• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Half Title
 Advertising
 Title Page
 Going to the cottage
 A scene in spring
 The hen-house
 Back Matter
 Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Rose-bud stories for young children
Title: Going to the cottage
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055067/00001
 Material Information
Title: Going to the cottage
Series Title: Rose-bud stories for young children
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill. ; 12 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Myrtle, Harriet, 1811?-1876
Sheldon and Company ( Publisher )
Boston Stereotype Foundry ( Electrotyper )
Publisher: Sheldon and Company
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Electrotyped at the Boston Stereotype Foundry
Publication Date: 1871, c1866
Copyright Date: 1866
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Harriet Myrtle.
General Note: Added engraved series t.p.
General Note: Includes list of books in the same series on p. 4.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055067
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002447093
notis - AMF2347
oclc - 57510259

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Half Title
        Page 3
    Advertising
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Going to the cottage
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    A scene in spring
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The hen-house
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Matter
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Cover
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Spine
        Spine
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THE ROSE-BUD STORIES.


GOING TO THE COTTAGE.
EGGS AND CHICKENS.
THE GOAT AND HER KID.
BERTHA AND THE BIRD.
THE DUCK HOUSE.
MAY DAY AT THE COTTAGE.
ADVENTURE OF A KITE.
A DAY IN THE WOODS.
THE PET LAMB.
TWO DEAR FRIENDS.
LITTLE AMY'S BIRTHDAY.
CHRISTMAS EVE AT THE COTTAGE.








FOR YOTTUNG O3HILDRE N.
Illu-utra.ted.





Going to the Cottage.


BY

MRS. HARRIET MYRTLE.







SHELDON AND COMPANY.
18i i.

























Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 186, by
SHELDON AND COMPANY, in the Clerk's Office of the District
Court of the Southern District of New York.




















ELECTaOrrPED AT THS
BOSTON STEREOTYPE POUNDRY,
No. 4 Spring Lane.










Eoi fo Ie 0of14e,



NE fine morning little Mary
awoke almost before it was
light, and as she opened her
eyes she saw her papa stand-
ing by her bed, half dressed, and
heard him say, "My little girl,
do you remember what morning
this is?" ?
Marr clapped her hands, and
jumped up in a moment, for she
remembered all about it. This
was the morning fur going to the
(7)






8 GOING TO THE COTTAGE.

cottage, -where her mamma and
Susan, their little maid, had gone
three days before, to get it all
ready for them to live in. 0,
papa, let he be dressed directly !"
cried she.
Mary was dressed quickly;
breakfast was all ready; and
then a cab came to the door, and
a number of trunks, boxes, and
packages were put into it. Then
Mary kissed her aunt, and her
little cousins, Willy and Thomas,
and jumped into the cab. Her
papa got in after her, and the
door was shut; and then Mary
put out her head, and said, Good
by, good by- come and see us






GOING TO THE COTTAGE. 9

very soon!" She just heard,
Yes, yes; and then away they
rattled over the stones.
They went through several
streets. Then they came to a
place where a coach with four
horses was standing. This was
the coach that was to take them
to the cottage. Presently they
were rattling away again in it;
first through the streets, then
over smooth roads by pretty
houses with gardens, and then by
green fields and trees.
Mary had lived in London all
"her life; and she was delighted
with the gay gardens, the green
grass, and the tall trees. It was





10 GOING TO THE COTTAGE.

the beginning of March, so the
leaves had not yet come out; but
there were bright-yellow and pur-
ple crocuses, and white snow-
drops, and dancing daffodils in
the gardens; and little lambs
frisking about in the fields; and
large broods of primrose-colored
goslings following the old geese
on the commons. All the way
Mary stood at the window, and
looked out at everything, and
often called out, "Look, look,
papa or, What is that ?" or,
0 how pretty! "
They had their dinner at an inn.
Then they went on again. Now
Mary began to long to see her






GOING TO THE COTTAGE. 11

mamma, and to get to the cot-
tage. Every house she saw, she
began to think was the cottage.
" Is this it, papa ? 0, then this
must be it !" she kept saying; but
still the coach went on, on, on.
At last her papa began to look
out too.
SCan you see it now? can you
see mamma? cried Mary.
"No," he replied; "but I can
see somebody."
Mary looked, and there she saw
Susan, standing at the door of a
little inn. The coach stopped,
the coachman opened the door,
and in a moment Mary was cling-
ing round Susan's neck.





