C of farming to the X, Y, Z of marketing.
Professor C. K. McQuarrie, state demonstration agent
of the College of Agriculture, an authority on truck farm-
ing, in an article on this subject, says:
"We know, from close observation and a good many
years of practical experience, that vegetable growing in
Florida is, to a very large extent, a type of gambling of the
most intense kind. However, there is this to be said in con-
nection with vegetable-growing in the state: that an analysis
of the business, as a whole, gives favorable results.
"The biennial report of the Commissioner of Agriculture
for the years 1913 and 1914 shows that the value of the
vegetable crops for the State of Florida was $13,185,904,
as compared with $11,408,223 for the citrus crop, while
the total value of all the field crops of the State was almost
$19,000,000.
"An analysis of this report is interesting. It shows that
the earning value of the land in vegetables was, for those
two years, $141.15 for every acre, whereas for the ordinary
field crops the average earning value per acre was $17.45.
"In following this analysis a little farther, we find from
this report that the increase in acreage in vegetables for 1913


Twenty-two


























































COLONY LANDS WELL ADAPTED FOR STOCK AND CATTLE RAISING













Twtmty-three













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and 1914 was thirty per cent. whereas the increase in value .
was sixty per cent. This shows conclusively that the vege-
table growers are beginning to get better posted on the best
methods of producing vegetables, as well as to market them
to better advantage;
"There are certain qualifications necessary for a success-
ful vegetable grower. Quite a number of newcomers into
the state have an idea that it is an easy matter to take up a
piece of land and begin vegetable growing, for the reason
as already stated, that the dollar comes back quicker from
vegetables than from any other crop.
"They overlook the fact that whatever line of business a
man enters, there is a certain educational period through
which he must pass before he can become an expert. This
holds true of vegetable production just as much as it holds
true of ship-building, steel-making, or any of the other in-
dustries in which any man may engage."
James J. Hill, the builder of railroads and one of the
biggest factors in the agricultural development of the West.
says:
"By intensive cultivation with fruits and vegetables, one
acre can be made to support a family. Five.acres is a com-
petence, and ten acres the limit-if devoted to fruit and
vegetable farmin---that one family can take care of
properly."
Nowhere in all the world can intensive farming be more
profitably conducted than here in Florida, because you can
raise three and four crops a year on the same acre, and by
studying the markets can have some product to sell every
season of the year, with little or no competition from other
states.
Supporting Mr. Hill's view of the small farm, Professor
George K. Holmes, of the United States Department of


-'>T


7 -T. .nf^ v wa: wja~aiiw 's


'1 ,











Agriculture, in n article on the "Movement from City and
Town to Farms." in the Year-Book of 1914. issued by the
Deparnent, ays:
"A large proportion of the farmers from the city have
cce etabl d themselves, although more generally
in small wa tan in large one.
"Succ in the farming venture depended largely on the
knowledge previously acquired as well as on the experience
that developed in the undertaking."


a-,i


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Twtniy-five


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7









The Lure of the Citrus Grove
L IKE the gold fields of California the orange and the
grapefruit have been the came of thousands of
fortune hunters migrating to Florida. Those who
came expecting to get something for nothing have been dis-
appointed, for it requires patience and constant work and
vigilance to grow a citrus grove. The yield of fruit depends
upon the vigor and healthfulness of the trees. You cannot
plant your orchard and expect it to take care of itself. It is
not worth while going into the buness unless you are de-
termined to raise the best of fruit. It is quality that tells in
S marketing, and it is quality that pays the profits. But to get
S quality requires skill, good judgment, experience, incesant
care, cultiva on, watchfulness art and patience.
Citrus grove cultivation, however, has the facination of
the gold fiel and the experienced will not be dismayed.
The growers in Florida have received in the last few years
an annual income of ten million dollars from a yield of about
8,000,000 bxes.
"The Biennial Report of the State Department of Agri-
culture for 1913-14 credit Putnam County ith an income
of $462,624 from grapefruit and oranges, and Marion
County with $285.300, a comiind value of $747.924.
The total vamue of the 9 of thee two crops for the state
w was $7.517.462. It will be seen from this that these two
counties in which are located the land of the Florida Farms
S. and Homes, Inc., produce about one-tenth of the oranges
and grapefruit of the state. These facts alone re Scient
proof of the adaptability of the Company lands for citrus
culture.
Transportation and marketing are among the impotaat
factors for success in citrus growing. Alone the for ril-
roads that traverse our lands, and the Ocklawaha River


'. -& '





^ "T1--e--- n^Ty-










with its boat lines, the ctru sower can fid ideal locatio
for his gre with very short haul to the station.
The Florida Citru Exch e is solving the problem of
marketing for the grower and has proved a money-maker
for its members. The Echne is a cooperative organiza-
bion composed of. and operated by, the rower of citrw
fruit.
Another organization which i doing much to aid the
farmer and the producer of marketable foodstuff is the
Florida Marketing andDistibuting Bureau.




















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"Not only are the cotton states large importers of grains
and hay, but also of meats, amounting in value roughly to
about $100,000,000, exclusive of Texas and Oklahoma."
Add to this the amount of poultry, eggs and dairy prod-
ucts that the South imports from the North and West which
Florida can produce and ship more cheaply than many other
states, and you can realize that Florida has a veritable gold
mine in the markets which are open to her farmers, with all
the advantages of climate, productivity of soil and lower
freight rates in their favor.



'- r, ,V
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Twenty-eigh


Three Hundred Million Dollars More
Waiting for Florida Farmers

ARMERS' Bulletin No. 645, issued by the U. S.
Department of Agriculture, December, 1914, in an
article on agricultural products shipped into the cot-
ton states, says:
"The total value of these four products (wheat, corn,
oats and hay) brought into these (southern) states amounts
to nearly $200,000,000 yearly, representing about 22 per
cent. of the total yearly consumption of these products in
the cotton states.


r'
MAKING HAY ON J. T. WHITTINGTON'S FARM ON COLONY LAND
AT HOLLISTER











Florida ha the advantage over California in its nearnes
to the large cities and markets of the East and Middle West
It is only about 36 to 48 ho distant from New York or
Chicago, while California is a fve or ix day railway jour-
ney from the East across the continent. Florida can be
reached in less time from the East by a delightful ocean trip
than it takes to go to California by limited trains.
The following figures show the ditances in miles from the
country's principal cities to Orange Springs, on the Florida
Farm and Homes Ic., property, a central point in Florida.,
as compared to LoA Angeles, Cal.
Advanae In
Mil to Mi-n to
Omng Sp.rin Lo Aniw Orane Soring
Boton . 1.290 3,235 1,945
New York 1,060 3.145 2.085
Philadelphia .969 3,054 2,085
Baltimore 872 3,014 2,142
Wahington 832 2.974 2.142
Richmond 702 2.813 2,111
Cincinnati 877 2,421 1.544
Cleveland ... 1121 2.574 1.453
Detroit 1. ,138 2.511 1.373
Indianapoli. 964 2.295 1.331
Pittburgh .. 1.134 2,701 1,567
Chicago 1.161 2,260 1.099
Kansas City. 1.326 1.807 481
Omaha 1.440 1,906 466
St. Paul. 1.555 2.308 753

Fast fruit trains operated from Palata. Florida, to points
north and west make the run to the big centres of con=rmp-
tion in the following time, in hours, which gives special ad-
vantages to the Florida Farms and Homes, Inc., settles. as
Palatka has rail and water competition.



