• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Gregory Gold
 Digging deep
 Mary and her aunt
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Gregory Gold and other stories
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055081/00001
 Material Information
Title: Gregory Gold and other stories
Physical Description: 62, 2 p. : ill. ; 13 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Strong, J. D ( Joseph Dwight ), 1823-1907 ( Editor )
Rudd, Nathaniel ( Engraver )
Hyde, John N ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: 1870
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Wealth -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1870   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: edited by Rev. J.D. Strong, author of "Child life in many lands" etc.
General Note: Some illustrations engraved by Rudd and some illustrated by J. Hyde.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055081
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002447283
notis - AMF2537
oclc - 56903570

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Gregory Gold
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Digging deep
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Mary and her aunt
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Advertising
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text


























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GREGORY GOLD,

AND

OTHER STORIES.



EDITED BY
REV. J. D. STRONG,
AUTHOR OF "CHILD LIFE IN MANY LANDS," ETC.









BOSTON:
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY,
38 & 40 CORNHILL.
1870.













GREGORY GOLD.



EALTH, health
and friends had
Gregory Gold ;
but excellent as
these blessings
are, they will
not of them-
selves make a
man happy. The fruit of happi-
ness grows not on such barren
boughs. Gregory was one of
those who seem to see a long way
5






6 GREGORY GOLD.

before them, and who prosper in
all they undertake. When he
bought into the funds, stocks rose;
when he purchased land, it was
soon after wanted for the railway,
and thus became more valuable;
and when he speculated-in hops, a
sudden advance took place, on ac-
count of the great failure of the
hop plantations. Gregory was, in
the language of the world, a
"lucky man; and if thriving in
his concerns could with any pro-
priety be called "luck," a lucky
man he was; but, alas he lived
without God in the world.






GREGORY GOLD. 7

Gregory Gold had a fine man-
sion, with every comfort that he
could crowd into it. Had he paid
half as much attention to the wel-
fare of his soul as he did to the
comfort of his body, it would have
been better for him; but how can
a man who lives only for the world
set his affections on things that are
above? Gregory had fine gardens
and an admirable vinery; this
vinery was a pet of his, and he
boasted of it all the country
round. It was a common saying,
and much it pleased him to hear
it, that the largest bunch of the






8 GREGORY GOLD.

best grapes that had ever been
seen in the neighborhood grew in
the vinery of Gregory Gold.
Man has been likened to a tar-
get struck by the arrows of
worldly trouble; but a rich man
is a broader target than his poorer
neighbor, on account of the ex-
tent of his possessions; no wonder,
then, that he is more frequently
stricken. Notwithstanding his
great prosperity, Gregory Gold
had often to endure petty troubles.
His favorite horse fell down and
cut his knees; his choice puppy,
that slept every night on the rug











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GREGORY GOLD. 11

by his bed, sickened and died; a
hail-storm broke the glass panes
of his hot-houses; his coachman
turned out dishonest; the large
mirror in his drawing-room was
fractured by a careless servant;
his tulip-roots, for which he had
paid so high a price, sprang up
into common flowers; and what,
perhaps, vexed him and'mortified
him more than all put together,
was the fact that a wealthy neigh-
bor had outdone him in the prod-
uce of his vinery, leaving him
only "second best in the estima-
tion of those who had before






12 GEGOIOY GOLD.

trumpeted his fame. These
things, and many others of the
same kind, which ought not to
have much moved him, vexed his
temper, wounded his pride, and
made him suppose that no one was
tried so much as he was; the least
of his annoyances was magnified
into a great affliction.
Gregory Gregory does it be-
come a man, blessed with health
and so many comforts, to forget
the goodness of God, and to give
way to pride and anger on account
of a few tulip-roots and a few
bunches of grapes? For shame