12 GOING TO THE COTTAGE.

Where is mamma? cried she.
She is waiting for you at the
cottage," said Susan.
There stood by Susan's side an
old man, whom she called Mr.
Oliver. He had a barrow, and
into it they put all the trunks and
different things they had brought.
Mary helped very busily. Then
they began to walk up a pretty,
green lane, that was rather steep.
Mary took hold of her papa's
hand. She could hardly speak
now -she was thinking so much
of her mamma and the cottage.
There were sweet scents; the air
seemed very, very fresh; there
were primroses and violets grow-






GOING TO THE COTTAGE. 13

ing under the hedges; the birds
sang all round them; but she
went straight on, sometimes look-
ing up at her papa, sometimes at
Susan.
They turned a corner by a neat
white railing. Inside it there was
a green field, with trees all round
it; and at one corner a thatched
cottage, with ivy growing up to
the roof. The sun was setting,
and its bright rays shone on the
windows, and made them glance
like golden light from amidst the
dark, green ivy.
"Is this it?" said Mary, in a
whisper to her papa.
He answered, in a low voice,





14 GOING TO THE COTTAGE.

"Yes, this is our cottage, my
little child."












They came to a gate, just under
two tall trees. Susan opened it.
They went along a winding path,
among trees and shrubs, towards
a porch all covered with honey-
suckle, with its young fresh leaves.






GOING TO THE COTTAGE. 15

Under the porch stood Mary's
mamma, and in a moment they
were clasped in her arms.








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A Ie n i Spring.




drove up to one of the great
railway stations a carriage
U containing a set of very
happy.faces. There was a kind,
cheerful-looking old lady, and a
good-natured looking nurse, and
there were three children. These
were named Philip, Edward, and
Emily. They were going a jour-
ney to the North of England with
2 ()





18 A SCENE IN SPRING.

their grandmamma, and were to
live with her for two or three
months. They were very fond
of her, and they liked the idea
of travelling with her, and going
to new places, and playing in her
gardens, and seeing her house.
Philip was eight years old, Ed-
ward seven, and Emily five.
They jumped into the railway
carriage one after the other. In
came grandmamma, in came.nurse.
Then the door was shut, and they
waited about five minutes, during
which they asked about six times,
"When shall we set off?" Then
the train began to move; then
off* it went so fast that they





A SCENE IN SPRING. 19

laughed and shouted for joy, and
their grandmamma was obliged to
tell them to be more quiet, be-
cause an old gentleman in one
corner of the carriage looked
rather angry at the noise they
had made.
They travelled all day. In the
evening they left the railway, and
their grandmamma's carriage met
them and took them to her house,
but it was quite dark before they
got there. Edward and Emily
were fast asleep, and scarcely
woke up when they were put
into bed, and Philip could only
see the spreading branches of
the trees as they drove up to





20 A SCENE IN SPRING.

the door, with the stars peeping
through them.
When they awoke in the morn-
ing, they could hardly make out
where they were, but they soon
remembered, and felt very happy.
They thought everything pretty.
Their beds and their white cur-
tains, the paper of the rooms,
the carpets, everything pleased
them. Then, when they were
dressed, it seemed very nice not
to know the way down to the
breakfast-room, but to have to be
led down a strange staircase and
into a new lobby; and then it was
nicer than all, just as they got
down, to meet their grandmamma






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22 A SCENE IN SPRING.

with her bonnet on, and after run-
ning to her and giving her plenty
of kisses, to hear her ask them to
come out with her for a walk
before breakfast.
When she opened the door, and
they went out into the open air,
it was the greatest pleasure of all
they had felt yet. Never had
they seen such very green grass,
nor been able to run under such
large trees, nor felt anything so
fresh as the air, nor seen anything
so bright as the, spring flowers.
Then, before their eyes, spread
out a smooth lake, shining in the
morning sun; and beyond it there
rose green hills, and behind them