.- .FN

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Twenty-nine








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Atlanta
Baltimore
Boton .
Bufalo
Chattanoosa
Columbus
Chicago .
Cleveland
Dayton .
Detroit.


Knoxville .
Kansas City
Memphis .
Milwaukee.
Minneapolis
New York.
Omaha ..
Pittsburgh .
Toronto


In the matter of the Florida market the colony lands are
most advantageously located. They are just midway be-
tween the two greatest local centres of population, Jackso-
ville and Tampa. which are large importer and conumer
of all the products which can be raised on-the Company's
lands, as well as of meat and dairy products, for the pro-
duction of which this section is especially adapted.


DIVERSIFIED FARMING ON COLONY LANDS.-STRAWBERRIES ON
RICHARD VBLMU AN'S AND CORN ON J. T. WHIT-
Sr TINGTON'S FARMS AT HOLLISTE.--SUGAR CANE AND
tGERMAN MILLET ON OVEREND FARM AT BURBANK










The Magic of Florida's Climate
LLORIDA'S climate is me of CGods great gifts to
the tate of r eatest opporatmnim lA mm, mre
valuable in he crcible of Natre than all the old
thatthe alchemists ever dreamed of, is the secret of the magic
of Florida' climate.
In the winter it mellows the olden fruit in the dtnr
groves and every mouth of the year fters the tender vegeta-
tion that flls Florida's concopia with all the delicacies of
e vegetable world to pour into the lap of the nation when
the mow-covered field of the north farmers wait in
barren slide for the sprinime thaw with al its discom-
forts and inconvnience.
In no other tateare the mesuhine and the rain so admir-
ably proportoned for man's health happine and prosperity.
More and more the tourist and the hommneearr ar learning
that Florida i the nation's greet playgro ad and mi-
tarium for those in arch of creation and health, and the
greatest treasure hose for the man who earnesly seeks to
better himsef and will apply the e intelligence and
persistency that know not failure.
The abene of extreme of heat or cold are conducive to
health and longevity. On this point Dr. J. V. E. Westfall
third Vice-Preident of the Eqitable Life Asurance So-
ciety of New York, in an address at Jacksonville. Fla.,
October 29, 1915, to the agents' convention called attention
to the fact that Florida has the lowest mortality rate of any
southern state.
The Twentiet Century Farmer says: "We tell stories
and laugh at the ignorance of the Easterner concerning the
West, but the average Westerner's ignorance concernin the
South is more dense. The northern residents of Florida are
loud in their praise of the year-round climate and there is a


_s__******- *_**-**--*IH-HI^J


Iz p-fi77


Thirty-oxe











saying that one who lives in Florida never wants to live
elsewhere."
During the summer fully seventy-five per cent. of the pre-
cipitation occurs in the form of showers in the afternoon.
These rarely continue into night, at the beginning of which
clouds disappear and a nocturnal temperature of 68 to 70
degrees follows.


MR. AND MRS. JAMES R. MURPHY, SON AND PARTY, ENJOYING
THE FRUITS OF A HUNT AT ORANGE SPRINGS ON THE
OCKLAWAHA, DECEMBER EIGHTH, OUT IN THE OPEN


Cooling breezes constantly blowing across Florida from
Ocean to Gulf make even the July and August days more
pleasant than they are in the northern and central states
at that time.
Here the climate is more delightful than thatof Southern
Italy or California, as is shown by the following table, which


Thirty-two











was taken from the U. S. Weather Bureau reports for the
last fifteen years:

Average Average Average Average
Winter Spring Summer Autumn
Temp. Temp. Temp. Temp.
Southern Italy .47.3 57.3 73.7 61.9
Los Angeles. Cal.. 52.0 60.0 70.0 65.0
Sacramento, Cal. 48.0 60.0 75.0 61.0
Florida 64.0 72.0 81.0 75.0

Average Average Average Average
Yearly Highest Lowest Clear
Temp. Temp. Temp. Days
Southern Italy 60 85 20 220
Los Angeles, Cal.. 62 109 28 250
Sacramento, Cal. 61 100 29 238
Florida 73 88 54 279


Thirty-three











TYPCAwON~I~rS


I-COTTAGE AT ORANGE SPRINGS. 2-HOME OF G. C. SMITH,
FOUNDER OF CARLETON. 3-BUNGALOW AT BURBANK.
4-COTTAGE COLONY AT FT. MC COY


Thirty-four









HOMES ON THE LANDS
ANDHOMEM&


5-SHAFER FARM AT KENWOOD. 6-A COLONIST'S HOME AT HOL-
LISTER. 7-FLOWING WELL AT KENWOOD. 8-HOME
OF SUPERINTENDENT OF RODMAN FARMS


Thirty-five










Florida Growing Faster Than the
Nation
LORIDA, already outstripping the nation as a whole
Si the ratio of its growth as compared with past
F years. is recognized to-day by all students of prog-
ress as being upon the eve of a great movement of popula-
tion to its vacant lands and a development in agriculture,
general trade and industry that will place it among the lead-
ers. Especially is this true of stock raising, dairying and
general farming.
It has been made famous by its citrus groves and truck
farms, and it will be still more famous for diversified agri-

Barton W. Currie. sent by the Counry Gentleman to in-
vestigate conditions in the South, writing in the issue of Feb-
ruary 14. 1914, said:
"A good many millions of us, who do not know the
SSouu and who have calmly blundered ahead in our mis-
Stak-ew of the South and its resources and progress, are
waking to a realization of our folly.
"During the past decade the South has outstripped other
sections of the United States in the increase of educational
facilities, and during the next decade the advance in this
direction will be in greater proportion.
"The low cost of land and the lower cost of living in the
South will swing the tide of native immigration into the
southern states."
S Florida's population as given by the United States 1910
census is 752,619, an increase since the census of 1900 of
224.077, or 42.4 per cent. as against only 21 per cent. for
the United States as a whole.
Of Florida's entire population 219.080 live in cities and
S incorporated towns of 2,500 inhabitants or more, while










