• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Chapter I: Tom and Min
 Chapter II: The cake and figs
 Chapter III: Off to the wood
 Chapter IV: The hole in the...
 Chapter V: The new coat
 Chapter VI: The first game
 Chapter VII: The dogs and...
 Chapter VIII: A rest
 Chapter IX: Tom goes for the cake...
 Chapter X: Min goes home for more...
 Chapter XI: How long may we...
 Chapter XII: Tea in the wood
 Chapter XIII: Tom mends his...
 Chapter XIV: Ned has a fall
 Chapter XV: Ned has to go home
 Chapter XVI: Ned has not done...
 Chapter XVII: Good news for Ned...
 Chapter XVIII: Tom and Min...
 Chapter XIX: Tome tells his...
 Chapter XX: Tony's trip
 Chapter XXI: Tony on the sands
 Chapter XXII: Tony taken home
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Prize story book series
Title: The pic-nic
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055058/00001
 Material Information
Title: The pic-nic
Series Title: Prize story book series
Alternate Title: Picnic
Physical Description: 60 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rooper, Wilhelmina L
Sergeant, G. H ( Editor )
Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh ( Publisher )
Publisher: Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1887
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Picnicking -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Seaside resorts -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1887
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Wilhelmina L. Rooper ; edited by G.H. Sergeant ; illustrated.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
General Note: Words are hyphenated and paragraphs are numbered.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055058
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236742
notis - ALH7220
oclc - 68181785

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Chapter I: Tom and Min
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Chapter II: The cake and figs
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Chapter III: Off to the wood
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Chapter IV: The hole in the wall
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Chapter V: The new coat
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Chapter VI: The first game
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Chapter VII: The dogs and the hares
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Chapter VIII: A rest
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Chapter IX: Tom goes for the cake and figs
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Chapter X: Min goes home for more food
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Chapter XI: How long may we stay?
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Chapter XII: Tea in the wood
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Chapter XIII: Tom mends his ways
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Chapter XIV: Ned has a fall
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Chapter XV: Ned has to go home
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Chapter XVI: Ned has not done well
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Chapter XVII: Good news for Ned and Bell
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Chapter XVIII: Tom and Min go home
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Chapter XIX: Tome tells his tale
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Chapter XX: Tony's trip
        Page 53
    Chapter XXI: Tony on the sands
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Chapter XXII: Tony taken home
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



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THE PIC-NIC.












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THE PIC-NIC





WILHELMINA L. ROOPER
AUTHOR OF
CrATS WITH THE CHILDREN,' ACTION SNGS, R CITATIONS, ETC.



EDITED BY
G. H. SERGEANT
(Late Head Master, St. Yames' Boys' Schlool, Dover)


ILL US TRA TE D












LONDON
GRIFFITH, FARRAN, OKEDEN & WELSH
successorss to NtEwbery and Harris)
WEST CORNER OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD
1887










































The Rig/h/s of TranslabioMl and of ReProductian are Reserved.






THE PIC-NIC.
I.
TOM AND MIN.
1. "Oh, Tom! look what
Ma-ma gave me just now."
"What is it, Min? Why
do you not show it to me?'
2. "If you are rude, Tom,
I will not show it you, nor
give you a-ny.
"A-ny what, Min ? But I
have such, a hard sum to do.
What do six and nine make,
Min?"
3. Six and nine, Tom;
why ten, do they not ?"
"No, I am sure they do
B




6 THE PIC-NIC.

not. You are no good at
sums, Min, dull Min!"

4. "I am good at sums,
Tom," said Min, who did not
like Tom to call her dull.
" Ma-ma says I am. I do
sums ve-ry well.

5. But you are not as old
as I. You must know more
than I do. At a-ny rate, I
will not try to do a sum now,
for it is time to go and play."
6. What time is it ?" said
Tom, as he put down his sum
book.
It is half-past four, and
Ma-ma told me to put my
work a-way and go out."




THE PIC-NIC. 7

7. Oh, then, if she told
you to go out, I may go too.
I have not been told to stay













"'I have such a hard sum to do.'"

in, as you were one day, not
long a-go, when you were a
bad girl."

