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Group Title: Bessie's country stories / Thomas Miller ;, 6
Title: The young angler
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055074/00001
 Material Information
Title: The young angler
Series Title: Bessie's country stories Thomas Miller
Physical Description: 60, 4 p. : ill. ; 12 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Miller, Thomas, 1807-1874
Sheldon & Company (New York, N.Y.) ( Publisher )
Boston Stereotype Foundry ( Electrotyper )
Publisher: Sheldon and Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Boston Stereotype Foundry, electrotypers
Publication Date: 1870
 Subjects
Subject: Nature -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Summary: Describes the animals and plants to be found in the countryside.
Statement of Responsibility: by Thomas Miller.
General Note: Added series t.p., engraved.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follows text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055074
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002447038
notis - AMF2292
oclc - 27039833

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Advertising
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Content
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Advertising
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



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THE YOUNG ANGLER.
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Bessie's Country Stories.

SIX VOLUMES.

THE SHEEP AND LAMB.
THE YOUNG DONKEY.
THE LITTLE RABBIT-KEEPERS.
THE COCK OF THE WALK.
THE COWS IN THE WATER.
THE YOUNG ANGLER.










THE


YOUNG ANGLER.


BY THOMAS MILLER.


ILL USTRATED.






SHELDON AND COMPANY.
1870.

























Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 18oS,
BY SIIELDON AND COMPANY,
In the Clerk's Offie of the District Court of the Southern
District of New York.














Electrotyped at the
BOSTON STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY,
No. 19 Spring Lane.









The Young Angler.



T is pleasant to walk beside
some inland river, that
falls into the sea, and see
the young angler sitting
under a tree, watching his red float;
for when that is pulled under the
water he knows a fish has got hold
of his hook, and, giving a sharp
pull, he has it out in a second, and
pops it into his basket. Sometimes
a fish gets hold of the bait, that is
very strong, and when he pulls, it
(7)





8 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

pulls too, and breaks his fish-line,
then swims away with the hook in
its mouth. You would think, after
such an escape, it would be cautious,
and never make a bite at a fish-hook
any more; but it does not do so,
and, perhaps, before he goes home
he may catch the very same fish,
and find his hook in its mouth.
And how often is it the case with us,
when we have done something
wrong, for which we suffer, that,
while the pain lasts, we resolve
never to do so again, yet go and do
it almost before the pain has gone:
but we are worse than a silly little
fish, for, when it is tempted by the
bait, it does not see the hook, while






THE YOUNG ANGLER. 9

we have sense enough to know when
we are going to do wrong before we
do it.
Some fish are very pretty, and
have fins as yellow as gold, and
scales as bright as silver; and
it is not cruel to catch them in a net,
put them at once into water, then
carry them home, and leave them
to swim about in a large glass globe,
giving them such food as they like
to eat, and changing the water very
often, so that it may be as fresh and
sweet as the stream they lived in
before you brought them home.
Those white swans go sailing past
the young fisherman, and are not
at all afraid of him; and very pretty





10 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

they look moving about the water,
and they do it so easy too, moving
one foot now and then, so as to go
slow or quick, just as they please.
You see the young angler knows
how to fish, through sitting so far
back that his shadow does not fall
on the water, for, if it did, it would
scare the fish, and they would swim
away from him, instead of keeping
round his red float, which does not
frighten them.
I think it is much nicer to live in
a pretty village, in summer, than it
is to go to the sea side, because
there are so many things to be seen
in the country which are not to be
found in a sea-side town. Round a






STHE YOUNG ANGLER. 11

.village, there are pleasant walks
through the fields all among the
flowers, and birds singing, and bees
buzzing about, and little insects in
the air and among the grass; and
pretty white lambs bleating among
the daisies, and dear little calves
beside the cows, and long-legged
foals running races, and leaves al-
ways in motion on the trees, as if
they had nothing else to do all their
lives but dance for joy. And it is
so nice to have country brown bread,
and sweet butter just churned, and
cheese-cakes, and custards made of
eggs and cream ; and to have honey,
and fruit fresh from the garden,
where we have tea in the summer-





