• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Patty and Joe
 Dolly's grief
 Archie's fault
 Master Pickle
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: Tiny tales for little tots
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055084/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tiny tales for little tots
Physical Description: 124, 4 p., 6 leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Brookes, Warwick ( Illustrator )
Edmonston & Douglas ( Publisher )
T. and A. Constable ( Printer )
Publisher: Edmonston and Douglas
Place of Publication: Edinburgh
Manufacturer: Thomas and Archibald Constable
Publication Date: 1870
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1870   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Scotland -- Edinburgh
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with six illustrations by Warwick Brookes.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055084
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002238585
notis - ALH9103
oclc - 56969929

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    List of Illustrations
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Patty and Joe
        Chapter I: The quarrel
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
        Chapter II: The treat
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Plate
            Page 29
            Page 30
        Chapter III: London delights
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
        Chapter IV: The zoo
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
        Chapter V: The picnic
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
        Chapter VI: Fie! Fie!
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
    Dolly's grief
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Plate
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Plate
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Archie's fault
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Plate
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
    Master Pickle
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Plate
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    Advertising
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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-TINY TALES.

























Edinburgh: Printed by Thomas and Archibald Constable

FOR

EDMONSTON AND DOUGLAS.


LONDON HAMILTON, ADAMS, AND CO.

CAMBRIDGE . MACMILLAN AND CO.

GLASGOW . JAMES MACLEHOSE.












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TINY TALES


FOR


LITTLE TOTS



With Six Illustrations by Waarwich Briooes.



EDINBURGH
EDMONSTON AND DOUGLAS
1870.




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PATTY AND JOE PAGE

I.-THE QUARREL, 9
II.-THE TREAT, 20
III.-LONDON DELIGHTS, 31
IV.-THE Zoo, 41
V.-THE PICNIC, 48
VI.-FIE! FIE! 55

DOLLY'S GRIEF, 65

ARCHIE'S FAULT, 91

MASTER PICKLE, 111
5
















List of Illuutrationu,



'THE QUARREL, Frontispiece.

THE LONDON COUSINS, PAGE 28

A DOLLS' SCHOOL, 77

MARY NURSING ANGELINA, .83

PLAYING AT SCHOOL, 93

"HE AMUSED HIMSELF WITH HIS
TOYS,". 116




















































d













PATTY AND JOE.

I.-THE QUARREL.

ATTY and Joe were two
Little children, who lived
with their kind papa and
i mamma in a large house in
the country. They had lived
there as long as they could remem-
ber, so they knew nothing about
9





10 PATTY AND JOE.

the town. They had never seen
the sea either, but they had always
lived quite happily and contented
where they were, for they found
plenty of amusement in playing in
the woods and fields, and besides
they had a dear little pony of their
own, which they could manage
quite well, and they used to caper
about in the green meadows on
Dingle's back-for Dingle was the
name of their pony.
Well, perhaps you would like to
know how old these little children





THE QUARREL. 11

were. Patty was nearly seven, and
Joe was five.
Now I am sorry to say that Joe,
being the youngest, was rather a
spoilt little boy. He was not so
gentle and kind as his sister, nor
so obedient either. He was often
very cruel to animals, and quite
made Patty cry, for she could not
bear to see anything in pain, what-
ever it was.
One beautiful day in summer
they were playing in a field, and
as it was very hot they soon felt






12 PATTY AND JOE.

rather tired, so they lay down
under a hedge to rest.
"What are you doing, Joey
dear ?" said Patty, as she saw
him lying with his back turned
towards her, very busy about some-
thing. Joey did not seem to hear,
for he did not answer.
At last Patty peeped over his
shoulder in fun, but when she saw
what he was doing she said-
"Oh, Joey dear, don't do that!
How can you! Please don't." For
what do you think Joey was





THE QUARREL. 13

doing? He had got a poor little
snail between his finger and thumb
in one hand, and had just been try-
ing to pinch off its horns with his
nails, and now he had got a piece
of stick and was trying to dig it
out of its shell. Don't you think
he was a very cruel little boy? and
when his sister saw him he got in a
passion, and slapped her face and
cried-
Leave me alone, Patty, I'm
not hurting you ;" but Patty took
up the little snail, which could not





