• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 A little one's welcome
 Silver minnow
 The shepherd-dog
 A little West India girl
 Charlie's gold dollar
 Dairy-maids
 The fairy artist
 Nut-gathering in Virginia
 In the hammock
 Out door and in
 The two dogs
 The little dressmaker
 How Dick rode bare-back
 Charley's story
 Brace up!
 If I were a bird
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Little ones' welcome
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00055027/00001
 Material Information
Title: Little ones' welcome
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Cassell & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Cassell & Company
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1886
 Subjects
Subject: Pets -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1886   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1886   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1886
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by favorite American authors.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00055027
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224121
notis - ALG4382
oclc - 67837443

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Title
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title 1
        Title 2
    A little one's welcome
        Page 1
    Silver minnow
        Page 2
        Page 3
    The shepherd-dog
        Page 4
        Page 5
    A little West India girl
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Charlie's gold dollar
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Dairy-maids
        Page 10
    The fairy artist
        Page 11
    Nut-gathering in Virginia
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    In the hammock
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Out door and in
        Page 17
        Page 18
    The two dogs
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The little dressmaker
        Page 21
    How Dick rode bare-back
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Charley's story
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Brace up!
        Page 26
    If I were a bird
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text

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YVELCOlM}] ]DAISIES.







LITTLE ONES'

WELCOME



BY FAVORITE AMERICAN AUTHORS











CASSELL & COMPANY, Limited
739 AND 741 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.















































COPYRIGHT,

1886,

BY O. M. DUNHAM.






























Press of W. L. Mershon & Co,
Rahway, N J.













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A LITTLE ONE'S WELCOME.

WELCOME, daisies, from your sleep!
Snow has left the ground, -
Winter's gone; you need not peep
So timidly around!

Welcome, pale green vale and hill,
Homes of bird and bee!
You, too, silver plashing rill,
That used to talk to me.

Welcome, buds upon the bough
Drooping o'er the eaves!
Though you're only babies now,
You '11 soon be grown-up leaves.

Welcome, soft blue sunny sky,
Birds and blossoms gay!
Now you've come at last, do try
A good'long while to stay.

GEORGE COOPER,











SIL VER MINNO W.














SILVER MINNOW.

SILVER MINNOW 's gone to sea, Silver Minnow's pert and smart
He a captain bold would be; Through the water see him dart,
Venturesome young fish is he, He knows all a sailor's art,
Pretty Silver Minnow. Pretty Silver Mininow.

Silver Minnow fain would go Silver Minnow fears no snare
Where the coral forests grow, Where the mermaids comb their
Through the sea-weed groves hair;
below, May no pirate meet him there,
Restless Silver Minnow! Foolish Silver Minnow!
MARY N. PRESCOTT.


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SILVER MINNOW.










THE SHEPHERD-DOG.



THE SHEPHERD-DOG.

EVERY morning, obeying his call,
Scott, the shepherd-dog, faithful and strong,
Down the long lane to the grassy fields
Steadily drives the cattle along.





















Birds may flutter beside the way,
Hare or squirrel may near him run,
Nothing can tempt him to leave his charge;
He guards the herd till his task is done.

But when he is free to go as he likes,
He chases the game with a hearty good-will
Among the rough thickets, the rocks and the woods,
Till he hears a shrill whistle sound over the hill.





















































































SHEPHERD-DOG



SHEPHERD-DOG,










A LITTLE W IL'T 7INDIA GIRL.

Then he does not linger his pleasure to seek,
But across the stretch of meadow-lands wide
Homeward he hies with a bounding step,
Nor rests till he reaches his master's side.

And every evening, obeying his call,
lie marches steadily down the long lane,
And gathers the herds from the grassy fields,
And drives them safe to their barn again.
M. E. N. IATHEWAY.