12 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

house that stands beside the hedge,
in which the birds build their nests,
and where we can see the young
ones if we peep among the branches.
Then we sleep so sound at night,
after such long walks ; and, when
we wake in the morning, we can
hear the birds, and the lambs, and
the cows; and the cocks crowing,
and the hens cackling, and all sorts
of country sounds, that are so
pleasant to the ear. And when we
peep out of the chamber window,
we see the garden, and orchard, and
fields, and hills that are a long way
off; and the boy driving cattle to
water, and the milkmaid with her
milk pail on her head, and carts and






TIE YOUNG ANGLER. 13

horses moving about, and all the
busy stir of village life. And when
we walk down the village street, we
can stop and see the wheelwright
making a wagon, and watch him
put the spokes in the wheel; or look
at the blacksmith shoeing a horse,
while he holds its foot up beneath
his knees, and drives the nails into
its hoof without hurting it. Then
we pass a farm-house, with beehives
and roses before it, and clean milk-
pans put out to sweeten; and see
the old sheep-dog, sleeping at the
gate in the sunshine; and the pretty
white cat, up in the apple tree, half
hidden among the leaves, where it
is waiting to catch a bird. Then we






14- THE YOUNG ANGLER.

can peep in at the dame-school and
see Billy, who has been a bad boy,
pinned to the old woman's gown-
skirt; and little Jack, with his
thumb in his mouth, crying, because
he was playing at marbles on the
floor instead of minding his lesson,
and the old dame has taken them
from him, and is shaking her rod at
him, and saying what she will do if
he does not give over crying, which,
if she does it, will make him cry
louder than ever: yet the old wo-
man is kind to them, and will, when
they are very good, strew a little
sugar on the dry brown bread they
bring with them to school; and all
her charge is threepence a week,






THE YOUNG ANGLER. 15

which includes teaching them man-
iers, and that is, to make a bow to
her when they come in and when
they leave school; and if they for-
get, which they often do, she shouts
out, Where's your manners, sir?"
Now the grass begins to seed, and
must be mown to make hay to feed
the cattle in winter; and the sound
you just now heard was made by
the mower, with his rag-stone, as
he whetted his scythe to make it
sharp, and give it a rough edge,
which is the best to cut grass. How
hard he works what long strokes
he takes what hundreds of blades
of grass and pretty flowers he cuts
down at every stroke he takes and





16 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

look how smooth and level the field
is where he has mown it and the
grass is raked off!
It is very pleasant to go into the
hay-field, and help to make hay, be-
cause the more you throw it about
the better it is for it. It has to be
turned over with hay-forks, and well
shaken and dried, before it is put
into the wagon, to be carried away
by horses, and made into great hay-
stacks with pointed tops. Though
there are many hundreds of kinds
of grass, there is only one that
gives such a nice smell to new hay,
and that is called the vernal grass,
and very pretty it is.
Then, if the farmer is good-





THE YOUNG ANGLER. 17

natured, he will only laugh when
he sees you rolling in it, and
throwing it over each other, cover-
ing up some dear sister or, brother
with hay, as the little robins did
the "Babes in the Wood" with
leaves, until not so much. as a hand
or foot can be seen. There are
some grumpy, cross, old farmers,
who will not let children play with
the hay, hut are as nice about it
being handled as if they had to eat
"it I wish they had. Do not go
into their hay-fields, for they will
not let you have a jolly romp, as.
if you could do any harm--such.
grumpies.!
Though he does not do it on pur-
2





18 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

pose, sometimes the mower, with his
sharp scythe, cuts off the head of
some bird or pretty field-mouse, or
something that is squatting and
hiding in the grass, and afraid to
move when it hears the scythe
coming near it. I once picked up a
corn-crake such a handsome bird !
- with its head cut clean off in that
way; and you do not know how
sorry the mower was for what he
had done, when I showed it him,
though he could not help it.
Many a pretty little field-mouse's
and dormouse's nest is found in the
field, after the grass is mown, often
with the young ones in, that are
,quite blind, and .have hardly any