14 PATTY AND JOE.

do anything for itself but spit, and
she threw it right into the middle
of the hedge, where Joey could not
get at it.
"You're a nasty cross thing,"
cried Joey, stamping his little foot
on the ground, and then he threw
himself down and began to roar
with all his might.
Little Patty was very sorry
when she saw him do this, be-
cause she was afraid she had been
unkind; "but no," she thought, it
can't be unkind to save the poor





THE QUARREL. 15

snail from being hurt and perhaps
killed, and it does not hurt Joey
to have it taken away from him ;"
so, as Joey would not be com-
forted, and refused to play with
her, she sat down on the grass
and made a beautiful daisy chain
for her doll, who was looking on
and smiling all the time,-for dolly
always looked good-tempered, and
though she could not say "Thank
you" when Patty put the daisy
chain round her neck, still she
looked as if she wished very much





16 PATTY AND JOE.

that she could say it. Joey got
tired of roaring in about ten
minutes, so he leant on his elbows
and looked at Patty.
"Shall we play at something?"
said Patty.
"No, you too cross. I don't like
you a bit."
"I don't feel cross, then," said
Patty, "so I shall send Miss Patty
Gertrudeana Aanessima over to
invite you to tea with me. I
shall pretend to write you a letter,
you know, and you must read it






THE QUARREL. 17

aloud, and my little girl shall wait
for an answer."
"Bother your girl! I'11 poke out
her eyes if she comes near me."
Well, I'm sure she shan't, then,
for I don't want to have my dar-
ling's eyes poked out."
"I want to go and chase the
pigs, I'm tired of staying here,"
said Joey, kicking his legs on the
ground.
"Oh! you mustn't, indeed you
mustn't. Papa told me not to let
you."
B






18 PATTY AND JOE.

"You not the missis. I shall
kick you if you stop me."
"But papa told me to. Please
don't go, dear Joey."
"Shall, shall, shall," cried Joey,
getting up and walking towards
the yard.
Patty ran after him and tried
to stop him, but he was such a
naughty little boy, that he gave
his sister a hard kick on her leg,
and it hurt her so much that she
fell down on the ground.
Joey felt sorry when he saw
4<





THE QUARREL. 19

Patty cry, for he was really very
fond of her, so he put his little
arm round her neck and said
"Don't cry, Patty. I won't do
it again."
"You won't go to the pigs, will
you ?" asked Patty.
"Not now," answered Joey.
Joey agreed to play a game
with Patty then, as, I suppose, he
thought he had better make up
for having kicked her, so they
played happily for the rest of the
afternoon.












CHAPTER II.
THE TREAT.
ONE day when they had both
been very good indeed, and had
not had one bad mark of any sort
in their mark-books for a whole
week, their mamma said to them-
"I am going to give you both
a great treat, as you have been
such good children lately. I am
20





THE TREAT. 21

going to take you to London to-
morrow, to stay a few days with
your Aunt Jane. Do you think
you will like that ?"
"Oh mamma, mamma, what a
lovely, sweet, kind mamma you
are! How boo-o-o-tiful, how spen-
difous screamed the children,
jumping on their mamma and
hugging her like young bears.
"But mind, children," added
their mamma, "that you must
behave yourselves very nicely, for
Aunt Jane is very particular, and






22 PATTY AND JOE.

her little children are very well
behaved."
"Shall we really have some
more little children to play with ?"
asked Patty; "but perhaps they
will be too big to play with us."
"No, I think there are some
just about your size," said mam-
ma.
'And is there a little boy like
me too ?" asked Joey.
"Yes," answered mamma, "there
is a dear little boy called Harry,
who is six years old, I think, and






THE TREAT. 23

as you are five, you will do very
well for each other."
Oh how jolly!" cried Joey,
jumping and hopping round the
room. "Oh how drefully jolly "
I don't know how to believe it,"
said Patty; it is perfectly ex-
quisite!" Then they both marched
round and round the table, singing
I'm so very very happy,
I don't know what to do !"