She does not always wear such ga clothes. She is not always,.
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covered with beads and brooches, as you see her here. She is ow
dressed to march in' a procession with many more children, for it is
a feast-day in honor of some saint.
A LITTLE WEST INDIA GIRL.





hough sh e is so gayly dressed she my coult lary out doors all
the has any they wll bere of bright colors te, nd o sno or iceyellow
TYou can see this little ha s bracelets on her arms, great r her
She does not always wear such gay clothes. She is not always



covered, and with beads and gold brooches, as yound see er he. her head she no
dressed to urban, made byprocession with many modkerchief about heen, for it ishead
a feast-day in honor of some saint.
Though she is so gayly dressed she may not wear any shoes. If
she has any they will be of bright colors, red, green, or yellow.
You can see that she has bracelets on her arms, great rings in her
ears, and pearl and gold beads around hlr neck. On her head she
wears a turban, made by winding a handkerchief about hler head
and tying it in a knot. This is of silk, and has on it brooches of
gold or brass. Though her skin is dark, her eyes are bright and
her teeth .is white as milk.










A LITTLE IVEST IN'DL4 GIRL.

Once these colored people ---
lived in a state of slavery. Now
they are free and happy. They
do not have to work very hard I
for a living. They do not need
much fire, the air is so warm,
and not much clothing. They
can find enough fruit in the
forest to eat half the year. They
catch fish in the streams and in
the sea. They sing, and dance,
and live an idle life. Like most
people who know but little, they
care more for what they put on
than for learning.
If a person has a great deal .
of jewelry, he may go barefoot
and know nothing; but they will .
respect him more than a man of '
sense. It is pleasant to live in a hot country where there is no
cold, but there is more real good to be got in a land like ours.
Schools, and books, and snow are better for us than idleness, igno-
rance, and sunshine.
FREDERICK A. OBER.













How do you like it?
-- -




"How do you like it "









CHARLIE'S GOLD DOLLAR.




CHARLIE'S GOLD DOLLAR.

IT was Charlie's birthday. His father gave
him a gold dollar for his own.
"What will you
do with it ?" asked
Bert.
I don't know,"
said Charlie.
"Buy candy," "
said Bert; "Iwould '
if it were mine."
In the afternoon ...
Charlie went to
town with papa.
"I want to spen, .
my dollar," sai, lIe ..
" but I don't
know what to -
buy.
Just then
they passed a
florist's and ,
Charlie called -
out, "Let 's
stop, papa. I want some violets and a rosebud."
Papa stopped, and Charlie got them. Then he bought
some oranges, a couple of lemons, some candy, and half a
dozen little seed-cakes.









CIIARLIE'S GOLD DOLLAR.

"Now let us get a doll, a pretty one with blue
i eyes, papa, and a picture-book," said Charlie.
What are you going to do with
tlheii ?" asked his father.
You '11 see," said
Charlie.
By and by they came
to a little old house.
S Charlie stopped and
g, a wanted to go in. A lit-
tle girl lived here who
was very sick. She was
one of Charlie's school-
Smates. He gave her the
flowers and an orange.
How happy they made
her!
"Now I shall have something to
look at all day long," she said.
At the next house was a poor little
lame boy. Charlie gave him the
pretty picture-book, and he clapped
his hands for joy. Then Charlie gave
him a lemon, for some lemonade, a big
orange, and some candy. Little Jamie I. ,
was very happy.
A little girl who had never had one .
got the pretty blue-eyed doll. Charlie ,
gave the cakes and the rest of the ,
candy to two little ragged boys in the
street. Then he went home.
What did you buy ? asked Bert.
0, nothing for myself, but I am










DAIRY MAIDS.

so happy! I never had such a good time in my life," said
Charlie.
That was because you made a good time for others, my
boy," added his papa.
ELIZA M. SHERMAN.























PEEPING through the nursery door,
Such a pretty sight
Met my gaze,-upon the floor
Four girls, dressed in white,
"Making cheeses," so they said,
Raising such a breeze,
Each wee, charming dairy-maid,
Whirling out a cheese.
N. J. T.













THE FAIR1L'Y ARTIST





















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NUT- GA TIERI ING IN VIR GINIA.


THE FAIRY ARTIST.