A cN)





24 A SCENE IN SPRING.

higher hills, and again behind
them the distant mountains, that
looked misty and purple. Near
the house flowed two clear, fast-
running rivers, which joined to-
gether into one stream, and then
went hurrying and foaming over
rock and stone into the still lake.
There were larks singing over
head, and thrushes in the trees,
and two blackbirds were hopping
along in the grass with their bright
yellow beaks. Bees hummed past,
the morning wind sounded among
the branches, everything looked
bright and happy. Away went
the children one after another
over the grass, Philip leading the





A SCENE IN SPRING. 25

way. They seemed to want to
run round the trunk of every tree,
and to rush up and down every
slope. Little Emily was at last
obliged to leave her brothers to
race about by themselves, and ran
back laughing and breathless- to
her grandmamma, who had seated
herself on a garden chair, and
held out her arms, laughing too,
to receive the little merry girl.
But as Emily turned to kiss her,
she said, "Why are you crying,
grandmamma ?" Her grandmam-
ma only kissed her, laughed again,
and brushed away the tears.
"Why did she cry?" asked
Mary.






26 A SCENE IN SPRING.

"It was not because she was
unhappy," said her mamma. You
must wait till you are older before
you can understand those tears."
"Mamma," whispered Mary, "I
saw you cry that evening that
papa and I came first to the cot-
tage, when we were all walking
about, and the sun was setting.
Were those the kind of tears?"
Mary's mamma did like Emily's
grandmamma, for she gave her a
kiss and said nothing. Then she
went on with the story.
After breakfast the children
longed to go out again, and to go
close to the rivers and the lake;
it seemed to them that to walk






A SCENE IN SPRING. 27

by the water would be the most
delightful thing in the world, and
so their kind grandmamma made
haste to lead them there. They
went through the flower-garden.
Emily often stopped to look at
the lovely flowers, but Philip and
Edward were too impatient to get
to the water to stop. for anything.
It was very beautiful, quite as
beautiful as they expected. The
water was so clear that they could
see the sand and pebbles at the
bottom. They could see the fish
swimming, and gliding, and dart-
ing along. Then the gurgling
and rushing and tinkling sounds
were very pleasant to hear. They






28 A SCENE IN SPRING.

threw stones in, and watched the
round rings they made in the
smooth places. They sat down
on the bank under a weeping wil-
low, which had already put on its
spring dress of delicate green,
and watched the tips of the
branches that bent down into the
running stream, and could get no
rest any more. Little Emily tried
to pull them out, she thought they
looked so tired, but they were
quite out of reach/
When they came to the place
where the rivers joined the lake,
they found something they liked
better than all. This was a boat-
house. It was built of wood, and





A SCENE IN SPRING. 29

in the form of a pretty cottage.
It was covered with creeping
plants; the early honeysuckle
was just coming into flower, but
the rest were only budding yet,
except the green ivy, which is
always pretty. A door opened
at one end, and their grandmam-
ma took them in; and there was
a little room for cloaks to hang
in, and sails for; the boats were
laid there. Thentheywent through
-another door, and came to a flight
of steps that went down to the
water's edge; and there was a
little wharf made for the boats to
lie in, and two pretty boats were
fastened to iron rings in the wood
work.