533.539, or 70.9 per cent, lived in rural territory. For
confirmation of these and other facts about Florida's rapid
growth see the United States Cesus.
From this it must be concluded that the principal industry
and the most profitable for the people generally is farming
cattle raising and dairying.
The general character of Florida agriculture is indicated
by the fact that nearly one-fourth of the total value of crops
in 1909 was contributed by potatoes and other vegetables.
about one-fifth by fruits and nuts, about one-ixth by cereals,
and about oneeventh by cotton. The remainder, rqpre-
senting 24 per cent. of the total, consisted mostly of grains
and seeds (other dan cereals), forest products and sugar
crops.
The total wealth of the state in the form of farm property
in 1910 was $143.183.000. Of this more than four-ffths
i in the form of land and buildings valued at $118.146,000
as against $40,799.838 in 1900. an increase of 189.6 per
cent. in t years.
The value of Florida's twelve leading diversified crops
common to most of the country, not including citrus fruits,
increased from $6.667.000 in 1899 to $15.104.000 in
1910. a ain of 126 per cent. againstonly 81 per cent. for
the whole country.
In the ten yea 1900 to 1910 the increase in the value
of farm lands in the United States was 118 per cent., and
in Florida 203 per cent The value of farm buildings in
the United States in that time increased 77 per cent, and
in Florida 144 per cent.
The value of farm implements and machinery in the coun-
try increased 68 per cent. between 1900 and 1909, and in
Florida 126 per cent.
In 1900 the resources of the national banks of the state
amounted to $9.642,703; these resources now amount to






-~t ut-sve


I











about $60,000,000. The individual deposits of the na-
tional banks rose from $6,435,000 in 1900 to $32,035,-
000 in the latter part of 1912, and have been steadily in-
creasing since, while the deposits in the other banking insti-


TWO PROSPEROUS COUNTY SEATS.-BUSINESS STREETS IN
OCALA (ABOVE), PALATKA (BELOW)

tutions rose from $3,714.000 in 1900 to $28,683.000 in
1912.
In 1890 there were 2,400 miles of railroad in this state.


Thirty-eight










In the nt ten years the increase was to 3.256 miles, or a
in of only 760 mile. But in the last 12 year there ha
been a gain of over 2,000 miles and this gain is indicative
of the general progress and prosperity of the mtate.
Although Florida is not primarily a manufacturing state
its manufactures have shown a steady growth.
In 1909 there were 2,159 establishments giving employ-
ment to an average of 57.473 wage earners, or 7.6 per cent.
of the total population. During this period the gross value
of products per capital of the entire population of the state
increased from $8 to $97.
The value of the factory products of Florida rose from
$36.800,000 in 1900 to $90,000.000 in 1912; the value
of farm products from $18,300,000 to $43.600,000; the
value of forest products from $18,000,000 to $34.000.-
000: the value of the mineral output from $2,300.000 to
$11.000,000.

























\V4


--= m_










Florida Should Lead the Nation in
Production of Beef Cattle
W LORIDA is more of a live stock state than many sup-
Spose. Following is the estimated number on farms
Sand the value of live animals in Florida as given by
the U. S. Department of Agriculture January 1, 1915:
Horses 57.000 valued at $6.897.000
Mules 28,000 valued at 4.564000
Milch cows .. 133.000 valued at 5,652,000
Cows 735,000 valued at 10,658.000
Cattle (other than milch cows)
Sheep 119,000 valued at 262,000
Swine 949,000 valued at 5,694,000
Barton W. Currie, sent by the Couty Gentleman to in-
vestigate conditions in the South, writing in the isue of Feb
ruary 14, 1914, said:
"There is every fundamental reason for the South to lead
the nation in the production of beef cattle, pork and mut-
ton."
David F. Houston, the present Secretary of Agriculture,
says: "The increase in meat production of the country
Must come from the South."
H. S. Elliott. Chief Clerk, Department of Agriculture,
in the Florida Quarterly Bulletin, October 1, 1914, says:
"Among the principal general reasons why Florida is
adapted to successful live stock growing of all kinds, almost
Without limit, is its unlimited and unfailing water supply,
which is absolutely essential to successful stock raising, as
Share its green pastures. Another equally important condition
is the short period necessary for feeding and sheltering of
>-s tock as compared with other sections of the country. An-
other of equal, if not of greater importance, is the adapt-
ability and capacity of the soils of this state to the production
of nearly all kinds of grains and forage crops at as mall, if






S. .


Forty











not less, cost than any other section of the country. In all
of this the equable climate of the state has much to do, of
course, but it is because of these advantages and conditions
that Florida should, and can, compete with any and excel
'most of the states as a live stock producing country."
, S"A considerable proportion of the future meat supply of
S the country must come from the South, and this situation is


A FLORIDA DAIRY HERD NEAR PALATKA


becoming better understood and more appreciated every day.
The lands are especially adapted to the production of cattle
and there is no reason why not only the beef supply, but the
supply of pork for American markets, should not be pro-
duced on soils of the South."
SDr. Seaman A. Knapp, who was Mr. Wilson's great
assistant, not a Southern but an Iowa man, after pointing out
the great advantages of the South as a corn and stock coun-
try, says: "It is unnecessary to dilate upon these facts. The


Forty-one










































Cc- is?



'p.'


South has not been understood. Neither its soil nor its
climate has been appreciated. Lands are far below their
value at the present time, and there is no better place in the
country for young, thrifty and vigorous men to start in agri-
culture."
Mr. Davenport, general manager of the ournal-Stoc4-
man, writing to his paper from Central Florida, says: "In
recent letters I have had considerable to say regarding the
production of cattle in Florida, but in my own opinion, the
opportunity for profitable hog-raising is still greater. It re-
quires less land and less money to get a start. For a man
with sufficient capital, a combination of both hogs and cattle
would be best"
The United States imported from Argentina, South
America, from October, 1913, to September, 1914, 154,-
000,000 pounds of beef and meat products, of which 140.-
000,000 pounds were refrigerated beef.
The Year-Book for 1913, Department of Agriculture,
says the census of 1910 shows a "decrease in ten years of
9,385.343 head, or 18.5 per cent. of all cattle other than
milch cows in the United States."
Discussing the demand and supply of beef as one of
"world wide importance," in view of this decrease in produc-
tion as compared to an increase of 20 per cent in population,
the Year-Book says of the South:
"Possibilities of the South: There is one section that can
produce more cattle and produce them more cheaply than
any other section in the whole country, for the lands are still
cheap, the grazing is good, the pasture season is long, feeds
can be produced at a minimum cost, an inexpensive shelter
only is required. That section of the country is the South."
And of all the South the State of Florida possesses these
advantages to a greater extent than any other state, because
no shelter is needed for range cattle in the greater part of the
state and they can graze throughout the year.