O, THERE is a little artist
Who paints in the cold night hours
Pictures for wee, wee children,
Of wondrous trees and flowers;

Pictures of snow-white mountains
Touching the snow-white sky;
Pictures of distant oceans
Where pygmy ships sail by;

Pictures of rushing rivers
By fairy bridges spanned;
Bits of beautiful landscapes
Copied from elfin-land.

The moon is the lamp he paints by,
His canvas the window-pane;
His brush is a frozen snow-flake;
Jack Frost the artist's name.
NELLIE M. GARABRANT.




NUT-GATHERING IN VIRGINIA.

I WONDER if any of my young readers ever went chinquapin
hunting. Some of you may have seen the little pear-shaped nuts,
with shining brown skins and broad white ends. They look like
little chestnuts. What fun it is to gather these nuts when they are
ripe! First the green prickly burs which cover them begin to turn
yellow and crack open, and the sharp end of the nut shows itself.


















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,UT-GVTIIERI~G.









NUT-GATIERING IN VIRGINIA.

Sometimes, in spite of many watchful eyes, the chinquapin ripens,
falls out of the bur, and decays unseen.
In the South all the children around, both white and colored,
assemble in the early fall, when the burs are well open, with sticks
to beat out the nuts. They cut off branches heavy with chinqua-
pins and pile them on the ground. Then all the little ones stand






















around with poles, and laugh to see the brown nuts hopping about
under their brisk strokes.
As soon as all the burs are threshed out, they cut more, and go
on until a quantity of chinquapins lie on the ground.
Then little calico bags are filled with the nuts, and there is a
contest to see who can carry off most.
When they go home, the chinquapins are boiled, and with a
needle and very long thread strung into necklaces. The owners
---




















wear them for several days, biting off nuts as they want them, until
they grow too hard for anything but mice or squirrels.
nano.
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they grow too hard for anything but mice or squirrels.









IN TIHE IIHALO OKC

Chinquapins are, after all, only playthings; but when the chest-
nuts ripen they are worth money to the gatherers.
The great burs open later, and are more strongly guarded with
sharp prickles. They Are threshed out with heavy poles and car-
ried off to market.
Many little bare feet are shod with shoes bought with chestnuts,
and many garments are furnished in the same way.
It is a merry time with young folks. They crowd around the
trees. Some climb them, while others collect the nuts when they
are thrown down. I am sorry to say there is sometimes much dis-
puting over the shares each shall have.
PINK HUNTER.


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IN THE HAMMOCK.

EDITH'S youngest dolly, Fairy, was just up from the measles, and
out for the first time in the hammock.
Her cousin Frank had never cared for Fairy. He said she was a
ragamuffin sort of a thing, anyway. And now he wanted Edith to
put her down, and play checkers with him.
"O, no!"said Edith; "poor little Fairy! The doctor said she
must be amused, and drink lemonade a long time yet."
Don't she have to eat oranges too ? sneered Frank. I '11 give
you ten cents of my money to buy 'em for her, if you '11 play ten
games with me."
How many oranges can I get for ten cents ? asked Edith.










IN THE HAMMOCK.

Six," replied Frank.
I suppose Dolly could rest nicely under a tree in the shade,"
said Edith ; "only, if she gets cold now, she '11 die; the doctor said
so."
Nonsense!" whispered Frank, but not loud enough for Edith
to hear; "your doll has n't had the measles, or if she has, it's only
the German measles, and they are sick hardly a bit with them."
Six oranges," Edith repeated, thinking how nice they were.


















Six oranges," added Frank, right on the corner of the street,
and if you can't, I '11 give you a dollar out of my bank."
Upon this, Fairy was carefully laid away among some sweet-
smelling ferns and fragrant mosses. Then Edith and Frank played
game after game of checkers and enjoyed them very much.
When they went out to drive that afternoon Edith bought the
oranges. Her papa kissed her very fondly for giving up her own
pleasure for that of her cousin. She had her reward in many ways,
not the least of which was that Dolly got quite well from the
measles.
ELIZABETH A. DAVIS.