GREGORY GOLD. 13

for shame! Open your eyes to
your mercies, that you may think
less of your little cares.
At no great distance from the
mansion of Gregory Gold stood
the cottage of Richard Moreton.
This cottage, by a sad accident,
had been nearly burned down; but
Richard, helped by his kind neigh-
bors, had been able to restore it to
almost its former state. Gregory
Gold would, no doubt, have lent a
helping hand; but Richard More-
ton was too diffident to ask him,
and Gregory Gold was too much
occupied with his own concerns to






14 GREGORY GOLD.

trouble his head with those of his
poorer neighbors.
Many a man, unknown to him-
self, is rendered selfish by his
success in the world, and his keen
desire to obtain wealth. There
are hundreds who, knowing noth-
ing of the trials of those below
them, are deaf and blind to sor-
rows, which otherwise they would
be quick to see and ready to re-
lieve.
Richard Moreton was the very
opposite of Gregory Gold; for he
had neither health, nor wealth,
nor earthly friends of any influ-






GREGORY GOLD. 15

ence; but he had this great ad-
vantage, that from his earliest
youth he had been brought up in
the fear of the Lord. He not
only feared God, but trusted in
him; and, grateful for his daily
bread, went on from day to day
magnifying the Lord, and greatly
rejoicing in God his Saviour.
What happens to the poor often
happens to the rich, and teaches
them to feel for others' calamities.
The fire at Richard Moreton's cot-
tage hardly occasioned a thought
on the part of Gregory Gold; but
the fire which broke out in his own






16 GREGORY GOLD.

mansion had a very different effect
upon. him. Much damage was
done; and a great deal more would
have been done, had it not been
for the timely aid and resolute
conduct of Richard Moreton, who
seemed to outdo himself in his ex-
ertions; had the house been his
own, he could not have been more
in earnest in his attempts to sub-
due the flames.
Gregory Gold, when he came to
consider, was not a little ashamed
to find himself so deeply indebted
to one towards whom he had
shown no kindness in the day of






GREGORY GOLD. 17

distress; however, all that he now
had to do was to make amends for
his neglect, and to reward his
neighbor for his valuable ser-
vices.
It was on the Sabbath following
the fire that Gregory Gold called
at the cottage, where he found
Richard Moreton reading the
Bible to his children. His son
and daughter had just read a chap-
ter in the Gospel of St. Luke, and
Richard was explaining it to them
as Gregory Gold entered. After
talking about the fire, and thank-
ing Richard heartily for the kind






18 GREGORY GOLD.

part he had taken, the conversa-
tion went on thus: -
"Your health is not very good,
I believe?"
"No, sir, I am not over strong.
and yet I should do very well if I
could get rid of the rheumatism,
which often lays me up for a week
together; but God knows what is
best for me."
And how is your wife? Has
she better health than you have?"
"No, sir; for two months she
was bedridden, though she is now
able, you see, to sit by my side.
Many a time has she worked hard






GREGORY GOLD. 19

for me when I have been put by,
and now it is my turn to show
kindness. She has been a good
wife to me, and a good mother to
my children, and while I can get a
crust she shall share it."
"I am afraid that your eyes are
not very good, for they look
rather red."
"My sight is not good; but,
blessed be God, I can see to read
my Bible, for the print is large.
What a blessing, sir, is a large-
printed Bible If my eyes were
worse than they are, I should not
be without comfort, for God's






20 GREGORY GOLD.

word tell us that 'affliction cometh
not forth of the dust, neither doth
trouble spring out of the ground.'
Well may we trust God, sir, in
natural blindness, when we see
that he shows so much tenderness
for poor darkened souls. 'I will
bring the blind by a way that they
knew not; I will lead them in
paths they have not known: I
will make darkness light before
them, and crooked things straight.
These things will I do unto them,
and not forsake them.'"
And what do you mean to do
with your children?"






