• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Title Page
 Carrying the hay
 Beginning of a sad adventure
 Fall into the river
 The wounded hand
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: Violet stories
Title: A sad adventure
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055072/00001
 Material Information
Title: A sad adventure
Series Title: Violet stories
Alternate Title: Little Rosy's travels
Physical Description: 55, 5 p. : ill. ; 12 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Miller, Thomas, 1807-1874 ( Attributed name )
Sheldon & Company (New York, N.Y.) ( Publisher )
Boston Stereotype Foundry ( Electrotyper )
Publisher: Sheldon and Company
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Electrotyped at the Boston Stereotype Foundry
Publication Date: 1871, c1868
Copyright Date: 1868
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Mothers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's accidents -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fishing -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1871   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre: Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Attributed to Thomas Miller ... et al.. Cf. NUC pre-1956, v. 336, p. 287.
General Note: Added engraved series t.p.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055072
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002447198
notis - AMF2452
oclc - 57510254

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Advertising
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Carrying the hay
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Beginning of a sad adventure
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Fall into the river
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    The wounded hand
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Advertising
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Back Cover
        Page 61
        Page 62
Full Text



























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LITTLE ROSY'S TRAVELS.

SIX VOLUMES.


ON THE JOURNEY.
A WALK AND A DRIVE,
THE DUCKS AND PIGS.
THE WOUNDED BIRD.
A SAD ADVENTURE.
THE DOCTOR'S VISIT.












A SAD ADVENTURE.




ILLUSTRATED.







SHELDON AND COMPANY.
1871.


























Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 18C8,
BY SHELDON AND COMPANY,
In the Clerk's Ofice of th( T i Court of the Southern
district .- ork.















Electrotyped at the
BOSTON STEREOTYPE FOUNDRT,
No. 10 Spring Lano.










A Sad Adventure.



CARRYING THE HAY.

HE good Jack could not
carry all the hay that day.
He only took a little, just
to show them how they
were getting on up at the farm.
Rosy knew that there was plenty
more to do, and she was not at all
tired of the hay-field; so she tried
very hard to learn some new words
at her reading lesson, and to say all
that she knew without spelling.
(7)





8 A SAD ADVENTURE.

After that came the counting; and
Rosy's mamma was surprised to
find that she could count up to thirty
quite well, and that on this day
she remembered that two and two
make four, three and three six, and
four and four eight, without having
to find out on her fingers. So she
taught her a little more that she had
not learnt before; and then all the
books and the slate were put away,
and Rosy stood up before her mam-
ma to say the text which she learnt
yesterday, and to learn a new one.
It was only a tiny text that Rosy
ever learnt, because she was a tiny
girl; but her kind mamma was very
glad when she had not forgotten the
last one.





CARRYING THE HAY. 9

She could say quite well, -
"The Lord is my shepherd; I
shall not want."
So now she learnt, -
"He maketh me to lie down in
green pastures."
When she had said it over a few
times she knew it, because her mam-
ma had explained to her first what the
green pastures were, and told her to
think of the nice fields where the
hay was made, before the grass had
grown long, and when the sheep
used to lie in it; and she told her
that it meant that God was kind to
his people, and took care of them as
the shepherd does of his sheep.
Rosy listened, and said that she





10 A SAD ADVENTURE.

had asked God to make her one of
his little lambs, and to take care of
her like that, and asked whether her
mamma thought he could hear such
a little girl's voice. And her mam-
ma said, -
0, yes, because the good God is
always near you, and he loves to
hear the little children pray. He
can hear my Rosy even when she
does not speak out loud."
Then R.osy said that she had asked
God to make her a good girl that
morning, and she said, "Have I
been good, mamma?"
And her mamma kissed her, and
said, -
"Yes, my Rosy has been a very
good girl to-day."





