• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Preface
 The cat and the hen
 A cat in a bag
 Sam and his dog Red-leg
 Bob and Tom Lee
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The new born lamb
 The good boy, the bad boy, and...
 Bad Ben and old Sam Sly
 Poor Fan
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Very little tales for very little children: in single syllables of three and four letters. First series.
Title: Very little tales for very little children
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055082/00001
 Material Information
Title: Very little tales for very little children in single syllables of three and four letters
Physical Description: 105 p. : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bell and Daldy ( Publisher )
Strangeways and Walden ( Printer )
Publisher: Bell and Daldy
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Strangeways & Walden
Publication Date: 1870
 Subjects
Subject: Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Readers -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Readers   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: With: Very little tales for very little children : in single syllables of three and four letters. Second series.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055082
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002239239
notis - ALH9765
oclc - 56903639

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Table of Contents
        Page 6
        Page 7
    List of Illustrations
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Preface
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The cat and the hen
        Page 1
        Page 1a
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    A cat in a bag
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Sam and his dog Red-leg
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
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        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Bob and Tom Lee
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
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        Page 86
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        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
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        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title 1
        Title 2
    Table of Contents
        Contents
    List of Illustrations
        List, Illustrations
    The new born lamb
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The good boy, the bad boy, and the nice wise girl
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
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        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Bad Ben and old Sam Sly
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Poor Fan
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
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        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    Advertising
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text








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---- 7



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Page 9.









VERY LITTLE TALES

FOR


VERY LITTLE CHILDREN.


IN SINGLE SYLLABLES OF THREE AND FOUR
LETTERS.


FIRST SERIES.





LONDON:
BELL AND DALDY, YORK STREET.
COVENT GARDEN.
1870.













CONTENTS.



THE CAT AND THE HEN ...

A CAT IN A BAG 25

SAM AND HIS DOG RED LEG 45

BOB AND TOM LEE 71













ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGk
Boy on Box.-Frontispiece.

Cat in Bag . 31

Shot in Leg . . 57

Dying Boy ....... 94












PREFACE.



THOSE persons who know the difficulty
:f putting into words of three or four
letters, any connected story suited to
the capacity, and calculated to fix the
attention of an infant, will, it is hoped,
feel more disposed to thank the writer
for attempting this little work, than to






PREFACE. 11

May He, without whose aid no work
can prosper, give the little book His
blessing !












FIRST TALE


THE

CAT AND THE HEN.

(N WORDS OF THREE AND FOUR LETTERS.








THE


CAT AND THE HEN.



PART I.
AN OLD BOY.

ONE boy had a pet cat; it was
an odd pet, was it not? and one
had a pet hen; it was an odd
pet too.
Ned, the boy who had the




THE CAT


cat, was a bad boy. He was
not big, but he was old : he was
ten; and yet he was bad.
Hal, the boy who had the
hen, was a big boy: he was not
so old as the bad boy, but he
was big for his age: he was but
six.
The boy of ten had a bad fit
one day; and tho' he was so old,
he did cry all day; but no one
saw why.
The big boy was sad to see
him cry, and he did ask him,





AND THE HEN.


" Ned, why do you cry all day?"
and did try not to let him.
But the bad boy hit him a
box on the ear; and put him off
and did say in a pet, "Sir, do
not ask me why I cry; I may
cry or not as I see fit: you are
bad to me, sir."
Oh, no, Ned, I am not bad
to you: I do not ask why you
cry, as you bid me not."





THE CAT


PART II.
A BAD BOY.

Boy of six. Why did you
say I was bad to you, Ned?
Boy of ten. You are bad to
me, sir.
Boy of six. Oh, Ned! I do
not say sir to you. Pa-pa did
say to me, one day, it was bad
to say sir; so do not say sir to
me, Ned.
Boy of ten. I may say sir,





AND THE HEN. 5
if I see fit; and I do say sir to
you, for you are bad to me, sir.
Boy of six. How am I bad
to you, Ned? Say how I am
bad to you, and I can try not to
be so.
Boy of ten. No, you do not
try; you are bad to me. Did
you not get the pet hen from
the old man at the cot, tho' I
did ask him for it, to lay an egg
for me?
Boy of six. Yes, I did get
the hen, but the old man at the





THE CAT


cot got it for me, and put it in
to my box, to lay an egg for me:
he did not get it for you, Ned.
Boy of ten. I can get it off
the nest yet, sir.
Boy of six. If you are so
bad to me, Ned, I can go to
Tom Orr, who is as old as you
are, and yet he is not bad to me.
Boy of ten. Do go off to
him. Go; you got a dog for
Tom, and you got no dog, or no
hen, for me; so you see you
are bad to me.