GREGORY GOLD. 21

"I must do the best I can with
them and for them, sir. I had by
me a trifle of money, that might
have come in useful enough some
-day; but the fire took it all, and
now and then I am afraid; but I
have no right to be afraid; He
who feeds the ravens will feed
them. Come what will, sir, they
are brought up to fear God, and
to look for salvation to him who
died on the cross for sinners."
"Richard Moreton, in spite of
your troubles, you are a happy
man."
"Well, sir, I should rather say





22 GREGORY GOLD.

that I am contented and thankful
than happy; for this is a world of
trial, and we must expect, if
through mercy we get to a better,
to go 'through much tribulation.'
God's grace does not prevent a
man from bleeding when he is
wounded, nor from feeling sorrow
when he is afflicted, though it
does give him patience to endure
his affliction. God has been very
merciful to me, and I have much
more reason to praise him than to
repine."
Gregory Gold listened with
wonder. A new train of thought





GREGORY GOLD. 23

had been opened to his mind, and
he became desirous to be alone.
He failed not to recompense liber-
ally the service of his poor neigh-
bor, and on his return home was
heard to say, "My troubles are
very little, and Richard Moreton's
are very great; but I see now
how it is; while I have been mak-
ing mountains of mole-hills, my
neighbor has been making mole-
hills of mountains." This visit to
the cottage of Richard Moreton
was attended with a holy influ-
ence; so that, graciously led by
the Holy Spirit to God's holy






24 GREGORY GOLD.

word, and moved to serious
thought, Gregory Gold became a
wiser and a better man. He was
led as a penitent sinner to cast
himself, in true faith, on the Lord
Jesus Christ as his Saviour.
Is there no other person in the
world, think you, besides Gregory
Gold, who has run into the error
of making mountains of mole-
hills?
Some people are too apt to
think that others have fewer and
less afflictions than themselves;
but if they only knew what many
endure, they would be ready, with






GREGORY GOLD. 25

upraised hands and thankful
hearts, to render thanks to their
heavenly Father for his forbear-
ance and kindness. After all,
Richard Moreton might be said to
be a richer man than Gregory
Gold in his unchanged state; for
Gregory had then only provided
for time, while Richard was pre-
pared for eternity.














DIGGING DEEP.



MONG
Those I
Shave ever
met with

in my
rambles
up and
down the world, Old Gerrard, the
gardener, is not to be forgotten. I
could tell you many things about
him, but at the present moment I
27






28 DIGGING DEEP.

have only a short accouilt to give;
but, short as it is, it may contain a
lesson worth learning.
One day Gerrard was digging a
bed to put in the early potatoes;
Francis Blythe and his sister Fanny
came into the garden, for they
loved to hear the -old man talk.
The young people made the best
of their way to the potato-bed,
where Old Gerrard was at work,
and the following discourse took
place among them:-
"I see that your spade is quite
bright; how long have you been
used to digging? "






DIGGING DEEP. 29

"How long, Master Francis?
Why, I have been a digger all my
days. When I was your age I
dug for my father; when a little
older I dug for my master, and
after that I dug for myself; and
now you see how I am digging
for your father. The history of all
my digging would take some time
to tell."
"Oh do tell us all about it,
Gerrard."
Not all, Master Francis; but
if you and Miss Fanny would like
to hear a part of it, I will tell it
you, and welcome."






30 DIGGING DEEP.

"Thank you, Gerrard; thank
you. I shall much like to hear
about it, and so will you, Fanny,
I know."
Yes, that I shall; so the sooner
you begin, Gerrard, the better."
"Then I will begin at once,
miss; and I shall be very glad if
you can turn to a good purpose
anything that falls from the lips of
Old Gerrard. My father was a
gardener, and he first taught me to
dig. 'Gerrard,' he used to say,
'never be afraid of bending your
back, for he that works hard in the






DIGGING DEEP. 31

day sleeps easy in the night.' And
again, 'Gerrard, never be back-
ward in bending your knees to
your Maker, for he only can give
you grace to stand erect in the hour
of trial.'"
"You had a good father, then,
Gerrard ?"
I had, Master Francis, and as
good a mother too ; but it pleased
God, in his wisdom and mercy, to
take them from the world when I
was a boy. At that time I was
working for a nursery-man, and he
used me hardly, and made me dig