OUT DO OR AND INv


























FIVE little hickens,- Fluffy-down caught it first
Was n't it fun, And gave a big tug;
When their mother called them, Yellow-back and Topknot
To see them all run? Each seized a wing;
Out in the garden-path Two ran with all their might,
She scratched up a bug; But never found a thing.


Johnny and Charley,
Playing in the hall,
When their mother called them
Did not come at all.
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OUT DOOR AND IN.

When she sent nurse Mary,
Johnny kicked and cried;
Charley to the bannister
Ran for a slide,
Screamed as he tumbled down,
Bump went his head;
And both little naughty boys
Were sent off to bed.
If I had a silver dollar
Bright and new,
I really do wonder
What I would do, -
Buy two naughty little boys
Who seldom do obey,
Or five little chickens
Who are merry all day?
AMANDA M. DOUGLAS,
















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THE TWO DOGS.
LITTLE May and Effie's mamma bought them two dogs one day.
One was a woolly dog on wheels, the other a saucy-looking wooden
dog that barked. May was three years old, and Effie only a year
younger.
As mamma came in holding the two dogs, both children ran to
meet her. She told May to take her choice of them. First May took
the white woolly dog, which was the most costly. It had a blue
collar with bells. Then she took the saucy-looking wooden dog.
It did look so bright and pert that she wanted both. Finally she
ofk one under each arm, and seated herself in her little chair.
ffie stood waiting, with hands held out. But May clasped the
dogs tighter. She nodded to Effie, and called her a very nice
baby.
They looked very funny. Mamma could not help laughing.
Soon Effie's little lip began to roll with a grieved look. Mamma
said May must give Effie one of the dogs. May looked at each. At
last, with a sigh, she gave the woolly dog to Effie. The funny pert
look of the wooden dog took her fancy, and she called him Pert."
Effie was all smiles when she took her dog. His name was Floss."
That night the two dogs were taken to bed with the children.
Early in the morning May waked the whole house with her bark-
ing dog.
AUNT CARRIE.













































































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THE TWO DOGS.










THE LITTLE D1A,L.;.llil.'I.'.























THE LITTLE DRESSMAKER.

THIs little girl, I 'm glad to say,
Is fond of work as well as play.

From bits of ribbon, velvet, lace,
She makes nice gowns to suit each face.

Puts feathers in a bonnet tall,
And trims a hat for little Doll.

One dolly 's large, the other small;
One stands alone, and one must fall.

Though dressed so nice, they won't obey,
But sit quite sullen all the day.










HO W DICK R ODE BARE.BA CK.

"I will not scold, call forth their tears,
Although they sit a dozen years! "

She makes their dresses, learns to wait--
What don't come early may come late.
C. H. R.



HOW DICK RODE BARE-BACK.

ONCE on a time, long years since, there lived a boy named Dick,
who was just four years old.
His home was near the woods; -a small b:'own house, with a
steep hill just back of it to keep off the cold north wind.
Dick had dark eyes, full of fun ; and he did not like to be still;
that was hard work for him.
One day Dick set out to cross the road to the cornfield where
Stephe was at work with his hoe; he liked to see Stephe hoe tihe
rows of corn. But on the way he saw something else that made
him stop and think, and then just walk past the field with his hands
at his back.
Hi, hub !" said Stephe, where are you bound ? "
But Dick just gave him a smile and a nod, and went on.
Odd little chap said Stephe, as he struck his hoe once more.
"What is lie up to now ? "
He had to turn from the road then, and as soon as he did so Dick
set off on a run.
What had he seen ? What did he want to do ? Why old Fan,
the horse, had been let loose to crop grass by the roadside, and
there she was, not far off. Dick set his mind on a ride.
He came up by the side of Fan, who went on with her lunch of
grass; she did not mind such a small boy as Dick.
She had her head bent down, and Dick stood on tiptoe and got
hold of the end of the strap which was tied on her neck.
Ha, old Fan !" said he, "you have no work to do; you must
give me a good ride! "










HOW DICK RODE BARE-BACK.