CARRYING THE AIY. 11

Then Rosy whispered, -
"May I go again to the field,
dear mamma? "
Her mamma did not answer
directly, but held up her little girl's
chin and looked into her eyes. Then
she asked, -
Was that the reason why Rosy
wanted to be good? and she looked
rather disappointed.
But Rosy said, very earnestly, -
Mamma, I did want to be good
really; I often do; and I want to
go to the hay-field too."
So her mamma answered, -
Well, my chicken, you may go;
and I will go with you to-day."
Little Rosy did not stop for more,
but ran off, and said, -





12 A SAD ADVENTURE.

Please, nurse, dress me."
She was soon ready, and trotting
off by her mamma's side.
Susan, the farmer's daughter, met
them at the gate, and catching the
little one up in her arms, ran off
with her, saying that her cheeks
looked like rosy apples, and that
she really must let her eat a piece
of them.
Rosy knew that was only fun,
and she laughed, and said, -
"0, no, I can't spare any; Iwant
them all myself."
Then she scrambled down to run
up to the wagon which was being
laden, and Susan called out that her
two legs were just like two stone





CARRYING THE HAY. 13

pillars, they were so firm and
strong.
That was exactly what the little
girl liked; for of all things she
wanted to be very strong. The wagon
was already getting very full; and all
the people, with their large wooden
rakes, were raking the hay together,
and then the men, with their great
forks, hoisted it up and piled it on
the top of the heap.
There were two men up on the
top too, who were busy laying it all
straight, and when the wagon was
ready to start they wanted to lift
Rosy up; but she said, -
0, no; it is so heavy now for
the poor horses, and I am so heavy,





14 A SAD ADVENTURE.

you know. It wouldn't be kind;
they couldn't draw me at all."
The truth was, perhaps, that
Rosy was a little bit afraid of get-
ting up so high, and then old Peter
was not on the top, but some strange
men that she did not know. So
she ran to her mamma's side, and
said, -
"I had better not go up, mamma;
had I?"
And her mamma thought not; so
Rosy got some one to lend her the
great whip, and she ran as fast as
her little legs would carry her after
the horses, and pretended to beat
them. That was only fun; for the
poor horses were very good, and





CARRYING TIE HAY. 15

pulled away as hard as they could.
Rosy would not have beaten them
for the world; and I don't much
think that the men would .have let
her go near enough; for perhaps
the horses might not have liked to
be struck by such a little girl. They
might have been offended, and
kicked; and then poor little Rosy
might have got knocked down and
hurt very much.
So Rosy only ran near the wagon,
and cried out, -
Gee up, Miister Light Horse!
gee up, Mister Red HIorse or else
Rosy will get to the gate first."
And all the people shouted when
the wagon started, and said some-





16 A SAD ADVENTURE.

thing which meant Hurrah;" and
it looked very- pretty going under
the olive-trees, and through the
meadows, out into the open road,
and so to the farm.
That hay-making was a 'very
pleasant time, and Rosy said that
she had never been so happy in all
her life, and that she never should
forget it, not even if she lived to
be a hundred years old.
It was a pleasant time, too, for
her papa and mamma and nursey,
because their little Rosy tried hard
to be very good,.-not to be cross,
or rude, or selfish, or unkind all the
time; but kind, and gentle, and
polite to every one. And two or





CARRYING THE HAY. 17

three times, when she was beginning
to snatch her hat or her stick from
nurse when she was helping her,
she all at once remembered, and
said, -
"I so sorry, nurse; please kiss
Rosy."
2





18 A SAD ADVENTURE.



BEGINNING OF A SAD AD-
VENTURE.

OME time after the hay-
making Rosy's papa and
mamma went out one day
to pay some visits.
They left Rosy with nurse, and
told her to be very good, and only
to play in the garden or in the little
field which was near the houses.
She was to do everything that nurse
told her, and not tease her a bit, or
ask for a walk, because the good
nursey had a headache.
Rosy did not much like being left





A SAD ADVENTURE. 19

at home, for lately she had gone out
so often with her papa and mamma
that she thought she should be very
dull, especially as her nurse was so
poorly. However, she promised;
and she quite intended to be the
best of little girls that day.
As soon as they had done their
breakfast, and her papa and mam-
ma were gone, they went into a
sitting-room, which opened into the
garden.
The sun was very hot, and
nursey's head ached so much that
she could not go out at all. She
would have liked Rosy to stay in-
'doors, and play with her doll for a
little while, because then she would