AND THE HEN.


Hal ran to Tom Orr, to sit
by him; for Tom was a boy
who was not bad; no one saw
him bad for one day, old as he
was.




PART III.
A SAD BOY.

Hal. Oh, Tom! I am so
sad to day; I can not say to
you how sad I am!





THE CAT


Tom. Why are you sad,
Hal?
Hal. I am sad to see Ned
so bad a boy: he is in his old
bad fit to day; and I can not
get him out of it all I can
do.
Tom. He may go out of it
now: we are not by to see him;
for he is a sad bad boy: but, as
we can not get him out of it, do
not let us be sad.
Hal. No, do not let us be
sad. It is a hot day, so let us




AND THE HEN.


go out. Let us get our dog,
and run to the new cut hay.
Tom got his dog; and Hal
and he ran off to the hay, and
lay on it in the hot sun: and
Tom put hay on the top of his
dog, and hid him for fun. So
the dog got out, and ran off to
Ned. Tom and Hal ran too;
and as Hal ran up to Ned,
he saw him sit on his box (the
box he had for his hen), and
Hal did cry out to Tom, "Oh,
Tom! Ned has got my box, and




THE CAT


my pet hen; and if the hen is in
the box, and can not get air, she
may die. Do, Tom, bid him
not sit on the lid on the box;
and do ask him to let my hen
get out." So Tom bid Ned let
Hal get his own hen out of the
box.
But the bad boy sat on the
box lid, and did not get off it;
and he had a sad air.




AND THE HEN.


PART IV.
A NEW BOY.

Now, Ned was a sad bad boy,
we all see; but, bad as he
was, he now saw his own sin;
for as Tom and Hal lay in the
hay, GOD had let him see how
bad he was, as you are now to
see. As he sat on the box lid,
he did say to Hal, "Oh, Hal,
you are not bad to me, but I
was bad to you: you do not yet





THE CAT


see how bad I was to you."
And Ned did cry. "But now I
ask you not to put me off; for,
if I try, you may yet see me a
new boy, and may let me be a
pet boy to you, as you are to
Tom Orr."
Hal. Yes, yes, you are my
pet boy now. Oh, joy, joy,
Tom! we may all cry joy to
day, for Ned is not a bad boy
now.
Tom, in joy. Do you say
so?





AND THE HEN. 13
Hal. Yes, he is a new boy.
Ned. I can try to be a new
boy; but you do not see how
bad I was yet.
Tom. Oh, if you try not to
be bad, it is all we ask; so now
be gay, as we are; and let us all
run to the new cut hay.
Hal. Yes, let us all run off,
and we can put the dog, and the
cat, and the pet hen, all in the
hay for fun; and Ned can see
the dog and the cat run out of
the hay; and the hen fly off to





THE CAT


her sod hut. Let us get the cat
and the hen, and go.




PART V.
A BOY SAD FOR HIS SIN.

NED did not get up: he did
cry on; and he did say, "Go,
Hal, run to the hay; but let me
sit on the box, for I am sad."
Tom. But why are you sad,
Ned? you are not bad now.





AND THE HEN.


Ned. Oh, no, not now; but
I was so bad.
Hal. How, Ned? do say
how?
Ned. I put the cat into the
box, on the top of the hen, and
sat on the lid to vex you, Hal;
and the cat bit the hen; and the
hen put out the eye of my cat,
but the cat did not die; no, it
got out, and ran off, as I put up
the lid of the box.
Hal. And did my pet hen
die?