The next morning at ten o'clock
they were all packed into their
carriage to drive to the railway






24 PATTY AND JOE.

station, for they lived three miles
from it, and they were going by
the train that started at twenty
minutes to eleven.
The children were so dreadfully
afraid all the time that they should
be late for the train, that they
wanted the horses to race up the
hills as well as down.
At last they were really off, for
the whistle had screamed, and
now the engine was puffing on its
way. They only had to be in the
train for three hours and a half,




*





THE TREAT. 25

as they did not live very far from
London.
They had never been in a train
before, so it seemed wonderful to
them how fast they came from
one place to another; but what
puzzled Joey most was the trees
and fields all running away, as
he thought. At last they had
stopped at the station, and were
soon packed into a cab and were
driving to Bruton Street, where
their aunt lived; and as they went
along they looked out of the win-






26 PATTY AND JOE.

dows in wonder and amazement at
all they saw. They stopped pre-
sently in front of a. large house.
A footman came out and took up
their boxes, and then showed them
into a large room, which looked
like the dining-room.
"Mrs. Davis has visitors in the
drawing-room, but she will be with
you soon," said the footman, as he
put some chairs for them and went
out of the room.
In about five minutes Mrs. Davis,
who was their aunt Jane, came into





THE TREAT. 27

the room, and the children thought
she looked very kind, but they did
not take so much notice of her as
of a little girl who came into the
room with her. She was about the
same size as Patty, but she did not
look so strong and rosy.
The children felt very shy, and
sat looking at each other with-
out speaking, till Aunt Jane said,
"Kitty, you had better take your
little cousins upstairs to take off
their things," so they all got up
and went out of the room.





28 PATTY AND JOE.

Kitty took them up a lot of stairs,
and into a large room, which she
said was the nursery. Joey soon
spied the little boy whom he had
already chosen for his playfellow
standing near the window, and they
were both extremely delighted to
see a dear little baby boy crawling
about on the floor.
"That is Harry," said Kitty,
pointing to the little boy by the
window, "and baby is called Willie.
I think that is a pretty name, don't
you ?" Then she took them into a


























Ztl
i1 ' :" J~y ~ ~ ~




















f 71

































0 Y I l I I -





THE TREAT. 29

little room leading out of the nur-
sery, and told them that was her
room, and that Patty was to sleep
there with her
How old are you ?" asked
Patty.
I am seven," answered Kitty.
You are older than me, then,"
said Patty, "for I am not quite
seven yet, but I shall be in two
months."
Then they went down stairs, and
enjoyed their tea very much, and
afterwards they played together till






30 PATTY AND JOE.

bedtime, for they did not feel a bit
shy now, and when it was bedtime
they did not feel sorry, for they
were tired after their journey, so
they slept very soundly indeed.










CHAPTER III.
LONDON DELIGHTS.

THE next morning the carriage
was ordered at eleven o'clock, for
they were to have a nice drive in
the town, and to do some shopping.
The shops were great delights to
them, as they had not seen any-
thing but village shops before.
They went into a large toy-shop,
and Aunt Jane bought Patty a
perambulator for her doll, and a





32 PATTY AND JOE.

large horse and cart for Joey. Oh,
how delighted they were! they
really didn't know what to do with
themselves, they were so happy.
Afterwards they went to a dra-
per's shop, and their mamma bought
them each a new hat and some
gloves. Then they went to a con-
fectioner's and had some lemonade
and buns, and then to several more
shops for things that Aunt Jane
wanted, so they both thought that
shopping in London was very nice
fun.





LONDON DELIGHTS. 33

In the afternoon they had a game
of shops, and Aunt Jane hunted
up some treasures for their shop.
Kitty and Patty were great friends
now, and so were Harry and Joe.
One morning at breakfast Aunt
Jane said-
"Well, children, are you ready
for another journey ?"
"Are we going home ?" asked
Joey, looking very blank.
No, not home," said Aunt Jane,
looking rather mysterious, but
where do you think ?"
C






34 PATTY AND JOE.

"Oh, where, where ? do tell us,"
cried the children, dropping their
knives and forks, and looking
eagerly at Aunt Jane.
"Hum," said Aunt Jane, turn-
ing round and looking out of the
window, "what does the weather
look like ?"
"Oh, beautiful, mamma," cried
Kitty; "but do, please, tell us."
Oh do, do We can't wait."
"Well," said Aunt Jane, very
slowly, while the children gazed at
her with open eyes and mouths,





LONDON DELIGHTS. 35

" I was thinking of taking you to
the Crystal Palace."
Of course all the children were
so terribly delighted they did not
know what to do. Kitty and
Harry had been before, so they
told Patty and Joey what a lovely
place it was, and made them long
more and more to see it.
They started very soon after
breakfast, and the little country
children were much amused and
surprised when the train seemed
to be going right over the tops