20 A SAD ADVENTURE.

not have been obliged to keep
getting up to see where her chicken
was.
But Rosy did not like staying in,
even for a little while ; so the kind-I
nurse did not say no, but let her run
out before the window, only she bid
her keep in sight.
For some time the child sat on
a little seat making a daisy chain
for herself, which she brought in
pretty often to show how it was
getting on.
When that was done she crept
under the orange-trees and began
picking several kinds of large
wild flowers, which she knew she
might have. These were in-





A SAD ADVENTURE. 21

tended as a present for her dear
mamma when she came home, and
it took a little time to make them
up into a nosegay quite to her
mind.
When that was done she went
in again to show this grand present
to her nursey.
But poor nurse was lying down
then, and half asleep. She only
said, -
Yes, dear. I'll look by and by.
Mind you keep quite in sight, and
don't put anything into your
mouth."
And Rosy, seeing that it teased
her to talk to her, went out again in
search of some way of amusing
herself.





22 A SAD ADVENTURE.

There were no oranges now on
the trees to tempt her, for they had
all been gathered to make marma-
lade. When they were being picked
Rosy had one to taste, but she did
not much like it, for it was so bitter.
Now these same trees were getting
covered with white blossoms again,
and Rosy liked the smell, and some-
times wished she might have some;
but they were a great deal too high
for her to reach.
So she went round and round the
garden, and into the first little field,
picking wild flowers, and watching
the bees and flies and other insects
that settled on them. It was a dull
time certainly for the poor little girl,
for she had no one to play with.





A SAD ADVENTURE. 23

Perhaps you may wonder why
she did not fetch Julia, and play
with her in-doors ; but unfortunately
that young lady had had a dreadful
fall and broken her nose. It had
therefore been thought the best plan
to send her to a doll-doctor, to get
a new head and neck. So, you see,
poor little Rosy was left quite alone.
I think that the best way for her
would have been to stay by poor
nursey's side and build a house with
her bricks quite quietly; but Rosy
did not think so.
She wandered about until she saw,
in one part, a little hole in the
hedge which she had never noticed
before, and through this hole a





24 A SAD ADVENTURE.

bunch of beautiful scarlet anemones
pushing themselves into the garden.
Rosy loved anemones, and when
she peeped down she saw that there
were much better ones on the other
side. The hole was large enough
for her to creep through, and
through she went in a minute.
There were some other sweet-smell-
ing flowers there as well, and soon
she had picked a good many, and
was just going back with them,
when suddenly a most magnificent
butterfly took a fancy to her flowers,
and settled on her bunch.
Rosy laughed out loud with
pleasure, but she did not touch it
for fear of hurting it, only she stood
still to admire it.





A SAD ADVENTURE. 25

But the butterfly would not stay
to be looked at; it saw some violets
farther on, and flew to get sweets
out of them. Rosy ran too, for
she also liked violets, and she
thought to pick the very one on
which it had settled. However, the
butterfly was too quick for her. It
had seen a buttercup farther on, and
away it went in an instant. Rosy
was as quick in following, and so
they continued their game until she
suddenly found herself on the bank
of the river.
The butterfly flew across, which
was not at all fair of it, as little
girls have no wings, and so Rosy
could not cross too. But she did





26 A SAD ADVENTURE.

not think of that. It was the rec-
ollection of what she had done that
she thought of now.
What had her mamma said to
her about keeping close to the house,
and about never going near water?
And what had she promised?
Rosy was all at once filled with
shame and fear; for, besides being
sure that she had done wrong, she
remembered what her papa had told
her about little children, who will
not keep near their nurses, some-
times falling into the hands of
wicked people, and never seeing
their dear mammas again.
She turned to go home, but she
had run so far that now she could