32 DIGGING DEEP.

beyond my strength; and so, having
no parents to guide me, and more
spirit than was good for me, instead
of bearing it patiently I ran away
and made the best of my road to
Bristol, got on board a merchant
ship, and became a digger of the
sea."
A digger of the sea What do
you mean by that?"
"I mean, Miss Fanny, that I be-
came a sailor. The keel of a ship
cuts its way through the waters,
and people call this ploughing the
sea; and what is ploughing but






DIGGING DEEP. 33

digging in a different way? When
sailors row a boat they dig the
waters with their oars; but you
must not think this to be a fancy
of mine. In the first chapter
of the prophet Jonah it says,
'Nevertheless the men rowed hard
to bring it (the ship) to land, but
they could not;' but though it
says rowed in the verse, in the
margin of my Bible it says digged;
so you see, after all, that I was
right in calling myself a digger of
the sea."
So you were; so you were."
"While I was a sailor we had






34 DIGGING DEEP.

deep digging to go through, for
heavy storms came upon us; and
sometimes the ship seemed to dig
her way almost to the bottom.
'They that go down to the sea in
ships, that do business in great
waters; these see the works of the
Lord, and his wonders in the deep.
Oh, that men would praise the
Lord for his goodness, and for his
wonderful works to the children
of men (Psalm cvii. 23, 31.)"
"How long did you remain at
sea?"
"Quite long enough, Master
Francis; for I had none ab6ut me




















limit






DIGGING DEEP. 37

there but wild companions, who
taught me to smoke tobacco, drink
liquor, and swear, so that gentle-
men used to point me out as a
warning to their sons. We went
to hot countries, where the sun
seemed almost to burn us up; and
we sailed to cold countries, where
there seemed to be no sun at all, -
frost and snow on the land, and
icebergs on the ocean. Well, the
ship was lost, and I was cast on a
desert island. I sat for two days
on the shore. It was a terrible
thing to sit there without food from
hour to hour, and then to see the






88 DIGGING DEEP.

"sun go down, leaving me alone in
darkness. I tied my handkerchief
to a piece of wood, as a signal;
and at last I was seen by a passing
ship, which took me off the island.
It pleased God to spare my life;
and then I next enlisted for a
soldier."
"Then you gave over digging at
last?"
"No, Miss Fanny. I was then
obliged to dig more than ever."
"Why, do soldiers dig?"
Some of them do. I enlisted
among the Sappers, and in times
of war they are often obliged to





DIGGING DEEP. 39

use their pickaxes and spades very
nimbly. I had enough, and more
than enough, of digging in the
trenches. War is a fearful evil.
How sad it is that the wickedness
of men is such that we cannot all
live in love and peace, and in the
knowledge of our Lord and Saviour
Jbsus Christ! I was a sad, wild
young man when a soldier.
"And how came you to give
over a soldier's life? "
"I got wounded, but, thank
God, not so badly as to disable me
from getting my living. So, after
obtaining my discharge from the





40 DIGGING DEEP.

Sappers, I worked in a coal mine,
where I dug deeper than ever."
"Do you call working in a mine
digging, Gerrard ? "
"Why not, Master Frank?
While digging in the coal mine, a
crash, which is a fall of coals,
caught me, but through rfercy it
did not kill me. This accident
was a means in God's hands of
sobering my mind, opening my
eyes, and leading me to serious
thought. I began then to dig
deep in the precious mine of
God's holy word, and the only
way of salvation through a cru-






DIGGING DEEP. 41

cified Redeemer was made known
to me. I repented of my sin and
believed the promises of God.
The peace of God passes all un-
derstanding. I have dug for it in
Holy Scriptures as a man digs for
hidden treasure. And now I
have told you a little of my deep
digging."
As Francis and his sister
walked away from the garden,
they talked of Old Gerrard.
"He dug deep," said Francis,
"in the nursery ground, in the
sea, among the Sappers, and in






42 DIGGING DEEP.

the coal mine; but he dug deeper
in God's word than in any of
them."