36 PATTY AND JOE.

of the houses, and sometimes they
seemed to be running a race with
another train, and they got quite
excited over it.
At last they came to the Crystal
Palace, and when they had gone up
the steps and were inside it, Patty
and Joe only said, "Oh !" and did
not speak again for some time, for
they really didn't know what to
-say, it seemed so beautiful. They
went all over it, and saw every-
thing that was to be seen; and
were they not delighted with the





LONDON DELIGHTS. 37

fairy fountain ? but they could
hardly look at one thing properly
before they had to look at some-
thing else. They had brought their
dinner with them, so they had it in
the gardens, and enjoyed it very
much.
Then they went to see some
monkeys, and Joey very nearly had.
his finger hurt, for when he was
giving one of them a nut, he put
his finger in too far, so the monkey
was just going to catch hold of it
when Kitty pulled it away.





38 PATTY AND JOE.

Then Aunt Jane took them to a
merry-go-round, and they each had
a ride. This was such fun. They
walked about the grounds, looking
at all sorts of things, and they felt
as if they could never be tired of
looking at all the wonderful things
they saw, and they were all very
sorry when Aunt Jane told them
it was time to go back; and Joey
said-
"I don't want to go away yet;"
but his mamma said-
"You must be good, and come





LONDON DELIGHTS. 39

when you are told, Joey. Now,
you have had the pleasure of com-
ing, but if you are not good when
you have such treats you must not
have any more." So then Joey
was quite good, and they all got
into the train and started back.
When they got back they had
a nice tea waiting for them, and
directly after tea they went to bed,
for they were very tired after their
long and happy day, and their little
heads were no sooner on their pil-
lows than they were fast asleep.





40 PATTY AND JOE.

One day they drove to Hyde
Park, and then they got out and
walked about there for a little
while, and they thought it was the
most delicious walk that they had
ever had. Then Aunt Jane took
them to see a bazaar, and, oh, how
they longed to be able to buy lots
of things that they saw there They
hadn't time to admire all they
wanted to, for Aunt Jane said it
was getting late.










CHAPTER IV.
THE ZOO.
WE are going to the Zoological
Gardens-hurrah !" screamed the
children, as they ran to ask nurse
to dress them.
"We shall see real lions, and
tigers, and bears," cried Joey, open-
ing his eyes very wide, and shout-
ing loud. Have you ever seen a
real live lion, nurse ?"
SYes, Master Joe," said nurse;
41






42 PATTY AND JOE.

"I have been to the Zoo several
times."
"Don't the lions ever eat people
up ?" asked Joey, looking as if he
really felt rather frightened, but
thought he ought to be delighted
because the others were; but he
felt quite happy when he was told
that all the wild beasts were kept
in cages where they could not get
at anybody.
They enjoyed themselves very
much indeed walking about in the
gardens, but Joey was a little bit





THE ZOO. 43

frightened once or twice. Once
when a lion put its paw against
the front of the cage and gave a
low growl, Joey thought he was
trying- to get at him, and he
screamed out. They were very
much amused, too, at seeing the
great bears climbing up and down
the poles.
They went to look at the mon-
keys, and fed them with nuts and
sugar as they had done at the
Crystal Palace, but these monkeys
were bigger. While they were






44 PATTY AND JOE.

standing looking at them a very
funny thing happened. One of the
monkeys grabbed Joey's hat, and
carried it off to the back of its cage,
and played with it.
They had to get the man who
took care of the monkeys to fetch
it out again for them, as they could
not get it away from the monkey.
They saw such lots of animals
that they could not remember all
their names, but they knew that
they had enjoyed themselves very
much indeed.






THE ZOO. 45

I cannot tell you what they did
every day in London, for they
stayed there a whole fortnight, and
they liked it very much. One
day Aunt Jane gave them a chil-
dren's party, and they all had a
very merry evening, dancing, and
playing all sorts of games.
They both behaved very nicely
on the whole while they were in
London, and their mamma was
much pleased with them, and said
she should be able to bring them
again; and Aunt Jane said she
again" an





46 PATTY AND JOE.

thought they were dear good little
children, and she should ask them
to come and stay with her again
some time. They were very sorry
indeed to go away from London,
for, as they said, they had enjoyed
themselves dreadfully, but still they
felt very happy, because cousin
Kitty was to go back with them,
for her mamma thought that very
likely the country air might do her
good, as she was not at all strong,
and seldom got any change out of
London. Her delight was great






THE ZOO. 47

when she heard that she was to go
back with her aunt and cousins to
the country, for the country was as
new to her as the town was to the
others, and Patty and Joey were
no less glad to have her. They
planned all sorts of fun together,
and they helped Kitty to pack up
her dolls and some more of her
treasures which she was going to
take with her; so one Monday
morning they went in the train
back to the country.