8. Min got ve-ry red




8 THE PIC-NIC.
II.
THE CAKE AND FIGS.
1. "I was not a bad girl,
Tom. I on-ly did a bad hem,
and had to stay in and un-do
it."
2. "But I will go a-way,
and not play with you, for you
are rude."
No, no," said Tom, "I
do not mean to be rude, dear
old Min, it is on-ly my fun.
3. "You know I did not go
out to play that day, till you
were a-ble to come too. Come,
Min!" But Min did not move.

4. Then Tom put his arm
in hers, and said, "Come M in,




THE PIC-NIC. 9
kiss and make it up. I did
not wish to vex you. It was
my hard sum that put me out.
It will not add up a-ny way.
5. "A hard sum like that
does vex a man so, Min."
But you are not a man,
Tom, you are a boy."
6. "Well, a boy, but I wish
I was a man. I will not do
sums when I am. Do tell me
what you have in that box
Min, do, like a nice girl."

7. Well," said Min, "well,
I will, but you must not be
rude, Tom. 'I have a cake,
and some figs in the box.
Ma-ma gave them to me."




IO THE PIC-NIC.
III.
OFF TO THE WOOD.

1. Ma-ma says we may
take them in-to the wood, and
eat them when we like."
That will be fun," said
Tom, "come a-long."
2. Min put on her hat and
Tom put on his cap. They
set off down the path, that led
to the wood.

3. Look, Tom," said Min,
"as she bent down to pick a
rose, I want to have this rose
in my hat. Here is a pin,
will you pin it in for me?"
4. Yes, if you like, Min;




THE PIC-NIC. ii
but it is not such a big rose as
the red one by the gate; let
us run and get that one too."
5. Tom and Min ran to the
gate. When they were near it,
they saw a boy and a girl out
in the lane.
6. "Oh, Tom, do you see
Ned and Bell Gray? Let us
ask them to come and play
with us in the wood.
7. Then we can give them
some of our cake, and a fig
each; Ma-ma gave me four
figs.
8. Ned and Bell will be
glad of the cake, for they do
not get much at home."




1.2 THE PIC-NIC.

.IV.
THE HOLE IN THE WALL.

I. "And we do not get
too much," said Tom. "I am
sure we need not give a-ny
a-way. Ask them to come and
play with us, Min.

2. "When the time for play
is o-ver, they can go home,
and we can eat what Ma-ma
gave us. You do not want to
tell them what we have."

3. "Oh, but Tom, I want
them to have some."
"I do not," said Tom, "so
I will hide the box in this
hole in the wall, and---"




THE PIC-NIC. 13
4. It will not go in," said
M in.
Not so, it will not, I see.
But I will take the cake and
the figs out of the box. Run
off Min, I will come as soon
as I have put them safe in the
hole.
5. "Get Ned and Bell to
come and play with us, for
then we can have a good
game.
6. Min did as Tom told
her, but she did not like it,
that she was not to tell Ned
and Bell of the nice food.

7. It made her sad, that
they were to go home, and not




14 THE PIC-NIC.
have a-ny. "I will do my
best to make Tom give them
some," she said.


V.
THE NEW COAT.

i. But soon she felt glad.
What made her glad? It was
that she could make Tom give
Ned and Bell some cake and
figs, all in good time.
2. Tom was not a bad boy.
When he saw what it was
right for him to do, he did it.

3. This was what Min's
Pa-pa had said to her Ma-ma,
one day, when Min was by,

































, /, i
N AND GRA.Y ..



_--'-. --
D DEGA

...........i





NED ND ELL RAY




16 THE PIC-NIC.

and she took in all that he
said.
4. Ned and Bell were ve-ry
glad to play in the wood with
Tom and Min. How nice
you look, in your blue coat,
Ned," said Min, as they
went down the lane to the
wood, "is it a new one?"