THE CAT


Ned. "Oh, yes, Hal, you
may see it lie in the box; so
you see now how bad I am;"
and Ned did cry and sob.
Tom put up the lid of the
box, and Hal saw his pet hen
lie! Oh, it was sad to see her!
and Hal ran off not to see her
die: and he hid in the sod hut;
for, tho' he was not a bad boy,
yet he did cry for his pet hen.





AND THE HEN.


PART VI.
A BOY IN WOE.

HAL did not let Ned see him
cry. He sat in the hut; and as
he sat, he saw the cat lie on a
bed of hay far off. It did not
get up, or run off; but did cry
and mew, as if it was ill: so Hal
did go to it, and he saw it did
not see; and he was sad for the
cat; and Hal did rub its ear,




THE CAT


and try to be of use to it; and
the cat did pur for him; but it
did not see him.
Hal sat by the cat, and Ned
ran in, to say he was on his way
to the man at the cot, to ask for
a new pet hen for him; and as
he saw Hal pat his cat, and rub
her ear, Ned put his arm on
Hal, and did cry, and say, "Oh,
Hal, was I not a bad boy to
you? Yes, I am bad to all!
Oh, how sad it is to see my
cat! It has no eye, it can not





AND THE HEN. 19
see, and it is ill. Oh, if it did
but die, as the hen did!
Hal. Do not be so sad,
Ned; we can pet the cat, and
try to be of use to her yet; and
as you are not bad now, we may
all be in joy.
But Ned was not in joy.


PART VII.
A BOY IN JOY.
TOM now ran in to the hut,
and joy was in his eye, and he
C





THE CAT


did say to Hal, "Ned is not bad
now, is he ?"
Hal. No, no; he is a new
boy: he did ask GOD not to let
him be bad, and he is our own
boy now.
Tom. If so, do not let us
be sad all day, but let us run
to the hay, and try to lay it
out to dry for the men who
mow.
Ned. You can not be sad,
Tom, for you are not bad; but I
am bad, and can not be gay. Do





AND THE HEN.


you two go to the hay; but let
me go and try if I can get a
new pet hen for Hal.
So Tom did say, "Yes, you
may go (and fun was in his
eye), but Hal and I may go too.
Let us get the box and go." So
all ran to the box and Ned did
get it; and he set up the lid to
put in a bed of hay for the new
hen; but, to his joy, the old pet
hen lay on its bed in the box;
and she did fly out as he set up
the lid; and did fix her eye on





THE CAT


him, as if she was in joy to see
him.
So Ned did cry out, "Oh,
joy, joy, Hal; she did not die!
I see how it is, she had got ill,
by the bad air in the box; but
she did not die !"
And so it was. As Hal and
Ned ran off, Tom saw the hen
was too ill to get up, but not so
ill as to die; and he had put her
on the hot hay in the sun, and
let her lie; and she got out of
the fit and got up, and did fly





AND THE HEN.


to her box to eat; so all was
nowj oy, as she did not die.
The cat did not see, but she
was not ill; and Ned, as oft as
he saw her, set her in his lap
and fed her, and did say, "Oh,
how sad it is to be a bad boy!"
and he was now the pet boy of
Tom and Hal, and all who saw
him; and the eye of GoD was
on him, as it was on Hal and
Tom.


END OF THE FIRST TALE.












SECOND TALE.



A CAT IN A BAG.

IN WORDS OF THREE LETTERS.








CAT IN A BAG.


PART I.
A SAD BAD BOY.
SAM RAY was a bad boy. He
was so bad, he did not do as he
was bid; but he did all he was
bid not to do.
One day he got an old pet
cat, and he put her in a bag, and
did try to tie her up in the bag.




A CAT IN A BAG.


The pet cat did mew and
cry, and did try to get out of
his way, and she bit him on the
leg, and on the arm, and got off.
But Sam did not let her go
far; he ran at her, and got her
up on his arm, and hit her a
box on the ear. Nor was the
box all he did to her; no, he
put her in to the bag, and did tie
her up in it; and he cut a rod,
and hit her, as she lay in the
bag, to get her to cry out. Oh !
was he not a sad bad boy ?




A CAT IN A BAG.