90 A SCENE IN SPRING.

"0, grandmamma," cried Philip,
"may we have a row on the
lake?"
"Yes, that you shall some day
very soon," said she, "but I have
no one here to-day that I could
trust to row you."
After examining every thing
again and again, they went back
to the river. Their grandmamma
showed them where they might
go by themselves, told them what
to avoid touching or breaking in
their play, and then left them to
run about as they liked.
Every day they found some-
thing new to enjoy, but still they
longed very much to go on the






A SCENE IN SPRING. 81

lake, and it had never yet been
convenient to send them. One
day, when their grandmamma was
gone out to pay some visits, they
were playing in the garden, and
they saw a black speck on the
river at a distance. It came
nearer and nearer, and grew
larger and larger, till they saw
it was a boat with a gentleman in
it. He rowed round close up to
the boat-house. By the time he
got there they had all run down
to the spot. He spoke to them,
and said he was come to ask their
grandmamma to let him leave his
boat in her boat-house till next
day. They said she was out, but





32 A SCENE IN SPRING.

that they were sure she would let
him; so he rowed round, and
Philip and Edward went in at the
door that they might help him.
They went down the steps, and
he showed them a rope, and told
them how to throw it to him.
Then he pulled by it, and the boat
came close up to the boat-house,
and they fastened it by a chain to
an iron ring.
Then the gentleman laid up his
oars in the boat and stepped out,
and they all walked up the garden
together; and when he found how
much they wished to go on the
lake, he said he should come back
next day, and that meantime they






A SCENE IN SPRING. 83

must ask their grandmamma to let
them come to see him. For, he
said, he lived on an island in the
middle of the lake, and that they
might row across in a boat and
spend a whole day on the island,
and then return in the evening.
They told him that they would be
sure to ask.
That I have no doubt they
would," said Thomas.
And their kind gt'andmamma
would be sure to let them go,"
said Mary.
When their grandmamma heard
what Mr. Pennington (for that
was the gentleman's name) had
said, she gave them leave; so
8






84 A SCENE IN SPRING.

when he came back it was agreed
that they should go the very next
day.
They were hardly awake on this
happy "next day," when they
asked if it was a fine morning ?"
Nurse said it was rather gloomy,
but she hoped it would clear up.
Grandmamma was rather afraid
of it, but they were all quite sure
it would be fine, and she could
not bear to disappoint them, so
she sent them in the carriage,
with nurse to take care of them,
to a place some miles off, where
there were boats to be had, and
where it was not much more than
a mile across to the island.






A SCENE IN SPRING. 35

The wind rose as they drove
along, and sometimes it rained,
and the lake became covered with
waves like the sea, only very little
ones. When the carriage stopped
there was not a boat to be had.
All the boatmen had gone away,
finding it so cold and stormy, and
not thinking that any one would
wish to go on the lake. It was very
sad. They could see the island
looking green and beautiful across
the water.
"But then did they not go after
all?" asked Willie, sorrowfully.
"You shall hear," said Mary's
mamma.
The coachman thought they had






36 A SCENE IN SPRING.

better go home again. So did
nurse. "O no, do stop a little
while cried Philip.
"Perhaps a boatman will come,"
said Edward.
"Perhaps Mr. Pennington will
come for us in his boat." said
Emily.
This was a happy thought, and
the coachman said he would try
to make a signal. So he tied his
ir-ed handkerchief to the end of
-his whip, and held it up as high
as he could. Philip and Edward
fund two sticks, and tied their
handkerchiefs to them; and nurse
made a very nice flag for Emily,
for she tied a long blue scarf to






A SCENE IN SPRING. 37

her umbrella, and Emily flour-
ished it about in the air very
finely.
"They see us, they see us!"
cried Philip, presently. "Look,
don't you see several people run-
ning about on the island, holding
up sticks?"
"Yes, yes," cried Edward, "I
am sure I do; I think I can see
them getting out the boat."
"And I can see Mr. Penning-
ton's white hat," said Emily.
"But, nurse, what are you laugh-
ing at?"
"Why, look again," said nurse.
"I'm afraid your people hurrying
about and holding up sticks are






38 A SCENE IN SPRING.

nothing but a number of cows gal-
loping up and down with their
tails up in the air."
"And Mr. Pennington, with his
white hat, is only a cow with a
white face," said Philip, who could
not help laughing in spite of the
disappointment.
The sun shone out brightly just
then, and they did not give up
hopes, but all began to wave their
flags more than ever.
I am sure I see some one
now," cried Edward. "That can-
not be a cow walking on two
legs."
"And look! he waves a blue
handkerchief to us. I never heard