5. "Yes, it is new; and I
must, take care not to get it in
a mess, or Aunt Jane will be
ve-ry cross.
6. "Why did your Aunt
Jane let you put on a new
coat to play in, Ned?" said
Tom. "I have an old coat to
play in."




THE PIC-NIC. 17

7. "So has Ned," said Bell,
"but he has torn it, and Aunt
Jane made him put this new
one on. She told him to take
great care of it.
8. "If he gets it in a mess,
she says she will send him to
bed at six, and not let him
have a-ny tea. We must not
play at a game, that will make
him mess or tear it."

VI.
THE FIRST GAME.
i. "Your Aunt is not ve-ry
kind to you, is she?" said
Min.
"Well, yes, she is, but she




18 TTHE PIC-NIC.
is not like our Ma-ma was.
I wish she had not had to go
a-way to Pa-pa."
2. "When will she come
back?" "We do not know,
it may be soon."
3. Now then, what game
are we to play at," said Tom.
"You fix on one, Ned."
Let us play the hunt
game," Ned said, Min can
be the hare, and the rest of us
the dogs."
4. Oh, I will be the hare,"
said Min, "and will I not
just give you a, run! I must
have a start."
5. "You will be a-ble to




THE PIC-NIC. 19

see me some way off, by the
red rose in my hat, but I will
not let you get hold of me
ve-ry soon.










V -


"'Mii can bie the ha-.'"
6. "Tom can not run so
fast as I can, nor can you,
Ned, nor can Bell, I am
sure..




20 THE PIC-NIC.

7. Min said what was true.
She ran ve-ry fast. Ned,
Tom, and Bell, ran for a long,
long time, be-fore a-ny of them
ev-en got near to her.

VII.
THE DOGS AND THE HARES.

1. "I will not have a girl
beat me in a run," Ned said.
"I have now made up my
mind.
2. "I will get hold of Min.
You will see now, how I can
run;" and he set off to run
more fast than he had done
be-fore.
3. Min fell o-ver a log at




THE PIC-NIC. 21

last; then Ned took hold of
her sash, and said, "Now, I
have got you, Dame Hare."













Min fell o-ver a log at last."
4. "Yes, Sir Dog, you have,
for this log made me trip,
and fall," said Min. But you
need not hold me so fast, I
will not run a-way."
C




22 THE PIC-NIC.
5. "Now are we to eat
our hare ?" said Ned, as Tom
and Bell ran up, "or what are
we to do with her ?"

6. Oh! I will tell you of a
good game to go on with,"
said Tom.
Min, come here to this
oak-tree.

7. "I am the dog, who
must take care of you, and see
that you do not get a-way, as
you will try to do.

8. "You, Bell, must be a
kind hare, who will try to
help Min to get free.

9. And you Ned, must be




THE PIC-NIC. 23
the dog, that will not let Bell
the hare get to Min the
hare."

VIII.
A REST.
1. "But, Tom- ," Min
said. "Oh, it will be a good
game, let us go on, Min. I
have to keep Ned off, as well
as Bell, for I do not want him
near my hare, do you see ?"
2. The game was good fun.
It went on till Min made a
dash, and got a-way, when
Tom was af-ter Ned.
3. Ned and Tom both ran
to get hold of Bell. She was




24 THE PIC-NIC.
not ve-ry near them, so she
too got a-way be-fore they
came up to her.

4. How hot I am," said
Bell, let us now rest a bit."
Yes, so we will," said
Min, "let us sit on this nice
dry moss. And Tom, dear,
you go and get the cake and
figs, out of the hole in the
wall.
5. "It will be nice to sit
here and eat them."
Tom got ve-ry red, when
Min said this.
6. "Cake Plum Cake ?
Figs Ripe Figs ?" said Ned
and Bell with joy.




THE PIC-NIC. 25
7. Now Tom was not a bad
boy, and when he saw Ned
and Bell look so full of joy,
to hear of the cake and the
figs, he was glad to let them
have some.