.- ."..T & 6


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The Atlantic Coast Line R. R in its booklet on South
and Central Florida. says:
"With tick eradication, which is imminent and bound to
come, and even in advance of it, improved cattle is the nat
or possibly the first step in the production of prime beef. To
say that to raise good beef and get best prices from our scrub
or "Florida knot-head" cattle is out of the question, would
be only the simple truth. The proof is easy: Last year stock
men bragged about getting $28.00 to $30.00 for four-year-
old steer, while Hon. C. A. Carson, of Kisimmee, sold a
half-breed Polled Angus two-year-old steer right off the
range for $55.50, while scrub two-year-olds averaged him
less than $20.00 to the same buyer. Mr. Z T. Chambliss
of Ocala, Marion County, sold a two-year-old grade Short-
horn weighing 1.145 pounds at 6 cents, netting $68.70-
more than three times what Mr. Caon's two-year-old scrubs
brought. Mr. Carson sold his half-breed Angus steer, saw
the advantage and bought fifty of these pure-bred bulls.
"The improved beef breeds, Aberdeen Angus, Hereford
and Shorthorn. all do well, and half-breeds show wonderful
improvement over the scrubs. It seems hardly necessary to
emphasize this point further than to say it is altogether feas-
ible and will be profitable to raise purebred cattle to supply
the demand that is already here for blooded stock for breed-
ing purposes. This is a mot inviting field, full of interest
and certain of big profits. There is no risk in it if cattle are
imumue from tick fever.
"Mr. Sistrunk, of Ocala has a herd of full-blood Angus
cattle, half-breeds and scrubs to be bred up. They were
inspected June 1st, running at large on his splendid estate
on prairie and hummock land, and showed some ticks, but
were handsome notwithstanding. The remarkable and in.
teresting fact is that the pure-bred cattle were in better lesh
and sleeker and apparently thriftie tan the half-breeds, and
the half-breeds in much better condition than the scrubs."



r __

~YJ -il ,- .- -


Forty-three


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.-4


Best Lands in the World for Raising
Forage Crops

WLORIDA is above all the best place in the world for
general farming, and there is a well developed tend-
ency in Central Florida that amounts almost to a
revolution in favor of the general farm of from fifty to several
hundred acres with stock raising and dairy farming.
The lands of the Florida Farms and Homes. Inc., are
peculiarly adapted to this class of agriculture, and we want
especially to interest the general farmer, for whom we will
make special terms if he settles on the land and undertakes
to develop forty acres or more along these line.
There are many such farms in Marion and Putnam coun-
ties that demonstrate what he can do.
With the growth of general fanning much attention is be-
ing paid to forage crops. In conjunction with the Depart-
ment of Agriculture at Washington, the State Experimental
Farm at Gainesville has done much to develop new grasses
that promise to add millions of dollars yearly in a few years
to the profits of Florida farmers.
Of these the one that is attracting the greatest attention
to-day is Natal grass, which will grow on any kind of soil
and which seems especially adapted to the high sandy lands
which until lately have been in very little demand.
Professor John M. Scott, assistant director of the Experi-
mental Station, writing of Natal grass, says:
"Natal grass makes its best growth on any good citrus
land. It will grow on quite sandy soil but will not produce
as good yields as it will on the better soils. It is now grown
abundantly in Marion, Lake, Sumter, Seminole, Orange and
Polk counties.
"The seed is widely distributed by the wind and it may
come up from seed in cultivated fields or elsewhere like crab

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Forty-four










grass. There should be no fear of its becoming a peat for
it can be eradicated without difculty.
"The yield of hay per acre varies greatly, depding upon
the soil and climatic condition.
"Natal grass wa planted on the station farm at Gaines-
ville in May. 1908. where it has been growing each year
ance.
"The average yield of hay per acre has been about one
and a quarter torn. The heaviest yield during one season
was 2.6 tons per acre from two cuttings. The soil upon
which it was grown is what is classed as high pine land, such
as would produce 15 to 20 bushels of corn per acre.
"The following figures give some idea of the feeding value
of Natal hay when compared with timothy:
Natl Timothy
Moisture .. 9.75 per cent. 13.2 per cent.
Fiber ... 36.75 29.0 "
Ash .. 5.02 4.4 "
Protein .. 7.45 5.9 "
Starch. sugr, etc. 39.23 45.0 "
Fats. etc. 1.80 2.5

There are thousands of acres of land of the Florida
Farms and Homes, Inc., which will produce large yields of
Natal grass.
Kudzu is another new grass for which great things are
claimed. E. B. Eppes, of Tallahassee, in an article in the
Biennial Report of the State Department of Agriculture for
1913-1914, says:
"This remarkable vine gives promise of being one of the
leading sources of wealth in the southern states in the future.
It is really a pea vine that springs up from the roots when
the first warm days come in the spring and grows vigorously






S ... ---- .... .. -..









until a killing freeze comes in the fall. This gives a growing
season of at least eight months, a total of ten tons per acre
in a ingle season having been made.
"The analysis made by the State Chemist of Florida
shows protein 17.43, and starch and sugar 30.20, being a
somewhat richer food than wheat bran. The hay is worth
about $20 per ton and up, making the product of an acre
yield $200 or over."
Professor John M. Scott, assistant director of the State
Experimental Station, says of Kudzu:
"The hay obtained is of first quality. It compares favor-
ably with that of cowpeas, beggar weedd a alfalfa in feed-
ing value," but he advises caution on the part of the farmer
-in planting it extensively until he is sure that his land is
adapted to it.
Rhodes grass is regarded as one of the best species for
pastures on dry soils, giving two or three cuttings of about
one ton each per acre. Oats, barley and rye are also recom-
mended for forage crops.
Of the velvet bean, in an article on the importance of
legumes, Professor Scott says:
"Among the list of legumes we can give, probably there is
no other legume that will adapt itself so well to Florida con-
ditions as will the velvet bean. Along with this we might
include all the members of the velvet bean family, such as
the hybrid beans now being produced, the Chinese velvet
bean, the Lyon bean, and the Yokohama bean."
Cowpeas are one of the best legumes we have in Florida
and should have a place on every farm. They are inex-
pensive to grow and make a good growth on all soils except
those which are very wet.
Peanuts are often profitable both for hay and for grazing.


Fork
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They are also a good money crop. Dwarf Eeex rape is ne
of the bet winter pasture crop. It i eamly grown.
Japanese cae i described by Profesor Scott as perhaps
the bat forage we have in Florida. The yield per acre i
from one to tirty ton of gero fodder, smmetimm as ih as
forty to ifty tam on rich land.
Chufas are a profitable crop a sandy oils where winter
grazing wanted for hop and poultry.