CHAPTER V.
THE PICNIC.
ONE day their mamma said they
should all have dinner out in a
pretty wood which was* not very
far from their house, as it was such
a beautiful day. So of course the
children were quite delighted, and
ran about everywhere to fetch the
things that mamma wanted to
48





THE PICNIC. 49

pack in the baskets which they
were to take.
They were all very merry, and
when they came to the wood the
children all helped to lay out the
dinner on a white cloth upon the
grass. Afterwards they played at
gipsies among the trees, but mam-
ma told them to be sure not to go
near the edge of the river, as the
banks were very slippery, so they
promised her that they wouldn't.
Patty and Kitty were gipsies, and
Joey was the little child who had
D





50 PATTY AND JOE.

to be stolen by the gipsies, and
mamma was the mamma in the
game, who had to cry very much
and wring her hands when her
little child was stolen away by the
wicked old gipsies, and papa was
to be the policeman, and come to
hunt out the gipsies from their
hiding-place, and take them off to
put them in prison. How they
screamed with laughter when papa
ran after them, dodging them in
and out of the trees !
After they had been playing at

*






THE PICNIC. 51

this for some time, Joey was no-
where to be found. They hunted
everywhere they could think of,
and at last papa went to see if he
was anywhere by the river, and as
he was looking about he heard a
scream some little way off, so he
ran towards the place he heard it
from, which was further on by the
side of the river, and round a
corner.
Before he came to the place he
saw what had happened. Joey
had been down by the river and





52 PATTY AND JOE.

had fallen in, so when papa saw it
he ran with all his might, and
when he got there he found Joey
had begun to float down with the
tide, so he jumped in directly, and
after some little difficulty got hold
of Joey and dragged him on to the
bank. Poor little Joey was quite
insensible, and papa was afraid he
was dead, but he carried him at
once to a cottage which was near,
and had him put into a warm
bed, and his little hands and feet
rubbed. He then went as fast as





THE PICNIC. 53

he could to tell mamma about it,
for she was still in the wood look-
ing for him there. The woman of
the cottage was very kind to Joey,
and took the greatest care of him,
and when papa and mamma came
back they had the pleasure of see-
ing that Joey was a little better,
for he had opened his eyes; but
he did not keep them open long,
and soon he fell into a nice quiet
sleep, and everybody was very
glad then, for they hoped ttat he
would be better when he woke up





54 PATTY AND JOE.

again, and so he was, for when
he awoke he called mamma very
softly, and asked her what was
the matter. Mamma sent all the
others home after tea, but she
stayed at the cottage with Joey,
because he would not be well
enough to move till the next day,
so the next day the carriage came
to fetch them, and he was much
better. Joey always remembered
after that what came of being dis-
obedient.










CHAPTER VI.
FIE! FIE!
THE children had now had a good
long mid-summer holiday, and their
mamma said that it was quite time
they should begin to do some les-
sons again, and Kitty was to do
hers with them.
Patty and Kitty could both read
pretty well in an easy book. Joey
could only 'read little words, say





56 PATTY AND JOE.

his multiplication-table, and a few
hymns.
The children were really rather
tired of their holidays, but they
would not say so for the world, nor
even think so, but they were, for all
that; and they showed it by being
fretful and tired before the day was
half over, so mamma thought quite
right that the very best thing they
could do would be to begin lessons
again. Patty liked doing lessons
much better now that she had
Kitty to do them with her, for they





FIE! FIE! 57

could do nearly everything to-
gether, and as they had both be-
gun to learn music, mamma said
that they should learn a pretty
little duet together, to play to
Patty's papa when they knew it.
This little plan delighted them very
much, and they both made up their
minds to take great pains to learn
it.
One day Joey took it into his
head to be very naughty indeed ;
he would not spell was" when
his mamma told him to, and he





58 PATTY AND JOE.

would not say his tables properly
though he knew them quite well,
or do anything that he was told.
He did not try to be good, but was
very sulky for some time, and then
began to roar.
At last mamma was obliged to
do what she did not like doing at
all. She had to take Joey up to
her room and whip him, and then
put him to bed. Joey did not
come down again that day, but he
had to stay in bed by himself all
day, for he would not say he was