IX.
TOM GOES FOR THE CAKE AND
FIGS.
I. Of this Min had felt
sure, so she told him to go
and get the cake and the figs,
when Ned and Bell were near.
2. She was ve-ry glad that
her plan did not fail. Tom
ran off, while Bell and Ned
and Min sat down, on some
soft dry moss, to wait for him.




26 THE PIC-NIC.
3. Soon a loud call made
them all jump up, and run
to meet Tom. What is
it, Tom ? What have you
done?"

4. Oh, dear!" said Tom,
"just come and look here."
They went to the wall, and
saw that the cake and figs
were a mass of red ants.
5. Tom did not ev-en dare
to take the food out of the
hole.
"Is it not a pi-ty?" said
Bell.
6. Now you see, Tom,"
said Min, "that it was not
wise to put the cake and figs




THE PIC-NIC. 27

in the wall," as she gave him
a sly look.
7. "It was not wise," said
Tom; "I wish I had left them
in the box, and put the box
down on the bank. Then we
had been a-ble to keep an eye
on it."

X.
MIN GOES HOME FOR MORE FOOD.
1. "What can we do now?"
said Bell.
"I will go and tell Ma-ma
of our loss and she may be
a-ble to give us some more,"
Min said.
2. "I 'say Min, do not tell




28 THE PIC-NIC.
Ma-ma why I put the cake
and figs in the hole in the
wall," put in Tom.
"Oh, dear no," and off ran
Min.
3. "Why did you hide them
in the wall ?" Ned said.
"Oh, why ? I--"
"Ah, you will not tell us!
I hope Min will not be long,"
went on Ned, and I hope
your Ma-ma will give her
some more cake."
4. "Here is Min she has
not been a-way long; who is
that with her ?" said Bell.
5. "Why Ma-ma and Aunt
Ann, to be sure," Tom said,




THE PIC-NIC. 29

" and look! they have some-
thing in their hands."

6. See how kind Ma-ma


-C~


/-g








"'See how kind Ma-ma is,' said Min."

is," said Min, as she came up
to Tom and Ned, and Bell.
She held out her dish for
them to see what was on it.




30 THE PIC-NIC.
7. :On her dish :,were four
big bits of roll and jam, four
plum buns, and four jam pies.
8. Ma-ma had four mugs,
and Aunt Ann a jug of milk.

XI.
HOW LONG MAY WE STAY ?
I. How nice! how kind of
you, Ma-ma," Tom said, as he
gave her a kiss.
"Oh, what fun to have tea
in the wood," was the cry of
Ned and Bell.
2. Yes," said Ma-ma,
"on-ly it will be milk in the
wood, for Tom and Min do
not have tea as '' rule.




THE PIC-NIC. 31
3. "When Min came and
told me that the ants had got
to the food, I went at once to
see what I had to. give you
to make up for it. You will
do ve-ry well, now, I am
sure.
4. Oh, yes, Ma-ma! how
long may we stay out ?"
"You may stay out till six;
come in when you hear the
bell ring.

5. "May you and Bell stay
as long as that, Ned ? It is
now five. Did Aunt Jane tell
you when to go home?"
6. No, she does not know
,we are here," said Ned, "but




32 THE PIC-NIC.
she will not mind, for she told
us we need not be in till it
was time for our tea, and we
have tea at six."


XII.
TEA IN THE WOOD.
I. "But did you not ask
your Aunt to let you come to
play with Tom and Min?"
2. "No, for she had gone
out when we met them, and
we may play with them when
we like.
3. Aunt Jane told us so.
She says it does us good to
be with them, and it does too."
"Well, I am ve-ry glad to




THE PIC-NIC. 33
hear that," said Ma-ma in a
kind tone.
4. Aunt Ann and I must
now go back, and you can
have the milk and food."
As soon as they had gone,
Ned and Bell and Tom and
Min sat down to take tea, or
as Ma-ma said, milk.
5. "You pour out the milk,
Min,' said Tom. "I will
hand the mugs. Here is a
blue mug for Bell, a pink one
for Ned, a red one for me,
and a blue and gold one for
you.
6. Pass the dish, Tom,
now take a bit of roll,




34 THE PIC-NIC.
Ned.. .Bell dear, do you
take a bit too," said Min,
"that's it."
7. "Just hear Min talk like
Ma-ma," said Tom. Now
I will talk like Pa-pa. Ned,
old boy, have some more; do
not be shy. Try a bit of this
jam pie. Not that bit; take
this one; it is much the best,
for it has more jam in it."