MARY AND HER AUNT.


UST in





little




pale cheeks and a bad appetite,
went to live with her aunt. Mary
43






.44 MARY AND HER AUNT.

was not a happy child, for she had
been sadly spoiled by being
allowed to have her own way.
She neither loved to do any kind
of work, nor to read her Bible,
though she was able to do both.
It pleased God to take away her
parents, and then, having no other
earthly friend to take care of her,
she lived with her aunt in a
poor cottage. The ground was
hard, the ponds were frozen, and
the trees were powdered over
lightly with snow, and hung with
rime when Mary first came to the
cottage; but the holly-bush at the






MARY AND RER AUNT. 45

corner of the garden fence, with
its bright red berries, looked
cheerful.
"I do not like this cottage,"
said Mary; "there is nothing in
it."
"Oh, but there is, though,"
replied her aunt, with a smile.
"Thank God, we have a crust in
the cupboard; and see yonder, on
the table, lies my big Bible.
' Bless the Lord, O my soul: and
all that is within me bless his holy
name. Bless the Lord, .0 my
soul, and forget not all his bene-
fits."' (Psa. ciii. 1, 2.)






46 MARY AND HER AUNT.

In February, the weather being
mild, Mary's aunt set her to weed
one of the beds, but she did not
like it. "It would never do for
us not to work," said Mary's aunt,
"while all the ploughmen and
farmers' boys are so busy around
us in the fields. Besides, God's
holy word says, 'The hand of the
diligent maketh rich.'" (Prov. x.
4.)
In March, Mary Hollins found
the cottage and the country more
pleasant than in the last month;
for, though the wind blew, the
weather grew warmer. The






MARY AND HER AUNT. 47

rooks began to build in the high
elm-trees; the thrush and the
blackbird were seen and heard in
the narrow lanes, and the country
people became busier at their
work, ploughing and sowing.
"If other people work harder than
they did," said Mary's aunt, "so
must you and I, Mary, while we
have health. How good is God
to keep sickness out of our little
cottage!"
In April, the showers fell and
the sun shone, the grass grew, and
buds and flowers and bees and
butterflies increased. Mary's






48 MARY AND IER AUNT.

heart was then a little lighter, and
she read the big Bible to her aunt
with better temper, and she began
to love it and to pay great atten-
tion to her pious aunt's words. It
was pleasant to see the rainbow in
the sky, to look at the flowers
springing up in the gardens, and
to hear the voice of the cuckoo.
Mary's aunt was always praising
God for his goodness. "It is a
good thing to give thanks unto
the Lord, and to sing praises unto
thy name, O most High." (Psa.
xcii. 1.)
In May, the fields all round the





















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-~









MARY AND HER AUNT. 51

cottage were a perfect picture, for
the trees were covered with fresh
green leaves, the hawthorn was
in blossom, insects were on the
wing, and the birds were singing
from morning till night. Mary
really began to feel happier than
she had yet been ; she worked, and
that gave her an appetite. She
also loved to sit in the evening at
the cottage door, enjoying the
fresh air. Then her aunt kindly
taught her, and was always cheer-
ful and thankful. What! said
her aunt, "shall we' let the birds






52 MARY AND HER AUNT.

sing, and have we no songs of praise
to our heavenly Father? "
In June, the little cottage was
one of the prettiest places you
ever saw; for the rose-tree at the
door was in full bloom, the garden
was a complete posy, and the bees
in the beehive seemed as if they
would lay up all the honey they
could while the weather was warm
and the sun was shining. Mary
and her aunt now worked in the
hayfield. It is true Mary could
not do much, but she did her best,
and was all the better and all the
happier for it. At night she read