FIE FIE! 59

sorry, he felt too naughty. But
when the others went to bed, and
mamma kissed them and tucked
them in, and said they had been
very good children, then Joey did
long to kiss his dear mamma, and
made up his mind to tell her that
he was sorry and that he would be
good, but he was such a silly little
boy that he felt afraid to, and did
not call mamma till it was too late,
and she had gone out of the room.
He heard her go down stairs.
Ah! how he wished then that he





60 PATTY AND JOE.

had answered her properly when
she asked him before tea if he
was sorry, and .he had turned
away from her quite sulkily and
said "No," and he had heard her
sigh as she left him. He thought
of all this now, and oh! how he
wished she would come back, just
one minute, and then he would
tell her he was sorry, and would
be a good boy, and ask her to
forgive him.
He lay awake a long time think-
ing about it, and hoping mamma





FIE! FIE! 61

would come up, for he really did
feel so very sorry now that he
could not possibly go to sleep with-
out kissing her. Every step he
heard outside the door he hoped
was hers, and once when nurse
came into the room for something,
he called out "Mamma." but nurse
scolded him for being awake at that
time of night. The time seemed
so long to him that he thought
mamma would not come again at
all that night, and he began to cry
bitterly to himself.






62 PATTY AND JOE.

He had nearly cried himself to
sleep when he was suddenly startled
by feeling some one kiss him. He
woke directly, and threw his arms
round his dear mamma, and told
her he was very sorry for being
a naughty boy, and begged her to
forgive him.
Oh how happy he felt when she
took him up in her arms and loved
him again!
Have you asked God to make
you a good boy ?" asked mamma.
"Yes," said Joey, "when you


*






FIE! FIE! 63

went down stairs I did, and I told
Him I was sorry, and I asked Him
to make you come up to kiss me
that I might tell you too."
"That was right, my darling,"
said mamma, and she gave him
another great big kiss and tucked
him up very comfortably; so Joey
felt quite happy now, and made up
his mind to be very good the next
day, and try to make up for it, for he
wondered how he could have been
so naughty to such a dear, kind
mamma, who loved him so much.


e





64 PATTY AND JOE.

He felt as if he loved her more
than he. had ever done before, and
would do anything to please her.
He was soon fast asleep, and woke
up quite good and happy the next
morning. He seemed quite a dif-
ferent little boy to what he was
the day before, and he was so
extra good that mamma was very
pleased with him, and he had not
to wait that night for a kiss.
















DOLLY'S GRIEF,













E


















DOLLY'S GRIEF.


OOR Dolly felt ready to
cry. She thought she was
treated very badly by
her mamma, for her mamma
had got a new child who
was loved much more than she
was, and as this poor Dolly
67





68 DOLLY'S GRIEF.

was the eldest, she felt quite
hurt.
"I have been left lying in this
cupboard nearly two whole days,"
thought Dolly to herself, "and my
mamma has not even looked at
me all this time. She does not
love me at all, now that she has
another child to love. I heard her
change my name to Sarah Jane,
because I was old and ugly, and
my sister is called Angelina Eme-
lina. I heard her say, too, that I
should wait on this Angelina. No
'S





DOLLY'S GRIEF. 69

indeed, not I! Ah how unhappy
I am! I am put aside because I
have grown ugly, and no wonder,
after all I have suffered! I lost
my youthful beauty when I had
the small-pox. My hair came off
when I had the fever. My leg
had to come off because my foot
had been crushed. My arm had
to come off because I fell down
stairs and broke it. My uncle,
Dr. Harry, took out my eye be-
cause he said I had a waterfall in
it, and he flattened my nose one





70 DOLLY'S GRIEF.

day when he was in a passion, for
he knocked my head against the
chest of drawers. Oh I did think
I was done for then, and so I was
in one way, for after that my mam-
ma would have nothing more to
say to me because I was so ugly.
Ah! no one would believe what
I have gone through." As Dolly
finished this long and sad story,
she cried bitterly.
"Well, my dearest cousin," be-
gan her companion, whom Sarah
Jane had not noticed, for she had





DOLLY'S GRIEF. 71

only been put into the cupboard
half-an-hour before, when our friend
was fast asleep,-" I am truly sorry
for you," she continued, "I know
it must be very trying to your feel-
ings to be put aside for a young
and pretty sister, especially after
all your sufferings. I thought of
you yesterday evening when I saw
your sister sitting on the parlour
sofa, looking so happy, and all
the company admiring her. Ah!
but she will grow up very vain,
and become disagreeable, while