XIII.
TOM MENDS HIS WAYS.
I. Then Tom took the bit
of pie with less jam in it, and
ate it. He al-so took one of
the buns that was not so big
as the rest.
























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4.























TEA INTEOD
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36 THE PIC-NIC.
2. Why did Tom do this?
When he did not want his
Ma-ma to know why he had
hid the cake and figs, he was
sure, that he had done what
was bad.

3. He made up his mind to
mend his ways. He took a
step in a good way, and put
self on one side.

4. The four were ve-ry gay.
Bell said, "Ned and I like
to hear you talk like your
Pa-pa and Ma-ma."
5." What shall we do
next?" said Min, when tea
was o-ver.
"I know! we will go to the




THE PIC-NIC. 37

pond, and wash our mugs,"
Tom said, "how can we dry
them ?"
6. "I have on a new tie,"
Il

1[ j1









"'We can wash them in the pond, and put them in the
sun to dry.' "
said Bell, "I will take it off
my neck, and we can use it to
dry the mugs with."




38 THE PIC-NIC.
7. "Oh, no, Bell, that will
not do; we need not dry them
at all," Min said, "we can
wash them in the pond, and
put them in the sun to dry.
The sun is hot. It will soon
dry them."

XIV.
NED HAS A FALL.
I. Then they ran down to
the end of the wood, where
the dark pond lay. "Is it
ve-ry deep ?" said Bell.
2. "No, not at all deep on
this side; we may play here
when we like. It is all mud
just at the edge, so you, Ned,




THE PIC-NIC. 39
must take care not to mess
your new coat."
3. Oh, I will take care,"
said Ned, "I will go to the
pond at once with my mug."
4. Mind, mind, Ned, that
your foot does not slip on the
bank," Tom said.
5. "No fear !"-but as the
word fear came from his lips,
his foot did slip, and he fell
in-to the wet mud at the edge
of the pond.
6. "Oh dear, oh dear!" was
the cry of all the four. Tom
gave Ned his hand. Ned got
up the small bank; he was not
hurt, but his face, his legs, his
D




40 THE PIC-NIC.
arms, and his new coat were
all o-ver mud.

7. Ned had a ve-ry odd
look ; he did not cry. Bell
did cry, till Tom told her
Ned was not hurt.
8. No, I am not hurt,"
said Ned, but I am ve-ry
cold and wet, and oh! look at
my new coat. Oh dear! what
will Aunt Jane say? Do not,
do not all grin at me. It is
not fun for me, if it is for you.
What am I to do?"

xv.
NED HAS TO GO HOME.
I. "You must go home at




THE PIC-NIC. 41
once, Ned,'"' said Min, "and
tell your Aunt how it was."
2. "Oh, no! I can not tell
her that I fell in-to the pond,
she will say I was a bad boy
to go near it, for she told me
one day I was not to do so.
3. She will send me to
bed for a week, or whip me;
no, I will say that Tom gave
me a push, and I fell in the
mud. She will not mind then."

4. Oh, Ned! Ned!" said
Min, "you must not tell a lie."
Why not? I mean this
will do no one harm, and it
will save me from no end of
woe.




42 THE PIC-NIC.
5. "Oh! but you must not
tell a lie. Come here, Ned,"
and Min drew Ned a-way
from Bell and Tom. Do












"' You are a ve-ry, ve-ry bad boy,' said Aunt Jane."
not, do not tell a lie Ned, it
is so mean. And then, too,
your Ma-ma! how sad she
will be if her boy tells a lie.




THE PIC-NIC. 43
6. "I will go with you to
your Aunt Jane, and help you
to tell her of your fall."