MARY AND HER AUNT 53

to her aunt about David the young
shepherd, or the little captive
maid, or the Saviour Jesus Christ
healing the sick, and making the
blind to see and the lame to walk.
Mary's aunt began to love her
niece better than ever. What a
peaceful place is our little cot-
tage," said she, and how thank-
fully ought we to rejoice !"
In July, what with the singing
of the milkmaid, the fine weather,
the glowing colors of the sky, the
field flowers, the waving corn, and
the ripening fruit, Mary seemed as
cheerful and contented as her aunt.






54 MARY AND HER AUNT.

Her wilful temper was altered for
the better, and she gladly did
what she was told to do. At this
time trouble unlocked for entered
the cottage. Mary's aunt was
taken very ill, and some thought
she would not live. In this
trouble she had faith in Jesus
Christ, and was at peace. Little
Mary's heart was full of grief, and
she prayed to God, in the
Saviour's name, that her aunt
might not die. It was a happy
time for her when her aunt got
well again.
In August, Mary was busier






MARY AND HER AUNT. 55

than she had ever been, for her
aunt took her to glean in the corn-
fields, and to pick hops in the hop-
yard. She worked, too, in the
garden, and she saw how her aunt
managed the bees when they be-
gan to swarm. There was always
something for her to do, and she
was always ready to do it. She
loved her aunt more and more.
When she knelt down on the cot-
tage floor in prayer, her heart was
at peace; and when she read in
the great Bible how Jesus Christ
died for sinners, she was more
thoughtful, and would talk with






56 MARY AND HER AUNT.

her aunt for an hour together
about holy things.
In September, Mary's aunt cut
her garden hedge with the large
shears, thinned her bed of turnips,
and pulled up the weeds that grew
among her leeks and onions. Be-
sides these things, she still went
gleaning with Mary, and some-
times for half a day together they
went nutting in the wood. I
hardly think, among the poor peo-
ple of the parish, two persons
more cheerful and contented could
be found than little Mary and her
aunt. "Godliness with content-






MARY AND HER AUNT. 57

ment is great gain." (1 Tim. vi.
6.)
In October, Mary's aunt gath-
ered the medlars from her tree to
lay them by, that they might get
mellow. She also took Mary,
early in the morning, to gather
mushrooms, and in the afternoons
to pick blackberries. Both the
mushrooms and the blackberries
were sold; so that, what with one
thing and another, money was laid
up in the cupboard ready to buy
clothes and to pay the rent of the
cottage. "Cold weather is com-
ing on," said Mary's aunt; "but






58 MARY AND HRR AUNT.

He who has blessed us in the sum-
mer will bless us in the winter,
never fear. 'Oh, give thanks unto
the Lord; for he is good; for'his
meroy endureth forever,'"
In November, the wind began
to'whistle round the cottage, and
the leaves were blown from the
trees into the air. Many people
are frightened at the high winds,
but Mary's aunt had learned to put
her trust in Him who holds the
winds in his fists, and she gently
led Mary on to trust him too.
In December, came the frost
and snow; and though Mary and





































IU.CIC~i-I~



.--csi ~~
~~_r









MARY AND HER AUNT. 61

her aunt could not work out of the
cottage, they found quite enough
to do within it. What a change
had taken place in Mary in twelve
months! She had a good appe-
tite and a rosy cheek; her wilful
temper was subdued; she was
submissive, teachable, cheerful,
thankful, and always as busy as
a little bee. Besides all this, she
really did love the large old Bible;
and when Christmas-day came,
she joined her aunt with all her
heart in singing the words:-

The Lord of life and glory
Put by his glittering crowvn;







62 MARY AND HER AUNT.

It was to die for sinners
That he from heaven came down.
Oh, these are happy tidings,
And well may Christians say,
Rejoice in Christ our Saviour!
Rejoice on Christmas-day!"








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