A SCENE IN SPRING. 39

of a cow with a blue face," said.
Philip.
Both the boys began to shout
aloud; and Emily jumped so high
that nurse was obliged to hold
her, for fear she should jump out
of the carriage.
And now they could plainly see
that Mr. Pennington was in his
boat, and was rowing towards
them. They watched him eagerly,
and the very minute he touched
the shore they were ready to get
in, and were seated in a moment.
It was great joy to find them-
selves really in a boat at last. He
pushed his oar against the bank;
the boat began to move. He





40 A SCENE IN SPRING.

seated himself and was beginning
to row, when a sudden gust of
wind blew it back so violently
that it stuck fast in the sand. It
was vain to push, it would not
move.
"You must all get out again,"
said he.
0, must we get out!" cried
Emily, with her eyes full of tears;
" and shall we not go to the island
after all?"
"Yes, O yes! little Emmy,"
said Philip, "we shall go. Mr.
Pennington only wants to lighten
the boat, so that he may push it
off the sand."
"I don't wonder she cried,












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42 A SCENE IN SPRING.

though," said Mary. "No more
do I," said Willie, with a sigh.
They all got out. Philip and
Edward helped with all their
might, and at last the boat floated
off again into the water.
And now they were once more
seated, the oars began to dip
regularly into the water, then to
be raised dripping out of it, then
to dip in again; the boat glided
on; the shore seemed to move
slowly back. "But it did not
really," said Thomas, "they moved
on, that was the thing."
"Yes, that was the thing," said
Mary's mamma.
Two white swans came swim-






A SCENE IN SPRING. 43

ming out from among the reeds
and the tall grass at the water's
edge, and followed the boat, arch-
ing their long necks and ruffling












their wings. The easy, floating
motion of the boat was very
pleasant.
Just then a violent shower of






44 A SCENE IN SPRING.

rain came on so suddenly that it
took them all by surprise. Nurse
put up her umbrella to shield her-
self and little Emily; but the
wind caught it, turned it inside
out, and carried it out of her
hand in a moment. Away it
went, skimming over the water,
and at last stuck fast in a little
point of rock. One of the swans
sailed slowly round and round it,
examining it, and seeming to ask,
"What sort of bird are you?"
Even nurse could not help join-
ing in the laugh at her poor
umbrella. She covered up little
Emily quite snug under her cloak.
As to Mr. Pennington and the






A SCENE IN SPRING. 45

boys, they did not mind the rain
in the least.
"Here comes the sun again,"
said Philip, presently, and it
hardly rains at all."
0, look, look I cried Edward.
Emily's face peeped out from
behind the cloak at this, and she
threw her arms up, calling out,
"A bridge, a beautiful bridge has
been built across the lake, all
made of gold and diamonds and
precious stones And indeed a
bright rainbow had appeared. It
stretched quite across the sky,
making a perfect arch, the two
ends resting on the mountains at
each side of the lake.






46 A SCENE IN SPRING.

0, how beautiful it must have
been'! cried little Mary, throwv-
ing her arms round her mamma.
"If we could but get on that
rainbow bridge," cried Emily,
" and walk on to the tops of the
mountains all among that purple
and golden light! 0, I should
like to go to the tops of those
mountains "
"But look, Emily saidPhilip,
"look at the water. The little
waves are all manner of colors."
0, look at that crimson wave,"
cried Edward, "and at that green
one."
"The golden one near it I like
best," said Emily. "0 no that






A SCENE IN SPRING.' 47

bright blue one I look and then
that violet one I don't know
which I like best."
"Why, the water-fairies must
be pelting one another with roses
and violets, and all manner of
flowers, under the waves," said
Mr. Pennington.
"Ah, ah! Mr. Pennington,"
said Philip, pointing up to the
rainbow and laughing, the beau-
tiful fairy is up there."
Emily looked up and sighed,
for the rainbow was beginning to
fade. It grew fainter every mo-
ment, and 'they watched it as it
faded away. While they watched
it, the sky seemed suddenly all