THE YOUNG ANGLER. 19

hair on them, and are not much larger
than a pin. The nests of birds, too,
that build on the ground, as a few
do, are also found when the grass is
cut down early in the season, as it
is sometimes; also the nest of the
ground bee, and those of many
strange insects that burrow in the
earth, and of whose habits we know
so little.
Now the roses are all in bloom,
and throw out such a strong, sweet
smell after a shower, that the very
wind seems weary as it moves
along, under such a load of fra-
grance. The scarlet stocks are also
in flower; and it must bother the
bees to know which to go to for





20 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

honey, so many blooms as there are
to choose from: and the great
woodbines, which are also called
honeysuckle, now put out their
blossoms, streaked with red, white,
and yellow, and as long as your
fingers; and, when you smell their
perfume, you think nothing is half
so pleasant, except it be the sweet-
brier. In our walks we find the
tall crimson foxglove, all speckled
inside, and looking amid the green
as if there was a fire, while many of
them rise up so close that they
touch each other. Beside the water-
courses we see the blue forget-me-
not, which is so pretty a name, and
such a dear little flower, that we






THE YOUNG ANGLER. 21

take it home and give it to those we
love, hoping they will never forget
the giver; and there is no wild
flower to compare with it for beauty,
unless it be the pretty scarlet pim-
pernel, which grows by the way-
side in places, and is no taller than
the white star-shaped chickweed.
The old gardener, who is going
home to his little cottage, with the
basket and rake over his shoulder,
could, if he liked, tell us a good
deal about the insects he turns up
with his spade, while digging the
ground; of some that he finds which
are great grubs, as long as your
finger, and turn to beetles; and
others that waken up out of the






22 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

earth, and open their great wings
and fly about; also the tiny ants,
that make a nest in which hundreds
live, and seem never at rest except
in winter, so busy are they in ar-
ranging their eggs, and feeding their
young; they are such clever little
things that they can make an arched.
passage on the hard, level gravel
walk, with only grains of sand, and
along which they can safely walk in
and out, without knocking down
one single grain; though, were you
to kneel and blow hard with your
breath, you would make a great
gap through it as wide as this book,
and not leave a mite of the tunnel
standing in the middle of the path-





THE YOUNG ANGLER. 23

way. That old gardener could
also tell us of insects that attack
the gooseberry and currant bushes,
while they are in flower, and spin
webs over the little green berries,
which cause them to drop off and
never become ripe; of the green fly,
that spoils so many roses; of the
jumping thrip and the cuckoo-spit,
which, when full grown, is about as
long as your nail, and looks like a lit-
tle tiny frog, though it is a rare fellow
to leap, and could, at one bound,
spring clean across the table; he
could tell us how one insect lays its
eggs in the nest of another, so that,
when its young come to life, they
feed upon those which were the first





24 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

to occupy the nests; and they, in
turn, are eaten by others, which
also are at last picked up by the
birds, and so on to the end; for
many of the birds are served up
as food on our tables.
It must make the birds very hap-
py to fly about and stand pecking
among so many sweet flowers; and
to show them to their young ones,
which, by this time, are able to fly,
though not very far at a time with-
out resting; and you may always
tell a young bird from an old one
through its flying so short a distance
at a time. But many of our sweet
singing birds will soon leave us, and
fly to some country over the sea,





THE YOUNG ANGLER. 25

where it will be summer when the
cold autumn winds are blowing
through the hedges in which they
built their nest. For the corn is
now in ear, and will soon be ripe
enough for the reapers to go out
with their crooked sickles to cut it
down, and gather in the harvest.
And where the forget-me-nots
grow beside the long lake-like pond,
you will also find the water-lily.
When first the water-lily shows it-
self among the leaves before it
opens, it looks like an egg in a green
nest; then as it gets larger you
might fancy it was a bird sitting
among the green leaves in the mid-
dle of the water, but when it fully





26. THE YOUNG ANGLER.

expands you see a great, grand white
flower, as large as a saucer sometimes,
and you wonder how it came there,
and could almost believe that some
water fairy, who was hidden beneath,
was holding it up in her hands. If
you could look beyond the trees, you
would see men and boys busy sheep-
washing, which is always done be-
fore they clip off the fleece, to make
the wool clean, and this is called
sheep-shearing. Sheep are good
swimmers, and so you would say, if
you saw the men take hold of them,
and push them about in the water,
for no sooner do they take their
hands off, than the sheep swims to
the bank, where it stands bleating,