A SAD ADVENTURE. 27

not see the. gate or the hedge
through which she had crept.
She ran a little one way, then
another, then stood still, and felt in-
clined to cry or even to scream for
help.
Just at this moment she spied a
man fishing in the river with a long
line.
At first she was frightened, and
thought perhaps he was a wicked
man, and might do her some harm;
when, at the same moment, the man
also turned and saw her.
He lifted his line out of the
water, and while he was putting
some fresh bait on the hook, he
began to ask her if she did not





28 A SAD ADVENTURE.

belong to the lady who was staying
at that large house up yonder. He
told her also that she was a pretty
little girl, and just the very image
of her mamma.
Rosy was pleased at this, and
thought that he must be a nice man,
as he knew her mamma and spoke
so politely to herself. She did not
mind being told she was pretty at
all; and, besides, she was very
anxious to watch some one fishing.
She had never seen fishes caught
before, only pictures of such things.
So now she stood by and saw the
man put the bait on the hook to
make the fishes come, and then
throw the line into the water. The





A SAD ADVENTURE. 29

man told her not to speak or she
would frighten the fishes away, but
to watch the end of the line. Very
soon she saw the water move. A
fish had come to eat the worm on
the hook and tugged the line down;
but the man who held the rod fast,
pulled it out quickly, and there was
a fish at the end of it, with the hook
sticking in its mouth, wriggling on
the bank.
Rosy did not like to see it so
much hurt; and she was glad when
the man took it off the hook. But
even then it lay gasping for breath;
and Rosy remembered that her
mamma had told her that fishes
could not breathe out of water; and
she cried out, -






30 A SAD ADVENTURE.

0, please put it in again "
But the fisherman said, -
"O, no, we want to eat it. Do
you never eat fish? "
Rosy certainly did, for she was
very fond of them; but still she
thought it a great pity that taking
them out of the water prevented
them from living.






F7t









VI








" The man pulled it out quickly, and there was a
fish atthe end of it."
(31)
--i': ".J" :
.i t",." ,-I i .-= o it



7l~l,i, :"' "Lh-,. jL






(31)








FALL INTO THE RIVER. 33



FALL INTO THE RIVER.

OSY was so taken up with
the fishing now, that she
had quite forgotten about
her having done just what
her mamma had said she must not
do, in running down to the water.
She had forgotten her fears, too,
about what nurse would say, and
also about this fisherman, whether
he might not be intending to run
away with her as well as the fish;
she only. thought about the poor
dying fish, and was making up her
mind never to eat fish again, when
3





34 A SAD ADVENTURE.

the man put the fishing-rod into her
hand and bid her try to catch one
herself.
She was afraid to say no, though
her little heart beat fast; and besides,
the fishing-rod was so very heavy
that she could hardly hold it. I think
that fisherman could not have known
much about little children, or he
would never have put such a great
thing into her hand.
Poor Rosy hoped that no fishes
would come, and would have liked
to call to them to keep away, but the
fisherman put his finger on her
mouth, and whispered,
Keep very still."
She was afraid to disobey; and at





FALL INTO THE RIVER. 35

that very moment a fish pulled at
her hook.
Then the man called out,
"Pull in! pull in quick! "
And poor Rosy tried; but the
fish was a large one, and it could
pull too. It had no idea of being
caught by such a little child, and
thought it would catch her instead.
Poor little Rosy was frightened
then, indeed. She tugged away in
her turn ; but it was of no use, the
fish was the stronger of the two;
and in another moment her little
feet had slipped from under her,
and down she fell into the river !
How do you think she felt as she
went splash in? I am sure I can-





36 A SAD ADVENTURE.

not tell you; but I dare say lots of
things came into her little head all
at once; but it was time for the
fisherman to be frightened then as
well as Rosy.
He was not used to small chil-
dren, and did not know that a big fish
might prove as strong as a little girl,
so he had never thought of her
being pulled in. But as soon as he
saw her fall down the bank, after
her he sprang, and before she had
gone quite under the water he had
got hold of a bunch of her clothes,
and pulled her out again. She had
never let go the fishing-rod, but
held it more tightly as she fell; it
was something to cling to ; so at the

















k f /




Ii--


















"The fish had no idea of being caught by such a small
child, and thought it would catch her instead."
(37)