48 A SCENE IN SPRING.

changed into green leaves, and
looking round they found that
they were close to the island,
under the tall drooping willow-
trees.
They were almost sorry that
their pleasant row was over, but
they were soon as merry as pos-
sible. The island looked beauti-
fully green; every blade of grass
shone like a diamond after the
rain, and all the chestnut buds and
golden beech buds glistened in
the sun. The white flowers of
the wild cherry-trees shone like
silver on their red branches, and
the birds were singing a joyous
concert. Mr. Pennington helped





A SCENE IN SPRING. 49

them out, and carried little Emily
in his arms up to the house. They
were very kindly received by Mrs.
Pennington, who had their wet
cloaks, caps, and bonnets taken
off; made them come near the
fire, and soon seated them to lun-
cheon, for they were quite hungry
after all their adventures in the
keen mountain air. Then they
all went out together to make a
tour of the island, which was like
a park, covered with fine grass
and many large trees; and now
the day was quite bright and fine.
The first thing which pleased them
when they went out was the sight
of several beautiful peacocks,
4





50 A SCENE IN SPRING.

walking gracefully about under the
trees, sweeping the grass with
their long splendid tails. They
stopped to admire them, and one
of the largest and finest, just as
if he knew they were looking at
him, spread his tail up like a fan,
and stood facing the sun, and
showing off every bright eye in
his feathers, which shone like
gold, and seemed to flash with the
brightest purple, and green, and
deep blue colors. Then his small,
dark, purple head, with its crest,
stood proudly up in front.
"0, you beautiful, lovely crea-
ture! cried Emily. You are
as bright as the rainbow."





A SCENE IN, SPRING. 51

They went onto the water's edge,
passing through the cows that had
caused them so much debate, and
laughed heartily at the recollec-
tion of it. When they came to
the water, there were a great
many swans and other water-
birds. They seemed to know Mrs.
Pennington, and came swimming
close up to her. They wanted to
be fed. She went into a pretty
garden-house that stood near,
where she kept their food, and
she gave a little basket of corn
and broken bread to Emily, and
told her and her brothers to throw
some on the water for them.
They liked this very much, and





52 A SCENE. IN SPRING.

soon had all the birds near them.
It was quite difficult to manage to
give any to the small ones, for the
swans, with their long necks,
could reach so far that they had
more than their share; but the
children took the greatest pains
to throw pieces so near the small
ones that they got plenty.
They walked on, and soon came
to a flock of sheep and lambs
feeding peacefully on the fresh
grass. Then they came to a part
of the island which was enclosed
with a light, high iron fence, and
inside it they saw a herd of deer;
pretty, spotted, sleek creatures,
some of them with large branching






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54 A SCENE IN SPRING.

horns. They went in by a gate
and passed through. Sometimes
as they walked near a thicket,
two or three deer would start
off from among the bushes and
bound away to a distance, so fast
that they could hardly see their
feet touch the ground.
At last they came round again
to the spot where they had landed.
"There is that dear boat again ? "
cried Philip.
Would you like to get in again
and have another row?" asked
Mi. Pennington.
The only answer he had was a
shout of joy from both the boys,
and a clasp round his knees from





A SCENE IN SPRING. 55

little Emily. "Get in, then,"
cried he. This was soon done,
and he rowed them all round the
island. They saw from the water
all they had seen on the island.
Sometimes the deer, then the sheep,
then the cows, and the peacocks,
and every now and then a peep
of the house; and they were fol-
lowed by a whole fleet of swans,
geese, and wild-ducks, with their
young broods.
While they were still in the
boat they heard the bell ring to
warn them that in half an hour
dinner would be ready. So they
went in. They had a very pleas-
ant dinner, and they had as much






56 A SCENE IN SPRING.

to see in the house as outside.
There were pictures and prints,
and collections of shells, and beau-
tiful plants, and the time went so
fast that they were quite surprised
when the evening came, and nurse
told them that it was time to go
back.
Mr. Pennington said that he
must row his little friends back
again. The evening was beauti-
ful, and they saw the sun set
behind the mountains while they
Were on the water. While they
were looking at the golden mist,
and crimson clouds floating above
as the sun went down, Mr. Pen-
nington made them look round on