PART I.
THE BOY WHO WAS
NOT BAD.
HAL RAY was not a bad boy;
and ran out to see why his old
pet cat did mew and cry in so
sad a way.
He ran up to Sam, and did
say to him, "Oh, Sam! why did
you tie the cat up in the bag?
and why do you hit her? It is
bad to do so; I can not let you
do it."




A CAT IN A BAG.


Sam. I do it for fun, Hal;
I tie her up in the bag, and I
hit her, and get her to cry, all
for fun.
Hal. Let her out of the
bag, Sam, I beg of you; do let
her go. It is no fun to her, to
be put up in to a bag, and
to be hit, and if pa-pa or mam-
ma see you, it may be bad fun
for you; so do let her go, I
beg.
Sam did not do as he was
bid. No, he did not let her go,





A CAT IN A BAG.


but hit her, as she lay in the
bag.
Now, his pa-pa and mam-ma
did not see him; but GoD did.
The cat did cry and mew as
he hit her, as if she had got
mad; and did try to get out.
As she did so, she saw a rip
in the bag, and to her joy, she
got out one paw, and one eye,
and one ear; and now the rip
ran up to the top of the bag;
and pop! out got the cat, ear,
and eye, and paw, and all.




A CAT IN A BAG.


PART III.
AN EYE OUT.

THE pet cat did not now run off,
out of the way of Sam. No,
she was now as if she was mad;
and she was in ire at him, and
ran at him, and, oh, sad to say!
she bit him in one eye, so as to
put it out; and she cut him on
the lip, and ear, and on the eye
lid of the eye she had not bit;
and the lid of it lay all cut and





A CAT IN A BAG.


red on the eye, so as not to let
him see at all.
It was now Sam who was to
cry; and, oh, how he did cry
out! It was sad to see him;
for he saw no one. Tho' the
sun was up, and by his ray had
lit up the day, for all men to
see, yet Sam saw no one; no
air, no sky, no sun! day was
now no day to him.




A CAT IN A BAG.


PART IV.
ILL IN BED.

HAL now ran in for his mam-ma,
and she ran to see her son, and
to ask why he did cry; but as
she saw his eye lid, and his ear,
and his lip, and the bad eye, all
cut in a way so sad, she was in
woe for her son, and she did
say to Hal, How has Sam got
cut in so bad a way?"
Hal. It was the cat who





A CAT IN A BAG.


ran at him, mam-ma, and bit
him, and put out his eye; but
do not ask me why the cat ran
at him.
His mam-ma did not ask,
but she put Sam to bed, for he
was too ill to sit up. It was sad
to be ill, was it not, and it was
sad to be in bed too; but it was
woe to be ill, and in bed, and not
to see, all in one.




A CAT IN A BAG.


PART V.
NOT FIT TO DIE.

ONE day Sam was so hot, and so
ill in bed, she let him get up;
but his eye did not let him sit,
or lie in one way, all day. He
got in to bed, and out of bed,
and did try to lie, and try to sit
up; but, no, he was so ill, he
saw he was to die; and so did
Hal.
Hal did cry and sob, to see





A CAT IN A BAG. 39
him so ill; but Sam bid him
not.
Sam. Do not cry for me,
Hal, for I am a bad, bad boy.
I am to die, and yet I am not
fit to die! oh, if I had let the
cat go, as you bid me! But I
did not do as I was bid, and
now I am to die, and I can not
see mam-ma, or pa-pa, or you.
So Hal did cry too, and was
as sad as Sam. But his mam-
ma said to him, Do not cry,
my boy; Sam is ill, but GoD





40 A CAT IN A BAG.
can yet fit him to die. It is to
be of use to him, GOD has let
him be so ill. The cut on his
eye lid is not a bad one: he is
not so ill now as he was; and he
may yet see, and not be ill.
Hal. Oh, do you say so,
mam-ma? Oh, I am in joy if
you say Sam may yet see!
Sam. Tho' I am ill now,
and tho' my eye is out, I may
not die, but may see you all
yet! Oh, joy! Ah! mam-ma,
let us all ask GoD not to let me





A CAT IN A BAG.


sin, and not to let me die, but
to let me see.
"Oh, yes!" Hal did say,
"do let us ask Him not to let
Sam die."
So his mam-ma bid Sam ask
and say, Oh! my GoD, do not
let me be a bad boy; but aid
me to do as I am bid; and let
me do to all, as all are bid to do
to me."