Forty-seven
























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CELERY FIELD IN PUTNAM COUNTY NEAR PALATKA


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Forty-eight


Many Side Crops Pay Fancy Pric
NDER the heading "Sugetions-Special Crops,"
the Biennial Report of the Department of Agricul-
ture. State of Florida. says:
"There are many side crops adapted to the various sec
tions of the state that pay fancy prices, and which usually
come at a time of the year or season when conditions are
such as to create a demand out of the ordinary. This rule
holds good also as to standard crops.
"We suggest as an example in the latter line sugar-cane
growing and manufacturing, either into syrup or sugar.
Syrup.is preferable for the single farm or for a very few.
Sugar manufacturing is better for a large number, either on
some co-operative plan or by a company of large capital.
"Conservatively speaking, there are at least 12.000.000
acres of land in Florida, unexcelled anywhere in the United
States for the purpose, and if all the wet lands of the State
were reclaimed for cultivation she could furnish sugar for
the world and feed millions of people besides."
Sugar cane is grown by many colonists of the Florida
Farms and Homes, Inc., and there are several syrup mill
rea fine quality of syrup is produced.


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Acreage Value of Florida Crops
SlDOWING is a conservative estimate of the value
; | per acre of truck and other crops under favorable
market conditions, as quoted in the Year-Book of
the Atlantic Coast Line:


Cantaloupes, average crop .
Watermelons, average crop .
Cucumbers, average crop .
Head lettuce, average crop .
Celery .
Natal grass (4 to 6 cuttings), ton per acre
Beets, average crop .
Irish potatoes, average crop .
Carrots and beets, average crop .
Snap beans, average crop .
Figs .. .
Oranges .
Sugar cane .
Cabbage, average crop .
Spinach, -average crop .
Cauliflower, average crop .
Sweet peppers, average crop .
English peas, average crop .
Corn, bushels to the acre .
Tomatoes .. ..
Turnips .
Sweet potatoes .
Peanuts .
Pecan . .
Tobacco .
Eggplant .. .
Strawberrie .
Dewberries .


$ 50 to $100
50 to 100
100 to 400
100 to 350
300 to 600
50 to 100


100 to
75 to
100 to
100 to
200 to
100 to
75 to
100 to
100 to
150 to
200 to
150 to
30 to
100 to
75 to
100 to
50 to
200 to
85 to
150 to
100 to
100 to


.4


Petty-sin,


200
125
200
150
300
500
125
200
275
300
300
200
150
200
150
200
75
400
400
200
250
150


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7o










Every Month is Planting Time in
Florida
pHE Florida Quarterly Bulletin of the Agricultural
Department, April. 1914, gives a list, printed below.
of what experience demonstrates can be successfully
grown each month as the season most suitable for each va-
riety comes round in Central Florida, which includes the
lands of the Florida Farms and Homes, Inc.
January.-Asparagus seed, Brussels sprouts, cabbage
Seed and plants, cauliflower seed, collards, leeks, lettuce,
mustard, onion sets, radishes, rape, Spanish onion seed, to-
mato seed, turnips, eggplant seed, oats.
February.-Asparagus seed, early corn, Sea Island cot-
ton, beans, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cantaloupes, carrots.
collards, cucumbers, eggplant seed, English peas, Irish pota-
toes, kale, leeks, lettuce, onions, parsley, parsnips, pepper
seed, rutabagas, salsify, spinach, Windsor beans, beets.
March.-Beans, beets, Brussels sprouts, cantaloupes, car-
rots, cauliflower, collards, cowpeas, cucumbers, early corn,
S eggplant, English peas, Irish potatoes, kale. kohlrabi, leeks,
okra, onions, parsley, parsmps, pepper, pumpkin, radish.
. rape, rutabagas, salsify, squash, sugar corn, watermelons,
tomatoes, turnips, Sea Island cotton.
April.-Beans, cantaloupes, collards, cowpeas, cucum-
bers, eggplant, English peas, Irish potatoes, kohlrabi, lettuce.
okra, onion plants, parsley, parsnips, peppers, pumpkins, rad-
Sishes, rutabagas, squash, sugar corn, dasheens, sweet pota-
S toes, tomatoes, turnips, watermelons, velvet beans.
May.-Beans, butter beans, cantaloupes, collards, cow-
peas, cucumbers, eggplant, okra, peppers, pumpkins, squash,.
sugar corn, sweet potatoes, tomato plants and seed, water-
S melons, velvet beans, dasheens.
June.-Butter beans, cabbage seed, cauliflower seed.


h*4~'


Fifty


i.


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celery eed, cowpeas. eggplant, peppers, squash, sweet pota-
toes, tomatoes, watermelons.
July.--Cabbage seed, cantaloupes, cauliflower seed
celery eed, cowpeas, eggplant parsley, pepper, puamiu.


MARKETING LETTUCE IN DECEMBER AT RODMAN ADJOINING
COLONY LANDS

rutabagas, squash, sweet potatoes, tomato plants and seed,
watermelons.
Augus.-Beans. beets, cabbage, cauliflower seed, car-
rots, cowpeas, cress, cucumbers, collards, eggplant Irish


'4-



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Fifty-one


1P~71
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w-1


Fifty-mo


potatoes, kale, kohlrabi, okra, onions, rape, rutabagas, sal-
sify, spinach, squash, tomatoes, turnips, Windsor beans,
celery seed.
September.-Beets, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots.
cauliflower plants, celery plants, collards, cowpeas, cucum-
bers, English peas, Irish potatoes, kale, leeks, lettuce, mus-
tard, onion sets, parsnips, radishes, rape, rutabagas, salsify,
spinach, squash, turnips.
October.-Beets, Bermuda onion seed, Brussels sprouts,
cabbage, carrots, cauliflower plants, celery plants, collards,
kale, leeks, lettuce seed and plants, mustard, onion sets,
Sparsnips, radishes, rape, spinach, turnips, strawberry plants.
November.-Beets, Brussels sprouts, cabbage seed and
plants, carrots, collards, kale, lettuce, mustard, onion sets,
Sparsnips, radishes, rape, spinach, turnips, oats, rye, straw-
Sberry plants.
December.-Cabbage plants and seed, collards, leeks,
lettuce plants and seed, mustard, onions, radishes, rape,
Strawberry plants, oats.
The average time in favorable seasons for plants to ma-
ture, from the sowing of the seed:
Bush beans, from 40 to 50 days, according to variety.
Pole beans, from 60 to 90 days, according to variety.
Beets, from 60 to 75 days, according to variety.
Cabbage, from 60 to 100 days, early varieties.
Cabbage, from I10 to 120 days, medium early varieties.
Cabbage, from 150 to 190 days, late varieties.
Carrots, from 60 to 75 days, according to varieties.
Cauliflower, from 100 to 150 days, according to varieties.
Celery, about 150 days, golden self-blanching variety.
Corn, from 70 to 90 days, according to variety.
Cucumbers, from 60 to 80 days, according to variety.
Eggplants, about 120 days.
Lettuce, from 60 to 90 days, according to variety.