A SCENE IN SPRING. 57

the other side of the lake, and
there they saw a curious sight.
Thick gray clouds had gathered
in that direction, and they soon
saw that it was snowing there,
and that the tops of the moun-
tains had become white.
When they reached the shore
they found the carriage waiting.
They thanked Mr. Pennington
with all their hearts for the pleas-
ure he had given them, and then
jumped in. They reached home
safely, and ran up to their dear
grandmamma to tell her all they
had done and seen.
















NE morning, after breakfast,
f Goodman Dove came in at
the gate, with his basket
of tools and several planks.
Little Mary ran to fhim to ask
what he was going to do. He
looked very wise and grave, took
out his rule, put on his specta-
cles, and began measuring the
wall just outside the kitchen chim-
ney, in the gravelled yard. "It
(58)





THE HEN-HOUSE. 59

is a little secret," said he, "but
you mdy come and help if you
like."
"A secret! exclaimed Mary.
"What, did mamma say so? O,
then I shall hear of something
nice by and by. I wonder what
it is? Are you going to build
another cottage?"
Goodman Dove again looked
wise and grave, and told her to
hold one end of the plank he was
sawing.
Mary helped very busily. He
worked away till he had made a
nice little wooden house with a
sloping roof, and inside it, from
one end to the other, he fixed two






60 THE HEN-HOUSE.

rounded pieces of wood very like
the perches that were inside Aunt
Mary's canary bird's cage, only
much larger. "What is going to
live in this house, I wonder,"
Mary said very often. Then she
began to dance round the yard,
and then she came back to her
work again.
At dinner-time Mary told her
papa and mamma how the work
was getting on, and often looked
at them and laughed as if she
knew something was coming that
she should like, but she could not
think what; and they laughed
too.
After dinner old Mr. Dove






THE HEN-HOUSE. 61

brought a door, and fixed it at
one end of the wooden house.
It had a little door in the bottom
of it which slid up and down.
Then he fixed up several little
boxes, open in front, along the
wall at the back, in two rows,
one above the other.
Just as he was finishing, Mary's
mamma called her. "If you will
go with Susan to meet the coach,
my little girl," said she, "per-
haps you will find that something
has been sent down by it for
you."
Mary ran to get ready, and set
off with Susan. She was in a
great hurry, for she saw by her





62 THE HEN-HOUSE.

mamma's laughing face that this
had something to do with the
surprise.
A cloud of dust and a sound
of wheels made them set off run-
ning when they were half down
the hill, and at the moment that
they got to the inn the coachman
was handing down a basket, which
he held carefully by a handle at
the top. Mary ran up to it.
There was a card on the top, and
she could read her own name in
Aunt Mary's writing on the card.
what can be in this bas-
ket?" she cried out. "Open it,
Susan; make haste!" But as
Susan was beginning to unfasten





THE HEN-HOUSE. 63

it, Mary said, Stop -we won't
open it until we get home, and
papa and mamma can see it too."
So Susan took it up by the han-
dle, and away they went up the
hill with it.
Mary ran round and round the
basket, peeping in at the little
openings, and helping to carry it
now and then. There is straw
in the bottom," she said, "I can
see that." Just then a noise in-
side the basket, and a great
flouncing and jumping about made
her start. "It is something alive,
I am sure it is. Something that
is to live in that nice house. 0,
make haste, Susan cried Mary,





64 THE HEN-HOUSE.

and she took hold of the handle
with Susan, and both together
soon got it to the gate.
Her mamma was waiting in the
porch, and smiled when she saw
Mary's ied 'face, and the great
hurry she was in. "Papa, papa,
come and open the basket! cried
Mary. She had to run for her
papa and find him, and it took
her some time, for he was at the
bottom of the field, seeing the
pond cleaned out. As Mary ran
down towards him, she looked
back, and called out, "Don't
open the basket till we come."














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