THE YOUNG ANGLER. 27

while the water makes quite a pool
on the ground as it drips from the
wool; then she sees her lambs, and
they run up to her and bleat so sadly,
seeming to say, What ever have
they been doing to our poor, dear old
mother Why, bless my heart alive,
she's as wet as sop, and I do be-
lieve the brutes have been trying to
drown her! Come, cheer up, old
girl! and have a run with us in the
sunshine, and you'll be all the better
for it, for I see now they've only
been washing you, and I am glad of
it, for to tell you the truth, you
wasn't a bit too clean, but smelt
rather strong, and I always caught
a lot of sheep-ticks after sleeping





28 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

beside you, and I hope they are all
drowned, for they are nasty things
to bite; and I should have asked the
shepherd to have rubbed you well
over with sheep-salve if you hadn't
had this ducking instead; but come
along, old girl, and have a run in
the sunshine, and you'll soon be
dry." And the old sheep says
"Baa, baa, baa," which means,
"Well, my son, I don't mind if I
do." But if it makes the lambs
stare again to see the old ewe after
she has been washed, you may
guess how wide they open their eyes
in wonder when they see she has had
all the wool .clipped off her, and no
marvel that, in their way, they ex-





THE YOUNG ANGLER. 29

claim, Well, I never! why,
mother, what a guy they have made
of you. They have even taken off
the old flannel petticoat that used to
reach to your heels, and hardly left
a bit of anything on your back.
What a shame to strip you in the
way they have done, when the days
will soon begin to draw in, and the
nights to get cold, and you'll want
an extra blanket to keep you warm.
I wonder how they would like to be
nearly stripped to the skin, then
left to sleep on the cold ground.
You had a nasty cough after that
ducking, mother, and I shouldn't at
all wonder if you have the ague
now." And it does seem hard, yet





30 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

there is no other way of getting
woollen clothes in winter to keep us
warm, any more than there is of
getting mutton chops, without caus-
ing sheep to suffer. Then, by next
year, the wool will have grown so
much that the sheep will have to be
sheared again, and it very often
happens, that when their fleeces are
so long, they get tangled among the
brambles and thorns, and cannot
get clear unless some one helps
them, or they lose great handfuls
of wool in struggling to free them-
selves. When a boy, I went to a
sheep-shearing feast at a farm-
house, and they gave all us boys fur-
menty in brown porringers, and a





THE YOUNG ANGLER. 31

wooden spoon each; it was made of
boiled wheat, spice, sugar, and new
milk, and though it was very nice,
you could not eat much of it, for
you felt after, as if you had eaten
rather too freely of small gravel, so
heavy was the boiled wheat.
Look at that poor ass, which his
master has tied by the leg, instead
of leaving him free to have the whole
range of the Common There seems
to be only a few thistles within his
reach; and though he likes such
prickly food, he would prefer free-
dom with it, instead of being tied
up as he is. What patience there is
in his poor face what a gentle look
-in his eyes and I like him all the





32 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

more because mention is made of
him in the pages of our Holy Bible,
as you all know. He knows as
well as a child does, when he is
spoken to gently and treated kindly,
and will prick up his ears and trot
on as fast as he can, sooner through
a few kind words than he will from
cruel blows. Some worthy people
are called asses, because they do
more than their duty, and save the
idle from work, and take trouble
upon themselves for the sake of
others, who do not deserve such
kindness; and I would rather be
such an ass than one of those who
called me so, after I had done all
the good I could for him; for the





THE YOUNG ANGLER. 33

feeling that we have done our duty
is better than thanks from those
whose praise comes only from the
lips instead of the heart. I once
heard of a youth, who, thinking to
do something very clever, took up an
ass's little foal in his arms, and laid
it at the feet of a young lady who
had just come from the sea side,
saying, as he did so, "A present
from Margate." The young lady
looked very archly at him, stroked
the head of the pretty foal, and
said, "Yes, I see it is; and bears
the well-known motto of
'When this you see,
Remember me.'"
Which was very like saying, she
3