L.,


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Melon, from 80 to 90 day, according to variety.
Mustard about 35 days
Okra, about 70 days.
Onios, from 120 to 130 day according to variety.
Peas. from 60 to 70 days. according to variety.
Pepper, from 100 to 120 days ccordin to variety.
Potatoes, from 85 to 100 days. according to variety.
Radihes, from 25 to 35 days according to variety.
Squashb about 60 days, for early varieties.
Squash, about 120 to 150 days for late variieties.
Spinach, from 50 to 60 day.
Tomatoes, from I10 to 130 day according to variety.
Turnips, from 60 to 90 days according to variety.


GIGGING EARLY IRISH POTATr
NOTE CORN C


)ES IN MARCH IN PUTNAM COUNTY.-
MOP WILL UNDER WAY









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Fifty-three


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,.9










Millions Spent Every Year to Help
the Farmer
T O the man who desires to be his own master Florida
offers a royal welcome backed by the fostering care
of State and Federal government, the great railroads
serving the state and the growing cities with their profitable
markets.
Never in the history of the world was so much done to aid
the man on the land. Millions of dollars are spent annually
to analyze his soil, to improve the seed he sows. to grow new
and better varieties of foods, to increase his yields, to guard
them by timely warning of frost and storms, to find the best
methods to preserve and market his products, and to improve
the breed of his stock, that his labors may be made more
profitable and his home life more attractive.
And all these advantages the agencies of the Government
bring to the door of the man on the land. He does not have
to go in search of them. They are his for the asking, and
without extra cost. The best brains of the nation are at his
service.
If you have ever thought of owning your own farm buy
it now, don't wait and mourn for opportunities lost. The
best you will ever have is staring you in the face with the
powerful hand of the nation to pave the way for you.
In no other state in theJnion is there a better experi-
mental farm than that at the Agricultural College at Gaines-
ville, which is only twenty-three miles by public roads from
the Florida Farms and Homes, Inc., demonstration farm at
Orange Springs.
At the State Farm are some of the very best scientific men
in the world who will be at your service when you locate on
the land of the Florida Farms and Homes, Inc.


A' J 'z'


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Fifty-four


,*' *-4"-'










Profesor McQuarrie. State Agnt of the Agricultural
Department. ays:
"In the State of Florida it has been found that with the
long eason. ay the whole twelve month in which to grow
crops, the Govenment demonstration syte can be carried
on to the fullest extt more so than in any other state in
the Union. The State of Florida is blessed with a climate
second to nope. The soil is of a nature that responds vey
readily to a proper treatment and it has been found that
diversied fanning can be conducted in Florida on a more
diveiied ale than anywhere in the country, if not in the
world. The one-crop system that has been practiced s long
by our native farmers musd give wa to the three or four
crop system, which in the long run ill help to bill up the
state as nothing else can along this line."





















Fify-










Story of Demonstration Farm
A T Orange Springs the Florida Farms and Homes.
Inc., is conducting a demonstration farm under the
direction of a scientific farmer who has been em-
ployed by the Government as a farm demonstrator in North
Carolina and in the citrus canker campaign in Florida.
At this farm an accurate account of every item of expense
and a record of every transaction affecting the farm in any
way will be kept in an open book for the information of any
and everyone who cares to consult it.













CLEARING DEMONSTRATION FARM AT ORANGE SPRINGS

It was made plain to the expert that this farm was intend-
ed to demonstrate the cost of cultivation as well as the chir-
acter and productivity of the land, and that every item of
expense and every failure, as well as success, must be set
down so plainly and simply that any may n can understand it
In connection with the farm there is a library of farm
literature, and this, as well as the scientific knowledge and
S. practical advice of the expert, is at the service of the colo
nists. It is the purpose of the Company to promote in every







Fi. -ty
SFifty-sir



























































































' J ..v









Florida Farm a Winter Pastime for
Northern Farmer
WO9R the northern farmer Florida offers a very attractive
proposition for a winter home which, will pay for it-
self and profitably employ his time when he would
otherwise be idly waiting for the return of spring.
In the New England states and the great Northwest the
farmer suffers a serious loss by reason of the long winters
whch lock up his invested capital, his land, his own activi-
tad his machinery from four to six months every year,
depriving him of its earning capacity and putting him at a
serious disadvantage with the man in Florida who can till
his ground all the year round.
Every month is planting time in Florida and when his crop
is laid by the northern farmer who has a Florida farm can
have his ground ready for planting or prepare it after he
comes down here. He can find tracts on the Florida Farms
and Homes, Inc., land that are well adapted to Irish pota-
toes. At Hastings, Florida, they shipped last year 1,900 cars
of potatoes. These are planted in December and January
and are harvested in from 85 to 100 days, according to
their variety. The yield varies from 50 to 75 barrels to the
acre and the price from $3.00 to $7.00 a barrel.
At Rodman, some of the best Irish potato lands of the
Company can be had. Here Mr. H. S. Cummings, Pres-
ident of the Rodman Lumber Company, has cleared since
last spring 200 acres of cut over land, 100 of which he will
plant in potatoes.
According to the statement of the Superintendent of this
farm, to clear this land, cultivate it during the summer with
crops which he turned under, and to prepare it for winter
planting has cost $75.00 an acre. Taking the very con-
servative estimate of fifty barrels of potatoes to the acre at


Fifty-eight


:;i ,

E









three dollars a barrel gies a return of $150.00 an acre.
Mr. Cummings had already obtained a profit from the timber
on the land. Following the potatoes will be a crop of cora
which will be sowed about two or three weeks before the
potatoes ae harvested. The yield of corn, which will not
require any further fertilizing, he estimates, will be from 50
to 75 bushels to the acre. Corn matures in from 70 to 90
days and can be followed by a forage crop.
Another profitable crop for a northern farmer's Florida
farm that will take care of itself in his absence is sugar cane.
Strawberries also offer him most profitable opportunities.
These are merely suggestions of the wonderful possibilities
for the man who does not care to pass the winters in idleness.
but who realizes that his ability to work in the quickly pass-
ing years of vigorous manhood is the one great asset which
he can convert into a comfortable home in Florida where
he can spend the winter of his life in the mot delightful
climate in the world enjoying health and happiness.





















-;jc:^^'^ -"


Fifty-ue -r










Ocklawaha Valley the Land of the
Tourist
T HE OCKLAWAHA, which borders the lands of the
Florida Farms and Homes, Inc., at and near Orange
Springs is the most picturesque of Florida's famous
rivers. For beauty and variety of scenery it surpasses the
Suwanee River and attracts more tourists than any other
waterway in the state.