A CAT IN A BAG.


PART VI.
THE OLD PET CAT.

IN a day or two Sam was not so
ill. The bad eye was not so hot
and red; and the cut on the eye
lid was not ill at all, tho' he did
not yet get the lid up off his eye.
As the day was at an end,
he got in to bed, in joy; for he
now saw he was not to die: and
Hal lay by him, in joy too. As
the sun got up, Sam got out of





A CAT IN A BAG.


his bed, and did rub his eye;
and, Oh, joy! joy! he saw it
was day; "I see the sun! I see
the day!" he did say; and he
did cry out to Hal, "I see the
bed, Hal, and you in it! oh,
get up, get up! and let us run to
mam-ma, and let her see how I
can see now!" And his pa-pa,
and mam-ma, and Hal, as all
saw him, did cry out, "Joy!
joy! our boy can see!"
Sam now ran for the old pet
cat, as he had got his eye to see





A CAT IN A BAG.


her: and he got her on his arm,
and had her for his own pet;
and he fed her, and let her lie
in his bed: and the old cat sat
on his lap, and did pur for him
in joy, as she. let him rub her
ear. And his mam-ma did say
to Sam, You do not use her ill
now, my boy, so we do not see
her fly at you, to put out an
eye, and cut you, as she did .the
day you put her up in the bag."


END OF THE SECOND TALE.











THIRD TALE.


SAM AND HIS DOG

RED-LEG.

IN WORDS OF THREE LETTERS.








SAM AND HIS DOG
RED-LEG.


PART I.
THE LAP DOG.
SAM was a big boy, and he had
a pet lap dog. He let it lie in
his bed as he lay, or he let it sit
in his lap as he sat. He fed it
out of all he had to eat; and it
was as fat as a fed pig; yet it





48 SAM AND HIS
was not so big as a kid of a day
old! Was it not a pet ?
It had a red tip to one ear,
and it had one red leg; so now
you see why it was dog Red-
Leg. If Sam bid it put up the
red paw on his lap, the dog did
as it was bid, and put up no
paw but the red one; or if he
did say to it, Go, Red-Leg, and
get me my hat off the pin," Red-
Leg ran for the hat, and got it
off the pin for Sam; and got
him no hat but his own.





DOG RED-LEG.


Now, Red-Leg was a dog of
wit, as you may see; and Sam
was a lad of wit, too; and he
had got a gun; for he was old
and big, and fit to use one: and
he let no one get at it, or use it,
but men. But Bob (a boy who
saw him get it) was sad, for he
had no gun. He was not fit to
get one, tho' he was as big and
as old as Sam.
Bob was son to an old man
who lay ill in a cot not far off.
The old man had no son but




50 SAM, AND HIS
him. He had had a son who
was not so old as Bob; and he
was not bad. He was fit to die;
so GOD had let him go up to
Him in joy; and now the old
man had no son but Bob; and
he was a bad, bad boy.
Bob had no dog, nor any
gun; but he had a pet of his
own, and it was a bad one.
You may say it was fit for a bad
boy to get a bad pet. He had
set a gin one day, and he got an
old mag-pie in it; and tho' the





DOG RED-LEG. 51
mag-pie had its leg cut in the
gin, Bob did not let it go, but
put it up in a box, and had it
for his pet.



PART II.
THE DOG AND GUN.
Now, Sam and his dog, and Bob
and his mag-pie, set off one day,
to sit on the dry sod in the sun.
The mag-pie sat by Bob,
and Red-Leg lay on the sod by
E




SAM AND HIS


Sam. The eye of the dog was
on Sam; but his lip and his leg
lay on the top of the gun.
Now, Bob was in joy to see
the lip of the dog at the top of
the gun. "It may go off! it
may go off!" said the bad boy.
"The gun may go off and hit
Red-Leg, and vex Sam. But
my pet mag-pie can not be hit
by the gun; for the top of the
gun is to Sam and to his dog,
and not to me, or to my mag-
pie."