34 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

could not look at that ass with-
out thinking it was like the youth
who brought it to her, and remind-
ed her of him. I do not think he
ever came with a "present from
Margate" to that witty young lady
again not even with a little mon-
key, for fear of the old, well-known
motto.
Once I found a hedgehog rolled
up tight in a ball, and carried it
home, and kept it for many months,
feeding it on bread and milk, and
leaving it to pick up what it liked
best, and that was black beetles,
which it found in the coal cupboard.
If he shuts himself up in a tight
ball, you may roll him about the






THE YOUNG ANGLER. 35

floor, and throw him across the
room, and he will not open himself
do all you can. I was once trying
to make him show himself, and
threw him, by chance, into a pail of
water; that made him show his
nose pretty quick, I can tell you;
though it did him no harm, I think
it made him sneeze again.
I used to pass the corner of a
rabbit warren, and if I went up
very softly to the bank, in which
they had made large holes to their
nests, and gave a loud whistle or a
shout, scores of little rabbits that
were about would come full gallop,
and run into their burrows so quick,
that you hardly caught sight of






36 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

them as they stuck up their short,
white tails, and went helter-skelter
into their holes: and sometimes I
used to see young hares playing
about, such pretty little brown things
as you would have loved to have kept
as pets; as I once kept two of them,
until they grew big ones, when they
made a pie of one and jugged the
other. Was it not very cruel, after
they had got used to me ? But the
pie was very nice -so full of rich
gravy! and though, I dare say, I
cried while eating it, I was more
sorry when it was all gone.
And have you never found, my
dears, while grieving over some
trifling matter which really did not






THE YOUNG ANGLER. 37

merit a tear, that if you have a
rich raspberry tart in your little
hand, you have not yet bitten a
piece out of, that the thought of
how nice it will eat turns aside the
torrent of your grief diverts the
mind, so to speak, from the trouble
to the tart, and from the tart to the
trouble, until the first bite is made,
when your whole mind is at once
filled up with the pleasure of the
repast, and you dry your pretty
eyes, and wonder whether there is
any more tart to be had or not?
And this is what wise and learned
people call philosophy, a rather
hard word, meaning that -no trouble
can be found too great to prevent us





38 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

from minding our tart, if we have
got one; and, if we have not, it
will cheer us amid our grief to think
that we may have one soon.
What famous places some of
those old commons are for black-
berries, where the poor people have
the right of turning in their asses,
cows, and horses to feed! No one
ever thinks of stubbing up the
brambles on a wild, free common,
and so they are left to grow and
spread year after year, becoming so
broad, and getting matted so closely,
that you cannot reach anything like
half way across them to get at the
bramble-berries, which hang so
black and tempting in the middle,










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NUTTING AND BLACIBEIRYING.
39








THE YOUNG ANGLER. 41

so sharp are the hooked thorns. I
have seen wild places in England,
where, if they would have borne the
weight, two wagons might have
been driven side by side over the
bramble bushes that spread so wide,
and were so close, as to form a solid
hedge as broad as a large dining-
room; nor could I, by any means,
reach the large, ripe berries in the
midst of that immease space. Some
few of the longest branches might
be hooked out with a stick, but
there were others you could not
reach at all; and once a boy went
with me, and we got two peck-
baskets full of blackberries in one
afternoon, and a pretty job we had




42 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

to carry so heavy a weight home,
for each basketful weighed many
pounds. It was said that the place in
which we got them had never been
ploughed nor dug, nor grown any-
thing but what was wild, and came
up of itself, since the world began,
and it looked as if it had not, it was
so savage and wild all over.
There never was such a spot for
badgers, foxes, ferrets, stoats, wea-
sels, and wildcats as that, for there
was nobody either to shoot or trap
them; nor was there a hare or rabbit
to be found within five miles of the
place. If the hunter chased a fox and
it once got there, the hounds were
whipped off the scent, so thick and





TIE YOUNG ANGLER. 43

close were the hazels, brambles, and
gorse-bushes; and it is well known
that a fox can find a way into a hole
too small to admit a foxhound.
There were also snakes and adders;
and I once saw a black adder a
poacher had killed there a yard long.
The adder is the only venomous
reptile to be found in England.
Snakes are as harmless as eels, so
are toads and newts. The adder
has a deadly poison in its fangs, but
there are very few to be found now.
As for a snake or a toad they are
as harmless as a pretty little kitten,
and there is no more venom in them
than there is in a ripe sound cherry ;
and those who tell you there is,