FALL INTO THE RIVER. 39

same time that he fished out Rosy
he pulled out a great fish also.
Poor Rosy was pale and trem-
bling, for she had thought she was
going to be drowned; she was wet
and cold besides, and instead of
saying, "thank you," to the man,
for getting her out, she only felt
cross with him for having made her
fish when she did not want to do
anything of the kind.
That was because she was cross
with herself, you know, and because
she remembered now how bad it
was of her to run out of the gar-
den, and all that long way from
home, when her mamma had told
her to keep near it and nurse.






40 A SAD ADVENTURE.

The fisherman said to her, -
"Never mind, missie. It's all
right."
But she thought, -
No, it isn't: it's all wrong."







*^/-- : --





THE WOUNDED HAND. 41



THE WOUNDED HAND.

HE man saw that Rosy
looked very pale and
frightened; so he tried to
amuse her by showing her
the great fish she had caught.
"Look, what a splendid fellow
we've got! Why, it was worth a
ducking to catch such a one "
But Rosy did not care to look at
the fish, though she certainly did
not feel so sorry for this one as for
the other, because she was cross
with it for dragging her into the
water so rudely.






42 A SAD ADVENTURE.

It was an enormous carp, and
weighed at least six pounds; and as
it lay panting on the bank Rosy
thought it must, at least, be a
whale; and she shuddered to look
at it.
But she was obliged to look, for
all that, for the man was delighted
with his prize, and kept showing
her its eyes, its head, and its back,
until Rosy said at last, in despair, -
"I want to go home; I so cold; "
and began to cry.
Then the fisherman was very
sorry, and took Rosy up in his
arms to comfort her. But when he
had lifted her up, he saw that her
little hand was bleeding. She had





THE WOUNDED HAND. 43

bruised and torn it against the
stones on the bank of the river
when the fish pulled her in.
So the man bathed the poor little
hand in the clear, cool water, and
tied Rqsy's little handkerchief round
it. Then he shouted as loud as he
could, to see if any one was near
who would take Rosy home while he
went to fetch the doctor. And soon
a boy and a girl came running up,
who lived at the farm where Rosy
went to see the dairy, and who
knew Rosy very well.
The man told them how she had
been hurt, and they promised to
take her home very quickly. And
the man gave the boy the great fish





44 A SAD ADVENTURE.

to carry for Rosy, and said he
would send the doctor directly.
So they set off to run home; for
Rosy was very wet and cold, and
very unhappy. The boy kept show-
ing her the fine fish, but she did not
care about it at all, and only wished
it back again in the water.
When they got home, Cecile
opened the door, and was very much
surprised to see Rosy in such a
state; but when she heard what had
happened, she thanked the boy and
girl for bringing her home, and said
that nurse had gone to sleep, but
she would take care of Rosy till
the doctor came.
So Cecile undressed her directly,


































"Rosy (lid not care anything about the fish she
Ii -

























(45)
only wished it bak agaia in tie witer, ,'








THE WOUNDED HAND. 47

and when she had been well rubbed
with warm flannels, and was laid
down in bed, she was obliged to
tell her tale ; and I will say that she
told it all quite truly, and did not
even lay the blame on the butterfly.
Only she said she did not think she
was going so far, far away, and
meant to come back in a minute.
Her hand, which had got scratched
and torn in her fall down the bank,
began to be very painful. It
smarted a great deal; and she
wondered what the doctor would
do to it. She thought that doctors
always hurt people a great deal
before they cure them ; and she
was afraid even of nurse touching





48 A SAD ADVENTURE.

her hand. Then he would be a
strange doctor, too, and Rosy never
liked strangers; so her heart went
pitapat.
Besides this there was the thought
of her dear papa and mamma.
They would be coming back soon;
and what would they say? and what
would nurse say? 0, how she did
wish that she had. never disobeyed
them !
Cecile did not say much, for she
saw that the little girl was punished
enough; but Rosy knew what she
must think of her, and almost felt
as if it would be better if she would
scold.
Then Cecile told her that the