72 DOLLY'S GRIEF.

you will always be sweet and
affectionate."
"But I shall most likely die
here while Angelina is still young
and pretty," said Sarah Jane, still
sobbing. "Ah dear cousin Alice,
I wish I was your sister, for your
mamma never loves new children
best, but loves the old ones always,
even better than the new.
"Quite true, quite true; she is
a dear sweet mamma," said Alice,
" I should like you for a sister, too,
dear Sarah Jane. You should not





DOLLY'S GRIEF. 73

be called Sarah Jane then, you
should have a pretty name. I
know mamma would let you, for
she always chooses pretty names
for her darlings."
"I should like always to be
called Ada Katharine, like I used
to be," answered Sarah Jane; "it
reminds me of so many happy
days."
"I think that my mamma is
very fond of you," continued Alice;
"and by the bye, dear cousin, I
have some news to tell you which





74 DOLLY'S GRIEF.

may cheer you up a bit. I heard
your mamma say to mine that
there must be a feast in honour
of her darling Angelina, and we
shall of course be invited to it."
"Ah but it will be no pleasure
to me. All the care and attention
will be for my sister. I may have
to wait on her. What an idea!
I shall be expected to admire her,
but I won't. I shall be scolded
for not being dressed nicely, but
how can I, when all my pretty
dresses have been taken away






DOLLY'S GRIEF. 75

from me, for Angelina?" As Sarah
Jane said this, the tears trickled
down, her pale cheeks, and she
really did look most miserable.
Alice tried to comfort her un-
happy cousin, and told her all the
news that she could think of to
amuse her.
Presently the cupboard door
opened, and a pretty little girl's
face peeped in, and she said-
"Now, my darling Alice, come
to the feast.-Why, Mary, here is
your Sarah Jane, isn't she to come





76 DOLLY'S GRIEF.

to the feast ? You had quite for-
gotten her, and she is looking so
unhappy."
"Quite true, quite true," thought
Sarah Jane to herself, as another
tear stood in her one eye, ready to
run out directly it was shaken.
"Yes, she may as well come,"
answered Mary; "we want all we
can get."
"I shall put her on a prettier
dress," said Minnie. This was
Alice's mamma who had opened
the cupboard. "She would look






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... .-:- ; s:' ., ., .... ,
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DOLLY'S GRIEF. 77

much nicer, you know, if she was
dressed better."
Do just as you like," answered
Mary, who was busy dressing An-
gelina in a white muslin dress, and
a pink satin sash. So Minnie found
a blue silk dress belonging to her
Alice, and dressed Sarah Jane in it.
When all the dolls were ready for the
feast they were seated in a row on
the sofa, and told to say their A B C
before they had any feast. Sarah
Jane almost forgot her troubles for
the time, for she was amused by





78 DOLLY'S GRIEF.

watching the others. It seemed
such a large and merry party to her,
for she had been so very lonely for
two days, and she counted up to
herself how many were there.
There were Cousin Alice and
Cousin Alfred sitting one each side
of her. Then there were Aunt
Ada's children-one was Cousin
Adelaide, who was very nearly as
pretty as Angelina, and there was
Cousin Polly, who was cook in the
doll's house, and had most likely
cooked all the feast. Sarah Jane






DOLLY'S GRIEF. 79

felt some comfort in thinking that
some of her companions were even
more slighted than herself. There
was also Cousin Fanny, who was
nurse in the doll's house, and Ellen
the housemaid, and John the foot-
man. There were also three baby
children, who lived in the doll's
house nursery. "Ah they are
all better off than I am," thought
Sarah Jane afterwards, they have
a nice house to live in. Ah me!
and I'm lucky if I'm in no worse
place than the cupboard."
4





80 DOLLY'S GRIEF.

They enjoyed their feast very
much, excepting that what they
had to drink tasted very nasty, for
it seemed like chalk and water.
They were told it was milk, and
they were expected to drink it, but
didn't they all make faces at it!
Presently Uncle Harry came into
the room, and how they all trem-
bled then, for everybody was afraid
of him! Angelina nearly fainted,
and her mamma had to hold some
salts to her nose, but having no real
salts she thought salt would do as