7. They met Aunt Jane on
the road home. Ned told her
how his foot did slip by the
pond, and that he fell in-to the
mud.
8. "You are a ve-ry, ve-ry
bad boy," said Aunt Jane.
"I told you that you were not
to go near the pond. Now, I
will--"

XVI.
NED HAS NOT DONE WELL.
i. But here Min felt she
must say a word for Ned-




44 THE PIC-NIC.
" Oh! do not be hard on
Ned, I beg of you. He did
not mean to do harm, and
he came at once to tell you
what he had done."

2. Hush! my dear Min,"
said .Aunt Jane; "Ned has
been a bad boy. He has
done what I told him not
to do. -He must go home
at once to bed, and he must
take some hot herb tea,
and--"

3. Oh, Aunt Jane! ugh!
I hate herb tea !"
It is not nice, Ned, but
you will have to take it to
keep you from a cold."




THE PIC-NIC. 45
4. "But oh!" said Min, and
a tear fell down her face, I
beg of you, do not whip Ned,
as well as send him to bed."
5. And Aunt Jane said in a
kind tone, "Ve-ry well, as you
are kind to beg so hard
for him, I will not whip him,
nor say more to him now.
6. But you must go home
at once, Ned. You must not
ev-en stay to say Good-bye.
I will soon come and mix the
herb tea for you." So Ned
ran off.
7. Then Aunt Jane and
Min went to find Bell and
Tom, for it was time to go
home.




46 THE PIC-NIC.
XVII.
GOOD NEWS FOR NED AND BELL.

I. Bell and Tom were soon
found. I am sure," said
Aunt Jane to Bell, "that you
have had a ve-ry nice time
with Min and Tom."

2. "Oh, ve-ry nice, till Ned
fell in the pond," said Bell.
"Ah! Ned was a bad boy
to go near the pond, he may
not play here a-gain for a long
time," said Aunt Jane.

3. "Oh! do not say that,"
said Min, "I am sure he will
not go to the pond the next
time you let him come to us."




THE PIC-NIC. 47

4. Well I hope not, but
he and Bell will soon go
a-way; their Pa-pa and Ma-ma
will be here in a few days."













"He made but one wry face, and when it was gone, he
:n-ly said, Ugh, it was sur.' "
5. Oh! Aunt Jane," and
Bell gave a jump for joy. I
must run off, and tell Ned, for




-48 THE PIC-NIC.
I am so glad, and he will be
so too."
6. Yes, go, tell him, the
good news may help down the
herb tea," said Aunt Jane.
Bell ran home as fast as she
could run.

7, When Aunt Jane soon
af-ter went in-to Ned's room
with the herb tea, he made
but one wry face, and when it
was gone, he on-ly said "Ugh,
it was sour."

XVIII.
TOM AND MIN GO HOME.
I. Tom and Min were by
this time at home. They were




THE PIC-NIC. 49
with Ma-mai in; heri room.
They told her all they had
done with Ned and Bell in
the wood, and of Ned'-j fall
in-to the mud.
2. Ma-ma said Ned was a
bad boy to go to the pond
when his Aunt had told him
not to do so, and that she did
not pi-ty him for the herb tea,
or that he had to go to bed.

3. "I like Ned and Bell,"
said Tom. Oh, Ma-ma,
they had such a good tea,
they do not have cake at
home as a rule."
4. But what of the ants,
Tom?" said Min in a low




50 THE PIC-NIC.
tone, which she did not mean
Ma-ma to hear.

5. Ma-ma did hear. Ah,
yes, how was it that the ants
came to get at the cake and
the figs ?"

6. Tom got quite red, and
said, "Oh, Min, you are a tell-
tale."

7. No, Tom, I did not
mean to be a tell-tale," said
Min, who was now ve-ry red
in her turn, Ma-ma, will you
be so kind as not to ask a-ny
more ?"
Oh, very well," said
Ma-ma.




THE PIC-NIC. 51.
XIX.

TOM TELLS HIS TALE.