So he led her to the stone-wall, and got up on top of the wall
and then on to Fan's back. He held on tight by her mane and
said, Get up Go 'long !"
Dick tried to make Fan go on down the road; but the good old
horse was wise and kind too. She might have flung the child off





















I. I







with one good shake; but she made up her mind if a horse lhas a
mind that the best thing to do with such a small boy was to take
him right home to his mother. So Dick could not make her do a
thing but just walk, at a slow pace, up the road to the house.
When the mother and Ruth saw Dick on old Fan, bare-back, they
each gave a cry and ran out to the gate.










CHARLEY'S STORY

My dear boy, who put you on that horse "
"O, ma, I got on my own self; and I had such a nice ride !"
It did not take long to lift the rogue off, you may be sure.
Ruth gave old Fan a pat, and said, Good, kind Fan, not to hurt
our little boy "
And the mother said, with a kiss, Do not get on the horse, dear
Dick, by yourself; you are too small yet to ride bare-back!"
Well, ma, I won't, for I must mind you," said Dick, with a sigh;
" but I wish I could grow to be a big boy soon !"
"You will," said his mother; but not too soon, I hope. I do
not want to lose my wee Dick quite yet."
MRS. D. P. SANFORD.



CHARLEY'S STORY.

MY name is Charley. I am a bird, and live in a pretty
gold cage. I have a little mistress who takes care of me.
..- She gives me nice seeds
S and fresh water. Her
l name is Pansy-- guess
it is because her eyes
are so blue. I love her
,- a and sing to her.
One day a great black
S~at got into the room. He
tiL:l to climb up to my cage.
I w;ts afraid he would catch
lilt-, and eat me. I shook my
S- winl s at him and cried out as
loud as I could. Pansy heard
me, and came and drove that wicked cat away.
Last summer I did a naughty thing. I got out of my
cage and flew away; Pansy forgot and left the door open.




































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BRACE UP.

I hid in a rose-bush. They looked all over the garden for
me and called Charley! Charley! but I would n't answer.
Soon dear little Pansy began to cry; then I felt sorry. I
peeped out from behind a great red rose, and there she sat
on the ground holding my empty cage.
The door was wide open, so I flew down from the rose-
bush and hopped into the cage.
Pansy was so glad! She laughed and clapped her hands;
then she took me into the house and gave me some fresh
seed and water. I was glad too, and sang her a pretty song.
I shall never be a naughty bird again.
M. E. STONE.




BRACE UP!
4
BE brave, little man,
And laugh if you can;
'T is hard to endure,
But crying won't cure;
Nor plasters nor pills
Can heal all life's ills;
While pluck will do more k" -'
Than groans by the score..
Brace up, little man, -
And laugh if you can!
J. J.GA
MICHIGAN.


















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RIGIIT JO`1'OUYLY IIE SANG.









IF I WERE A BIRD.







IF I were a bird, I would warble a song,
The sweetest and finest that ever was heard,
And build me a nest on the swinging elm-tree;
0, that's what I 'd do if I were a bird!
If I were a flower, I'd hasten to bloom,
And make myself beautiful all the day through
With drinking the sunshine, the wind, and the rain;
0, if I were a flower, that's what I would do!
If I were a brook, I would sparkle and dance
Among the green fields where sheep and lambs stray,
And call, Little lambkins, come hither, and drink! "
0, if I were a brook, that is what I would say!
If I were a star, I would shine wide and bright,
To guide the lone sailors on oceans afar,
And travellers lost in the -deserts and woods;
0, that's what I 'd do if were a star!
But I know that for me other tasks have been set,
For I am a child, and can nothing else be;
I must sit at my lessons, and day after day
Learn to read and to spell, and add one, two, and three.

Yet perhaps by my books I shall some time find out
How the birds sing so sweet, how the roses grow red,
What the merry brook says to the moss-covered stones,
And what makes the stars stay so high overhead.
M. E. N. HATHEWAY.




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