DOLLY'S GRIEF. 81

well. But she couldn't have been
so very faint, for she was able to
fancy that the salt did her good.
Sarah Jane could not help feeling
a little wicked wish that Uncle
Harry would just pitch upon that
affected Angelina, and make her
feel something of real suffering.
They all trembled still more, and
turned very white, when Uncle
Harry snatched Angelina from her
mamma's arms, and holding her
by her hair swung her round and
round. Oh, didn't she scream now !
V





82 DOLLY'S GRIEF..

and her mamma wept and entreated
him to save her, but he only laughed
and said, "Folly, folly, it's only
a dolly!" But he gave her up at
last, without having in any way
destroyed her beauty or her health;
only her tender nerves were slightly
shaken, and she had a violent fit of
hysterics, and was obliged to have
some more salt to do her good,
poor thing.
"Well!" thought Sarah Jane,
"there's one comfort in being
ugly, that Uncle Harry is not so











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DOLLY'S GRIEF. 83

anxious to hurt me; but I would
not be as sentimental as that for all
the world," and she looked scorn-
fully at her sister.
"My lovely, precious pet, he
shouldn't hurt her, no he shouldn't!"
said mamma, as she rocked the
sobbing Angelina to and fro in her
arms.
"Bah! I wouldn't be such a
baby," thought Sarah Jane, and
now when she began to think of it
she felt very glad that she was not
likely to be so spoilt.





84 DOLLY'S GRIEF.

Her cousin Alice, who sat next
to her, quite shared in her feelings.
After this event the party broke
up, for the mammas thought that
it would be much safer for the dolls
to be put away, and promised them
another treat after their Uncle
Harry had gone away to school,
which they hoped would be very
much pleasanter.
How happy Sarah Jane felt when
Aunt Minnie took her up in her
arms with Alice, and taught them
some lessons together out of a





DOLLY'S GRIEF. 85

very pretty picture-book! After
this they were put side by side into
a comfortable perambulator, which
was put into a large cupboard.
They both felt glad that they were
not separated, and they passed the
time by telling each other stories.
In the middle of the night they were
both dreadfully frightened by hear-
ing a loud scratching and nibbling
at something. They trembled vio-
lently, and took hold of each other's
hands, for they felt sure that it was
a mouse, and mice, you know, are





86 DOLLY'S GRIEF.

terrible things to dolls, for they are
much stronger, and sometimes eat
them up if they feel inclined, and
then it is no good for the poor dolls
to kick or scream or cry, for Mr.
Mouse pays no attention whatever
to their noise till he has had enough,
and rather more than enough, so
you may imagine how terribly
frightened these two poor dolls
were.
Oh, how glad they felt when at
last the horrible mouse went away,
without even looking at them!





DOLLY'S GRIEF. 87

What a good thing we had our
senses about us," they thought, "for
if we had been silly and sentimen-
tal we should have screamed out,
and Mr. Mouse would have heard
us, and would no doubt have hurt
us."
The next morning these dollies
in the cupboard were awoke by
hearing Mary, Sarah Jane's mam-
ma, sobbing and crying very bit-
terly, and as they were wondering
what was the matter, Minnie, who
was Alice's mamma, opened the





88 DOLLY'S GRIEF.

cupboard and took them out. Ah!
what did they see that made them
shudder all over? Angelina, who
was yesterday so beautiful, was
lying on the floor broken to
pieces! It was her own fault, for
she had been very proud and self-
willed the evening before, and
would sit on the mantelpiece, as
she thought it was the highest seat
and most suited to her, and also be-
cause she said she was too nervous
to sleep where a mouse might see
her, so she stayed there and fell fast






DOLLY'S GRIEF. 89

asleep; and while she was dream-
ing that she was walking with the
king of the fairies through a palace
of diamonds, she was suddenly
awoke and terrified by hearing
the clock strike close to her ear,
so in her terror she had fallen
off the mantelpiece and killed
herself.
SAh!" thought Sarah Jane, "I
ought never to have grumbled, for,
after all, I am much better off than
she was. I will try to be good, and
make my mamma love me. I only






90 DOLLY'S GRIEF.

hope that when I come to an end
it may not be through my own
fault 1"






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ARCHIE'S FAULT.


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ARCHIE'S FAULT.

ST was a very wet day,
and the children had
been indoors all the day,
and felt dreadfully tired
of everything. They had
played with their dolls, and played
at schools, and puss-in-the-corner,




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