ONE OF NATURE'S MASTERPIECES, ORANGE SPRINGS, WHOSE WATERS
HAVE WONDERFUL MEDICINAL QUALITIES

The Ocklawaha is narrow and winds in and out, not un-
like a corkscrew, in a most tantalizing and deceptive man-
ner. It is overarched by huge trees festooned with wild
vines and Spanish moss, as though draped by the hands of
fairies for some festive occasion. The banks of the stream
are a jungle, with underbush even heavier than that of the
great Dismal Swamp. The orchid and sweet-scented jasa-


Sixty











mine, the rhododendron and magnolia peep out occasion-
ally through the semi-tropical growth and fill the air with a
most delightful odor. Even the scent of the fragrant orange
blossom is discernible, for here and there on the banks of
this wild stream there have been located groves of Florida's
famous citrus fruit trees.
The mind cannot conceive, nor words express the beauty,
the grandeur, the strangeness of a night ride on this river of
rivers. One of the boat lines has a huge fire box on the


BRIDAL PARTY FROM NEW YORK BEING ENTERTAINED AT ORANGE
SPRINGS IN DECEMBER AT WINTER HOME OF MRS. GEORGE
DEAN, OF BOSTON, ON COLONY LANDS

top of their craft into which is fed pine logs-heart pine-
sending out a strange weird light that turns vegetation into
variegated hues, and disturbing the birds in their sleep,
causes them to flutter from tree to tree and cry out strange,
shrill notes of surprise and fear, while the splashing of the
waters indicates that even the reptiles are disturbed by the
unusual glare. There is no other place in the country, per-
haps in the whole world, where one in comparative comfort


Sixty-one










and safety experiences such wildness of natural beauty and
fantastic night scenes.
The stream is also of commercial value as it gives the
territory tributary to Orange Springs the advantage of com-
petitive freight rates to Palatka, which is one of the most
important rail and water transportation centres in the State.
In the tourist season the Ocklawaha River boats make
daily trips to Silver Springs. near Ocala, the outlet of a great
underground river.


SILVER SPRINGS A SPOT OF REMARKABLE BEAUTY ON THE
OCKLAWAHA SCENIC ROUTE

The "Springs" proper is a circular basin several acres in
extent, with effervescent water rising in an enormous flow
from a depth of about 80 feet, forming so great a volume
as to create a navigable river whose current flows from four
to five miles an hour. Beautiful, enthralling, it is so trans-
parent that the smallest object can be seen at the bottom of
its greatest depth. Drop a penny from a boat in midstream


Sixty-two










and one can behold it every foot of the way as it goes down
and down in its erratic course.
Civilization has not robbed the "Springs" or the Run of
their natural beauties, except here and there where some of
the giant cypress, stately pines and odd palmettos have been
felled by the lumberman's ax to clear the way for navigation.
No tourist can ever say that he has seen and enjoyed the
real beauties of Florida unless he has fished or bathed in the
crystal clear waters of Silver Springs, gone launch riding on


BEAUTIFUL DRIVE AT ORANGE SPRINGS TO ONE OF MANY LAKES

Silver Springs Run. or taken the boat ride on the tortuous
Ocklawaha. Here Nature is at her very best throughout
all the seasons of the year. Nowhere else in the old or new
world, not even in the tropics, has she combined so much
beauty and grandeur. To eliminate either one of these
trio of wonders would be to destroy the fabric as a whole,
yet either one in itself is worth spending much money and
going miles and miles to behold.


Sixty-three










The Sportsman's Paradise
PORTSMEN who have hunted and fished all over
the North and West and in the wilds of Canada de-
clare that in no part of North America have they
found such a variety of good sport as is to be had in the
rivers and lakes bordering on the lands of the Florida Farms
and Homes, Inc.
Mr. E. D. DeWitt, of New York, general manager of
The Editor and Publisher, a weekly newspaper for news-
paper makers, advertisers and advertising agents, in a recent
hunting and fishing trip (December, 1915) around Orange
Springs, with a party of friends, stated that he had hunted
and fished in the North Woods of Canada and all over the
United States, but nowhere did he find such sport in fishing,
duck, quail, wild turkey and dove shooting, hunting big
game, or such good deer, bear, wildcat and fox hunting, in
fact all sorts of game so plentiful and so enjoyably hunted,
considering the climatic conditions, as along the St. Johns
and Ocklawaha rivers and in the woods and fields on and
adjacent to the lands owned by the Florida Farms and
Homes, Inc.
In the clear waters of Silver Springs and Silver Run, a
stretch of ten miles, the party saw thousands of bass and all
kinds of fish. Here is a stream that the fly fisherman will
travel thousands of miles to reach as it offers him unlimited
opportunities for sport.
Salt Run, one of the favorite streams of Florida sports-
men, who know where the best sport is to be had, is one of
the wonders of Nature. The water here is as brackish as
sea water, though all the other lakes and streams nearby are
fresh. It has no known connection with the sea, being far
inland. The peculiarity of the stream is that every known
fresh water fish runs up it from Lake George, and, beyond


Sixty-four






























































IN THE SPORTSMAN'S PARADISE AROUND ORANGE SPRINGS













Sixty-five










doubt, it affords as fine bass fishing as any place in the
United States. Ten bass averaging eight and a half pounds
each were caught in a four-mile run.
Here in this inland sea thousands of mullet exist side by
side with black bass and other fresh water fish. The stream,
which rises from a big spring, is navigable for small boats.
The territory in parts is as wild as an African jungle and so
far from the beaten track that it is an ideal spot for true
sportsmen. Within calling distance of each other the mem-
bers of a party can shoot duck, quail, turkey and squirrels,
while others fish.
Within the same limits bear, deer, wild hogs and wild-
cats can be hunted, and panthers are occasionally found.
At Orange Lake, seven miles from Orange Springs, the
best of duck shooting is to be had and in its waters are found
some of the largest bass in Florida.
The fourth prize of the "Field and Stream," for large
mouth bass, for the first six months of 1915, was awarded
to W. E. Gray, of Ocala, for a catch in Orange Lake that
weighed thirteen pounds, 262 inches in length and 20%
inches in girth.
Mr. DeWitt, on his return to New York, wrote a letter
of appreciation to President James R. Murphy, of the
Florida Farms and Homes, Inc., which is here reproduced:


Sixty-six

















TH CEDITOn AND PUBLISHER
AND JO\lWNALIST
Pe nhUWleS .*M.- e..n.mm s ner,.S w mens ..m
SUrIu HIM WoAm BenlI.nl. NW r YOar

Jammarj 3. 1I6.