DOG RED-LEG.


But the gun was not in the
way to go off as it lay. It was
a new gun, and it was an odd
one too. If Sam was to let off
his gun, he had to fit a tin cap,
or cup, on a peg in the gun;
and the cap was to be hit on the
top, to set the gun off.
Now, Sam had put a cap on
the peg of his gun; and Bob
saw how he did it: for he had his
eye on the gun, and he did say,
" Oh, if it may but go off, and
hit the dog! He is a bad old





SAM AND HIS


cur, tho' he has a red leg; and
he bit my mag-pie one day. So
do, gun, go off, and hit him if
you can.
But the gun did not go off,
tho' Bob bid it. So he ran and
got a log-a big, big log (he
did not let Sam see him get it),
and he let the log hit the cap of
the gun on the top, to set it off;
and the gun did go off; and
how can I say to you all the ill
it did?
It did not hit Red-Leg; but





DOG RED-LEG.


it hit the pet mag-pie: and Bob
saw her lie on the sod, and he
was sad, and did sob and cry.




PART III.
A BAD SON.

To hit the mag-pie was not all
the ill the gun did. The old
man of the cot was not far off,
and, sad to say, the gun hit him;
yes, it hit him, and he lay on the





56 SAM AND HIS DOG.
sod, as if to die Bob did not
see the gun hit the old man; but
it had cut him on the leg: and
tho' he did not cry for the cut,
yet, as he lay on the sod, he did
cry to see one who was his own
son so bad a boy.
Bob, now, as the mag-pie
lay on the sod, saw how far a
gun can go; and he saw, too,
how bad it is to let one off; yet
he was not so sad for the old
man, as for his own pet mag-pie:
and he did say, "Oh, why did the





SAM AND HIS DOG.


gun go so far? why did it not
hit the old cur who had his lip
on it, and who bit my pet?
why did it not hit him?" So he
did cry and sob, and was sad.
But Sam said to him, "Do
not cry, Bob: the mag-pie may
not die. It can fly yet, you see;
and, may be, it is not so ill as to
die."
Bob. Oh, yes, sir! my mag-
pie is ill: you saw it try to
fly, but it can not get up. You
may see it now fix its eye on




60 SAM AND HIS
me, as if to ask why I let off the
gun at it? No, no, my mag-
pie can not fly, nor can it sit.
It can but lie on the sod and
die! And now I see it die!
Oh, how sad I am And Bob
lay on the sod by his pet; and
did cry, and sob, and hit the sod,
as we oft see a bad boy do.





DOG RED-LEG.


PART IV.
A SAD PA-PA.

THE old man of the cot saw
Bob lie on the sod; and, ill as
he was, he got up, to ask if he
was hit by the gun : but, as he
saw his son was not hit at all, he
said to him, Oh, Bob, you are
a bad boy! I saw you let off
the gun; and you see how it
has hit me, and cut my leg!
You let it off to hit Red-Leg,




SAM AND HIS


and did try to aim it at him;
but it did not go off so as to hit
the dog; no, it hit the mag-pie
you had for a pet (as was fit for
it to do), and you saw it die.
Now, you see the gun has
hit me too, and I may die, as
the mag-pie did; and, if I do,
who can be to you as I am? A
bad boy can get no one to aid
him, and how can you get on if
I am not by you? Oh, my son!
my son! bad as you are, I am
sad for you !"





DOG RED-LEG.


Bob got up off the sod, and
did fix his eye on the cut his
pa-pa had got. It was not for
his pet mag-pie he was now sad.
No, he was in woe to see his
pa-pa so ill!
Sam was sad to see the old
man ill, and sad to see Bob in
woe; and he said, "Bob is in
woe, sir, to see you so ill; and
he is sad, too, I see, for his own
sin: so he may yet get off his
bad way, and be as a son to
you. Do not, I beg, let him see





64 SAM AND HIS
you in ire. He may be of use
to you now you are ill; and he
can not be so sad, if you let him
be of use to you."
Bob. Oh, do not ask him
to let me be of use to him! I
am too bad a boy. I, who let
off the gun, and hit him, can not
be as his son.
Sam. You can try to be
of use to him, and to be as a son
to him now he is ill; can you
not?
Bob did not say yes, or no;