I. Then Min ran off to get
a pink for Pa-pa to put in his
coat, when he came home.
2. Tom said, "I say, Ma-
ma, I will tell you the tale of
the ants," and when he had
done so, his Ma-ma told him-

3. "It was not good of you,
Tom, to want to hide the
cake and figs from Ned and
Bell. I am glad the ants ate
them.

4. "I hope you will not act
so a-ny more. It makes me
sad that you did so, for I do




52 THE PIC-NIC.
not like my boy to be so fond
of good food, that he does not
want to give a-ny a-way."
5. And Tom said, "I will
not do so a-gain. Min made
me see it was not nice to act'
in that way.
6. ".I will try to be kind to
all, and to do as I like to be
done by."

7. Min soon came 'in with
her Pa-pa, who had put the
pink in his coat. He had in
his hand a new book, and said
he would read a short tale to
them be-fore they went to bed.
This is what he read.




THE PIC-NIC. 53
XX.
TONY S TRIP.
I. When To-ny Gray was
four years old, he went to stay
with his Aunt Lu-cy, who did
not live far from the sea.
2. One day he went to her
room, but no one was in it.
A lad told him his Aunt had
gone out to buy some fish.
3. To-ny said, "I will go
and find her." He went to
the fish shop. It was not far
off. When he got there he
was told his Aunt had just
gone on down the hill to the
town.
4. To-ny went down the hill




54 THE PIC-NIC.
too. But the road to the town
was by a lane on the left.
To-ny kept on down the hill.
The road down the hill led to
the sea.
5. When To-ny saw the big
blue sea, and the wide sands, he
gave a cry of joy. He did not
care now to look for Aunt Lu-cy.
6. His on-ly wish was to
play on the sands. He sat
down for a time to see the big
waves roll up to his feet, and
then fall back.

XXI.
TONY ON THE SANDS.
i. Then he set off for a




THE PIC-NIC. 55
walk. He saw a big ship
sail by, some way out on the
sea.
2. Next he saw a boat with
a red sail, not far from the
land, with two men in it. The
men let a net down in-to the
sea to get some fish.
3. Now and then he bent
'down to pick up a shell, or a
bit of sea weed.
4. He had gone a long way
from home. He went on and
on till he could walk no more.
He lay down on the sand near
a boat.
5. Soon a man came up and
saw him. "Why, who are





















































TONY ON THE SANDS.




THE PIC-NIC. 57

you?" he said. "What is
your name?"
6. "To-ny Gray," said To-ny,
" and I want to go home to
Aunt Lu-cy-and I want some
food."
7. "Want some food, do
you?" said the man, who had
a kind face; "well, I wish I
had some for you. But I have
none here, and my home is a
long way off."

XXII.
TONY TAKEN HOME.
i. "How did you get here,
with no one to take care of
you ?




58 THE PIC-NIC.
To-ny was not a-ble to talk
much; all he said was-
2. "To-ny wants to find
Aunt Lu-cy in the town."
Oh," said the man, "you
live in the town, and you came
out here, and got lost in some
way.
3. "Well, well, do not cry.
I will row you to the town
in my boat. It will be a nice
trip on the sea for you.
S4. Come with Ned Lee,
that is my name, and my boat
is The Rose."
5. Ned Lee ran his boat
down to the sea, put To-ny in
it, and let him lie in his coat.




THE PIC-NIC. 59
6. When they got to the
town, and Ned Lee had made
his boat safe, he took the boy
in his arms to the fish shop.












"Ned Lee ran his boat down to the sea, put To-ny in it,
and let him lie in his coat."
7. The fish-man was glad to
see him, for his Aunt Lu-cy had
been there, in a sad way lest
some harm had come to him.




60 THE PIC-NIC.
8. They gave him some hot
tea and cake, and sent word to
Aunt Lu-cy that he was found.

9. In a short time she came
for him, with a face of joy.
Then she took him home, and
put him to bed.


"And now," said Pa-pa to
Min and Tom, "bed is the
best place for you.
Good night, Min.
Good night, Tom."
"Good night, Pa-pa," and
off they ran.

THE END.




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