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TY, FLODA


FACT5 CONCERNING MA ION COUNTY, FLORI
ONE OF THE BEST AGRICULTU L COUNTIES IN THE STATE
POPULATION, 45000
County Seat. OCALA. I pulation 7.000


~tiLROA2S Wp 6SfT L~v
&KMLAWA#AdELLY PRR
,frLAI4'IC C00.5T LINE R R
SEABewRD ,fR Li'v RR
OCALA LSQIUTPWE.S TRA fi R
OCKLAWA/IA Dm.Y LIGT LINE
CLYDE *LIE AND fiART LINE


RIVERS N
S'JonHMs. OCKLAWAHA. WirTHACOOCHt \
LARrE NATURAL SMEG
SILvER 8iPRNs
ORANGE SPRINGS (5*lphr, Mgn.s,8. IIron
BLul SPRINGS (S&lphur)
SLT SPRINGS (Salt)
S/iVER GLEN SPRING /

BOTH HIGH AND GRADZD SCHooLS- BEST SYSTN
FINEST HIGH SCHOOL BOIILOIN "I'RA Cf7 TATE
UNIVERSITY O FLORI/OA WIT UI SHORi DISTANCe ir-"


ADJOINING COUNTY


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qRANGL IAKf LAlf WEIR
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SN/T AI f.SJ DIRE ,CmLANE PCGRAAN
,Axt 5/1 vR LAir! Qt,
cr'ova U3 m I,6Ar.
cCfURCHEs
5'COPAL. CA THOLIrC,
'17HOO13T. BAPT15T.
\VENT11 DAY
ADVENTISTS
EW/i5H SY1AGOGUE
CHRISTIAfV
c rlr~d PRE5B TERI AONlN


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AImosCo i.5On E ri/f 7Lt~OING COL#I(3 IMI TrM &TATE
R0405 OVER 800 MI'IL'


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r rrr ~~n .~ ,p r .q r..w' UM~-' m..... .~c ~~.W ~4 m .. ..a r.~ &
u 5, .- i i


vnw evv I N w .V,-
CENTRAL LOCATION or COLONY LANDS-
NEARNESS To MARKETS-
TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES
IDEAL LOCATION WIfTHBFER b!CE TO


NOTED RESORTS:.


Rivers, Lakes and .For StS tearnn with fith* ad Ild r
"'CirlrFclcshow a wting 4it.e 4unsq


BEING PATS OF
TowwsMP~sm-s i2i2D 14 SOUTIL RAt2E5 2' BaANt EA5T.

MA DEPT
~k~~L~7~CE--
Bonaed Ciunt Suirvaeor Co Engineer d Punarr. Cc,
PALATKAFLORIIA.
October 35 o9I.


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CONMERCfAL FEATURES.i ":
MARION COEXCEL3 IN STOCK RAISING. POULTR.YH /06o S.i e DAIRY/VG.
G vERAL FARNING. TRUCK GROwmING A mNC/TRUS FRUITS, 19/4 CROP
or CITRUS FRUITa IN MARION CO w~T 40.00 ',ooo s
,DtVELOPMENT
AT. LEAST rP OF TiH AVAILABLE AREA Or MAARIG CO 16 UNDER DI VLfOPMfvET
COMIA#ATIVC RATIO IN THE STATE Of FlORIDA ONLY S/o


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ATLANTIC C(OAl TL : l D
CONNErTING wb 5E4BOARD AI LINE Nth Or 1A MORN
'LANTIC COAST LINE Ry..(No. ha'nd South) RB.R-L- J
O L...............---.-.. ..HN aN N

31' 32 34,
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FLORIDA F

Looaft. It Ck:


19T

I *
................. ............... ..... ............. ------;- ------- : i- -
7 8 12 0



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....... .....~~~.~.. -------------,------------ --------
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* *I..t 5. I -I W MI s ..** .i I .-
3h 4 TOMn LIZARD OF
ROAza llI jMVA


33 -


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MAP OF LANDS


IrT I FAFMiM E HOMES.,Ihjrc..

b4 in CIaq and &tima Cmwdes. Flor
BEING PARTS OF

a 8-9-o ANDl 1 SOUTH. ANGES 234-245-26 -ZV7 EAST.


zalafw = C.E.

ec Cou nty Su rueyor Ca fo nqineerof Futrinm Co.
PALATKAYFLORIMA.
OotOwr- o0.l9i5


R2 2 5E


ACTS CONCErNING PUTNAM' COUNTY, FLOE
ONE OF THE MOST PROGRESSIVE COjNTIES IN THE STATE
POPULATION. 15.9Lc9
County Seat. PALATKA.Fbpuil rion. aooo


A6&LRBD5 .* .. BaT Li/ S
OCJ(LAW A WULLEY PRR
ATLANrTC COAST LINt RR (t h/n)
ORiAM .SourTmEAN A FrLOr R R
ILORIDA EASr COST RR
aKLAWAIM DAr LIenr Irs -
CLYDE LINE AND HAnr LINE

Sr JOHMN OCKLAWANA., OUNN CRC
LU&G AAUrgL SPRINGS
BEECHER SPmRING
WELAMA SPRINGS
LAKES
LAmE GOEORs6. CRtCScCrL ArE. LorriE
LA G[ORG[. LITTrr ORANIa LAKE. L AKE
STELLA. LAKE NAMARGARr LAKt CONO. LMA
BROWAR4 SARATOGA LAKE. LAKE LAGMIM
LAKE CHIIPC& GtORGSc LAKE, ORANaCG.O
GRlA4Ol. KUIA. P~tPTM.OWrIr 1 aCNKMIC
LAKES COWPIMM PwO. BmWCly. TuaCza.
6OwSE. Ckorftri SwAM LAKES thou-
aunda of smellr oPm6
BorH HIGH AND CGRACOa.SCejl; LO
OnE OF rLE BEST S s rEM', --STATE


RImAN CA
1 i~ n ~ Ii 2 HURCHEE
r METHODISF.
PRESBYTE



9 S'A
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[THOLIC COlIMrT

r. BAPTIS. EPISCOPAL
RIAN. CAIWtWC


APPROXIMTA TELY
0l


.*. ^* .,. _. ,. O
ONLY HIGHWAY h,
HCAO or DEiF
TRANSPORTATION ,(
EXCELSs i 7/..
CENTER OF LARGE
ONLY LARGE i


\
N.


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40 "a
aDNOAk


CO NILES Or COUNTr
S100 MILES Now A1

41/4EiJ .EM^d
iOQE ACROSS Sr JOn

SFARNINmI 4Au SrocK /
Au.UFAc TURINe I/Nus,
IPMHOR FARM I THE U,


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1160% '9444-F



.424
7'1(A T EASTPALAT
------i--------.~R RILILGAID WPM:
~"~~"~ doAT~u LINCS at PALATKA
-0 14 : hGar
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Maps of Colony Lands
Belonging to
Florida Farms and Homes, Inc.
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