DOG RED-LEG.


but he did cry as he saw the sad
cut on the leg of his own pa-pa;
and the old man said to him,
"You see, Bob, the eye of GoD
is on us all. Sin can not be hid:
for GoD can see all who sin.
He saw you hit the gun, and let
it off, as you sat on the sod;
and He did to you as you did
try to do to Sam. You did try
to vex him, and GOD saw fit to
vex you. But GOD did it to let
you see how bad you are, so as
not to let you go on in sin."





66 SAM AND HIS
Bob. Oh! I was bad bad
to Sam, who can vex no one;
but, oh! how bad I am to you!
You can not now let me be as
a son to you.




PART V.
THE END.

THE old man, and Bob, and
Sam, got in to the cot; and as
Bob saw his pa-pa so ill, and





DOG RED-LEG.


the cut on his leg so red, he ran
to his bed, and lay on it in woe,
and did ask GoD not to let his
pa-pa die.
Oh, GoD! I am a bad, bad
boy," said he; "a boy of sin!
But I am sad for all the ill I
did, and now I ask Thy aid to
get me out of the way of sin.
Thy Son can see all we do, and
He has an ear to all we say:
oh, let all I now do be fit for
His eye; and let all I say be fit
for His ear. And, oh, do not
F




SAM AND HIS


let my pa-pa die! But say I
may yet be a son to him; and
let me be Thy son, now and to
my end. A-men."
So Bob got up, and ran to
his pa-pa to try to be of use to
him; and GOD let him be of use,
and let him get all he had to ask
for, and in a day or two the old
man was not ill, and he said to
Bob,
"You do not vex me now,
my boy, for you try, I see, not
to be bad; and you see how





DOG RED-LEG.


GOD can aid us all to get out of
the way of sin, if we but try to
do so."
Then Bob said to Sam, low
in his ear, "Oh, Sam, I am in
joy now! pa-pa said 'my boy!'
Oh, I see he can let me be his
son yet!"
"Yes," said the old man, "I
can let you be my son. You
are my own son now. May
GoD let you be His son too."


END OF THE THIRD TALE.













FOURTH TALE.



BOB AND TOM LEE.

WITH

A FEW WORDS IN FOUR LETTERS.










BOB AND TOM LEE.


PART I.
A RACE.

IT was a hot day, at the end of
May, and Bob Lee, as he lay in
his bed, said to Tom, "Let us
get up, Tom; see how hot the
sun is; let us get up and go
out. We can run to the bay,





BOB AND TOM LEE.


and get a dip in the sea; so do
get up, and let us go."
But Tom said, "No, Bob,
we can not go. The bay is too
far off; we may not go so far,
for pa-pa and mam-ma bid us
not."
Bob. Why, Tom, the bay
is not far off at all. The sun is
not too hot; and the dew is
on the sod yet. Do let us run
off, and try to get a dip.
Tom. No, Bob; I can not
vex mam-ma. Tho' the dew is





BOB AND TOM LEE. 75
on the sod, yet the air is as hot
as if it was mid day; and she
bid us not run in the hot sun, or
dip in the sea to day, as you
have been ill.
Bob. But I am not ill to
day, Tom. You may lie in bed,
if you like it; but, as for me, I
am up now, and I can go to the
bay by my self.
Tom. Oh, do not dip in
the sea, Bob, I beg of you. I
can get up, too, and we may go
and get our dog, and run on the





BOB AND TOM LEE.


sod; but do not run to the sea,
or dip; for if you do, you may
die.
Now Bob was a bad boy:
he was as bad as Sam Ray. So
he did not do as he was bid,
but ran off to the bay to get a
dip.
Tor got up and ran out too,
to try to get up to Bob, and not
to let him go. And, as he ran,
he gave a call out to Bob, "Oh!
do not go on, Bob; do not dip
in the sea; do not be so bad a





BOB AND TOM LEE. 77
boy. You will vex pa-pa and
mam-ma, if you do."
But Bob ran on, and all he
said was, Ha, ha, ha! I am
too far on for you to get me,
Tom." And as he got to the
bay, he put off all he had on,
and ran into the sea, and got his
dip, just as Tom got up to him.
"Ha, ha! ha, ha! I am in
the sea, you see. Yes, I am in,
up to my arms: you can not get
at me now. Let me see if you
can.