44 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

know nothing at all about them. I
do, and tell you a truth, now well
known, that there is no venom in
either a snake, toad, newt, or frog.
When you are a little older, read
Bell's History of British Reptiles,"
and you will never be afraid of any
one of them any more. Too many
people hear things, repeat, and be-
lieve them, and never once try to
prove whether they are true or not.
Servants often do so, and frighten
children. They say, blind as a
mole," when it can see as well as
either you or I; and that the ant
"lays up store for the winter,"
when it sleeps all the time, -and
never once eats nor wakes again
until late in the coming spring.





THE YOUNG ANGLER. 45

Owls made their nests in the old
hollow trees, that grew here and
there in this wild-looking spot; and
great, broad-winged hawks built in
the branches, and looked down upon
the aged crab-trees, and sloe and
bullace bushes, which, at the close
of autumn, were quite black with
the ripe wild plums that hung on
them. No apples you ever saw
had a more tempting look than
those wild crabs at this season; they
seemed so yellow and ripe, and were
so richly tinged with red on the sides
that caught the sun; but only bite
one, and it would make you screw
your mouth up, I can tell you, for
no vinegar or lemon that you ever






46 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

tasted were ever half so sour as
those crabs, that seemed so much
like sweet, ripe apples. Then there
were smooth, open spaces, where the
turf was as soft as a carpet, with
patches of purple heath farther on,
and great beds of fern, on the
edges of which grew thousands of
harebells, that only flower at the
close of summer. Beyond these,
we came, here and there, upon a
wild growth of all kinds of shrubs
and trees, which there was no pass-
ing through thorns and brambles,
hazels and hollies, with trailing ivy
and woodbine--all closing round
some huge old oak that stood up
like a giant above the close thicket






THE YOUNG ANGLER. 47

that hemmed it in. Besides these,
there were acres of moist ground,
facing the south, that in spring-
time were blue and yellow, and
green and white, with bluebells,
primroses, and lilies-of-the-valley;
and this we used to call the Druid's
Garden, and try to fancy that some
old Druid lived there many hundreds
of years ago, and walked about
among those lovely flowers; for we
could not think there ever was a
time when they did not grow there,
without any other help than that of
the sunshine and the gentle rain.
Those great hogs, that were left
to pick up what they could in the
cornfields after harvest, are now, as





48 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

we see them, put into the straw-
yard to be fatted up against Christ-
mas, and cured for next year's bacon.
But for them, we should have no
hams, nor rich mince or pork pies,
spareribs or sausages, nor none of
that rich bacon which is so nice
with roast veal and boiled fowls,
nor yet that white lard which makes
such flaky pie-crusts and shortcakes.
And who is there, that ever sat,
down to a dinner of ham and green
peas, that did not think a pig was
a very nice thing when not too fat.
Many a poor family rarely taste any
other meat; and as it does not
take much to keep a pig, and they
can grow plenty of cabbages and
























"- L-111. !








II








HOGS IN THE STRAWYARD.
49








THE YOUNG ANGLER. 51

potatoes in a very little bit of gar-
den ground, they sit down and give
thanks for so good a meal, and
treat the pig kindly, and look at
him with loving eyes, though think-
ing how many stone he will weigh,
and about eating him all up after he
is killed. Some people make pets
of little pigs, and let them come
into the house to be fed, and I have
heard of one old lady, who, when a
very little pig was given her to pet,
sent it back with her love, and
would they be good enough to keep
it until just before Christmas, then
she should be much obliged to them,
and would have it killed, and cured,
and hung up for bacon. Still I






52 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

like to see them in the country, in
autumn, feeding on the acorns that
have fallen from the great oak trees,
and which they seem to be very fond
of; but were any one to give me a
nice little sucking pig, instead of
making a pet of it, I should have it
stuffed and roasted, and placed on
my table along with plenty of apple-
sauce and mealy potatoes, for it is
my belief that pigs were sent to us
to be eaten, even up to their very
tails, and country people say that
there is not a bit anywhere about them
but what is good. When you think of
the trouble the little old woman had
who went to market to buy a pig,
before she got home, to get some