THE WOUNDED HAND. 49

doctor lived a great way off, and
could not come yet; and that papa
and mamma were not coming home
for several hours; so she said she
should have some hot broth for din-
ner, and then go to sleep.
Cecile thought that the broth
would be better than meat just then,
and that it would warm the child;
but Rosy did not like broth; she
would rather have had meat or pud-
ding. She was going to say so,
when the thought came into her
head that perhaps it was because
she had not been good ; so she drank
the broth and said nothing.
She lay down, as Cecile bid her,
and tried to keep her eyes shut; but
4





50 A SAD ADVENTURE.

it was early to go to bed, and Rosy
was not sleepy. At any other time
she would have asked Cecile to tell
her stories or to sing to her; but
now she did not dare, because she
was so ashamed.
She got hot, and tossed about in
spite of trying to keep quiet; and
poor Cecile, who knew that little
children sometimes become very ill
after such accidents, was very un-
easy. She watched her anxiously;
but she did not say what she was
thinking about.
At last Rosy's eyelids became
very heavy, and, to Cecile's great
joy, she fell asleep. The hot, feverish
look went away by degrees, and her





THE WOUNDED HAND. 51

little face and hands grew moist.
So the good French maid lifted up
her heart, and thanked God that the
darling child had not been drowned,
and prayed that she might not have
any illness.
Do you think that Rosy dreamt
at all while she was asleep ?
I think she did, and that they
were not pleasant dreams, because
she started two or three times, and
once threw out her arms and gave
a low cry.
When she did so, kind Cecile put
her hands on her shoulder, and
patted her gently, and then she lay
still again and slept quietly. Per-
haps that finished one dream; but





52 A SAD ADVENTURE.

I think she began another each
time.
What funny things dreams are!
And sometimes we dream about
things that we don't care about one
bit. But any one could see that it
was not so with Rosy then.
She told them to her nurse after-
wards ; and so I can tell them to you.
First, she thought she was a little
tiny fish swimming about very happi-
ly in the river, with the sun shining
overhead, and feeling very cool and
comfortable in the water, when up
came a large, large fish, with a great
head and a tail, like no fishes that she
had ever seen. It was more like that
of the great sow with the fifteen





TIE WOUNDED HAND. 53

young ones, which she had often seen
since that day when she carried the
pears to them. This great fish was
very fierce, she thought, and it
wanted to eat her; so she gave that
scream, and then nurse came and
took her out of the water. She
forgot in her dream, you see, that
fishes do not have nurses.
Then she slept again, and dreamt
that she had been running very fast
in the garden, and had tumbled
down and hurt her knees. It pained
her very much, and her mamma
said that it was all her own fault,
for that she ought not to have run
so fast.
It was not like her dear mamma





54 A SAD ADVENTURE.

to say so, and Rosy thought it was
very unkind. Then some one came
and said, -
"The doctor is coming, and he
will be sure to put a leech on to
the place."
She knew what leeches were, be-
cause once she had seen them put
on her papa's head when he had a
headache; and she knew that they
bit people, and it made her very
frightened ; and she was very un-
happy and began to cry, thinking
that every one seemed to be so un-
kind and so different to what they
used to be.
How delightful it was to wake
and find only Cecile sitting by her,






THE WOUNDED HAND. 55

and looking at her kindly, and to
hear her say that now if Rosy felt
quite well she might be dressed in
dry clothes and get ready to see
the doctor!
The little girl could not help
putting her arms round Cecile's
neck, and giving her a great many
kisses, though she still felt too much
ashamed to talk as she used to do.
In a little while these ugly dreams
were almost forgotten, only she still
felt even more afraid of the doctor
than she had ; for, before she went to
sleep, she had a sort of idea that he
would do something very dreadful
to that poor little sorrowful hand of
hers.








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