78 BOB AND TOM LEE.
"Tho' the day is so hot,
Tom, and tho' I ran so far, yet I
am not too hot now I am in the
sea; no, Tom, I am cold: oh,
too cold!"
As he said this, he gave a
loud cry and put up his hand to
his head, and said, "Oh, Tom!
my head, my head!" and he
fell back in the sea.





BOB AND TOM LEE.


PART II.

A FISH MAN'S COT.

BOB lay in the sea; and if Tom
had not run in, and got him in
his arms to pull him out, the sea
had been his bed to die in.
But Tom got him out at
last, and set him on a dry sod,
in the sun; and took his own
bib, to dry the wet off him,
and to rub him warm; and he
put on all he had had on, and




80 BOB AND TOM LEE.
sat by him on the sod, and held
him in his arms.
But Bob was so ill, he fell
out of his arms on to the sod, and
did not stir. At last he said,
" Oh, Tom, I am ill! I can not
see you. Take me out of the
sea, and let me go to mam-ma."
Tom was in joy to hear one
word from his lips, for he had
been sure he was dead; and he
said, "You are out of the sea,
Bob: and I will get you on my
back, and take you to mam-ma."




BOB AND TOM LEE. 81
So Tom took him up on his
back, and bore him on as far as
an old fish man's hut, at the end
of the bay; and as Tom got to
it, he had to lay Bob on the sod,
and to sit on it him self to rest.
And as he sat he said to
Bob, Let us try to get into the
cot, and old Sam Joy can let
you lie on his bed till I run
home for pa-pa or mam-ma, to
come for you."
And Bob said, "Oh, yes,
Tom; do run for pa-pa and




82 BOB AND TOM LEE.


mam-ma. I am not so ill as I
was, and I can lay on the sod,
or go into the hut by my self:
so go, I beg of you."
Tom ran off; and Bob got
up to go into the hut; but he
was so ill, he had to lie on the
sod as he was. "Oh !" said he,
"I can not get up: GoD has let
me get ill, I was so bad a boy."
So he lay on the sod, and did
cry and sob, for he now felt how
bad he had been.





BOB AND TOM LEE.


PART III.
THE BULL DOG.

As Bob lay on the sod he saw
old Sam Joy, the fish man, lay
out his net to dry, not far off.
" Ah! he will take me into his
cot, and let me lie on his bed,"
said he; but ,as he sat up to
look for Sam, his eye met the
eye of an old bull dog, who, as
he saw a boy so near the cot,
was on lurk to bite him. Ill as
G





BOB AND TOM LEE.


Bob was, he now rose up to try
to get up into an old elm tree
that was near the cot; but the
dog ran at him, and got him by
the leg, and bit him : and all
Bob had to do was to cry out to
Sam Joy, and beg of him to call
the dog off; but Sam was too
far off, to see or hear him: and
Bob said to him self, "Ah! I
see how it is: I am so bad a
boy, GOD has let no one be near
to help me. Oh, pa-pa, mam-
ma, and Tom! why did I not do





btUB AND TOM LEE. 85
as you all bid me?" So he gave
him self up for lost, for he saw
the old bull dog fix his eyes on
him, and rush up the tree at
him, as if to tear him in bits.




PART IV.
FOX.
JUST as Bob had lost all hope,
Sam Joy got to the end of his
job. He had set one net in the





BOB AND TOM LEE.


sea, and had put one out to dry
on the sod; and he was now on
the way home to his cot, when
he saw his dog make a high
leap to get up to some boy who
was in the elml tree. And Sam
gave a loud call, and said,
"Fox, Fox! oh, fie, Fox!" and
off ran the dog, with a wag of
his tail, to meet the old man,
and left Bob in the tree.
When Sam came up, and
saw Bob Lee in the tree, he was
in joy that his dog had not got




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