THE YOUNG ANGLER. 53

supper ready for her good man, I
am sure you will say that it would
have tried your patience sorely; had
it been yours, and if the stick had
not banged the dog, and the dog
laid hold of the pig by the ear, I
think the old man would have
gone to bed without his supper that
night. I have heard say that a pig
will run up nine streets at one time
if it has the chance, sooner than go
the way the pig-driver wants it,
but I never could see very clearly
how it could run up so many streets
at once can you?
See in yonder field harvest
has begun! There the reapers are
hard at work cutting down the ripe






54 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

corn with their sharp, crooked
sickles. Were we a little nearer, we
could hear the hard brown ears of
wheat rattle together as the reaper
presses them down, and cuts them
off about a foot above the ground;
after which he binds them into
sheaves, each sheaf about as thick
as you could clasp in both your
arms; after that, the sheaves are
piled into shocks, the stubble end
resting on the ground, and the corn
standing up higher than your head,
one leaning against the other, with
an opening at the bottom for the
air to pass through the shock, and
dry the sheaves. The last thing is
the wagon, that comes to carry them





THE YOUNG ANGLER. 55

away to be piled into a large corn-
stack, that contains many hundreds
of sheaves; and, when that is well
thatched over, the harvest is gath-
ered in. Then the poor gleaners
come into the field, to pick up the
ears of corn which the reapers have
let fall; and many a poor woman
and her children glean enough to
supply them in bread half through
the winter.
When a little boy, I was a
gleaner, and went into the cornfield
with a large pocket before me, and
a pair of scissors hanging from a
string by my side; and when I had
gleaned a handful of corn, I cut the
straw off to within two or three





56 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

inches of the great brown ripe ears,
and rammed the ears well down into
the pocket. When that was full, I
went under the hedge, where my
dinner-basket was standing, and
where I had placed a large, coarse
bag, bigger than a pillow-case,-
and into it I emptied my pocket of
corn, cramming it hard down; then
I began to glean again, filling the
pocket and emptying it into the bag
until it was nearly night, when I
went home, having gleaned as much
corn as I could carry on my head:
and very tired I was, after such a
long, hard day's work, for I was but
a very little boy, and began to glean
at five in the morning, after walking





THE YOUNG ANGLER. 57

above two miles. Then my legs
and hands were very sore, through
moving among the hard, sharp stub-
ble which the reapers left standing,
about a foot high, after they had
cut down the corn; and which was
almost as hard and sharp as a field
of iron-skewers, all standing with
their points up, and their heads fast
in the earth. And as poor little
boys only wore stockings in winter,
and as you could not pick the ears of
corn up with gloves on had you
worn them, you may be sure it was
sharp work moving your feet
through, and putting your hands
into those keen, hard straw stubs,






58 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

which, in some places, were as close
as they could stick.
Then, after gleaning-time was
over, we beat out the corn on the
floor with a stick; and, when that
was done, carried it in a sack to
some field, and, spreading a sheet
on the ground, took a basin of corn
and chaff out of the sack, and,
holding it up as high as we could,
let it fall gently on the sheet, while
the wind blew all the chaff away
over the fields, as it did the thistle-
down when it was ripe: and when
we had done, only the clean, bright,
brown grains of corn were left,
which we again carried home in the






THE YOUNG ANGLER. 59

sack. Then we had to take it to
the mill to be ground ; and the miller
was a great thief, and kept about a
quarter of it for what he called toll,
and made us pay him besides in
money; but one day the wind blew
his mill-sails down, and all the peo-
ple said it served him right for taking
twice as much toll as he ou'ht to
have done; and, by so doing, rob-
bing the poor gleaners, who had
picked it all up an ear at a time.
Still it was very pleasant to eat the
sweet bread which you had got
through your own hard labor, and
which nobody had worked for to
feed you with, though you was but





60 THE YOUNG ANGLER.

a very little boy; and I often think
those little girls and boys are the
happiest who help their parents to
support them, and never eat the
bread of idleness.








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